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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

2

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

3

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

4

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

5

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

6

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

7

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

8

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

9

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

10

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

12

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

13

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

14

Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk M. Rapik Saat hazardous materials transport risk by rail · Tank Car Design Optimization Model Tank car weight and capacity model Metrics to assess tank car performance Illustration of the optimization model

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

15

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

16

Regulations Establishing Restricted Zones for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a Shore Clearance Line which cannot be crossed except in an emergency by any vessel transporting oil or hazardous materials in bulk in Long Island Sound. For the purpose...

17

HM-ACCESS Project (Framework for the Use of Electronic Shipping Papers for the Transport of Hazardous Materials)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-ACCESS Initiative James Simmons Acting Chief, Research and Development Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Engineering and Research Division May 2012 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 2 H-azardous M-aterials A-utomated C-argo C-ommunication for E-fficient and S-afe S-hipments U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Background Purpose: To identify and eliminate barriers to the use of paperless hazard communication technologies to improve the delivery of critical hazardous materials (HM) safety information throughout the transportation chain.

18

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

19

Review of the Lawrence Livermore Nationa Laboratory Identiified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages This site visit report documents the results of Office of Health, Safety and Security's review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) identification, immediate actions, communications, documentation, evaluation, reporting and follow-up to the discovery of defective Department of Transportation (DOT) UN1A2 55- and 30-gallon open head single bolt closure steel drums intended for storage and transportation of hazardous waste and materials. This review, conducted on January 26-29, 2010, was sponsored by the DOE Livermore Site Office (LSO) to support interface with the lab and this report is intended to support follow-up

20

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 16, 2012 HMCRP Project HM-04: Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security 2 The HM-04 Team * Battelle - Prime - Bill Tate, Project Director/PI & Co-Author * Dr. Mark Abkowitz, Vanderbilt University - Co-Author * American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) - Dan Murray, Lead * Visionary Solutions, LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 Project Objectives * Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; * Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection  

SciTech Connect

The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

23

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public...

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

25

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

27

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. Emergency responders participate in a training exercise in the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP), which also recently released its annual report. Administered by EM’s Office of Packaging and Transportation, TEPP ensures federal, state, tribal and local responders have access to the plans, training and technical assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to radiological transportation accidents.

28

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

30

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination ofindividuals who have entered a hot zone during transportation incidents involving radioactive.

32

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

34

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide

35

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

36

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

37

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

38

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

39

Quantification of the number of injured people due to hazardous material accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents with hazardous materials may threaten the lives of people living in the direct environment of the transportation infrastructure. In many countries, fire brigades play a major role in advising the authorities when they are dealing with issues where hazardous materials are involved. Since emergency responders have to deal with injured persons, information concerning the number of injured people and the types of injuries is relevant to them. In response to this need, we developed a method for calculating the number of injured people. This method was applied to the (re)development plans for the largest railway station in the Netherlands, Utrecht Central station. Through this intermodal transfer terminal, both passengers and substantial amounts of hazardous materials are transported. The fire brigades used the injury information to assess the spatial development plans and transportation plans for hazardous materials. Furthermore, the fire brigades used the injury information to determine their suppression tactics and equipment requirements.

Nils Rosmuller; Inge Trijssenaar; Johan Reinders; Peter Blokker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management  

SciTech Connect

The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W. [Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management, 505 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

43

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Materials Characterization Paul McConnell, (505) 844-8361 The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials, i.e., mixed waste, packaging is to enable this waste type to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this goal, regulations have been written establishing general design requirement for such packagings. Based on these regulatory requirements, a Mixed Waste Chemical Compatibility Testing Program is intended to assure regulatory bodies that the issue of packaging compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. Such a testing program has been developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories. Materials Characterization Capabilities

44

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

45

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

46

Transportation of Nuclear Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Transportation of Nuclear Materials Transportation of Nuclear Materials GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE on legal and regulatory requirements and standards for transportation of...

47

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

49

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Materials and Transportation Services | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials and Transportation Services General Information: Materials and Transportation Services provides Ames Laboratory employees with a wide array of services and support...

52

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

53

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and a Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan DOE O 461.1, 4b(2)e, "Quality Assurance Plan and Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan".. Training...

54

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction projects which impact existing building materials must include an environmental consultant air pollution control agency and the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) at least ten (10) daysUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Asbestos

Wilcock, William

55

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

57

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Packaging and transportation manual. Chapter on the packaging and transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this chapter is to outline the requirements that Los Alamos National Laboratory employees and contractors must follow when they package and ship hazardous and radioactive waste. This chapter is applied to on-site, intra-Laboratory, and off-site transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste. The chapter contains sections on definitions, responsibilities, written procedures, authorized packaging, quality assurance, documentation for waste shipments, loading and tiedown of waste shipments, on-site routing, packaging and transportation assessment and oversight program, nonconformance reporting, training of personnel, emergency response information, and incident and occurrence reporting. Appendices provide additional detail, references, and guidance on packaging for hazardous and radioactive waste, and guidance for the on-site transport of these wastes.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials  

SciTech Connect

Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

Murray, H. Jr.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

64

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

66

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

67

Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

Baugher, Britton William Herbert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels: DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, and DOE 1540.3A.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policies and requirements to supplement applicable laws, rules, regulations, and other DOE Orders for materials transportation and packaging operations. Cancels DOE 1540.1A, DOE 1540.2, DOE 1540.3A.

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

71

Journal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 1523 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hazardous Materials journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat Chromate reduction in FeJournal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 15­23 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK d Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation

Burke, Ian

72

Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Cancels Chapter 3 of DOE 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1 of 9-27-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 9c canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

GRR/Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies RCRA CERCLA 40 CFR 261 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The use of underground and above ground storage tanks, discovery of waste

74

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Speaker(s): Ravi Prasher Date: August 25, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil World energy demand is expected to reach ~30 TW by 2050 from the current demand of ~13 TW. This requires substantial technological innovation. Thermal energy transport and conversion play a very significant role in more than 90% of energy technologies. All four modes of thermal energy transport, conduction, convection, radiation, and phase change (e.g. evaporation/boiling) are important in various energy technologies such as vapor compression power plants, refrigeration, internal combustion engines and building heating/cooling. Similarly thermal transport play a critical role in electronics cooling as the performance and reliability of

75

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

Plasma transport near material boundaries  

SciTech Connect

The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

Singer, C.E.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

78

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

79

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

80

Heat transport system, method and material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

Musinski, D.L.

1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction in Darjeeling and Sikkim-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction July 2014 4pm A206a � School of Engineering ABSTRACT Interest in sustainable construction materials material resources, such as bamboo, are an integral part of sustainable development. The use of natural

Davies, Christopher

82

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On Closure Success On Closure Success 1 EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, Illinois May 26, 2010 Frank Marcinowski Acting Chief Technical Officer and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technical and Regulatory Support Office of Environmental Management DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities * Continue to manage waste inventories in a safe and compliant manner * Address high risk waste in a cost- ff ti effective manner * Maintain and optimize current disposal capability for future generations * Develop future disposal capacity in a complex environment * Promote the development of treatment and disposal alternatives in the 2 and disposal alternatives in the

84

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

85

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

86

Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record USERS OF PACKAGINGS CARRIER PACKAGE TYPE Hospitals and their suppliers common carrier Type A Industrial radiography companies private carrier Type B Soil testing laboratories private carrier Type B Food irradiators contract carrier Type B Medical supply sterilizers contract carrier Type B Academic research institutes common & contract carrier all types Nuclear energy fuel cycle facilities common & contract carrier all types Nuclear weapons complex contract & government carrier all types An agency or company that wants to ship RAM (shipper) often makes arrangements with a common or contract carrier or (where appropriate) a private carrier may transport the material. Packagings may be procured or

88

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council of State Governments Council of State Governments Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee May 15, 2012 Knoxville, Tennessee Revised Agenda 9 - 9:45 am Welcome, Introductions, and Committee Reports Report from co-chairs Tim Runyon (Illinois) Project update Lisa Janairo, CSG Midwest Work group reports Integrated Spent Fuel Management Work Group Teri Engelhart (Wisconsin) NTSF-related reports Planning Committee Tim Runyon (Illinois) Communications Ad Hoc Working Group Jane Beetem (Missouri) WIPP Security Communications Protocol Major Lance Evans (Iowa) Ad Hoc Working Group Information and Communications Work Group Lisa Janairo 9:45 - 10:45 am Committee Discussion Blue Ribbon Commission final report: state reactions, next steps

89

Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lightweight materials for transportation: Program plan  

SciTech Connect

This Program Plan has been prepared by the Office of Transportation Materials in response to a request by the House Committee on Appropriations. It recognizes that a significant commitment to long-term, stable materials research and development (R&D) is required to realize the benefits of lighter weight vehicles, including economic, environmental and energy related benefits. Extensive input was obtained from the major US automakers and from representative materials and component suppliers. Considerable interaction with the key members of the US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) has ensured consistency of technical direction. The program will support R&D activity at industrial sites through competitively bid subcontracts with cost sharing anticipated at 30--50%, with the higher amounts in process scale-up and manufacturing technology development. The recommended LWM Program will enable industry to develop pecessary technology by utilizing their capabilities as well as accessing supporting technology at national laboratories, universities, ongoing program activity at NASA, DoD, DOT, NIST, etc., and thereby leverage industry resources through integrated team approaches. Many individual program efforts are currently in place that address small portions of the overall needs of the LWM Program, both within DOE and in other agencies. Cognizance of these and overall integration of research activities are planned as significant program management tasks. Because of the international nature of the automobile business, benchmarking of foreign technology and tracking of worldwide developments are also key program elements.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

92

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Alert people in the immediate area to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVACUATE · Alert people in the immediate area not operate any electrical devices, phones, appliances, light switches, or equipment with open flames within the affected area EVACUATE · Leave area and go to an exterior location where you can call 911 from a land line

Karonis, Nicholas T.

93

Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates.

Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Video User' s Guide Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond

95

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

97

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material Degradation in Gas Diffusion on the water management of the PEMFC, namely the transport of product water (both liquid and vapor its water management performance and func- tion as indicators of the degradation of GDL material

Kandlikar, Satish

98

Secure Transportation_final_print-ready  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A History of Secure Transportation * The transportation of the CEUSP material in casks will be made by Hittman Transport, a commercial carrier * Hittman Transport is a specialty company whose primary mission is transporting hazardous materials * Transport method meets all of the requirements of the Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Department of Transportation for shipment of hazardous radioactive material * Hittman Transport maintains drivers with DOE security clearances and all shipments will be escorted by armed Federal officers Hittman Transport drivers' average number of years experience 26 Completed Hittman Transport shipments without significant accident or loss of material 196K Hittman Transport began supporting the nuclear industry

99

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

1996-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

1995-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

102

Radioactive material (RAM) transportation accident and incident experience in the U.S.A. (1971--1997)  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation`s (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the National Transportation Program (EM-70) of the US Department of Energy. Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident incident events in the US for the period 1971--1997. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred.

McClure, J.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Fagan, H.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Analysis Dept.; Thomas, T. [Dept. of Energy National Transportation Program (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

ECUT energy data reference series: lightweight materials for ground transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes information that describes the use of lightweight materials in automobiles. The information on this mode of transportation represents the largest potential energy savings for substitution of lightweight materials in the transportation sector. Included are data on energy conversion efficiency of the engine and its relationship to vehicle weight, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the service activity level as measured in ton-miles.

