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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

2

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

3

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

4

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

5

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting in unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin.

Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation...

9

Training Program EHS 657 ~ Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 657 Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials Training Course Syllabus...

10

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

11

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

12

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

13

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

14

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

17

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

22

Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications...

24

HM-ACCESS Project (Framework for the Use of Electronic Shipping Papers for the Transport of Hazardous Materials)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-ACCESS Initiative James Simmons Acting Chief, Research and Development Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Engineering and Research Division May 2012 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 2 H-azardous M-aterials A-utomated C-argo C-ommunication for E-fficient and S-afe S-hipments U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Background Purpose: To identify and eliminate barriers to the use of paperless hazard communication technologies to improve the delivery of critical hazardous materials (HM) safety information throughout the transportation chain.

25

Material Safety Data Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS of LITHIUM POLYMER battery (total 3pages) 1. Product and Company Identification Product 1.1 Product Name: LITHIUM- POLYMER Battery 1.2 System:...

26

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

27

Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations [Nuclear Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Analysis, Hazard Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technologies Overview Modeling and analysis Unit Process Modeling Mass Tracking System Software Waste Form Performance Modeling Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Development, Design, Operation Overview Systems and Components Development Expertise System Engineering Design Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Nuclear Waste Management using Electrometallurgical Technology Safety Analysis, Hazard and Risk Evaluations Bookmark and Share NE Division personnel had a key role in the creation of the FCF Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), FCF Technical Safety Requirements (TSR)

28

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Batteries Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials when shipped by air. Notify Shipping for any shipments that include lithium batteries. Note: If you need to...

29

Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2003 Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL 1) Source: Bldg: ________________________________________ Disinfection? cc YES, Autoclaved (each container tagged with `Treated Biomedical Waste') cc YES, Chemical

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

30

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCYRESPONSE TRAINING...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authorization Act authorized the establishment of Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training and Education Centers at Department of Energy sites...

31

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

32

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

33

NIST Study of Hazard to Firefighters Leads to Safety Alert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Study of Hazard to Firefighters Leads to Safety Alert. ... NIST-led research "validated the adverse consequences to firefighters when lens ...

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

35

Proceedings: Hazardous Waste Material Remediation Technology Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on hazardous waste materials remediation. The workshop was the fourth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of hazardous waste management as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information will help utilities understand hazardous waste issues, select technologies for their individual projects, and reduce decom...

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

Detection device for hazardous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chemical with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

Partin, J.K.; Grey, A.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act,...

38

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government...

40

Nuclear and hazardous material perspective  

SciTech Connect

The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

Sandquist, Gary M. [Applied Science Professionals, PO Box 9052 Salt Lake City, UT 84109 (United States); Kunze, Jay F. [Idaho State University PO Box 8060 Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Rogers, Vern C. [University of Utah PO Box 510087 Salt Lake City, UT 84151 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

43

Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

Thate, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper...

45

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

46

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

47

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

SYNTHESIS OF SAFETY ANALYSIS AND FIRE HAZARD ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful implementation of both the nuclear safety program and fire protection program is best accomplished using a coordinated process that relies on sound technical approaches. When systematically prepared, the documented safety analysis (DSA) and fire hazard analysis (FHA) can present a consistent technical basis that streamlines implementation. If not coordinated, the DSA and FHA can present inconsistent conclusions, which can create unnecessary confusion and can promulgate a negative safety perception. This paper will compare the scope, purpose, and analysis techniques for DSAs and FHAs. It will also consolidate several lessons-learned papers on this topic, which were prepared in the 1990s.

Coutts, D

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

49

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

50

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

52

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S....

53

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

54

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The hazardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, C.K.; Buelow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Wander, J.D.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

56

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

57

Toll Policies for Mitigating Hazardous Materials Transport Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate toll setting as a policy tool to regulate the use of roads for dangerous goods shipments. We propose a mathematical formulation as well as a solution method for the hazardous materials toll problem. Based on a comparative ... Keywords: bilevel programming, hazardous materials transportation, network design, toll setting

Patrice Marcotte; Anne Mercier; Gilles Savard; Vedat Verter

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

59

Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

62

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM); Buelow, Steven J. (Los Alamos, NM); Dyer, Richard B. (Los Alamos, NM); Wander, Joseph D. (Parker, FL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Biological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

containment as needed to keep the primary containers upright. Remove gloves and wash hands after preparing biological materials for transport. Lab coat, clean gloves, and...

65

Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations  

SciTech Connect

Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of nuclear experience on a common objectiveÑthe safe and secure storage and disposition of excess fissile nuclear materials.

Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. Emergency responders participate in a training exercise in the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP), which also recently released its annual report. Administered by EM’s Office of Packaging and Transportation, TEPP ensures federal, state, tribal and local responders have access to the plans, training and technical assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to radiological transportation accidents.

68

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

T. J. Rodovsky

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

70

Material Safety Data Sheet Isopropyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety Data Sheet Isopropyl alcohol MSDS Section 1: Chemical Product and Company Identification Product Name: Isopropyl alcohol Catalog Codes: SLI1153, SLI1579, SLI1906, SLI1246, SLI1432 CAS#: 67-63-0 RTECS: NT8050000 TSCA: TSCA 8(b) inventory: Isopropyl alcohol CI#: Not available. Synonym: 2-Propanol Chemical Name: isopropanol Chemical Formula: C3-H8-O Contact Information: Sciencelab.com, Inc. 14025 Smith Rd. Houston, Texas 77396 US Sales: 1-800-901-7247 International Sales: 1-281-441-4400 Order Online: ScienceLab.com CHEMTREC (24HR Emergency Telephone), call: 1-800-424-9300 International CHEMTREC, call: 1-703-527-3887 For non-emergency assistance, call: 1-281-441-4400 Section 2: Composition and Information on Ingredients Composition: Name CAS # % by Weight Isopropyl alcohol 67-63-0 100 Toxicological Data on Ingredients: Isopropyl alcohol: ORAL

71

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(s): Teeth. Cardiovascular system. HMIS RATING HEALTH: 3* FLAMMABILITY: 0 REACTIVITY: 2 SPECIAL HAZARD or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING ALDRICH - 435589

Lin, Anna L.

72

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 3 - Hazards Identification EMERGENCY OVERVIEW Irritant. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry lime or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling

Choi, Kyu Yong

73

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

74

Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Material Safety Data Sheet Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012 Revision date: 05/25/2011 1. CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION Product name: Speedway E85 Synonym: Speedway ED75/ED85; E-75; E75; E-85; E85; Ethanol/Gasoline Fuel Blend; Fuel Ethanol ED75/ED85 Chemical Family: Gasoline/Ethanol Formula: Mixture Manufacturer: Speedway LLC P.O. Box 1500 Enon, OH 45501 Other information: 419-421-3070 Emergency telephone number: 877-627-5463 2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS E85 is a mixture of ethyl alcohol and gasoline that is approved for use in an automobile spark ignition engine. Can contain small amounts of dye and other additives (>0.02%) which are not considered hazardous at the concentrations used. Product information: Name CAS Number

75

Washington TRU Solutions - Job Safety/Hazard Analysis Booklet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

participation is important to efficient, safe, and increased productivity. Through the process of Job Safety Analysis, these benefits are fully realized. Job Safety Analysis can...

76

Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LABORATORY SAFETY REPORT, MARTIN NUCLEAR FACILITY, QUEHANNA SITE  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the safety features and the major alterations to be performed prior to occupancy. The evaluation was made in support of fubrication work on the production of safe isotopic power sources from Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/. The chemical, nuclear, and radiobiological properties of Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/ are outlined. The projected physical fiow of materials for production of the isotopic power souroes is schematically given. An evaluation of the malfunctions, operational hazards, and remedial health physics procedures is presented. The analysis and evaluation of postulated maximum credible incidents are demonstrated. (B.O.G.)

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

79

Fusion reactor breeder material safety compatibility studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium breeder material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Breeder material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize breeder-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate the following. 1. Ternary oxides (LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, and LiTiO/sub 3/) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are chemically compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ reactions with water generate heat, aerosol, and hydrogen. 2. Lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release. 3. Liquid lithium reacts substantially, while 17Li83Pb alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen. 4. Liquid lithium-air reactions may present some major safety concerns. Additional scoping tests are needed, but the ternary oxides, lithium oxide, and 17Li-83Pb have definite safety advantages over liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/. The ternary oxides present minimal safetyrelated problems when used with water as coolant, air or concrete; but they do require neutron multipliers, which may have safety compatibility concerns with surrounding materials. The combined favorable neutronics and minor safety compatibility concerns of lithium oxide and 17Li-83Pb make them prime candidates as breeder materials. Current safety efforts are directed toward assessing the compatibility of lithium oxide and the lithium-lead alloy with coolants and other materials.