Abarcar, R.B.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. These full-scale tests, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Transportation Programs, demonstrate how spent fuel casks perform in accident environments that are more similar to what may happen during actual shipments. Each of the tests included the transportation vehicle as well as the cask. The damage to the casks from these tests was less than the damage during the regulatory hypothetical accident tests, demonstrating that the regulatory tests are more severe. DESCRIPTION PHOTO DURING TEST PHOTO AFTER TEST PHOTO OF PACKAGE AFTER TEST VIDEO OF TEST CRASH TEST Cask rail car with a 74 ton Type B Package on it crashing into a 690 ton concrete block at 81 miles per hour [photo]

105

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material  

SciTech Connect

The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

Neutron transport in Eulerian coordinates with bulk material motion  

SciTech Connect

A consistent, numerically stable algorithm for the solution of the neutron transport equation in the presence of a moving material background is presented for one-dimensional spherical geometry. Manufactured solutions are used to demonstrate the correctness and stability of our numerical algorithm. The importance of including moving material corrections is shown for the r-process in proto-neutron stars. (authors)

Baker, R. S.; Dahl, J. A.; Fichtl, E. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Computational Physics Group (United States); Morel, J. E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unique Solutions] Unique Solutions] [Working With Us] [Contacting Us] [News Center] [Search] [Home] [navigation panel] Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis Our Mission Our Contacts Write to Us Package Development Risk Assessment RADTRAN GIS Mapping Structural Analysis Thermal Analysis Structural Testing Thermal Testing MIDAS Data Aquisition System Concepts Materials Characterization Regulatory Development Certification Support RMIR Data Base Scientific Visualization Mobile Instrumentation Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 The Mobile Instrumentation Data Acquisition System (MIDAS), developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy, provides on-site data acquisition of containers that transport radioactive materials during impact, puncture, fire, and immersion tests.

109

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Drop Comparison Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Hypothetical Accident Conditions: Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 of the NRC transportation regulations were established to provide repeatable and definable conditions that encompass most real-life accidents. The real-life accidents on this page are comparisons to the environments that the regulatory hypothetical accidents protect against. The collision forces or fire temperature and duration that were present in each accident are similar to the conditions that spent fuel casks are designed to survive. Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision [DROP scenario] Mack Truck and Subaru Collision [CRUSH scenario] Freight Train and Freight Train Collision

110

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision Free Drop Test 3,000,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [DROP test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 1,000,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [DROP scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that are encompassed by the above test include: the package being struck by a train traveling 60 MPH the package falling off of a 30-foot high bridge onto solid rock or from a higher bridge onto a highway or railroad the package running into a bridge support or rock slope at 45 MPH. Packages are transported onboard trucks or rail cars, which absorb some of the impact energy, reducing the resulting damage to the packages from the accident. On May 2, 1995, an O&J Gordon Trucking Company truck consisting of a tractor and a lowbed semitrailer became lodged on a high-profile (hump) railroad grade crossing near Sycamore, South Carolina. About 35 minutes later, the truck was struck by southbound Amtrak train No. 81, Silver Star, en route from New York City to Tampa, Florida.

111

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

112

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

113

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

114

Office of Secure Transportation Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Number: HIAR-OST-2011-03-04 Site: Office of Secure Transportation (OST) Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight Independent Activity Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards Dates of Activity: 03/02/2011 - 03/04/2011 Report Preparer: Deborah Johnson Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the

115

Office of Secure Transportation Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Number: HIAR-OST-2011-03-04 Site: Office of Secure Transportation (OST) Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight Independent Activity Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards Dates of Activity: 03/02/2011 - 03/04/2011 Report Preparer: Deborah Johnson Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the

116

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES IN TRANSPORT CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect

Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR Part 71. The packages are transported in specially designed vehicles like Safe Secure Transport (SST) for safety and security. In the transport vehicles, the packages are placed close to each other to maximize the number of units in the vehicle. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are spaced sufficiently apart to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals and the impact limiter to ensure the structural integrity of the package. This paper presents a simple methodology to assess thermal performance of a typical 9975 packaging in a transport configuration.

Gupta, N.

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

118

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Dose Rate Calculator Click to use calculator. This tool calculates a dose rate (DR) at 2 meters (about 6 ft) from the surface of a package containing radioactive material IF you know the dose rate at 1 meter (about 3 ft). It will also calculate the reverse; DR at 1 meter if you know the DR at 2 meters. These two distances are used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to define acceptable dose rates for packages. Dose (Rad) Biological Effect < 5 rad No immediate observable effects 5 - 50 rad Slight blood changes may be detected by medical evaluation 50 - 150 rad Slight blood changes will be noted and likely symptoms of nausea, fatigue, vomiting, etc.

119

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

120

CORROSION STUDY OF REPLACEMENT MATERIALS FOR HAZARDOUS LOW LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING TANKS  

SciTech Connect

New waste tanks are to be constructed in H-area to store hazardous low level wastes. AISI Type 304L (304L) stainless steel was recommended as a suitable material of construction for these tanks. Cyclic polarization and coupon tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion resistance of 304L over a wide range of waste tank environments. The results of both tests indicated that 304L was not susceptible to attack under any of these conditions. Comparison tests were also performed with ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537) and Incoloy 825. The carbon steel corroded severely in some of the environments, while Incoloy 825 did not corrode. These tests, along with those for 304L, verified the correlation between cyclic polarization and coupon tests. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was performed to monitor the breakdown of the protective oxide film on the surface of the material as a function of time and temperature. These results also correlated with those from the cyclic polarization and coupon tests.

Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.

1991-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244­252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low 2005 Available online 4 November 2005 Abstract Paper sludge ash was partially converted into zeolites by reaction with 3 M NaOH solution at 90 C for 24 h. The paper sludge ash had a low abundance of Si

Downs, Robert T.

122

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 7591 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 75­91 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching

Florida, University of

123

Analysis of emitter material transport in thermionic converter  

SciTech Connect

Output power and efficiency of a thermionic converter depend on temperatures, cesiated work functions, and emissivities of electrodes as well as the interelectrode gap size. Operation lifetime of a thermionic converter is directly related to the values as well as the stability of these parameters, which can be seriously altered by the transport of emitter material to the collector during operation. Loss rate of tungsten, a preferred emitter material, by sublimation at typical operating temperatures is small (about 3{times}10{sup 7} atom/cm{sup 2}sec at 2000 K). The loss rate, however, can be several orders of magnitude higher in the presence of gaseous contaminants. Accelerated transport of emitter material to collector surface changes the effective emissivity and work functions of the electrodes, resulting in performance degradation. A phenomenological model was developed to simulate emitter material transport to the collector in the presence of oxygen, water vapor, and carbon oxide contaminants. The model accounts for interaction of these contaminants with both emitter and collector. Model results were in agreement with experimental data and theoretical results of other investigators. An analysis was performed to determine steady-state chemical composition of deposited material onto the collector surface in the presence of H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} gaseous contaminants. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne hazardous transport Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 12 tEknolo Giavd ElinGEn FRost i JoRd 2007 1 Remote sensing of permafrost hazards in mountains Summary: tEknolo Giavd ElinGEn FRost i JoRd...

125

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Testing Carlos Lopez, (505) 845-9545 Packages transporting the larger "Type B" quantities of radioactive materials must be qualified and certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, or under the equivalent international standard ST-1 issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The principal thermal qualification test is the 30 minute pool fire. As part of the National Transportation Program, the Transportation Risk & Packaging Program at Sandia can plan and conduct these tests for DOE and other package suppliers. Test Plans, QA plans and other necessary test documents can be prepared for customer and regulatory approval. Tests may be conducted with a variety of available facilities at Sandia, including large pools, an indoor fire facility, and a radiant heat test

126

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

127

Electron Transport Materials: Synthesis, Properties and Device Performance  

SciTech Connect

We report the design, synthesis and characterization, thermal and photophysical properties of two silane based electron transport materials, dibenzo[b,d]thiophen-2-yltriphenylsilane (Si{phi}87) and (dibenzo[b,d]thiophen-2-yl)diphenylsilane (Si{phi}88) and their performance in blue organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The utility of these materials in blue OLEDs with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C']picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphorescent emitter was demonstrated. Using the silane Si{phi}87 as the electron transport material (ETm) an EQE of 18.2% was obtained, with a power efficiency of 24.3 lm/W (5.8V at 1mA/cm{sup 2}), in a heterostructure. When Si{phi}88 is used, the EQE is 18.5% with a power efficiency of 26.0 lm/W (5.5V at 1mA/cm{sup 2}).

Cosimbescu, Lelia; Wang, Liang; Helm, Monte L.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

132

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Testing Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Type B packages that transport radioactive materials must survive a sequence of full-scale (actual physical size) impact, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transportation accident conditions. The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73) tests 1 through 4 (Drop, Crush, Puncture and Fire) are sequential, test 5 (Immersion) is performed on either a previously tested or untested package. Free Drop Test Crush Test Puncture Test Thermal Test Immersion Test [drop] Click to view picture [crush] Click to view picture [puncture] Click to view picture [thermal] Click to view picture [immersion] Click to view picture Dropping a package from 30 feet onto an unyielding target. (the unyielding target forces all of the deformation to be in the package, none in the target). The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a 1100 pound steel plate from 30 feet onto a package. This test is only required for packages weighing less than 1100 pounds. The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a package from 40 inches onto a welded, 6 inch diameter, steel spike. The speed on impact is 14.6 feet per second or 10 miles per hour. Placing a package 40 inches above a pool of burning fuel for 30 minutes at 800 degrees Celsius (1475 degrees Fahrenheit). Placing a package under 50 feet of water for 8 hours. Fissile material packages are also immersed under 3 feet of water for 8 hours sequentially after tests 1 through 4

133

Quantitative Relationships between Microstructure and Effective Transport Properties based on Virtual Materials Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies in e.g. batteries, fuel cells and for transport processes in porous materials. Keywords science (e.g. charge transport in electrodes of fuel cells and batteries5;6 ), or for chemical and bio

Schmidt, Volker

134

Framework for a flexible, real-time controller for automated material transport systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. V MATERIAL TRANSPORT CONTROLLER: FUNCTIONS 2b SPECIFICATIONS . . 5. 1 Startup Routine 5 2 External Commands. 5. 3 Internal Commands. . 5. 4 Message Sequence. . Page 10 13 15 21 21 23 23 25 27 28 34 34 35 39 40 CHAPTER 5. 5... decomposition for the AGV controller. RapidCIM shop floor controller structure Material transport controller structure. Material transport controller architecture. Control configurations. Physical layout of a conveyor network Conventional representation...

Edlabadkar, Abhay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

HS663(b) Pre-purchase form for hazardous materials Version 4: 19/03/2013 Reference HS316: Purchasing Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segregated storage area and if yes, is one available? Is a safe method available to transport the chemical guideline Is the chemical a Schedule 4 or Schedule 8 Drug. Some S4s and all S8s require additional: Purchasing Guidelines This form can be used to assist consider the risks of introducing new hazardous

New South Wales, University of

136

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Cancels DOE O 460.1B, 5-14-10

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Journal of Hazardous Materials 165 (2009) 148155 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in their frequent detection in soils, groundwater, and wastewater. The fate and transport of these compounds be a good candidate to remove TC from wastewater containing higher amounts of TC. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction A recent survey in 1999­2000 on 139 US streams revealed that among

Li, Zhaohui

139

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-5507-2013 STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 Distribution Statement: A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Transportation Safeguards System (TSS) packaging and transportation and onsite transfer of nuclear explosives, nuclear components, Naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear materials, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels: DOE 5610.12 and DOE 5610.14.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

To the best of my knowledge, the following hazardous materials are/were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surfaces must be performed with an appropriate instrument. If radioactive contamination is detected Chemicals (Poisons|Toxics) Radioactive Materials 9/30/2010 #12;GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORY EQUIPMENT. Resurvey to assure contamination has been removed to less than 100 counts per minute per 100 cm2

Washington at Seattle, University of

143

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect

The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

New, P.F.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA); Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Exciton transport and coherence in molecular and nanostructured materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past 20 years a new classes of optically active materials have been developed that are composites of nano-engineered constituents such as molecules, polymers, and nanocrystals. These disordered materials have ...