Jeppson, D.W.; Cohen, S.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

Murray, H. Jr.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Review of the Lawrence Livermore Nationa Laboratory Identiified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages This site visit report documents the results of Office of Health, Safety and Security's review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) identification, immediate actions, communications, documentation, evaluation, reporting and follow-up to the discovery of defective Department of Transportation (DOT) UN1A2 55- and 30-gallon open head single bolt closure steel drums intended for storage and transportation of hazardous waste and materials. This review, conducted on January 26-29, 2010, was sponsored by the DOE Livermore Site Office (LSO) to support interface with the lab and this report is intended to support follow-up

84

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

85

Safety at the Center for Nanoscale Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

case of emergency or if you need help or assistance case of emergency or if you need help or assistance dial Argonne's Protective Force: 911 (from Argonne phones) or (630) 252-1911 (from cell phones) Safety at Work As a staff member or user at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), you need to be aware of safety regulations at Argonne National Laboratory. You are also required to have taken any safety, orientation, and training classes or courses specified by your User Work Authorization(s) and/or work planning and control documents prior to beginning your work. For safety and security reasons, it is necessary to know of all facility users present in the CNM (Buildings 440 and 441). Users are required to sign in and out in the visitors logbook located in Room A119. Some detailed emergency information is provided on the Argonne National

86

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant safety document ICPP hazardous chemical evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a hazardous chemical evaluation performed for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). ICPP tracks chemicals on a computerized database, Haz Track, that contains roughly 2000 individual chemicals. The database contains information about each chemical, such as its form (solid, liquid, or gas); quantity, either in weight or volume; and its location. The Haz Track database was used as the primary starting point for the chemical evaluation presented in this report. The chemical data and results presented here are not intended to provide limits, but to provide a starting point for nonradiological hazards analysis.

Harwood, B.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Materials Science Division Project Safety Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miller, Electron Microscopes Miller, Electron Microscopes Project No. 20006.3 Materials Science Division Project Safety Review Safety Analysis Form (03/08) Date of Submission March 12, 2010 FWP No.: 58405 Project Title User Experimental Work with Electron Microscopes in the Electron Microscopy Center This Safety Analysis Form (SAF) supersedes previous versions of 20006 and its modifications. Is this a (check one) new submission renewal supplemental modification X Principal Investigator(s) Dean Miller Other Participants (excluding administrative support personnel) EMC staff and EMC users (Attach participant signature sheet) Project dates: Start: March 2010 End: Open-ended This form is to be completed for all new investigations or experimental projects that are conducted in MSD laboratories, and for all ongoing such projects that undergo significant change from their original

90

Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these

91

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

92

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

93

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

94

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 16, 2012 HMCRP Project HM-04: Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security 2 The HM-04 Team * Battelle - Prime - Bill Tate, Project Director/PI & Co-Author * Dr. Mark Abkowitz, Vanderbilt University - Co-Author * American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) - Dan Murray, Lead * Visionary Solutions, LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 Project Objectives * Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; * Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced

95

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis of safety precautions for coal and gas outburst-hazardous strata  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author analyses coal and gas outbursts and generalizes the available data on the approaches to solving the problematics of these gas-dynamic events in the framework of Czech Republic Grant 'Estimate of the Safety Precautions for Coal and Gas Outburst Hazardous Strata'.

Hudecek, V. [Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record USERS OF PACKAGINGS CARRIER PACKAGE TYPE Hospitals and their suppliers common carrier Type A Industrial radiography companies private carrier Type B Soil testing laboratories private carrier Type B Food irradiators contract carrier Type B Medical supply sterilizers contract carrier Type B Academic research institutes common & contract carrier all types Nuclear energy fuel cycle facilities common & contract carrier all types Nuclear weapons complex contract & government carrier all types An agency or company that wants to ship RAM (shipper) often makes arrangements with a common or contract carrier or (where appropriate) a private carrier may transport the material. Packagings may be procured or

99

Life-cycle analysis of hazardous chemicals in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT policies set forth by the Department of Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) require that all laboratories maintain a chemical inventory to properly document the use of hazardous chemicals. While EHS has provided a ...

Chia, Valerie Jing-chi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An evaluation of current hazardous material management procedures for the Texas Department of Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dealing with hazardous materials on a day-to-day basis requires a fine--tuned material management system to minimize risk of exposure or injury to workers or to the public. An effective hazardous material management system should also keep up with all current regulatory requirements. This study evaluates the current hazardous material management procedures that the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT) is utilizing to ensure that if falls within the legal scope of the law and to provide recommendations for any areas of concern that may need to be improved. To satisfy this objective, a review of all the current and applicable federal regulations is conducted to determine the correct procedures for handling the hazardous materials that TXDOT uses daily. A discussion of the various state regulatory agencies is also included, as well as, a copy of all the applicable forms and documents that TXDOT must complete for these agencies. Since federal compliance is required of all the state transportation agencies, a brief review of several state DOT hazardous material management plans is covered to determine-nine how other agencies are handling their hazardous materials. And finally, TxDOT's current hazardous material handling procedures are discussed, including identification of several problem areas of concern, along with a series of recommendations to help improve TxDOT's current hazardous material management system.

Lovell, Cheryl Alane

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.

Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

GRR/Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies RCRA CERCLA 40 CFR 261 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The use of underground and above ground storage tanks, discovery of waste

105

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

107

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY MANUAL FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AWARENESS CERTIFICATION For CHP of: ______________________________ Professor, building, rooms, instructor, or P. I. for your work area: Room: Signature: Date: Completed CHP Awareness Certifications this document as a starting point for creating their work area specific CHP. Minimally this cover page

Holland, Jeffrey

108

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

procedure (TCLP) for lead. Contaminated Soils Soil sampling is neither required nor recommended prior and characterized using TCLP prior to disposal at a disposal facility included on the List of UW-Approved Disposal

Wilcock, William

109

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance The NRC certifies packages as being Type A or Type B on the basis of Safety Analysis Reports submitted by the package designer that demonstrate the package can withstand...

110

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Spent fuel casks are constructed with thick walls of various metals. This cask is approximately 18-feet...

111

Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of waste materials. Test results are presented in a second paper. As the application of many of the proposed test methods is new in the field of waste management, the principles of the tests are described. The selected tests tackle important hazardous properties but refinement of the test battery is needed to fulfil the a priori conditions.

Weltens, R., E-mail: reinhilde.weltens@vito.be [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K. [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Robbens, J. [University of Antwerp - Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Deprez, K.; Michiels, L. [University of Hasselt - Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan A, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Regulations Establishing Restricted Zones for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a Shore Clearance Line which cannot be crossed except in an emergency by any vessel transporting oil or hazardous materials in bulk in Long Island Sound. For the purpose...

113

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability: Real-Time Modeling of Airborne Hazardous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a centralized federal project for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time. Since ARAC began making assessments in 1974, the ...

Thomas J. Sullivan; James S. Ellis; Connee S. Foster; Kevin T. Foster; Ronald L. Baskett; John S. Nasstrom; Walter W. Schalk III

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

116

Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of at minimal risk to human health, safety or the environment.

Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

118

Flows of selected hazardous materials by rail. Final report for Sep 87-Apr 91  

SciTech Connect

The report is a review of hazardous materials rail traffic in the continental United States. It focuses on the year 1986, a relatively typical recent year in which an estimated total of 1,477 million net tons of freight was moved by rail. Of this, 63 million net tons, or four percent of the total, were hazardous materials. The report is designed to characterize the flow of selected hazardous materials and show their geographical distribution. It focusses on materials that (1) have large tonnages moving by rail, such as Products of Refining, (2) are regarded as especially dangerous, such as Products That May Be Toxic by Inhalation, or (3) have been recently designated as hazardous materials, such as molten or liquid sulphur. Its scope includes national, state and Business Economic Areas (BEAs) rail traffic. The purpose of the report is to help those in government and industry who are interested in the flows of hazardous materials see how these materials are geographically distributed by rail.

Beier, F.; Church, R.; Zebe, P.; Frev, J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

part. It may consist of one or more receptacles, absorbent materials, spacing structures, thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and devices for cooling or absorbing mechanical...

120

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radioactive material are determined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Postal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wind tunnel simulation of wind effects and associated displacement hazards on flat surface construction materials such as plywood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accidents and hazards continue to plague the construction industry. One often overlooked hazard to workers is the potential for flying debris and materials during high winds. This research was designed to evaluate the wind velocity required to create such an airborne hazard with flat surface materials such as plywood. This research was developed to show select correlations between the wind velocity, lifting forces and the susceptibility to movement of large surface area flat sheets of construction material, specifically four feet by eight feet sheets of floordeck plywood weighing 107 pounds. It also examined and evaluated the correlation of a shape coefficient to movement of materials and wind velocities, so that calculations can be made to adequately predict the potential movement of these materials. This will allow construction supervisors to reasonably prepare for such anticipated conditions. The Texas A&M University low speed wind tunnel was used to place a ftffl-scale stack of plywood floor decking material with the air stream flowing over the stack until top sheet separated or lifted from the stack. Next, a half-scale model was placed in the test section of the tunnel with pressure ports attached to a high speed sampling transducer to measure the actual pressures at select velocities. This allowed for a correlation between the ftifl-scale data and the sampled data. Tests were performed for several front and side angles of the wind striking the edge surface of the materials. Velocities were used up to 60 miles per hour full-scale equivalent. The full-scale model achieved lift forces exceeding the material weight of 107 pounds at one orientation angle at a velocity just below 30 miles per hour. This was consistent with the half-scale test pressures for a similar orientation. Various orientations yielded different forces as was anticipated. From this information a pressure coefficient was developed which when applied with a safety factor allows for reasonable calculations to be made to determine potential hazards and adequately secure materials on any sites where large flat materials may be handled or stored.

Madeley, Jack T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

123

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

126

DOE-HDBK-1101-2004; Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HDBK-1101-2004 HDBK-1101-2004 August 2004 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1101-96 February 1996 DOE HANDBOOK PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT FOR HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1101-2004 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

127

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous materials. Safe transportation of hazardous materials is very important. Union Pacific Railroad transports more hazardous material shipments than any other carrier. Early on they realized the benefits to having a dedicated team of personnel to respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. In order to remain the safest carrier of these commodities, an emergency response plan utilizing in house response personnel was needed. This document describes how that plan was created and includes a copy of the plan for the Union Pacific Railroad's Settegast Yard in Houston, Texas. Other carriers may use this as a template to establish their own in house response teams or emergency response plans.

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SEARCH SITE MAP SITE MAP SAFE HOME Search Site RAM PACKAGES What are they? When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record TESTING & CERTIFICATION How are packages certified? What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents?

129

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Accurate determination of package behavior for impact and puncture accidents can be obtained by testing sub-scale models. This technique is frequently used in conjunction with full-scale tests and computer analyses. Full-scale spent fuel packages can weigh 250,000 pounds (three fully loaded semi-trucks) or more, therefore the ability to determine the behavior with scale-models improves testing safety and reduces testing costs. *** 1/4 Scale Free Drop Test 1/4 Scale Component Free Drop Test 1/3 Scale Puncture Test 1/2 Scale Puncture Test 1/8 Scale Rail Crush Test [scale model DROP test] Click to view picture [scale model component test]

130

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with skin and if swallowed. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. May cause sensitization by skin-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage

Choi, Kyu Yong

131

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in contact with skin and if swallowed. Irritating to respiratory system and skin. Risk of serious damage - 319953 www.sigma-aldrich.com Page 2 #12;METHODS FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

132

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. Very toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse FOR CLEANING UP Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Do

Choi, Kyu Yong

133

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Harmful by inhalation. Risk of serious damage to eyes. Target organ(s): Central nervous system. Blood, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage ALDRICH - E12508

Choi, Kyu Yong

134

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. For additional information on toxicity, please refer or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

135

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Target organ(s): Central nervous system. Kidneys. HMIS RATING HEALTH: 3* FLAMMABILITY: 2 REACTIVITY: 1 material pickup is complete. Cover with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Do not breathe

Choi, Kyu Yong

136

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the environment. Harmful by inhalation and if swallowed. Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin. Toxic with dry-lime, sand, or soda ash. Place in covered containers using non-sparking tools and transport outdoors. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling

Choi, Kyu Yong

137

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

138

Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Chemical stability of salt cake in the presence of organic materials. [Detonation hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level waste stored as salt cake is principally NaNO/sub 3/. Some organic material is known to have been added to the waste tanks. It has been suggested that some of this organic material may have become nitrated and transformed to a detonable state. Arguments are presented to discount the presence of nitrated organics in the waste tanks. Nitrated organics generated accidentally usually explode at the time of formation. Detonation tests show that salt cake and ''worst-case'' organic mixtures are not detonable. Organic mixtures with salt cake are compared with black powder, a related exothermic reactant. Black-powder mixtures of widely varying composition can and do burn explosively; ignition temperatures are 300-450/sup 0/C. However, black-powder-type mixes cannot be ignited by radiation and are shock-insensitive. Temperatures generated by radionuclide decay in the salt are below 175/sup 0/C and would be incapable of igniting any of these mixtures. The expected effect of radiation on organics in the waste tanks is a slow dehydrogenation and depolymerization along with a slight increase in sensitivity to oxidation. The greatest explosion hazard, if any exists, is a hydrogen--oxygen explosion from water radiolysis, but the hydrogen must first be generated and then trapped so that the concentration of hydrogen can rise above 4 vol percent. This is impossible in salt cake. Final confirmation of the safety against organic-related explosive reactions in the salt cake will be based upon analytical determinations of organic concentrations. 12 tables, 5 fig. (DLC)

Beitel, G.A.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L{sup -1} and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process.

Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

144

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Dose Rate Calculator Click to use calculator. This tool calculates a dose rate (DR) at 2 meters (about 6 ft) from the surface of a package containing radioactive material IF you know the dose rate at 1 meter (about 3 ft). It will also calculate the reverse; DR at 1 meter if you know the DR at 2 meters. These two distances are used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to define acceptable dose rates for packages. Dose (Rad) Biological Effect < 5 rad No immediate observable effects 5 - 50 rad Slight blood changes may be detected by medical evaluation 50 - 150 rad Slight blood changes will be noted and likely symptoms of nausea, fatigue, vomiting, etc.

145

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

146

Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

Biggs, P.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Original Research Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2):151-156.

Robert Jones Md; Brandon Wills Do; Christopher Kang Md

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Hazardous Material Technician Apprenticeship Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes an apprenticeship training program for hazardous material technician. This entry-level category is achieved after approximately 216 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. Procedures for evaluating performance include in-class testing, use of on-the-job checks, and the assignment of an apprentice mentor for each trainee. (TEM)

Steiner, S.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES TOXIC/HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER FACILITY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities transferring toxic/hazardous materials with the following exceptions: A) gasoline station or similar installation solely incident to the retail sale or personal consumption of motor fuels for motor, phone number, signature and seal: C) Suffolk County tax map number (District-Section-Block-Lot); D

Homes, Christopher C.

150

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Test Methods and Protocols for Environmental and Safety Hazards Associated with Home Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

A number of health hazards and hazards to the durability of homes may be associated with energy retrofitting and home renovation projects. Among the hazards associated with energy retrofit work, exposure to radon is thought to cause more than 15,000 deaths per year in the U.S., while carbon monoxide poisoning results in about 20,000 injuries and 450 deaths per year. Testing procedures have been developed for identifying and quantifying hazards during retrofitting. These procedures commonly include a battery of tests to screen combustion appliances for safe operation, including worst case depressurization measurement, backdrafting (spillage) under depressurized or normal conditions, and carbon monoxide production.

Cautley, D.; Viner, J.; Lord, M.; Pearce, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fusion-reactor blanket-material safety-compatibility studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket material selection for fusion reactors is strongly influenced by the desire to minimize safety and environmental concerns. Blanket material safety compatibility studies are being conducted to identify and characterize blanket-coolant-material interactions under postulated reactor accident conditions. Recently completed scoping compatibility tests indicate that : (1) ternary oxides (LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, Li/sub 2/SiO/sub 3/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/ and LiTiO/sub 3/) at postulated blanket operating temperatures are compatible with water coolant, while liquid lithium and Li/sub 7/Pb/sub 2/ alloy reactions with water generate heat, aerosol and hydrogen; (2) lithium oxide and Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ alloy react mildly with water requiring special precautions to control hydrogen release; (3) liquid lithium reacts substantially, while Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/ alloy reacts mildly with concrete to produce hydrogen; and (4) liquid lithium-air reactions present some major safety concerns.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Keough, R.F.; Cohen, S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements  

SciTech Connect

This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment.

Sato, P.K.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hazard Analysis Database report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

160

On the safety implications of e-governance: assessing the hazards of enterprise information architectures in safety-critical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments across Europe and North America have recently reviewed the ways in which they provide both the public and their own departments with access to electronic data. Information service architectures have been proposed as one important component ... Keywords: data integrity, e-governance, emergency planning, safety information

Christopher W. Johnson; Stefan Raue

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

162

A hazard analysis of human factors in safety-critical systems engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety incident studies often cite human factors as a major cause of accidents. At Bhopal in 1984 human error - the failure to follow safe operating procedures - instigated the deaths of thousands of people from cyanide poisoning. In this case, human ... Keywords: EN50128, IEC 61508, human factors, safety-critical systems engineering

Les Chambers

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hazardous properties and environmental effects of materials used in solar heating and cooling (SHAC) technologies: interim handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General background informaion related to SHAC systems, how a particular material was chosen for this handbook, and codes and standards are given. Materials are categorized according to their functional use in SHAC systems as follows: (1) heat transfer fluids and fluid treatment chemicals, (2) insulation materials, (3) seals and sealant materials, (4) glazing materials, (5) collector materials, and (6) storage media. The informaion is presented under: general properties, chemical composition, thermal degradation products, and thermoxidative products of some commercial materials; toxic properties and other potential health effects; fire hazard properties; and environmental effects of and disposal methods for SHAC materials. (MHR)

Searcy, J.Q.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Experiment Hazard Class 9 - Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazard classification applies to all experiments involving magnets, magnetic fields, and electric fields. Other hazard classifications such as electrical safety and their...