Akselrod, Gleb M. (Gleb Markovitch)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH SAFE PACKAGING AND TRANSPORT OF NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

Nanoparticles have long been recognized a hazardous substances by personnel working in the field. They are not, however, listed as a separate, distinct category of dangerous goods at present. As dangerous goods or hazardous substances, they require packaging and transportation practices which parallel the established practices for hazardous materials transport. Pending establishment of a distinct category for such materials by the Department of Transportation, existing consensus or industrial protocols must be followed. Action by DOT to establish appropriate packaging and transport requirements is recommended.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

148

Quantitative transportation risk analysis based on available data/databases: decision support tools for hazardous materials transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

could be made appropriately and reasonably. The combination of recent interest in expanding or building new facilities to receive liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers, along with increased awareness and concern about potential terrorist action, has...

Qiao, Yuanhua

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

150

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

151

Computational study of the transport mechanisms of molecules and ions in solid materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolytes is a key element in the development of the solid lithium ion batteries. One promising material is dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc), which upon self-assembly may form conducting channels for fast ion transport. Computational chemistry is employed...

Zhang, Yingchun

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

152

Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 460.2 Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for transporting and packaging Department materials, and to provide an understanding of Department policies on activities which supplement regulatory requirements.

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Disposed Material Mobility and Transport in the Vicinity of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after the day of deployment. A 1-D sediment resuspension and transport model was verified using to be in suspension for the majority of the time and in particular following a resuspension event. The low settling velocities allow them to be in resuspension for long times (over 24 hours). Finally, we recommend monitoring

Voulgaris, George

154

Update to the Fissile Materials Disposition program SST/SGT transportation estimation  

SciTech Connect

This report is an update to ``Fissile Materials Disposition Program SST/SGT Transportation Estimation,'' SAND98-8244, June 1998. The Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition requested this update as a basis for providing the public with an updated estimation of the number of transportation loads, load miles, and costs associated with the preferred alternative in the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

John Didlake

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Risk & Packaging Contacts Transportation Risk & Packaging Contacts Ken Sorenson Program Manager (505) 844-0074 kbsoren@sandia.gov David Miller Operations Manager (505) 284-2574 drmille@sandia.gov Administrative Assistant Pat Tode (505) 845-8339, 845-7800 pprippl@sandia.gov Financial Analyst Laurel Taylor (505) 845-8598 ljtaylo@sandia.gov Risk Assessment Ruth Weiner (505) 284-8406 rfweine@sandia.gov Jeremy Sprung (505) 844-0314 jlsprun@sandia.gov Doug Osborn (505) 284-6416 dosborn@sandia.gov RADTRAN Ruth Weiner (505) 284-8406 rfweine@sandia.gov GIS Mapping Doug Osborn (505) 284-6416 dosborn@sandia.gov Structural Analysis Doug Ammerman (505) 845-8158 djammer@sandia.gov Bob Kalan (505) 844-0244 rjkalan@sandia.gov Jeff Smith (505) 845-0299 jasmith@sandia.gov Thermal Analysis Carlos Lopez

156

Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 National 0 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois NTSF Spring 2010 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Status and Future of TRANSCOM Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Meeting Summary Meeting Summary Notes

157

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Structural analysis utilizes computer design and analysis tools to provide package designers and certifiers with the most accurate method of determining package response to transportation environments. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. It can be used for package certification by generating a computer model of a test object (package) and subjecting it to an accident environment to understand its response. A computer model must be constructed with the same weights, dimensions, hardnesses, specific heat, conduction, etc. as an

158

Monte Carlo Study of the Spin Transport in Magnetic Materials , K. Akablia,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monte Carlo Study of the Spin Transport in Magnetic Materials Y. Magnina , K. Akablia,b , H. T of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530, Japan.. Abstract The resistivity in magnetic materials has been theoretically shown to depend on the spin

159

Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Packaging and Transportation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Packaging and Transportation Radiological shipments are accomplished safely. Annually, about 400 million hazardous materials shipments occur in the United States by rail, air, sea, and land. Of these shipments, about three million are radiological shipments. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, EM has completed over 150,000 shipments of radioactive material/waste. Please click here to see Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report. SUPPORTING PROGRAMS SAFE TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOLOGICAL SHIPMENTS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) TEPP provides the tools for planning, training and exercises, and technical assistance to assist State and Tribal authorities in preparing for response

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

162

Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2013 National National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Save the Date NTSF Registration Announcement NTSF 2013 Agenda EM's Huizenga Gives Keynote Address at National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Spring 2013 NTSF Presentations May 14, 2013 Presentations Communication Is Key to Packaging and Transportation Safety and Compliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board: Roles and Priorities

163

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 May 2010 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Chicago, Illinois May 2010 y May 2010 Page 1 Applying Risk Communication Principles Presented by: Ron Edmond Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education May 2010 Page 2 Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 May 2010 2  Participants should expect to gain the following skills: following skills:  How to recognize how the stakeholders prefer to receive information  How to integrate risk communication principles into individual communication  How to recognize the importance of earning trust and credibility y  How to identify stakeholders  How to answer questions using a variety of templates designed to keep messages focused May 2010 Page 3 The Chinese word for crisis contains two

164

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

165

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An indole derivative as a high triplet energy hole transport material for blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermally stable high triplet energy material derived from an indoloacridine core and indole hole transport units, 8,8-bis(4-(1H-indol-1-yl)phenyl)-8H-indolo[3,2,1-de]acridine (BIPIA), was synthesized as the hole transport material for deep blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. The BIPIA hole transport material showed a high triplet energy of 2.95eV and high glass transition temperature of 142C. A high quantum efficiency of 19.3% was obtained in the deep blue device using BIPIA as the high triplet energy hole transport material.

Min Su Park; Jun Yeob Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

168

Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter  

SciTech Connect

A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

LEVERAGING AGING MATERIALS DATA TO SUPPORT EXTENSION OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING PACKAGES SERVICE LIFE  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear material inventories are increasingly being transferred to interim storage locations where they may reside for extended periods of time. Use of a shipping package to store nuclear materials after the transfer has become more common for a variety of reasons. Shipping packages are robust and have a qualified pedigree for performance in normal operation and accident conditions but are only certified over an approved transportation window. The continued use of shipping packages to contain nuclear material during interim storage will result in reduced overall costs and reduced exposure to workers. However, the shipping package materials of construction must maintain integrity as specified by the safety basis of the storage facility throughout the storage period, which is typically well beyond the certified transportation window. In many ways, the certification processes required for interim storage of nuclear materials in shipping packages is similar to life extension programs required for dry cask storage systems for commercial nuclear fuels. The storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask storage systems is federally-regulated, and over 1500 individual dry casks have been in successful service up to 20 years in the US. The uncertainty in final disposition will likely require extended storage of this fuel well beyond initial license periods and perhaps multiple re-licenses may be needed. Thus, both the shipping packages and the dry cask storage systems require materials integrity assessments and assurance of continued satisfactory materials performance over times not considered in the original evaluation processes. Test programs for the shipping packages have been established to obtain aging data on materials of construction to demonstrate continued system integrity. The collective data may be coupled with similar data for the dry cask storage systems and used to support extending the service life of shipping packages in both transportation and storage.

Dunn, K. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, S. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Daugherty, W. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Sindelar, R. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Skidmore, E. [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Preliminary Evaluation of Using Fill Materials to Stabilize Used Nuclear Fuel During Storage and Transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a preliminary evaluation of potential fill materials that could be used to fill void spaces in and around used nuclear fuel contained in dry storage canisters in order to stabilize the geometry and mechanical structure of the used nuclear fuel during extended storage and transportation after extended storage. Previous work is summarized, conceptual descriptions of how canisters might be filled were developed, and requirements for potential fill materials were developed. Elements of the requirements included criticality avoidance, heat transfer or thermodynamic properties, homogeneity and rheological properties, retrievability, material availability and cost, weight and radiation shielding, and operational considerations. Potential fill materials were grouped into 5 categories and their properties, advantages, disadvantages, and requirements for future testing were discussed. The categories were molten materials, which included molten metals and paraffin; particulates and beads; resins; foams; and grout. Based on this analysis, further development of fill materials to stabilize used nuclear fuel during storage and transportation is not recommended unless options such as showing that the fuel remains intact or canning of used nuclear fuel do not prove to be feasible.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Lahti, Erik A.; Richmond, David J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

173

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

174

Sorption-capacity limited retardation of radionuclides transport in water-saturated packing materials  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides breakthrough times as calculated through constant retardation factors obtained in dilute solutions are non-conservative. The constant retardation approach regards the solid as having infinite sorption capacity throughout the solid. However, as the solid becomes locally saturated, such as in the proximity of the waste form-packing materials interface, it will exhibit no retardation properties, and transport will take place as if the radionuclides were locally non-reactive. The magnitude of the effect of finite sorption capacity of the packing materials on radionuclide transport is discussed with reference to high-level waste package performance. An example based on literature sorption data indicates that the breakthrough time may be overpredicted by orders of magnitude using a constant retardation factor as compared to using the entire sorption isotherm to obtain a concentration-dependent retardation factor. 8 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Packaging and Transportation for Offsite Shipment of Materials of National Security Interest  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The purpose of this Order is to make clear that the packaging and transportation of all offsite shipments of materials of national security interest for DOE must be conducted in accordance with DOT and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations that would be applicable to comparable commercial shipments, except where an alternative course of action is identified in this Order. Cancels DOE O 461.1A.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

177

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

178

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

179

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Computational modelling of transport phenomena in high energy materials processing application: large eddy simulation and parallelisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model is presented in order to address the coupled turbulent momentum, heat and species transport during molten metal-pool convection in association with continuous evolution of solid-liquid interface typically encountered in high energy materials processing applications. The turbulent aspect is handled by a large eddy simulation (LES) model and the phase changing phenomena is taken care of by a modified enthalpy-porosity technique. The proposed finite volume based LES model is subsequently parallelised for effective computational economy. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the present model, a systematic analysis is subsequently carried out to simulate a typical high power laser surface alloying process, where the effects of turbulent transport can actually be realised.

Dipankar Chatterjee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials Project Objectives Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced during these near- and longer-term spans; Identify potential impediments to and opportunities for their development, deployment, and maintenance (e.g., technical, economic, legal, and institutional). Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials

183

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 460.1C Packaging and Transportation Safety and DOE O 460.2A Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60.1C 60.1C PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY DOE O 460.2A DEPARTMENTAL MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION AND PACKAGING MANAGEMENT DOE O 460.1C and 460.2A Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 460.1C PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY DOE O 460.2A DEPARTMENTAL MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION AND PACKAGING MANAGEMENT FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. What are the objectives of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 460.1C? 2. What is the DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) exemption process in DOE O 460.1C? 3. What are the onsite safety requirements specified by DOE O 460.1C? 4. What are the objectives of DOE O 460.2A?

185

The Evolution of U.S. Transportation Regulations for Radioactive Materials?A Retrospective  

SciTech Connect

The discussion in this Chapter is a highly condensed version of the information presented previously in Chapter 52 of the 2nd Edition of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code.[1] The full text of the previous Chapter 52, i.e., Development of U.S. Regulations for the Transportation of Radioactive Materials - A Look Back over the Past 40 Years, could not be reproduced here. Therefore, this Chapter offers a high-level overview of the information presented previously, including all of the appropriate references. For the most part, the material that was not included in this version of Chapter 52 is available in the public domain. Due to the sheer volume of the information, readers interested in the preamble-only versions of the material referenced in this Chapter are redirected to Reference [1]. Readers interested in the full-text versions of the material referenced in this Chapter are redirected to the appropriate Federal Register and/or U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) websites. Because some of the material dates back to pre-website times, readers interested in the full-text versions of some of the references may have to rely on the services of their local libraries.