167

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

168

A Study of Pyrolysis of Charring Materials and its Application to Fire Safety and Biomass Utilization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A theoretical and experimental study of pyrolysis of charring material applicable to fire safety and biomass utilization is presented in this thesis. This work is… (more)

Park, Won Chan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

170

ORNL IntelligentFreight Initiative:Enhanced End-to-End Supply Chain Visibility of Security Sensitive Hazardous Materials  

SciTech Connect

In the post September 11, 2001 (9/11) world the federal government has increased its focus on the manufacturing, distributing, warehousing, and transporting of hazardous materials. In 2002, Congress mandated that the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) designate a subset of hazardous materials that could pose a threat to the American public when transported in sufficiently large quantities. This subset of hazardous materials, which could be weaponized or subjected to a nefarious terrorist act, was designated as Security Sensitive Hazardous Materials (SSHM). Radioactive materials (RAM) were of special concern because actionable intelligence had revealed that Al Qaeda desired to develop a homemade nuclear device or a dirty bomb to use against the United States (US) or its allies.1 Because of this clear and present danger, it is today a national priority to develop and deploy technologies that will provide for visibility and real-time exception notification of SSHM and Radioactive Materials in Quantities of Concern (RAMQC) in international commerce. Over the past eight years Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing, implementing, and deploying sensor-based technologies to enhance supply chain visibility. ORNL s research into creating a model for shipments, known as IntelligentFreight, has investigated sensors and sensor integration methods at numerous testbeds throughout the national supply chain. As a result of our research, ORNL believes that most of the information needed by supply chain partners to provide shipment visibility and exceptions-based reporting already exists but is trapped in numerous proprietary or agency-centric databases.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S S A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z SAAR - Supervisor's Accident Analysis Report SAAR for Division Safety Coordinators Safety Concerns/Comments Safety Engineering (Division) Safety Committee Safety Advisory Committee (LBNL) Safety Coordinator and Liaison Resources Safety Flicks Safety Shoes Safety Walk Around Check List Safety Walk Around Check List for Managers Satellite Accumulation Areas Security call x5472 Security and Emergency Operations Shipping & Transporting Hazardous Materials Shoemobile (schedule) (form) Site Access (parking permits, gate passes, buses) Site Environmental Report Site Map SJHA Spot Award Program Stop Work Policy Stretch Break Software-RSIGuard Subcontractor Job Hazard Analysis

172

December 14, 2004, Board letter providing Board Technical Report DNFSB/TECH-35, Safety Management of Complex, High-Hazard Organizations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Conwdy, Chalrmm 1 Conwdy, Chalrmm DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES , I SAFETY BOARD A J bggenberger, V i ~ e Charman John I Mansfield K Brucc lwdtthewa 625 Indiana Avenue, NW, Suite 700, Washington, D.C 20004-290 1 (202) 694-7000 December 14,2004 The Honorable Spencer Abraham Secretary of Energy 1 000 Independence Avenue, S W Washington, DC 20585- 1000 Dear Secretary Abraham: The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) issued Recommendation 2004- I, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations, on May 2 1, 2004. On July 2 1,2004, the Department of Energy (DOE) accepted Recommendation 2004- 1 . The enclosed technical report, DNFSBITECH-35, Safety Management of Complex, High-Hazard Organizations, provides background information and ideas for implementing the Recommendation.

173

Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. IV. Routine failure hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Routine failure events in selected solar thermal power system designs are examined, and their rates of occurrence estimated. The results are used to compare and rank the systems considered. Modules of 1 to 100 MWe are developed based on reference or other near-term designs. Technologies used include parabolic trough, parabolic dish, and central tower focusing; central and distributed power generation; and proximate and independent siting of power modules. Component counts and failure rates estimated include heat transfer system leaks, sensor failures, and mechanical and electrical component failures, such as pumps, motors, and wire and cable. Depending on the technology chosen, leak rates can approach 1000 per year per 100 MWe system capacity, while component failure rates can be several times that level. Within categories of failures, the various technologies can have rates differing by a factor of 1000 or more. A uniform weighting for the consequences of the various failure types is proposed. Under this weighting, central tower systems are most favored, followed by parabolic trough, parabolic dishes with dispersed power generation, and parabolic dishes with central power generation. This weighting does not account for possible variations in the technologies. A sensitivity analysis is used to bound the relative hazards of the various failure events required to invert one or more of the system rankings.

Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Hill, J.; Meunier, G.; Busick, H. III

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Waste collection in developing countries - Tackling occupational safety and health hazards at their source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management procedures in developing countries are associated with occupational safety and health risks. Gastro-intestinal infections, respiratory and skin diseases as well as muscular-skeletal problems and cutting injuries are commonly found among waste workers around the globe. In order to find efficient, sustainable solutions to reduce occupational risks of waste workers, a methodological risk assessment has to be performed and counteractive measures have to be developed according to an internationally acknowledged hierarchy. From a case study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia suggestions for the transferral of collected household waste into roadside containers are given. With construction of ramps to dump collected household waste straight into roadside containers and an adaptation of pushcarts and collection procedures, the risk is tackled at the source.

Bleck, Daniela, E-mail: bleck.daniela@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany); Wettberg, Wieland, E-mail: wettberg.wieland@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

S. 1429: A Bill to amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968, as amended, and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979, as amended, to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1992 and 1993, and for other purposes, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 28, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This bill would further amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1992 and 1993. The bill authorizes $5,562,000 as appropriations for the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act and $1,391,000 as appropriations for the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act for fiscal year ending September 30, 1992 and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1993.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Safety Notices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Notices Safety Notices Fatigue August 2011 Sleep deprivation and the resulting fatigue can adversely affect manual dexteri- ty, reaction time, alertness, and judgment, resulting in people putting themselves and their co-workers at risk. Liquid-Gas Cylinder Handtruck Awareness May 2011 Failure of a spring assembly can result in a loss of control, allowing the Dewar to become separated from the hand truck, leading to a very dangerous situation. Safe Transport of Hazardous Materials February 2011 APS users are reminded that hazardous materials, including samples, cannot be packed in personal luggage and brought on public transport. Electrical Incidents September 2010 Two minor electrical incidents in the past months at the APS resulted in a minor shock from inadequately grounded equipment, and a damaged stainless

177

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends Railroad Safety Statistics and Trends Robert E. Fronczak, P.E. Assistant VP- Environment & Hazmat Association of American Railroads Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting September 21, 2005 Railroad Safety: Topics Safety Statistics & Trends Train Safety (Train Accidents) Employee Safety Hazardous Materials Safety U.S. Railroad Safety Statistics: Main Themes Railroads have dramatically improved safety over the last two and a half decades. Railroads compare favorably with other industries & transportation modes. The most troubling railroad safety problems arise from factors largely outside railroad control. Railroads have implemented numerous and effective technological improvements and company-wide safety programs.

179

Pipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipeline Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U support to the U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). As a federal regulatory authority with jurisdiction over pipeline safety, PHMSA is responsible

180

Qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of maps for release of hazardous materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LinguisticBelief%C2%A9 software tool developed by Sandia National Laboratories was applied to provide a qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of various maps that provide information on releases of hazardous material, especially radionuclides. The methodology, %E2%80%9CUncertainty for Qualitative Assessments,%E2%80%9D includes uncertainty in the evaluation. The software tool uses the mathematics of fuzzy sets, approximate reasoning, and the belief/ plausibility measure of uncertainty. SNL worked cooperatively with the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) and the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop models for three types of maps for use in this study. SNL and RSL developed the maps for %E2%80%9CAccuracy Plot for Area%E2%80%9D and %E2%80%9CAerial Monitoring System (AMS) Product Confidence%E2%80%9D. SNL and LLNL developed the %E2%80%9CLLNL Model%E2%80%9D. For each of the three maps, experts from RSL and LLNL created a model in the LinguisticBelief software. This report documents the three models and provides evaluations of maps associated with the models, using example data. Future applications will involve applying the models to actual graphs to provide a qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of the maps, including uncertainty, for use by decision makers. A %E2%80%9CQuality Thermometer%E2%80%9D technique was developed to rank-order the quality of a set of maps of a given type. A technique for pooling expert option from different experts was provided using the PoolEvidence%C2%A9 software.

Darby, John L.; Marianno, Craig [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV] National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

182

MSDSonline HQ: Viewer Site Tour Accessing Material Safety Data Sheets at Michigan Tech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSDSonline HQ: Viewer Site Tour Main Menu Accessing Material Safety Data Sheets at Michigan Tech;Locations Tab Displays the location hierarchy for the organization. Location Search Enter the name

183

Materials of Criticality Safety Concern in Waste Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

10 CFR 71.55 requires in part that the fissile material package remain subcritical when considering 'the most reactive credible configuration consistent with the chemical and physical form of the material'. As waste drums and packages may contain unlimited types of materials, determination of the appropriately bounding moderator and reflector materials to ensure compliance with 71.55 requires a comprehensive analysis. Such an analysis was performed to determine the materials or elements that produce the most reactive configuration with regards to both moderation and reflection of a Pu-239 system. The study was originally performed for the TRUPACT-II shipping package and thus the historical fissile mass limit for the package, 325 g Pu-239, was used [1]. Reactivity calculations were performed with the SCALE package to numerically assess the moderation or reflection merits of the materials [2]. Additional details and results are given in SAIC-1322-001 [3]. The development of payload controls utilizing process knowledge to determine the classification of special moderator and/or reflector materials and the associated fissile mass limit is also addressed. (authors)

Larson, S.L. [Science Applications International Corporation, 301 Laboratory Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Day, B.A. [Washington TRU Solutions LLC, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Journal of Hazardous Materials 179 (2010) 895900 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. [7] showed that TCLP-Pb (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) of the surface soil in a Florida shooting range exceeded USEPA hazardous waste criteria of 5 mg Pb L-1. The TCLP-Pb leachability rate (TCLP-Pb:total Pb) was controlled by lead carbonate precipi- tation/dissolution reactions in soils

Ma, Lena

185

Safety philosophy in the transportation of radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

From Winter meeting of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Detroit, Michigan, USA (11 Nov 1973). The radiological'' and common cause risks'' involved in transporting radioactive materials are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Langhaar, J.W.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

K Basin safety analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

A COMPUTER-ASSIST MATERIAL TRACKING SYSTEM AS A CRITICALITY SAFETY AID TO OPERATORS  

SciTech Connect

In today's compliant-driven environment, fissionable material handlers are inundated with work control rules and procedures in carrying out nuclear operations. Historically, human errors are one of the key contributors of various criticality accidents. Since moving and handling fissionable materials are key components of their job functions, any means that can be provided to assist operators in facilitating fissionable material moves will help improve operational efficiency and enhance criticality safety implementation. From the criticality safety perspective, operational issues have been encountered in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) plutonium operations. Those issues included lack of adequate historical record keeping for the fissionable material stored in containers, a need for a better way of accommodating operations in a research and development setting, and better means of helping material handlers in carrying out various criticality safety controls. Through the years, effective means were implemented including better work control process, standardized criticality control conditions (SCCC) and relocation of criticality safety engineers to the plutonium facility. Another important measure taken was to develop a computer data acquisition system for criticality safety assessment, which is the subject of this paper. The purpose of the Criticality Special Support System (CSSS) is to integrate many of the proven operational support protocols into a software system to assist operators with assessing compliance to procedures during the handling and movement of fissionable materials. Many nuclear facilities utilize mass cards or a computer program to track fissionable material mass data in operations. Additional item specific data such as, the presence of moderators or close fitting reflectors, could be helpful to fissionable material handlers in assessing compliance to SCCC's. Computer-assist checking of a workstation material inventory against the designated SCCC to enhance the material movement was also recognized. The following three additional functions of the CSSS were requested by operational personnel: additional record keeping, assisting room inventory Material at Risk (MAR) calculations and generating the material label to be placed on a storage can. In 1998, a preliminary CSSS concept was presented to all key stakeholders for the feasibility of such an application. Subsequently, the CSSS was developed with full participation of all stakeholders including fissionable material handlers. In 2003, five CSSS workstations were deployed in the plutonium facility for beta testing and resolving any issues from the field uses. Currently, the CSSS is deployed in all laboratories in the LLNL Plutonium Facility. Initial deployment consists of only a few of the full system functions described in this paper. Final deployment of all functions will take a few more years to assure the system meets quality assurance requirements of a safety significant system.

Claybourn, R V; Huang, S T

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

194

Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

Nguyen, P.M.

1994-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy  

SciTech Connect

SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Safety considerations of lithium lead alloy as a fusion reactor breeding material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for lithium lead alloy interactions with various gas atmospheres, concrete and potential reactor coolants. The reactions are characterized to evaluate the potential of volatilizing and transporting radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. The safety concerns identified for lithium lead alloy reactions with the above materials are compared to those previously identified for a reference fusion breeder material, liquid lithium. Conclusions made from this comparison are also included.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Safety considerations of lithium lead alloy as a fusion reactor breeding material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for lithium lead alloy interactions with various gas atmospheres, concrete and potential reactor coolants. The reactions are characterized to evaluate the potential of volatilizing and transporting radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. The safety concerns identified for lithium lead alloy reactions with the above materials are compared to those previously identified for a reference fusion breeder material, liquid lithium. Conclusions made from this comparison are also included.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Record Retention Schedule Environmental Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indefinitely Environmental Health and Safety 1 Air Quality Sampling Files 30 2 Chemical Inventories 30 1 if not inspected Material Safety Data Sheets 30 Medical Records (except health insurance claim records) 30 after Disposal Records (OTHER THAN hazardous or medical waste) 3 Presence, Location and Quantity of Asbestos

Marsh, David

199

NITROGEN -N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an emergency? 1. PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION CHEMICAL NAME; CLASS: NITROGEN - N2 LIQUEFIED NITROGEN N2, (CryogenicNITROGEN - N2 MSDS (Document # 001040) PAGE 1 OF 10 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET Prepared to U ppm ppm ppm Nitrogen 7727-37-9 >99 % There are no specific exposure limits for Nitrogen. Nitrogen

Choi, Kyu Yong

200

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quantitative transportation risk analysis based on available data/databases: decision support tools for hazardous materials transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical evidence has shown that incidents due to hazardous materials (HazMat) releases during transportation can lead to severe consequences. The public and some agencies such as the Department of Transportation (DOT) show an increasing concern with the hazard associated with HazMat transportation. Many hazards may be identified and controlled or eliminated through use of risk analysis. Transportation Risk Analysis (TRA) is a powerful tool in HazMat transportation decision support system. It is helpful in choosing among alternate routes by providing information on risks associated with each route, and in selecting appropriate risk reduction alternatives by demonstrating the effectiveness of various alternatives. Some methodologies have been developed to assess the transportation risk; however, most of those proposed methodologies are hard to employ directly by decision or policy makers. One major barrier is the lack of the match between available data/database analysis and the numerical methodologies for TRA. In this work methodologies to assess the transportation risk are developed based on the availability of data or databases. The match between the availability of data/databases and numerical TRA methodologies is pursued. Each risk component, including frequency, release scenario, and consequence, is assessed based on the available data/databases. The risk is measured by numerical algorithms step by step in the transportation network. Based on the TRA results, decisions on HazMat transportation could be made appropriately and reasonably. The combination of recent interest in expanding or building new facilities to receive liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers, along with increased awareness and concern about potential terrorist action, has raised questions about the potential consequences of incidents involving LNG transportation. One of those consequences, rapid phase transition (RPT), is studied in this dissertation. The incidents and experiments of LNG-water RPT and theoretical analysis about RPT mechanism are reviewed. Some other consequences, like pool spread and vapor cloud dispersion, are analyzed by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) model.

Qiao, Yuanhua

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

T. J. Rodovsky

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant LAW Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis _Oct 21-31  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-10-21 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter and Melter Off-gas Process System Hazards Analysis Activities Dates of Activity : 10/21/13 - 10/31/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) reviewed the Insight software hazard evaluation (HE) tables for hazard analysis (HA) generated to date for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter and Off-gas systems, observed a

205

Capability Brief_Pipeline Safety Program.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Program Safety Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Capabilities Brief T he Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides specialized engineering and technical support to the U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). As a federal regulatory authority with jurisdiction over pipeline safety, PHMSA is responsible for ensuring the safe, reliable, and environmentally sound operation of the nation's network of natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. To

206

HSS Safety Shares  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Shares Safety Shares HSS Safety Shares Home Health, Safety and Security Home HSS Safety Shares 2013 Safety Shares National Weather Service - Lightning Safety General Lightning Safety 7 Important Parts of a Cleaning Label Kitchen Knife Safety Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Rabies Hearing Loss Winter Driving Tips 2012 Safety Shares Holiday Decoration Safety Tips Countdown to Thanksgiving Holiday Fall Season Safety Tips Slips, Trips and Fall Safety Back To School Safety Tips for Motorists Grills Safety and Cleaning Tips Glass Cookware Safety Water Heater Safety FAQs Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards First Aid for the Workplace Preventing Colon Cancer Yard Work Safety Yard Work Safety - Part 1 Yard Work Safety - Part 2 High Sodium Risks Heart Risk Stair Safety New Ways To Spot Dangerous Tires

207

Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-5507-2013 STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 Distribution Statement: A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services,

208

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

209

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GAULT, G.W.