Hafner, R

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

Accident analysis of railway transportation of low-level radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes: Application of the /open quotes/Maximum Credible Accident/close quotes/ concept  

SciTech Connect

The maximum credible accident (MCA) approach to accident analysis places an upper bound on the potential adverse effects of a proposed action by using conservative but simplifying assumptions. It is often used when data are lacking to support a more realistic scenario or when MCA calculations result in acceptable consequences. The MCA approach can also be combined with realistic scenarios to assess potential adverse effects. This report presents a guide for the preparation of transportation accident analyses based on the use of the MCA concept. Rail transportation of contaminated wastes is used as an example. The example is the analysis of the environmental impact of the potential derailment of a train transporting a large shipment of wastes. The shipment is assumed to be contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls and low-level radioactivities of uranium and technetium. The train is assumed to plunge into a river used as a source of drinking water. The conclusions from the example accident analysis are based on the calculation of the number of foreseeable premature cancer deaths the might result as a consequence of this accident. These calculations are presented, and the reference material forming the basis for all assumptions and calculations is also provided.

Ricci, E.; McLean, R.B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

When and how to end shelter-in-place protection from a release of airborne hazardous material : report on a decision-making concept and methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Shelter-in-place (SIP) is considered a credible alternative to immediate evacuation to protect the population on and around Army chemical warfare agent stockpile storage sites from accidental agent releases of short duration. To be effective, this strategy requires immediate SIP to minimize initial exposure to agent vapor, followed by timely and appropriate termination of SIP to minimize additional exposure to agent vapor accumulations in the shelter when the air outside becomes less hazardous. However, a major challenge facing emergency managers has been how to decide the best time and way to end SIP to obtain this ideal. This report describes a concept to make this decision, and suggests a methodology to apply the concept as a site-specific response tool. The major conditions that influence the exposure of a population are the source term values of the agent that is released, meteorological conditions, shelter air change rates, the distance of the shelter from the source, and th e dose-response relationship of the hazardous material. The circumstances that contribute to overall exposure associated with a SIP strategy involve exposure during the time before taking shelter, exposure while sheltered due to vapor infiltration, and additional exposure (if any) following the termination of SIP. Options to end SIP are to resume normal activities with no restrictions, to ventilate the shelter but remain indoors, to exit from the shelter and remain nearby, or to relocate to a designated facility. The optimal time and way to end SIP involves examining the relationships among the conditions and circumstances listed above to find the combination of these variables that gives the smallest area where a sheltered population might receive a certain level of toxic effect. For example, find the combination of times, conditions, and circumstances that produce the smallest area where fatalities are possible. In this case, the best time and action to end SIP to minimize fatalities is that combination of variables which produces the smallest area where this level of effect is expected. The methodology to apply the concept is to use a computer model to examine the relationships among these conditions and circumstances (many of which are pre-planned default inputs), and display the best time and action to end SIP quickly, in a user-friendly format. A computer model that was developed to prove the concept and demonstrate the methodology (called the TSIP Model) is described in the report, and the use of the TSIP Model is illustrated in a case study in an appendix to the report. The report also discusses public education and emergency instructions essential for implementing this concept, and makes recommendations for agreements, plans, and exercises relevant to deciding when and how to end SIP. This concept and methodology is independent of the atmospheric dispersion model used, and is not limited to chemical warfare agent vapor hazards. Thus it can help make decisions on when and how to end SIP following the accidental release of many other non-flammable non-reactive hazardous vapors if sufficient information is available about the characteristics of the material and the circumstances of the release.

Yantosik, G.; Lerner, K.; Maloney, D.; Wasmer, F.

2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

188

Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

190

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

191

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light output (L) of CsI:Tl to He + ions. The inset is an example where L=263 is determined for particles with certainty energy (TOF=840). The energy resolution can be determined by ∆L/L = 45/263. The light-energy dependence and energy resolution can be observed as the difference in curvature and dispersive of the data. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials Project start date: Spring 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Yanwen Zhang Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Scintillation response has wide applications in the field of astronomy, medical physics, high-energy

192

Study on release and transport of aerial radioactive materials in reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

The release and transport characteristics of radioactive materials at a boiling accident of the high active liquid waste (HALW) in a reprocessing plant have been studied for improving experimental data of source terms of the boiling accident. In the study, a heating test and a thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) test were conducted. In the heating test using a simulated HALW, it was found that ruthenium was mainly released into the air in the form of gas and that non-volatile elements were released into the air in the form of mist. In the TG-DTA test, the rate constants and reaction heat of thermal decomposition of ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate were obtained from TG and DTA curves. (authors)

Amano, Y.; Tashiro, S.; Uchiyama, G.; Abe, H.; Yamane, Y.; Yoshida, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan); Kodama, T. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108 Okitsuke, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori, 039-3212 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Confidentiality and the Desire for Open Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and the Desire for Open the Desire for Open Communication in the Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Material to a National Repository Repository A presentation to the A presentation to the DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM 21 21 - - 23 April 2004 23 April 2004 Ronald B. Pope Consultant April 2004 April 2004 Confidentiality Confidentiality - - TEC Working TEC Working Group Group - - Albuquerque Albuquerque 2 2 Objectives Objectives Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues

194

Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 National 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado NTSF Spring 2011 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Activities and Accomplishments Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation DOE Railcar Fleet Asset Planning & Lessons Learned DOE Shipment Activities: What We Accomplished and a Look Forward DOE-Idaho's Packaging and Transportation Perspective Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Global Threat Reduction Initiative National Nuclear Security Administration Overview

195

Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Devices  

SciTech Connect

We report the design, synthesis, thermal, and photophysical properties of two phosphine oxide based electron transport/hole blocking materials, 2,6-bis(4-(diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A11) and 2,4-bis(4-(diphenyl-phosphoryl)phenyl)pyridine (BM-A10) for blue electrophosphorescent organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The use of these materials in blue OLED with iridium (III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2]picolinate (Firpic) as the phosphor was demonstrated. Using the dual host device architecture with BM-A10 as the ETM yields a maximum EQE of 8.9% with a power efficiency of 21.5 lm/W (4.0V and 35 cd/m2). When BM-A11 is used as the ETM, the maximum EQE and power efficiency improves to 14.9% and 48.4 lm/W, respectively (3.0V and 40 cd/m2).

Von Ruden, Amber L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Darsell, Jens T.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electronic and thermal transport in GeTe: A versatile base for thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

GeTe is a narrow-band gap semiconductor, where Ge vacancies generate free charge carriers, holes, forming a self-dopant degenerate system with p-type conductivity, and serves as a base for high-performance multicomponent thermoelectric materials. There is a significant discrepancy between the electronic and thermal transport data for GeTe-based materials reported in the literature, which obscures the baseline knowledge and prevents a clear understanding of the effect of alloying GeTe with various elements. A comprehensive study including XRD, SEM, EDS, Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and 125Te NMR of several GeTe samples was conducted. Similar Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are observed for all GeTe samples used showing that the concentration of Ge vacancies generating charge carriers is constant along the ingot. Very short 125Te NMR spin-relaxation time agrees well with high carrier concentration obtained from the Hall effect measurements. Our data show that at ~700 K, GeTe has a very large power factor, 42 ?Wcm-1K-2, much larger than that of any high efficiency thermoelectric telluride at these temperatures. Electronic and thermal properties of GeTe are compared to PbTe, another well-known thermoelectric material, where free charge carriers, holes or electrons, are generated by vacancies on Pb or Te sites, respectively. Discrepancy in the data for GeTe reported in literature can be attributed to the variation in the Ge:Te ratio of solidified samples as well as to different conditions of measurements.

None

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Electronic and thermal transport in GeTe: A versatile base for thermoelectric materials  

GeTe is a narrow-band gap semiconductor, where Ge vacancies generate free charge carriers, holes, forming a self-dopant degenerate system with p-type conductivity, and serves as a base for high-performance multicomponent thermoelectric materials. There is a significant discrepancy between the electronic and thermal transport data for GeTe-based materials reported in the literature, which obscures the baseline knowledge and prevents a clear understanding of the effect of alloying GeTe with various elements. A comprehensive study including XRD, SEM, EDS, Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and 125Te NMR of several GeTe samples was conducted. Similar Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are observed for all GeTe samples used showing that the concentration of Ge vacancies generating charge carriers is constant along the ingot. Very short 125Te NMR spin-relaxation time agrees well with high carrier concentration obtained from the Hall effect measurements. Our data show that at ~700 K, GeTe has a very large power factor, 42 ?Wcm-1K-2, much larger than that of any high efficiency thermoelectric telluride at these temperatures. Electronic and thermal properties of GeTe are compared to PbTe, another well-known thermoelectric material, where free charge carriers, holes or electrons, are generated by vacancies on Pb or Te sites, respectively. Discrepancy in the data for GeTe reported in literature can be attributed to the variation in the Ge:Te ratio of solidified samples as well as to different conditions of measurements.

None

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Performance-oriented packaging: A guide to identifying and designing. Identifying and designing hazardous materials packaging for compliance with post HM-181 DOT Regulations  

SciTech Connect

With the initial publication of Docket HM-181 (hereafter referred to as HM-181), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, Transportation Management Division decided to produce guidance to help the DOE community transition to performance-oriented packagings (POP). As only a few individuals were familiar with the new requirements, elementary guidance was desirable. The decision was to prepare the guidance at a level easily understood by a novice to regulatory requirements. This document identifies design development strategies for use in obtaining performance-oriented packagings that are not readily available commercially. These design development strategies will be part of the methodologies for compliance with post HM-181 U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) packaging regulations. This information was prepared for use by the DOE and its contractors. The document provides guidance for making decisions associated with designing performance-oriented packaging, and not for identifying specific material or fabrication design details. It does provide some specific design considerations. Having a copy of the regulations handy when reading this document is recommended to permit a fuller understanding of the requirements impacting the design effort. While this document is not written for the packaging specialist, it does contain guidance important to those not familiar with the new POP requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan.  

SciTech Connect

This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty.

Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

none,

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transportation Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transporting nuclear materials within the United States and throughout the world is a complicated and sometimes highly controversial effort requiring...

202

GNEP Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Analysis FY-08 Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary for FY-2008 of activities, analyses and products from the Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal (M-TSD) sub-task of Systems Analysis within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Research & Development area of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. The objective of this work is to evaluate near-term material management requirements for initial GNEP facilities and activities, long-term requirements for large-scale GNEP technology deployment, and alternatives and paths forward to meet these needs. For FY-08, the work expanded to include the Integrated Waste Management Strategy as well as integration with the newly formed Waste Forms Campaign. The M-TSD team was expanded with the addition of support from Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to the existing team of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL), Argonne National Lab (ANL), Idaho National Lab (INL), Sandia National Lab (SNL) and University of Nevada - Reno (UN-R). During the first half of the year, analysis was focused on providing supporting technical analysis and documentation to support anticipated high-level decisions on program direction. A number of analyses were conducted and reports prepared as program deliverables. This work is briefly summarized in this report. Analyses provided informally to other program efforts are included in this report to provide documentation. This year-end summary was planned primarily as a compilation of activities following the anticipated programmatic decisions. These decisions were deferred beyond the end of the year, and funds were reallocated in a number of areas, thus reducing the M-TSD activities. This report summarizes the miscellaneous 'ad-hoc' work conducted during the later part of the year, such as support to the draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), and support to other program studies. Major programmatic contributions from the M-TSD team during the year included: (1) Completion of the IWMS in March 2008 as the baseline for waste management calculations for the GNEP Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The IWMS represents a collaborative effort between the Systems Analysis, Waste Forms, and Separations Campaigns with contributing authors from multiple laboratories. The IWMS reference is: 'Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Integrated Waste Management Strategy, D. Gombert, INL, et al, GNEP-WAST-WAST-AI-RT-2008-000214, March 2008'. (2) As input to the IWMS and support for program decisions, an evaluation of the current regulatory framework in the U.S. pertaining to the disposal of radioactive wastes under an advanced nuclear fuel cycle was completed by ANL. This evaluation also investigated potential disposal pathways for these wastes. The entire evaluation is provided in Appendix A of this report. (3) Support was provided to the development of the GNEP Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement from INL, SNL and ANL M-TSD staff. (4) M-TSD staff prepared input for DSARR (Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle) report. The DSARR is an INL led report to examine the time-dependent dynamics for a transition from the current open fuel cycle to either a 1-tier or 2-tier closed fuel cycle. Section 5.3 Waste Management Impacts was provided to INL for incorporation into the DSARR. (5) SNL M-TSD staff prepared a M2 milestone report 'Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Contribution for Secretarial Decision Package'. The report purpose was to comprehensively evaluate and discuss packaging, storage, and transportation for all potential nuclear and radioactive materials in the process and waste streams being considered by the GNEP program. In particular, a systems view was used to capture all packaging, storage, and transport operations needed to link the various functional aspects of the fuel cycle. (6) SRNL M-TSD staff developed a deliverable report 'Management of Decay Heat from Spent Nuclear Fuel'. This report evaluated a range of options for managing the near-term decay heat associated with Cs and Sr in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing waste