1999-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

Saito, G.H.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

DOE-STD-1027-92; Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques For Compliance With DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-92 7-92 December 1992 CHANGE NOTICE NO.1 September 1997 DOE STANDARD HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. Order No. DE98001283 Change Notice No. 1 DOE-STD-1027-92

212

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

Oliver, Douglas L.

213

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

Kim, Duck O.

214

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Hazardous Materials Business Plan Hazardous Materials Transportation & Shipping Hazardous Waste Requisition Hazardous Waste...

215

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

ASSET RECOVERY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS BENEFICIAL REUSE OF RADIOLOGICALLY ENCUMBERED LEAD STOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOE's policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site. This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead. When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding products a nd stewardship of the waste was eliminated. Methods and processes developed in cooperation with Fluor Hanford are applicable to, and have been successfully applied to, lead stocks at DOE sites such as Savannah River, Mound, Los Alamos, and Idaho.

Lloyd, E.R.; Meehan, R.W.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

FUNDAMENTAL SAFETY TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen is seen as the future automobile energy storage media due to its inherent cleanliness upon oxidation and its ready utilization in fuel cell applications. Its physical storage in light weight, low volume systems is a key technical requirement. In searching for ever higher gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage materials and systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be studied and used. To make safe and commercially acceptable systems, it is important to understand quantitatively, the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate risk mitigation strategies to handle unforeseen accidental events. To evaluate these materials and systems, an IPHE sanctioned program was initiated in 2006 partnering laboratories from Europe, North America and Japan. The objective of this international program is to understanding the physical risks involved in synthesis, handling and utilization of solid state hydrogen storage materials and to develop methods to mitigate these risks. This understanding will support ultimate acceptance of commercially high density hydrogen storage system designs. An overview of the approaches to be taken to achieve this objective will be given. Initial experimental results will be presented on environmental exposure of NaAlH{sub 4}, a candidate high density hydrogen storage compound. The tests to be shown are based on United Nations recommendations for the transport of hazardous materials and include air and water exposure of the hydride at three hydrogen charge levels in various physical configurations. Additional tests developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials were used to quantify the dust cloud ignition characteristics of this material which may result from accidental high energy impacts and system breach. Results of these tests are shown along with necessary risk mitigation techniques used in the synthesis and fabrication of a prototype hydrogen storage system.

Anton, D

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Strategic Safety Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fatalities Fatalities Radiological exposures > 2 rem Radiological releases above regulatory limits Chemical/hazardous material releases above regulatory limits Infrastructure Losses > $5 million Total 2 4 1 3 1 1 (Vehicle) 1 3 1 0 0 1 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (Yr to Date) Total 1 1 0 1 1* 0 Total 1 0 0 0 0 0 Total 2 3 2 0 2 0 Total 0 0 0 0 1 0 Safety Performance for 2 nd Quarter 2012 Strategic Safety Goals: Events DOE Strives to Avoid 1 * In 2012, to date, there has been a single fatality involving a motor vehicle accident outside the boundary of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) when a dump trailer and a General Services Administration (GSA) pickup driven by a WIPP employee collided. * Two occurrences have been added to the 2011 calendar year total for chemical and hazardous material releases above regulatory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

222

Some safety considerations of liquid lithium as a fusion breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid lithium is a favorable candidate as a fusion reactor breeding material. One of the major challenges, however, in using lithium as a breeding material is designing for its chemical reactivity under postulated accident conditions. At postulated operating temperatures for the breeding material, lithium has been shown to react vigorously with air, water, concrete, and many of the ceramics present in proposed fusion reactor designs. This lithium reactivity presents a challenge to typical reactor buildings under postulated accident conditions. A greater concern is the potential release of radioactive species to the environment, which may result from a postulated lithium leak accident scenario. There are two approaches to minimize this concern. First, minimize the radioactive species in a fusion reactor that may be released. Second, provide research, engineering, and safety evaluations necessary to operate at an agreeable risk. Both of these approaches are currently being pursued to obtain practical and economical solutions.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

P430 ABS Model Material Safety Data Sheet 204639-0001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No hazard in normal industrial use. Skin Absorption No absorption hazard in normal industrial use. Chronic are not recommended because their lack of cooling capacity may permit re-ignition Conditions of Flammability Requires

Rollins, Andrew M.

224

Some safety considerations of liquid lithium as a fusion breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for the reaction of steam with a high temperature lithium pool and for the reaction of high temperature lithium spray with a nitrogen atmosphere. The reactions are characterized and evaluated in regard to the potential for mobilization of radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. These evaluations include measured lithium temperature responses, atmosphere temperature and pressure responses, gas consumption and generation, aerosol quantities and particle size characterization, and potentially radioactive species releases. Conclusions are made as to the consequences of these safety considerations for the use of lithium as a fusion reactor breeder material.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Some safety considerations of liquid lithium as a fusion breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test results and conclusions are presented for the reaction of steam with a high temperature lithium pool and for the reaction of high temperature lithium spray with a nitrogen atmosphere. The reactions are characterized and evaluated in regard to the potential for mobilization of radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. These evaluations include measured lithium temperature responses, atmosphere temperature and pressure responses, gas consumption and generation, aerosol quantities and particle size characterization, and potentially radioactive species releases. Conclusions are made as to the consequences of these safety considerations for the use of lithium as a fusion reactor breeder material.

Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cryogenics safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described. (LCL)

Reider, R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Numbers & Contacts (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response Guide (PDF, PPT) Occurence Reporting (ORPS) (PDF, PPT) Reporting Hazardous Conditions (PDF, PPT) Reporting Safety Concerns (PDF,...

228

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Home (PDF, PPT) Emergency Response - Tips for Home (PDF, PPT) Household Hazardous Waste (PDF, PPT) Preventing Fires at Home (PDF, PPT) Tire Safety (PDF, PPT) Vehicle Inspections...

229

HAZARDS AND SAFETY MEASURES RELATED TO NUCLEAR-POWERED MERCHANT SHIPS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF DECLASSIFIED LITERATURE  

SciTech Connect

This compilation contains 202 abstracts of reports and documents on subjects related to maritime reactor safety; the abstracts are indexed in thc AEC Abstracts of Classified Reports'' (ACR). These ACR references were listed as unclassified or declassified in TID-4021, TID-40.35, and TID-4035, Supplement 1. The abstracts were selected as a part of the preparation of the classified bibliography (ALI-50, printed August 30, 1958) on this same subject. (See also SO-6200, Septcmber 15, 1957, unclassified.) The abstracts are grouped according to the category of information they present; within each category, the most recent abstracts are given first. Subject, author, and report number indices are provided. A report number code key is not included. The report numbers used by the AEC Technical Information Service can be found in TID-85 (1st Rev.). The abstracts are those indexed through ACR Vol. 13 (1957). Because of the lag in abstracting, reports issued in late 1957 are not likely to be included. (auth)

White, M.K. comp.

1959-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Officer Biological (Accident Reports) 2204 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) (4/2007) 1

Oliver, Douglas L.

231

H. R. 2092(Report No. 99-121, Parts I, II, and III): a bill to amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1986 and 1987, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Nineth-Ninth Congress, First Session, April 17, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Parts I, II, and III of the House report amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to preclude discriminatory tax treatment by states and local governments imposing an overvalued assessment against interstate gas transmission for ad valorem taxes. The amendment clarifies assessment terms and stipulates that federal courts may intervene if tax assessments exceed five per cent of true market value. The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 1986 and 1987 appropriations.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

About Fermilab - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and the Environment at Fermilab Safety and the Environment at Fermilab Questions people ask about safety at Fermilab Is it safe to live near Fermilab? Yes. Fermilab's activities produce no harmful effects on the environment or on the people who live nearby. The laboratory poses no radiation hazard to surrounding communities. Fermilab has a comprehensive environmental monitoring program to ensure the health and safety of both the laboratory site and the neighboring community. Can the accelerators "melt down" or blow up? No. In the event of a power interuption or failure of other equipment, each Fermilab accelerator simply switches off, like a light bulb or television set. Accelerators contain no harmful materials: the particle beams just stop. When equipment is fixed and power restored, operators are able to turn back on the accelerators.