Halsey, W

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The romantic rides in Sandburgs eagle-car changed society. On the one hand, motor vehicle transportation is an integral thread of societys fabric. On the other hand, excess mobility fractures old neighborh...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

207

Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas (INEEL/EXT-02-00992)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

992 992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Patrick Laney July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC INEEL/EXT-02-00992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Sponsored by Natural Gas Pipeline Infrastructure Reliability Program National Energy Technology Laboratory INEEL Field Work Proposal # 4340-70 Prepared by: Patrick Laney Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho With Contributions From: Ian Kopp Kenway Corporation Augusta, Maine July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Fossil Energy Technologies Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

208

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

209

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP WIPP Transportation Security Gregory M. Sahd Security Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy Contact Information Gregory M. Sahd Security Operations Carlsbad Field Office * U.S. Department of Energy 575.234.8117 * Greg.Sahd@wipp.ws WIPP Transportation "...The (WIPP transportation) system is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the U.S...." - National Academy of Sciences, WIPP Panel Hanford Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Argonne National Laboratory - East Nevada Test Site Argonne National Laboratory - West Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CBFO Manager Senior Management

210

NMR and Transport Studies on Group IV Clathrates and Related Intermetallic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermoelectric materials are the intermetallic clathrates. Clathrates are cage-structured materials with guest atoms enclosed. Previous studies have shown lower thermal conductivities compared with many other bulk compounds, and it is believed that guest atom...

Zheng, Xiang

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Zintl Phases as Thermoelectric Materials: Tuned Transport Properties of the Compounds CaxYb1xZn2Sb2**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zintl Phases as Thermoelectric Materials: Tuned Transport Properties of the Compounds CaxYb1±xZn2Sb. Introduction Because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity, thermoelectric materials have in efficiency, thermoelectric materials could pro- vide a substantial amount of electrical power from automotive

212

Improved power efficiency in blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes using diphenylmethyl linkage based high triplet energy hole transport materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved power efficiency in blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) was demonstrated by using new high triplet energy hole-transport materials based on the diphenylmethyl linkage. Two high triplet energy hole-transport materials with diphenylamine or ditolyamine moieties linked through a diphenylmethyl linkage, 4,4?-(diphenylmethylene)bis(N,N-diphenylaniline) (TCBPA) and 4,4?-(diphenylmethylene)bis(N,N-di-p-tolylaniline), were synthesized and evaluated as hole-transport materials for blue PHOLEDs. The power efficiency of TCBPA was superior to that of standard 1,1-bis[4-[N,N?-di(p-tolyl)amino]phenyl]cyclohexane.

Chil Won Lee; Jun Yeob Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Thermographic analysis of polyurethane foams integrated with phase change materials designed for dynamic thermal insulation in refrigerated transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The dispersion process of a micro-encapsulated phase change material (n-tetradecane) into a polyurethane foam was studied in order to develop a micro-composite insulating material with both low thermal conductivity and latent heat storage properties. The maximum weight content of micro-capsules added to the cellular matrix was 13.5%. Dynamic thermal properties of hybrid foams were investigated by means of a thermographic analysis. This was found to be a very effective diagnostic technique in detecting the change in heat transfer rate across the micro-composite foam in an indirect way, i.e. by measuring how the surface temperature changes over time under heat irradiation. Such a material would be of interest in the field of transport of perishable goods, particularly those requiring a controlled regime of carriage/storage temperatures.

Andrea Tinti; Antonella Tarzia; Alessandra Passaro; Riccardo Angiuli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The basics in transportation of low-level radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin gives a basic understanding about issues and safety standards that are built into the transportation system for radioactive material and waste in the US. An excellent safety record has been established for the transport of commercial low-level radioactive waste, or for that matter, all radioactive materials. This excellent safety record is primarily because of people adhering to strict regulations governing the transportation of radioactive materials. This bulletin discusses the regulatory framework as well as the regulations that set the standards for packaging, hazard communications (communicating the potential hazard to workers and the public), training, inspections, routing, and emergency response. The excellent safety record is discussed in the last section of the bulletin.

Allred, W.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

216

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

217

Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

Livingston, R.R.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Disilane- and siloxane-bridged biphenyl and bithiophene derivatives as electron-transporting materials in \\{OLEDs\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optical, electrochemical, and electron-transporting properties of disilane- and siloxane-bridged biphenyl and bithiophene derivatives were investigated, in comparison with those of the monosilane-bridged analogues (siloles). The UV spectra and cyclic voltammograms indicated that elongation of the silicon bridge suppresses the ?-conjugation, in accordance with the results of DFT calculations. The DFT calculations indicated also that the disilane-bridged biphenyl and siloxane-bridged bithiophene should have the low-lying \\{HOMOs\\} and LUMOs. The electron-transporting properties were evaluated by the performance of triple-layered \\{OLEDs\\} having vapor-deposited films of the Si-bridged compound, Alq3, and TPD, as the electron-transport, emitter, and hole-transport, respectively. Of these, the device with a disilane-bridged biphenyl exhibited the high performance with the maximum current density of 590mA/cm2 at the applied electric field of 12נ107V/m (applied bias voltage=13V) and the maximum luminance of 22000cd/m2 at 13נ107V/m.

Hiroyuki Kai; Joji Ohshita; Sayaka Ohara; Naohiro Nakayama; Atsutaka Kunai; In-Sook Lee; Young-Woo Kwak

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and responsibilities for offsite shipments of naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear material, nuclear explosives, nuclear components, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels DOE O 461.1. Canceled by DOE O 461.1B and DOE O 461.2.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

SciTech Connect

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive regulatory program of hazardous waste management, and the South Dakota Department of Environment

223

Molten Salt Heat Transport Loop: Materials Corrosion and Heat Transfer Phenomena  

SciTech Connect

An experimental system for corrosion testing of candidate materials in molten FLiNaK salt at 850 degree C has been designed and constructed. While molten FLiNaK salt was the focus of this study, the system can be utilized for evaluation of materials in other molten salts that may be of interest in the future. Using this system, the corrosion performance of a number of code-certified alloys of interest to NGNP as well as the efficacy of Ni-electroplating have been investigated. The mechanisums underlying corrosion processes have been elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the materials after the corrosion tests, as well as by the post-corrosion analysis of the salts using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques.

Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Mark Anderson; Dr. Michael Corradini; Dr. Todd Allen; Luke Olson; James Ambrosek; Daniel Ludwig

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

New Alkali Doped Pillared Carbon Materials Designed to Achieve Practical Reversible Hydrogen Storage for Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and room temperature. This satisfies the DOE (Department of Energy) target of hydrogen-storage materials single-wall nanotubes can lead to a hydrogen-storage capacity of 6.0 mass% and 61:7 kg=m3 at 50 bars of roughly 1­20 bars and ambient temperature. Chen et al. reported remarkable hydrogen-storage capacities

Goddard III, William A.

225

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

226

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

SciTech Connect

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect

The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity.

Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to overpressure--external to T Plant, was included for completeness but is not within the scope of the hazards evaluation. Container failures external to T Plant will be addressed as part of the transportation analysis. This document describes the HazOp analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of SNF sludge in the T Plant.

SCHULTZ, M.V.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Natural radionuclide content and radiological hazard associated with usage of quartzite sand samples from OvacikSilifkeMersin open pit as building material in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......building materials such as gas concrete and concrete...respectively. CONCLUSIONS The natural radioactivity due to...Xiaolan Z. Measurement of natural radioactivity in sand...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus samples. J. Environ...Karahan G., Karack Z. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides......

S. Turhan; A. S. Aykamis; A. M. Kili

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

232

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

233

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

234

OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are...

235

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

236

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

237

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

238

Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

Fix, N.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

240

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

242

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

243

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

244

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal restrictions

245

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and treatment as

246

Design and optimization of a multi-particle accelerator beam transport and delivery system for material irradiation in nuclear and fusion science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A beam delivery and transport system were designed for the use in MIT Materials Test Facility (M2TF). The purpose of this beam delivery system was to design a 36 MeV Proton Cyclotron for DPA accumulation and a 100 MeV ...

Sordelet, Tyler Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

INMM 55th Annual Meeting, July 2024, 2014, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, USA Transport Security for Nuclear and Other Radioactive Materials --A DOE Training Course  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory. The course was developed by Argonne for the U.S. Department of Energy Packaging Certification of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20585 ABSTRACT In early December of 2013, a weeklong training course on security Transport Security for Nuclear and Other Radioactive Materials -- A DOE Training Course Ronald B. Pope, Yung

Kemner, Ken

248

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fiscal year 1985 Department of Energy authorization (transportation programs). Hearings before the Subcommittee on Transportation, Aviation and Materials of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 21,22, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Representatives of DOE agencies, automotive and alternative fuel research groups, and the electrical vehicle industry testified during a two-day hearing on 1984 appropriations for research and development on transportation. Of major concern was an administration proposal to reduce spending for these programs by 23%, consolidating some and terminating others. Positive signs in the budget proposal for 1985 include an emphasis on high-temperature materials development. DOE spokesmen explained the rationale behind the budget figures and allocations, emphasizing the need to improve efficiency and reduce costs. Others spoke to the energy supply and security implications of pursuing alternative fuel and transportation modes. Two letters submitted for the record follow the testimony.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

251

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

252

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

253

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

254

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

255

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Argonne Transportation - TransForum Volume 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TransForum: Volume 1 TransForum: Volume 1 ISSN 2156-3594 (Print) ISSN 2156-373X (Online) Vol. 1, No. 4, Winter 1998-99 (966k pdf ) Energy Secretary Dedicates Argonne's Transportation Center: New Technology Promises Cleaner Diesels Measuring How Fuel Cell Stack Up Vol. 1, No. 3, Summer 1998 (684k pdf ) Using Corn to Fuel Your Car: A Good Environmental Choice? If You Can't Stand the Heat ... Call Argonne Modeling Cars Isn't Just Child's Play Lilliputian Sensors Could Help Solve a Gigantic Pollution Problem Making a Material Difference in Advanced Batteries Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 1998 (577k pdf ) Gearing Up for HEV Powertrain Design Taking a Closer Look into How Batteries and Fuel Cells Work ITS Makes Life in the Fast Lane Easier "Wrapping It Up to Go": Transporting Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Safely

257

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

258

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

259

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Facility Siting Program (Maryland) Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level nuclear waste facilities. This legislation describes the factors considered by the Board in making siting decisions. The Board is authorized to enact rules and regulations pertaining to the siting of hazardous and low-level nuclear

263

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management - December 4, 2007 December 4, 2007 Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30) Line management ensures that the requirements for generating, storing, treating, transporting, and disposing of hazardous waste, universal waste, and used oil, established under 40 CFR Subchapter I, applicable permits, and DOE requirements have been effectively implemented for federal and contractor employees, including subcontractors. Written programs and plans are in place and updated when conditions or requirements change. Employees have been properly trained for the wastes they handle. Documentation of waste characterizations, manifests, land disposal restrictions,

264

Breaking symmetries in ordered materials : spin polarized light transport in magnetized noncentrosymmetric 1D photonic crystals, and photonic gaps and fabrication of quasiperiodic structured materials from interference lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of breaking various symmetries on optical properties in ordered materials have been studied. Photonic crystals lacking space-inversion and time-reversal symmetries were shown to display nonreciprocal dispersion ...