233

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

234

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

235

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

236

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print Complete Experiment Safety Documentation Print User Safety Overview The steps for authorization of your experiment are described below. The ALS Experiment Coordinators are available to support you through this process. Please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at any stage if you have questions or need more information. Prior to Your Arrival at the ALS 1. Complete or Update and Experiment Safety Sheet If you did not submit a General User Proposal, you must submit an ESS one month prior to arrival at the ALS. 2. Biological, Radioactive, Hazardous, and Electrical Materials, and Lasers If your experiment involves the use of any of the above materials-no matter how small the quantities are or how innocuous the sample may be-additional authorization may be required. Please submit your ESS early and clearly identify your materials. Our staff will assess the hazards and contact you about any necessary supplementary documentation.

237

Overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus project is a joint development effort to produce a safe, near-zero emission, 32 passenger bus that is propelled by electric power with continuous on-board hydrogen powered battery recharging. A key initiative in the hydrogen bus development effort is a rigorous evaluation of operational safety. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., the prime contractor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, has developed a hazard analysis methodology designed to provide a systematic, comprehensive identification and evaluation of hazards. Although originally developed to support nuclear/chemical facility safety basis documentation, the SRS Methodology has widespread applicability to operations and/or systems that utilize hazardous materials and energy. This methodology was used to perform an overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus project to focus attention on those hypothetical circumstances that pose the greatest threat to the populace and property. The hazard analysis yields a listing of all known H2Fuel Bus hazards, postulated accident scenarios describing possible hazardous releases or conditions, an assessment of the scenarios in terms of frequency of occurrence and consequence, and binning in frequency-consequence space to assess the relative severity of postulated scenarios.

Hovis, G.L.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

238

User`s guide for the KBERT 1.0 code: For the knowledge-based estimation of hazards of radioactive material releases from DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of worker exposure to radioactive materials during accidents at nuclear facilities is a principal concern of the DOE. The KBERT software has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories under DOE support to address this issue by assisting in the estimation of risks posed by accidents at chemical and nuclear facilities. KBERT is an acronym for Knowledge-Based system for Estimating hazards of Radioactive material release Transients. The current prototype version of KBERT focuses on calculation of doses and consequences to in-facility workers due to accidental releases of radioactivity. This report gives detailed instructions on how a user who is familiar with the design, layout and potential hazards of a facility can use KBERT to assess the risks to workers in that facility. KBERT is a tool that allows a user to simulate possible accidents and observe the predicted consequences. Potential applications of KBERT include the evaluation of the efficacy of evacuation practices, worker shielding, personal protection equipment and the containment of hazardous materials.

Browitt, D.S.; Washington, K.E.; Powers, D.A. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliance Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Email: carlisles@cvsa.org Phone: 301-830-6147 CVSA Levels of Inspections Level I Full inspection Level II Walk Around - Driver - Vehicle Level III Driver - Paperwork Level IV Special Project - Generally focus on one item CVSA Levels of Inspections Level V Vehicle Only Level VI Enhanced RAM Level VII Jurisdictional Mandated * 8 basic classes/year held in various states * Prerequisites: CVSA Level I and HAZMAT certified * Industry attends course * To date 135 classes/2268 attendees * Currently 702 certified Level VI

240

Mr.~ Richard E..,Cunnlngham, Director Fuel Cycle and,Materials Safety  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

JUN 25 19g JUN 25 19g Mr.~ Richard E..,Cunnlngham, Director Fuel Cycle and,Materials Safety U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Comm~sslon Washjngton, D. C. 20555 Dear Mr. Cunnlngham: We recetved the enclosed May 21, 1979, radiologjcal survey report for the old Sylvania site at Hicksville, Long Island, from the Brookhaven Area Offfce. Sfnce saae actlvfties at the site were formerly conducted under license, we belleve you may be interested in It. If you have any questions, please give us a call (353-3016). - Sfncerely, William E. Environmental ~Enclosure. cc: Davtd Schweller, 6AO bee: MC # 62426 OFFICIAL FILECOPY Department of Enerw Brookhaven Area Office Upton, New York 11973 May 24, 1979 Will-Lam E. Mott, Director (EV 13) Environmental Control Technology Division, HQ

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Pipeline Safety (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The South Dakota Pipeline Safety Program, administered by the Public Utilities Commission, is responsible for regulating hazardous gas intrastate pipelines. Relevant legislation and regulations...

245

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chemicals--Safety measures. 3. Hazardous wastes. I. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Prudent) produced two major reports on laboratory safety and laboratory waste disposal: Prudent Practices Nanomaterials, 77 4.G Biohazards, 79 4.H Hazards from Radioactivity, 79 5 Management of Chemicals 83 5.A

Tai, Yu-Chong

246

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

248

NIST Blue Ribbon Commission on Management and Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; · the ... response; · Environmental safety; · Environmental remediation; and · Security for hazardous ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

250

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

Armstrong, D.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

McCormick, W.A.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

255

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

257

Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Railroad accident report: Head-on collision between Iowa Interstate Railroad Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East with release of hazardous materials near Altoona, Iowa, on July 30, 1988. Irregular report  

SciTech Connect

About 11:40 a.m. central daylight saving time on July 30, 1988, Iowa Interstate Railroad Ltd. (IAIS) freight trains Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East collided head on within the yard limits of Altoona, Iowa, about 10 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa. All 5 locomotive units from both trains; 11 cars of Extra 406 East; and 3 cars, including two tank cars containing denatured alcohol, of Extra 470 West derailed. The denatured alcohol, which was released through the pressure relief valves and the manway domes of the two derailed tank cars, was ignited by the fire resulting from the collision of the locomotives. Both crew members of Extra 470 West were fatally injured; the two crew members of Extra 406 East were only slightly injured. The estimated damage (including lading) as a result of this accident exceeded $1 million. The major safety issues in the accident include operational methods employed by the IAIS, training and selection of train and engine personnel, supervisory oversight by the IAIS, design of closure fittings on hazardous materials rail tanks, and oversight of regional railroads by the Federal Railroad Administration.

Not Available

1989-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial  

SciTech Connect

This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC{reg_sign} to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications.

Twitchell, K.E.; Skinner, N.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

262

Ammonia-Borane and Related N-B-H Compounds and Materials: Safety Aspects, Properties, and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ammonia-Borane and Related N-B-H Compounds and Materials: Ammonia-Borane and Related N-B-H Compounds and Materials: Safety Aspects, Properties and Applications (A survey completed as part of a project for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence, Contract # DE-FC36-05GO15060) Clinton F. Lane Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Northern Arizona University PO Box 5698 Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5698 Phone: 928-523-6296 e-mail: clint.lane@nau.edu Outline 1. Introduction 2. Safety Aspects 3. Synthesis 4. Physical Properties 5. Theoretical Studies 6. Chemical Properties 7. Synthetic Applications 8. Industrial Applications 9. Conclusions 10. References 1. Introduction Amine-borane complexes have great potential for use as a key component in hydrogen storage fuels due to their stability and the high gravimetric content of hydrogen in these

263

Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

UPF: Safety in Design | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UPF: Safety in Design UPF: Safety in Design UPF: Safety in Design Posted: February 11, 2013 - 3:05pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Safety is a fundamental requirement in the design of the Uranium Processing Facility. Designing controls for uranium and other hazardous materials can be daunting. That's why the Uranium Processing Facility has a Safety-in-Design Integration Team. Lynn Harkey, who leads SDIT, admits it is a challenge to balance competing requirements, but the payoffs are significant. "Safety is not an afterthought," he stressed. "It's something we've been doing since the beginning." Safety is a fundamental requirement in the design of the Uranium Processing Facility, and integrating safety into design allows the incorporation of engineered controls, such as ventilation systems, which eliminate or reduce

268

Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Safety evaluation for packaging two plywood boxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging evaluates and documents the ability of the plywood boxes listed below to meet the packaging requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for the onsite transfer of Type B radioactive material. Onsite transfer is the transport of hazardous materials on controlled routes confined to established limited areas and to portions of federally owned roadways to which public access is prohibited during transfer. The plywood boxes being used for this transport are PIN number PNLD-95-322 and PNLD-95-385. The contents being transported are wood, plastic, piping, rubber, and gloves. The source term was determined by nondestructive analysis and obtained from the solid waste storage/disposal record. Before the nondestructive analysis, the intention was to transport the boxes under WHC-SD-TP-SEP-020, Safety Evaluation for Packaging (Onsite) Plywood Box (WHC 1994), but Type B shipments are not included.

Flanagan, B.D.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

Office of Health and Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health and Safety Health and Safety Office of Health and Safety Mission The Office of Health and Safety establishes worker safety and health requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure protection of workers from the hazards associated with Department operations. The Office conducts health studies to determine worker and public health effects from exposure to hazardous materials associated with Department operations and supports international health studies and programs. The Office implements medical surveillance and screening programs for current and former workers and support the Department of Labor in the implementation of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA). Additionally, the office provides assistance to Headquarters and field elements in implementation of policy and resolving

271

FAQ 12-What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? The characteristics of UF6 pose potential health risks, and the material is...