Bita, Ion

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

267

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

268

Acceptance of Soil from Off Site Sources In order to guard against receiving contaminated soils to used as fill material on campus,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this guideline document in order to provide information for acceptance of clean imported fill material from off regulations governing the remediation of site, and hazardous chemical disposal. Local Oversight Program Agency, auto repair facilities and sites containing petroleum impacted soils and disposal and transportation

de Lijser, Peter

269

Being Prepared for Emergencies - A Key Component of HAZMAT Transportation  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the efforts by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to address need for being prepared to handle hazardous material (HAZMAT) transportation emergencies. Effective notification and reporting requirements are being implemented within EM to identify emergencies, assure appropriate notifications are made, and to assist in preparedness activities with the state, tribal, and local jurisdictions. In conclusion: The Office of Environmental Management will continue to address the preparedness issues from jurisdictions along its transportation corridors. This will be accomplished by providing planning information to the states and tribes on upcoming shipments, providing notification of a transportation incident to assure response assets are available, and continuing to offer the technical assistance and support of the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program. (authors)

McNeil, E.B. [Office of Packaging and Transportation, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report The Office of Environmental Management (EM) was established to mitigate the risks and hazards posed by the legacy of nuclear weapons production and research. The most ambitious and far ranging of these missions is dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War. Many problems posed by its operations are unique, and include the transportation of unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste, water, and soil, and a vast number of contaminated structures during remediation of the contaminated sites. Since Fiscal Year (FY) 2004, EM has completed over 150,000 shipments of radioactive material and waste. The mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Packaging and

271

CSER 00-008 use of PFP Glovebox HC-18BS for Storage and Transport of Fissionable Material  

SciTech Connect

This CSER addresses the feasibility of increasing the allowed number of open containers and permitting the transfer and storage of fissionable material in Glovebox HC-18BS without regard to form or density (metal, oxide having an H/X {le} 20, material having unrestricted moderation and plutonium hydroxide having a plutonium density of 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}).

ERICKSON, D.G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

275

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

276

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cold Weather Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

278

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

279

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transportation Networks for Emergency Evacuations  

SciTech Connect

Evacuation modeling systems (EMS) have been developed to facilitate the planning, analysis, and deployment of emergency evacuation of populations at risk. For any EMS, data such as road network maps, traffic control characteristics, and population distribution play critical roles in delineating emergency zones, estimating population at risk, and determining evacuation routes. There are situations in which it is possible to plan in advance for an emergency evacuation including, for example, an explosion at a chemical processing facility or a radiological accident at a nuclear plant. In these cases, if an accident or a terrorist attack were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other instances -for example, the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials-, there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on if and how to identify and proceed with the best course of action to minimize losses. Although both cases require as a starting point the development of a transportation network model of the area at risk, which must include road capacity and topology, in the latter the available time to generate this network is extremely limited. This time constraint precludes the use of any traditional data gathering methodology and the network generation process has to rely on the use of GIS and stochastic modeling techniques. The generation of these transportation networks in real time is the focus of this entry.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) bounding release model  

SciTech Connect

Transportation System Risk Assessments (TSRAs) document the compliance of proposed shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations as well as the associated risks involved. If a relatively simple bounding analysis can show that the consequences resulting from a worst case scenario are acceptably low, a more time intensive and costly risk analysis can be avoided. Therefore, a bounding release FORTRAN model has been developed to determine the consequences of a worst case non-criticality transportation accident. The consequences of three conservative bounding accidents are determined by the model: (1) direct radiation exposure, (2) airborne release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material, and (3) release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material into a waterway and subsequent uptake by an individual through drinking water. Program output includes the direct radiation exposure (mrem), maximum downwind concentration (mg/m{sup 3}), radiation dose (mrem) received as a result of the postulated airborne release of radiological material, intake (mg) due to inhalation, radiation dose (mrem) received by an individual resulting from a release of radiological material into a waterway and uptake into drinking water, and uptake (mg) due to ingestion. This report documents the methodologies and correlations used in the numerical model to perform the bounding consequence calculations.

Anderson, J.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

286

Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

James, Ralph B. (5420 Lenore Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Van Scyoc, III, John M. (P.O. Box 93, 65 Main St., Apt. 1, Plainfield, Cumberland County, PA 17081); Schlesinger, Tuviah E. (8 Carleton Dr., Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny County, PA 15243)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Fuels, Engines, Emissions Transportation Analysis Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Propulsion Materials Lightweight Materials Bioenergy Fuel Cell Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Transportation SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their effects on the combustion process in an internal combustion engine. Oak Ridge National Laboratory brings together science and technology experts from across scientific disciplines to partner with government and industry in addressing transportation challenges. Research objectives are

289

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

290

Hanford Site Wide Transportation Safety Document [SEC 1 Thru 3  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the basis for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to approve the Hanford Sitewide Transportation Safety Document (TSD) for onsite Transportation and Packaging (T&P) at Hanford. Hanford contractors, on behalf of DOE-RL, prepared and submitted the Hanford Sitewide Transportation Safety Document, DOE/RL-2001-0036, Revision 0, (DOE/RL 2001), dated October 4, 2001, which is referred to throughout this report as the TSD. In the context of the TSD, Hanford onsite shipments are the activities of moving hazardous materials, substances, and wastes between DOE facilities and over roadways where public access is controlled or restricted and includes intra-area and inter-area movements. The TSD sets forth requirements and standards for onsite shipment of radioactive and hazardous materials and wastes within the confines of the Hanford Site on roadways where public access is restricted by signs, barricades, fences, or other means including road closures and moving convoys controlled by Hanford Site security forces.

MCCALL, D L

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The 2005 - 2030 Harlingen-San Benito Metropolitan Transportation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Commercial Vehicle Survey 3. Truck Traffic and Routes 4. Dedicated Truck Lanes 5. Hazardous Material Routes 6. Roadway Freight 7. Local Roadway Freight E. Rail/Freight 1. Rail Safety 2. Commodity Flow by Rail in the Harlingen-San Benito MPO 3.... Construct Additional Rail and Complete Rail Realignments E. Construct Intercity Loops 5.14 Future Freeway Traffic Management and Operations Team??pg. 76 5.15 Future Mobility and Arterial Congestion Team???????pg. 77 5.16 Goals to Meet Transportation...

Harlingen-San Benito Metropolitan Planning Organization

2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Mississippi) Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality requires that each generator of greater than 220

294

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

295

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Facilities Siting (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure,

296

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Response Act (Georgia) Site Response Act (Georgia) Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Public Benefits Fund Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia's version of

297

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

298

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

299

Transportation Baseline Schedule  

SciTech Connect

The 1999 National Transportation Program - Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste/material transportation. The companion 1999 Transportation Barriers Analysis analyzes the data and identifies existing and potential problems that may prevent or delay transportation activities based on the data presented. The 1999 Transportation Baseline Schedule (this report) uses the same data to provide an overview of the transportation activities of DOE EM waste/materials. This report can be used to identify areas where stakeholder interface is needed, and to communicate to stakeholders the quantity/schedule of shipments going through their area. Potential bottlenecks in the transportation system can be identified; the number of packages needed, and the capacity needed at receiving facilities can be planned. This report offers a visualization of baseline DOE EM transportation activities for the 11 major sites and the Geologic Repository Disposal site (GRD).

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; John, Mark Earl

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95 The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. OSS19-05.doc

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

302

The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance  

SciTech Connect

As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, E.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Yucca MountainTransportation: Private Sector Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation: Transportation: Private Sector "Lessons Learned" US Transport Council David Blee Executive Director dblee@ustransportcouncil.org DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group April 4, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 2 US Transport Council Formed in 2002 during the Yucca Mountain Ratification debate to provide factual information on nuclear materials transportation, experience, safety & emergency planning Comprised of 24 member companies from the transport sector including suppliers and customers Principal focus is transport education, policy and business commerce related to nuclear materials transport US Transport Council -- DOE TEC 4/4/05 3 USTC Members AREVA BNFL, Inc Burns & Roe Cameco

304

Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the facility as constructed and with planned operation at the time of document preparation. Changes in facility planned and actual operation require that the identified fire risks associated with the CVDF be re-evaluated. Consequently, formal documentation and future revision of this FHA may be required.

SINGH, G.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

308

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

309

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

311

Materials | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

today New high-tech materials are the key to breakthroughs in biology, the environment, nuclear energy, transportation and national security. Argonne continues to make...

312

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Site study plan for Transportation, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Preliminary draft  

SciTech Connect

This site study plan describes transportation field studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. The studies are needed to identify and assess potential project impacts to transportation infrastructure and systems in the project vicinity and along potential transportation routes to the site across the State of Texas. The studies are also needed to locate and design project transportation facilities, and to evaluate and design impact mitigation. After identifying the transportation information requirements needed to comply with Federal, State, and local regulations and repository program requirements, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs for the characterization of site vicinity rail corridors and highway corridors, characterization of alternative statewide transportation routes, monitoring of site characterization effects on transportation, characterization of aircraft overflight patterns and hazardous material transportation patterns, and assessment of emergency response preparedness along alternative statewide transportation routes. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Participants should expect to...

315

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

316

Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to implement a comprehensive management program to safely, efficiently, and effectively manage its potentially reusable low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). Uranium materials, which are presently located at multiple sites, are to be consolidated by transporting the materials to one or several storage locations, to facilitate ultimate disposition. Management would include the storage, transport, and ultimate disposition of these materials. This action is needed because of DOE's current missions and functions; increasing budget pressures; the continuing need for good stewardship of resources, including materials in inventory; and continuing DOE attention to considerations of environment, safety, and health. Also, increased pressure on the federal budget requires that DOE take a closer look at materials management in order to ensure maximum cost effectiveness. This includes an examination of feasible uses of this material, consistent with DOE's mission, as well as an examination of management methods that are consistent with environmental requirements and budgetary constraints. DOE needs to implement a long-term (greater than 20 years) management plan for its inventory of potentially reusable LEU, NU, and DU.

N /A

2002-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

317

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators, transporters, as well as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. The regulations also define specific types

318

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program

319

56113.Transport and integration 13.1 Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be classified according to the hazard involved: · Mirror segments. The size of each segment allows transport by laser beams. This grid defines the X-Y-Z location of each node of the structure. Each node can several light cranes with a maximum payload of 3 tons. thereby allowing for redundancy. · The structural

Liske, Jochen

320

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards or steel reinforced concrete, these ferromagnetic materials may have an effect on the magnetic field environmental temperature control is required (2) Structural support for heavy equipment and vibration control

Maroncelli, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

323

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 FINAL Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the

325

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Zhang, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Deep Geological Environments, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GRR/Section 6-UT-a - Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 6-UT-a - Transportation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-UT-a - Transportation 06UTATransportation.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Utah Department of Transportation Regulations & Policies Permit Provisions 49 CFR Parts 171-180: Hazardous Material Regulations 49 CFR 387: Financial Responsibility Obligations 49 CFR Parts 382-399: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations UCA 41-1a-101: Utah Motor Vehicle Act UCA 41-6a-702: Left Lane Restrictions UAC R909-1: Safety Regulations for Motor Carriers Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06UTATransportation.pdf

328

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Materials Safety Data Sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

Schweik, Charles M.

330

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8/2/06, Product #16, stated: "Develop an annotated bibliography of publicly-available documents related to security of radioactive material transportation." * Earlier this year, a preliminary draft annotated bibliography on this topic was developed by T-REX , UNM, to initially address this STG Work Plan Task. Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 3 Considerations in Determining Release of Information * Some "Publicly-available" documents could potentially contain inappropriate information according to standards set by DOE information security policy and DOE Guides. - Such documents would not be freely

331

Reliability of Transport Properties for Bulk Thermoelectrics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents international round-robin study to ensure quality of transport data and figure of merit of thermoelectric materials

332

Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management  

SciTech Connect

A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

Grebenyuk, V.D. [Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Grebenyuk, O.V. [Dega Enterprises of NY, Inc., Flushing, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed Jemie Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

335

Sandia National Laboratories: Transportation Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Transportation Energy On May 19th, the DOE announced 7M for six projects (five in California +...

336

Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system. Quarterly technical report, December 1992--February 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this contractual effort is the development and demonstration of a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system to meet the unique needs of the Department of Energy (DOE) for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system will be designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganics, and explosive materials. The planned laboratory system will consist of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

Not Available

1993-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

338

West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West West Valley Demonstration Project Transportation Emergency Management Program Independent Oversight Review of the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance September 2000 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 4 2.0 RESULTS ......................................................................................... 7 Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessment .................................... 7 Program Plans and Procedures ..................................................... 8 Emergency Responder Performance .......................................... 10 Feedback and Continuous Improvement....................................

339

FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation and Traffic Management Transportation and Traffic Management FAQS Qualification Card - Transportation and Traffic Management A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-TransportationAndTrafficManagement.docx Description Transportation and Traffic Management Qualification Card

340

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss the objectives and requirements associated with this rule from the code of federal regulations. We have provided an example to help familiarize you with the material. The example will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste operations and emergency response or through the course manager. You may need to refer to these documents to complete the example, practice, and criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations

342

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

343

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

The need for suitable construction material and for the proper disposal of scrap tires has led the Texas Department of Transportation to use readily available scrap tires as an alternative fill material for highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Transportation 0-5517: Beneficial Use of Scrap Tire Bales in Highway Projects A research plan was developed was observed. In addition, a comprehensive literature review was conducted to determine the environmentalDOT. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation, nor is it intended for construction

Zornberg, Jorge G.

346

Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 `Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.` The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92.

Brumburgh, G.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

349

Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Dosimetric calculations gave a dose conversion coefficient of 15 mSv/WLM, which is higher than the value 5 m rights reserved. Keywords: Radon; Radon progeny; Human respiratory tract; Dose conversion coefficient serve as an indicator of underground uranium ores. It can also pass the surface between the soil

Yu, K.N.

350

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

352

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Objective: Develop materials technologies to minimize embrittlement of steels used for high-pressure transport of hydrogen

353

Does the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Street, Suite 450, Austin, Texas, 78701, USA Summary: Fly ash, a waste material from coal-fired power of fly ash [9]. Fly ash is a waste material from coal fired power plants; when added to concrete, fly ashDoes the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1 , M. Juenger1 and J

Siegel, Jeffrey

354

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.Threat and Unconventional Weapon Robert Jones, MD Brandonand as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fuel storage tanks, heating oil tanks, emergency generator tanks, industrial activities and landfills from an underground storage tank (UST) or associated piping are required within 24 hours of discovery Handling Facilities classify and manage petroleum-contaminated soils by the concentration of gas-, diesel

Wilcock, William

356

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 273 (2014) 272279  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural University, Shangdong 271018, China c Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida , Jun Luoa, , Lena Q. Maa,c, a State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School on Corresponding authors at: State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School

Ma, Lena

357

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 185 (2011) 983989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), a carcinogenic metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment. Human activities including mining, smelting, and As to arsenic via drinking con- taminated water (>50 g/L) leads to cancers, birth defects, and other diseases [3

Ma, Lena

358

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kilopascals kilopascals 0.14504 pounds per square inch 062001 Source: Engineering Unit Conversions, M. R. Lindeburg, PE., Third Ed., 1990, Professional Publications, Inc.,...

359

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the functionality of nanoscale materials and interacting assemblies * Research on optoelectronic, ferroelectric, ionic and electronic transport, and catalytic phenomena at the...

360

Update to ANSI/ANS-6.4.3-1991 for low-Z and compound materials and review of particle transport theory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ANSI/ANS-6.4.3-1991 Gamma-Ray Attenuation Coefficients and Buildup Factors for Engineering Materials Standard (herein known as ANS Standard), contains derived gamma-ray attenuation coefficients and buildup factors (more)

Durani, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

3.205 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laws of thermodynamics applied to materials and materials processes. Solution theory. Equilibrium diagrams. Overview of fluid transport processes. Kinetics of processes that occur in materials, including diffusion, phase ...

Allen, Samuel M.

363

Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermoelectric materials transport properties measurements improvement and standardization is undertaken by new IEA annex under the Advanced Materials for Transportation implementing agreement

364

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

366

Understanding and engineering ion transport in conducting polymers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many organic electronic and bioelectronics devices rely on mixed (electronic and ionic) transport within a single organic layer. Although electronic transport in these materials is (more)

Stavrinidou, Eleni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

368

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the equal energy hypothesisthe notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazardis that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 67 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA correction for intermittency is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transportation risk assessment for the US Department of Energy Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

In its Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future management of radioactive and hazardous waste at the facilities of the DOE complex. The alternatives involve facilities to be used for treatment, storage, and disposal of various wastes generated from DOE`s environmental restoration activities and waste management operation. Included in the evaluation are six types of waste (five types of radioactive waste plus hazardous waste), 49 sites, and numerous cases associated with each different alternative for waste management. In general, the alternatives are evaluated independently for each type of waste and reflect decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches. Transportation of waste materials is an integral component of the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The estimated impact on human health that is associated with various waste transportation activities is an important element leading to a complete appraisal of the alternatives. The transportation risk assessment performed for the EM PEIS is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful and consistent.

Chen, S.Y.; Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Lazaro, M.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

371

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

372

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

373

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

375

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

376

Local Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local Transportation. Transportation from the Airport to Hotel. There are two types of taxi companies that operate at the airport: special and regular taxis (

377

Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System  

SciTech Connect

The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chamber transport  

SciTech Connect

Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

OLSON,CRAIG L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

379

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

380

Transportation Baseline Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOEs projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations personnel in determining the industrial hazards, vulnerability assessments and health risk assessments to continental United States military installations. These techniques and procedures support the Department of Defense Force Protection measures, which provides awareness of a terrorism threat, appropriate measures to prevent terrorist attacks and mitigate terrorism's effects in the event that preventive measures are ineffective.

Jeffrey S Kirkpatrick; Jacqueline M Howard; David A Reed

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

383

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

384

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

387

Development of a GIS for environmental assessment incorporating known potential environmental hazards and remote sensing  

SciTech Connect

The development of a Geographic Information System (GIS) application to evaluate potential environmental hazards within the Bushkill watershed in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, is described by the authors. Information identifying hazardous materials used by businesses within the watershed was obtained from databases of the Environmental Protection Agency. These databases were supplemented and updated by visual reconnaissance and by a review of current tax maps, zoning information and aerial photographs. Information regarding the use or storage of substances considered hazardous was collected from various agencies as well as any known violations of environmental regulations by the businesses. Geographic information including remotely sensed data and maps of surface water bodies, geology and soil types was also obtained for the study area. A GIS was used to integrate the geographic information with the hazardous substance database resulting in a tool for use in environmental site assessments, planning for subsequent site characterization, and for environmental educational purposes.

Shaffer, D.L. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States); Roth, M.J.S.; Ruggles, R. [Lafayette Coll., Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

389

Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

FAQ 37-What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depleted uranium metal or oxide? depleted uranium metal or oxide? What are the potential health risks from transportation of depleted uranium metal or oxide? In the PEIS, risks associated with transportation of depleted uranium oxide and metal were estimated for transport by either rail or truck. Normal transport of oxide or metal would result in low-level external exposure to radiation for persons in the vicinity of a shipment. Based on estimates in the PEIS, the levels of exposure would result in negligible increased cancer risks. Risks from material released in an accident were also estimated. For a hypothetical railcar accident involving powder U3O8 that was assumed to occur in a highly-populated urban area under stable (nighttime) weather conditions, it was estimated that up to 20 people might experience irreversible adverse effects from chemical toxicity, with no fatalities expected. Approximately 2 potential latent cancer fatalities from radiological hazards are estimated for an accident under the same conditions. The probability of such an accident occurring is very low. The consequences from a truck accident would be lower, because trucks have a smaller shipment capacity. The consequences of transportation accidents involving depleted uranium metal would be much smaller than those involving uranium oxide because uranium metal would be in the form of solid blocks and would not be easily dispersed in an accident.

392

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPMZT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the PEA is in assess potential enJ?ronmental impacts of the implementation of a comprehek-e management program for potentiaIly reusable ICW enriched uranium (LEU). norr,:al uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). --l?prosimately 14,200 MTU (h?etric Tons of Uranium) of potentially reusable uranium is located at 15s

393

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

394

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

395

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

396

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

397

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 March 2011 Report for the Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protection Action Recommendation Cards for the Office of Secure Transportation [HIAR-OST-2011-03-04] The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the appropriateness of OST's path forward in revising the EPHA and PAR cards. Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011

399

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Three-dimensional simulation of groundwater flow and transport of chemical and low-level radioactive constituents within two production areas of the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of transport in the environmental media was performed. Predicting the future performance of any waste site or facility and postulated actions in terms of migration of potential hazardous materials requires mathematical models capable of simulating flow and transport in the groundwater. Three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the groundwater movement and contaminant transport in the Raw Materials Fabrication Area and the Separations Area. The overall objective of the analysis was to develop groundwater flow models that quantifies the rate and direction of the groundwater movement from the waste sites to points of discharge. The USGS Modular 3D model uses the strongly implicit procedure to solve sets of simultaneous finite-difference equations that represent the groundwater flow process. The transport functions, which are the concentration or mass flux at time t due to continuous injection starting at time t', were obtained by solving the three-dimensional advection-dispersion equations using the Sandia Waste Isolation Flow and Transport (SWIFT) model. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Stephenson, D.E.; Looney, B.B.; Andrews, C.B.; Buss, D.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sediment transport in the Mississippi Canyon: the role of currents and storm events on optical variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two modes of sediment transport were found to exist in the Mississippi Canyon: the offshelf transport of material in intermediate nepheloid layers originating at depths of 50-175 m and the resuspension and transport of material within the canyon...

Burden, Cheryl A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electrical and Thermoelectrical Transport Properties of Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IV Large Memory Effect in Graphene Based Devices IV-1Transport Properties of Graphene A Dissertation submitted into study the new material, graphene. By investigating the

Wang, Deqi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Office of Secure Transportation Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Our MissionTo provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct other missions supporting the national...

407

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

408

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

409

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

411

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the Cornell-McGuire method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radioactivity level in soil of a palaeo beach in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh and evaluation of radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......outdoor and indoor radiation hazard indices...annual effective dose rates. MATERIALS...Denundation of the Bay of Bengal extending along...kg). Gamma radiation hazard indices...based on the estimation that 1 Bq kg...gamma radiation dose rates. The index......

Ashna Islam; Mahfuza Sharifa Sultana; Aleya Begum; Selina Yeasmin

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Site Visit Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- March 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages

418

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

420

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Environmental hazards: real or exaggerated?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0223-302067, FAX (44) 0223-302068 Send materials to Science Advertising, 1333 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005. m Information for Contributors appears on pages 40-42 of the 1 January 1993 issue. Editorial correspondence, includ-ing requests...

MD Green

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Air pollution control: Indoor hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the need for further study of the health effects of indoor air pollution, ranging from radon emitted by building materials to the second-hand effects of cigarette smoke, and the ... overlooked in research on the health effects of environmental pollutants. In some cases,such as radon, the report says that there is an "urgent need" to study such health ...

David Dickson

1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Independent Oversight Review of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Transportation Emergency Management Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Transportation Emergency Management Program Independent Oversight Review of the March 2000 OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................... 4 2.0 RESULTS ......................................................................................... 6 Hazard Survey and Hazards Assessments .................................... 6 Program Plans and Procedures ..................................................... 7 Emergency Responder Performance and Preparation ............... 9 Offsite Interfaces ........................................................................... 10 Feedback and Continuous Improvement Process

425

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

426

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

427

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

428

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix J; Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-i APPENDIX J: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION OF UF 6 CYLINDERS, URANIUM OXIDE, URANIUM METAL, AND ASSOCIATED MATERIALS Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-ii Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-iii CONTENTS (APPENDIX J) NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-vi J.1 SUMMARY OF TRANSPORTATION OPTION IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 J.2 TRANSPORTATION MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.1 Truck Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.2 Rail Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.2.3 Transportation Options Considered But Not Analyzed in Detail . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.3 IMPACTS OF OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-10 J.3.1

429

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

430

NREL Simulations Provide New Insight on Polymer-Based Energy Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Atomistic simulations correlate molecular packing and electron transport in polymer-based energy storage materials.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The radioactive material must then be placed in inner packages that will prevent radioactive contamination during transportation. Dispersible radioactive material must be...

432

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

433

Assessment of transportation risk for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

In its Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future management of radioactive and hazardous waste at the facilities of the DOE complex. The alternatives involve facilities to be used for treatment, storage, and disposal of various wastes generated from DOE environmental restoration activities and waste management operations. The evaluation includes five types of waste (four types of radioactive waste plus hazardous waste), 49 sites, and numerous cases associated with each alternative for waste management. In general, the alternatives are evaluated independently for each type of waste and reflect decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches. Transportation of waste materials is an integral component of the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The estimated impact on human health that is associated with various waste transportation activities is an important component of a complete appraisal of the alternatives. The transportation risk assessment performed for the EM PEIS is designed to ensure through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful and consistent. Among other tasks, Argonne National Laboratory is providing technical assistance to the EM PEIS on transportation risk assessment. The objective is to perform a human health risk assessment for each type of waste relative to the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The transportation risk assessed is part of the overall impacts being analyzed for the EM PEIS to determine the safest, most environmentally and economically sound manner in which to satisfy requirements for waste management in the coming decades.

Chen, S.Y.; Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Lazaro, M.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

WIPP Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Container Documents Documents related to transuranic waste containers and packages. CBFO Tribal Program Information about WIPP shipments across...

435

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work...

436

Argonne Transportation Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Site Index General Information About TTRDC Media Center Current News News Archive Photo Archive Transportation Links Awards Contact Us Interesting Links Working with Argonne Research Resources Experts Batteries Engines & Fuels Fuel Cells Management Materials Systems Assessment Technology Analysis Tribology Vehicle Recycling Vehicle Systems Facilities Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Powertrain Test Cell 4-Wheel Drive Chassis Dynamometer Battery Test Facility Engine Research Facility Fuel Cell Test Facility Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Photo Tour Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plant Publications Searchable Database: patents, technical papers, presentations

437

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

438

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

439

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overall goal of the project is to develop materials technologies that would enable minimizing the problem of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the high-pressure transport of hydrogen

440

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Materialism and materiality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accountants and auditors in recent financial scandals have been pictured as materialistic, simply calculating consequences and ignoring duties. This paper potentially explains this apparently materialistic behaviour in what has historically been a truthtelling profession. Materiality, which drives audit priorities, has been institutionalised in accounting and auditing standards. But a materiality focus inherently implies that all amounts that are not 'materially' misstated are equally true. This leads to habitual immaterial misstatements and promotes the view that auditors do not care about truth at all. Auditors' lack of commitment to truth undermines their claim to be professionals in the classic sense.

Michael K. Shaub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

444

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

445

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Please cite this article in press as: M. Schiavon, et al., Transcriptome profiling of genes differentially modulated by sulfur and chromium identifies potential targets for phytoremediation and reveals a complex SCr interplay on sulfate transport regulati  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a complex S­Cr interplay on sulfate transport regulation in B. juncea, J. Hazard. Mater. (2012), http a complex S­Cr interplay on sulfate transport regulation in B. juncea Michela Schiavona,1 , Giulio Gallaa,1

447

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Audit Report - Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Secure Transportation Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities OAS-M-12-05 June 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 29, 2012 UN MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Office of Secure Transportation Capabilities" BACKGROUND The National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Secure Transportation (OST) is responsible for safely and securely transporting nuclear weapons, weapon components and special nuclear material for customers such as the Department of Energy, Department of Defense and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Specifically, OST shipments support the nuclear

449

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Accurate determination of package behavior for impact and puncture accidents can be obtained by testing sub-scale models. This technique is frequently used in conjunction with full-scale tests and computer analyses. Full-scale spent fuel packages can weigh 250,000 pounds (three fully loaded semi-trucks) or more, therefore the ability to determine the behavior with scale-models improves testing safety and reduces testing costs. *** 1/4 Scale Free Drop Test 1/4 Scale Component Free Drop Test 1/3 Scale Puncture Test 1/2 Scale Puncture Test 1/8 Scale Rail Crush Test [scale model DROP test] Click to view picture [scale model component test]

450

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. Computer analysis can be used for package certification by generating a

451

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comments & Questions Gary Lanthrum, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: glanthrum@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-5277 Fax: (505) 845-5508 Ashok K. Kapoor, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: akapoor@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-4574 Fax: (505) 845-5508 David R. Miller, SNL/TP Manager, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: drmille@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 284-2574 Fax: (505) 844-2829 Mona L. Aragon, SNL/TP Advanced Visualization, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: mlrage@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-2541 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Doug Ammerman, SNL/TP Structural Analysis, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: djammer@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 845-8158 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Fran Kanipe, SNL/TP Computer Programming, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: flkanip@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-1121 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Carlos Lopez, SNL/TP Thermal Analysis, Albuquerque, NM

452

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Photos 30-Foot Free Drop Test jpeg, 788K [photo] Click to view picture 1100-Pound Crush Test jpeg, 448K [photo] Click to view picture 40-Inch Puncture Test jpeg, 912K [photo] Click to view picture 30-Minute Pool Fire Test jpeg, 88K [photo] Click to view picture 8-Hour Immersion Test jpeg, 416K [photo] Click to view picture Graphics Unyielding Target jpeg, 144K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic Movies 30-Foot Free Drop Test AVI, 4.5 MB [movie] Click to view movie 1/3-Scale Puncture Test AVI, 3.3 MB [movie] Click to view movie 30-Minute

453

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SEARCH SITE MAP SITE MAP SAFE HOME Search Site RAM PACKAGES What are they? When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record TESTING & CERTIFICATION How are packages certified? What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents?

454

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Mack Truck and Subaru Collision Crush Test 200,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [CRUSH test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 60,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [CRUSH scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test* is designed to protect against include: the package being under a vehicle during a pile-up accident the package being pinned between two vehicles during a collision. The 55 gallon drum is an overpack for a smaller (6-inch diameter x 18-inch long, 1/4-inch thick stainless steel walled) package that is inside. Note*: This test is ONLY for packages weighing less than 500 kg (1100 lbs). On April 25, 1996, a Mack truck with a concrete mixer body, unable to stop, proceeded through an intersection at the bottom of an exit ramp. It collided with and overrode a Subaru passenger car near Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.

455

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Purpose Background Results References Demonstrating Target Hardness between an Unyielding Target vs. Concrete Target During 30-foot Drop Tests. 30-foot 1/2 scale DHLW (Defense High-Level Waste) cask drop onto an unyielding target click to play, avi 4.7MB 30-foot 1/2 scale DHLW (Defense High-Level Waste) cask drop onto a 1/2 scale (5 1/2 inch) concrete pad click to play, avi 2.5MB 30-foot van drop onto an unyielding target click to play, avi 3.7MB 30-foot van drop onto an 11 inch concrete pad click to play, avi 3.4MB Purpose [ Back to top of page ] The purpose of this series of tests is to visually demonstrate the severity of the Type B Hypothetical Accident Condition impact test (10 CFR Part

456

Photonic nano materials: anisotropic transport and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ph.D. Advisor Dr. Diederik Wiersma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ph.D. Advisor Prof

457

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

458

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Structural Analysis and Thermal Analysis of RAM Packaging Sandia National Laboratories jpeg, 24K Click to view picture AVI, 344K Click to view movie jpeg, 100K Click to view picture AVI, 1.5 MB Click to view movie C-1500 Truck Model Crash Analysis National Crash Analysis Center jpeg, 60K Click to view picture AVI, 616K Click to view movie AVI, 1.4 MB Click to view movie AVI, 368K Click to view movie Ship-to-Ship Collision Sandia National Laboratories Simulation Testing of Tire Designs Sandia National Laboratories jpeg, 72K Click to view picture AVI, 6.9 MB Click to view movie jpeg, 88K

459

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions [RAD Pie Chart] Exposure Source Average annual dose to an individual in the United States (millirem) Natural sources (including radon) - Ground, cosmic, and terrestrial - Internal radiation 200 mrem 100 mrem Occupational 0.9 mrem Nuclear Fuel Cycle 0.05 mrem Consumer Products - Tobacco - Other (i.e., smoke detectors, exit signs, luminous watch dials) Dose to lungs ~16,000 mrem 5 - 13 mrem Environmental Sources 0.06 mrem Medical - Diagnostic X-rays - Nuclear Medicine 39 mrem 14 mrem Approximate Annual Total 360 mrem [Radiation] Everyone in the world is continuously exposed to naturally-occuring background radiation. The average radiation dose received by the United

460

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

462

Water Transport Exploratory Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploratory Studies Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2007 kickoff meeting February 13-14, 2007 DOE Forrestal Building Rod Borup Mukundan Rangachary, Bryan Pivovar, Yu Seung Kim, John Davey, David Wood, Tom Springer, Muhammad Arif , Ken Chen, Simon Cleghorn, Will Johnson, Karren More, Peter Wilde, Tom Zawodzinski Los Alamos National Lab This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Objectives * Develop understanding of water transport in PEM Fuel Cells (non-design-specific) * Evaluate structural and surface properties of materials affecting water transport and performance * Develop (enable) new components and operating methods * Accurately model water transport within the fuel cell * Develop a better understanding of the effects of

463

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source January 18, 2012 Beamline Operation: HC1 APS Base Low Temperatures: HC2 Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures: HC3.1 Electric Furnace HC3.2 Optical Furnace HC3.3 Other High Temperature Lasers: HC4.2 Laser, Class 2 HC4.3a Laser, Class 3a HC4.3b Laser, Class 3b HC4.4 Laser, Class 4 High Pressures: HC5.1 High Pressure, DAC HC5.2 High Pressure, LVP HC5.3 High Pressure Vessels HC5.4 High Pressure Comp. Gas Chemicals: HC6.0 Chemicals, General HC6.1 Chemicals, Carcinogen HC6.2 Chemicals, Corrosive HC6.3 Chemicals, Toxic HC6.4 Chemicals, Flammable HC6.5 Chemicals, Oxidizer HC6.6 Chemicals, Other HC6.7 Chemicals, Explosive/Energetic Materials Biosafety: HC7.1 Biosafety Level 1 HC7.2 Biosafety Level 2 HC7.3 Biosafety Level 3

464

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL  

SciTech Connect

In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

467

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

468

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

469

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

473

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

474

ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

475

ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth rules...

476

EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

477

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

478

6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract This...

479

ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal Abstract...

480

EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials transportation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Safety Hazard at SRS EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is H-Canyon, where workers recently dissolved the last...