272

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Integrating Chemical Hazard Assessment into the Design of Inherently Safer Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive hazard associated with chemicals is a major safety issue in process industries. This kind of hazard has caused the occurrence of many accidents, leading to fatalities, injuries, property damage and environment pollution. Reactive hazards can be eliminated or minimized by applying Inherently Safer Design (ISD) principles such as "substitute" or "moderate" strategies. However, ISD would not be a feasible option for industry without an efficient methodology for chemical hazard assessment, which provides the technical basis for applying ISD during process design. In this research, a systematic chemical hazard assessment methodology was developed for assisting the implementation of ISD in the design of inherently safer process. This methodology incorporates the selection of safer chemicals and determination of safer process conditions, which correspond to "substitute" and "moderate" strategies in ISD. The application of this methodology in conjunction with ISD technique can effectively save the time and investment spent on the process design. As part of selecting safer chemicals, prediction models were developed for predicting hazardous properties of reactive chemicals. Also, a hazard index was adopted to rate chemicals according to reactive hazards. By combining the prediction models with the hazard index, this research can provide important information on how to select safer chemicals for the processes, which makes the process chemistry inherently safer. As part of determining safer process conditions, the incompatibility of Methyl Ethyl Ketone Peroxide (MEKPO) with iron oxide was investigated. It was found that iron oxide at low levels has no impact on the reactive hazards of MEKPO as well as the operational safety. However, when iron oxide is beyond 0.3 wt%, it starts to change the kinetics of MEKPO runaway reaction and even the reaction mechanism. As a result, with the presence of a certain level of iron oxide (> 0.3 wt%), iron oxide can intensify the reactive hazards of MEKPO and impose higher risk to process operations. The investigation results can help to determine appropriate materials for fabricating process equipment and safer process conditions.

Lu, Yuan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

275

Transportation Safety Excellence in Operations Through Improved Transportation Safety Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent accomplishment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Nuclear Safety analysis group was to obtain DOE-ID approval for the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantity radioactive/fissionable waste in Department of Transportation (DOT) Type A drums at MFC. This accomplishment supported excellence in operations through safety analysis by better integrating nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements in the Transportation Safety Document (TSD); reducing container and transport costs; and making facility operations more efficient. The MFC TSD governs and controls the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials in non-DOT approved containers. Previously, the TSD did not include the capability to transfer payloads of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials using DOT Type A drums. Previous practice was to package the waste materials to less-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantities when loading DOT Type A drums for transfer out of facilities to reduce facility waste accumulations. This practice allowed operations to proceed, but resulted in drums being loaded to less than the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance criteria (WAC) waste limits, which was not cost effective or operations friendly. An improved and revised safety analysis was used to gain DOE-ID approval for adding this container configuration to the MFC TSD safety basis. In the process of obtaining approval of the revised safety basis, safety analysis practices were used effectively to directly support excellence in operations. Several factors contributed to the success of MFC’s effort to obtain approval for the use of DOT Type A drums, including two practices that could help in future safety basis changes at other facilities. 1) The process of incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the TSD at MFC helped to better integrate nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements. MFC’s efforts illustrate that utilizing the requirements of other disciplines, beyond nuclear safety, can provide an efficient process. Analyzing current processes to find better ways of meeting the requirements of multiple disciplines within a safety basis can lead to a more cost-effective, streamlined process. 2) Incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the MFC TSD was efficient because safety analysts utilized a transportation plan that provided analysis that could also be used for the change to the TSD addendum. In addition, because the plan they used had already been approved and was in use by the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) at the INL, justification for the change to the TSD was more compelling. MFC safety analysts proved that streamlining a process can be made more feasible by drawing from analysis that has already been completed.

Dr. Michael A. Lehto; MAL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Identification of Aircraft Hazards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

K. Ashley

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

PUB-3000 | BERKELEY LAB HEALTH AND SAFETY MANUAL CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE HANDLING OF CRYOGENIC LIQUIDS FALL PROTECTION PROGRAM sJHA PROCESS - SUBCONTRACTOR JOB HAZARDS ANALYSIS JOB HAZARDS ANALYSIS WELDING, JOINING, AND THERMAL CUTTING SAFETY...

278

Health and safety plan for characterization sampling of ETR and MTR facilities  

SciTech Connect

This health and safety plan establishes the procedures and requirements that will be used to minimize health and safety risks to persons performing Engineering Test Reactor and Materials Test Reactor characterization sampling activities, as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. It contains information about the hazards involved in performing the tasks, and the specific actions and equipment that will be used to protect persons working at the site.

Baxter, D.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 ACM asbestos-containing material AHA areaAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control

Wechsler, Risa H.

280

Simplifying documentation while approaching site closure: integrated health & safety plans as documented safety analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) near Cincinnati, Ohio, environmental restoration activities are supported by Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) that combine the required project-specific Health and Safety Plans, Safety Basis Requirements (SBRs), and Process Requirements (PRs) into single Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs). By isolating any remediation activities that deal with Enriched Restricted Materials, the SBRs and PRs assure that the hazard categories of former nuclear facilities undergoing remediation remain less than Nuclear. These integrated DSAs employ Integrated Safety Management methodology in support of simplified restoration and remediation activities that, so far, have resulted in the decontamination and demolition (D&D) of over 150 structures, including six major nuclear production plants. This paper presents the FCP method for maintaining safety basis documentation, using the D&D I-HASP as an example.

Brown, Tulanda

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds -- cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarizes the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds; evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. Nevertheless, concern about cadmium hazards should continue to be emphasized to ensure that health, safety and environmental issues are properly managed. At the same time, the potential role that these systems can play in ameliorating some important health and environmental hazards related to other energy systems should not be ignored. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Zweibel, K. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

associated with your work or the equipment you are using, stop the work and ask your CAT representative for guidance in developing safe work practices that minimize the hazards...

283

Safety Board Recommendation 94-1, Remediation ofNuclear Materials in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Revision 2 describes the current status ofand changes to the Department's plans for stabilizing the nuclear materials. We plan to further revise this document over the next several months to reflect new plans at several sites, and the recently-issued Recommendation 2000-1, which also addresses our nuclear materials stabilization activities. The enclosed revision updates commitments for materials stabilization at the

The Honorable; John T. Conway

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Safety Share Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walkways  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2010 3, 2010 Safety Share Elevators, Escalators and Moving Walkways Dick Donovan, of HS-70, informed the HSS VPP Committee about a recent safety incident he experienced while at an airport in Las Vegas. Dick tripped as he was getting off of the escalator. The incident made him consider the day-to-day hazards we take for granted. With this in mind, Dick made an effort to look around to find safety information about using elevators, escalators and moving walkways. Dick came across some useful safety information provided by the Otis Elevator Company. The web site below provides links to two good one-page reminders for safety on elevators, escalators, and moving walkways. http://www.otis.com/site/us/Pages/SafetyforAll.aspx Dick also found more interactive presentations on the same material, see website below. These

285

Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hazards of black blasting powder in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

To help reduce explosion hazards in coal mines using dangerous black blasting powder, this circular outlines precautions designed to increase the safety factor in using this explosive.

Harrington, D.; Warncke, R.G.

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Use of hazard assessments to achieve risk reduction in the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship Demonstration Project SS-21, better known as the ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex has dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The entire Seamless Safety design and development process is verified by a concurrent hazard assessment (HA). The primary purpose of the SS-21 Demonstration Project HA was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing concurrent HAs as part of an engineering design and development effort and then to evaluate the use of the HA to provide an indication in the risk reduction or gain in safety achieved. To accomplish this objective, HAs were performed on both baseline (i.e., old) and new (i.e. SS-21) B61-0 Center Case Section disassembly processes. These HAs were used to support the identification and documentation of weapon- and process-specific hazards and safety-critical operating steps. Both HAs focused on identifying accidents that had the potential for worker injury, public health effects, facility damage, toxic gas release, and dispersal of radioactive materials. A comparison of the baseline and SS-21 process risks provided a semi-quantitative estimate of the risk reduction gained via the Seamless Safety process.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DeYoung, L.; Hockert, J. [Odgen Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Environment, Safety and Health Self-Assessment Report Fiscal Year 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Hearing Conservation Program Heavy Elements Research Laboratory Hazard ManagementManagement Safety Walkthrough Program Job Hazards Evaluations Hazardous Waste Management Management of Satellite Hazardous Waste Accumulation Areas On-the-Job Training

Robinson, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Engineered Nanomaterials, Sexy New Technology and Potential Hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineered nanomaterials enhance exciting new applications that can greatly benefit society in areas of cancer treatments, solar energy, energy storage, and water purification. While nanotechnology shows incredible promise in these and other areas by exploiting nanomaterials unique properties, these same properties can potentially cause adverse health effects to workers who may be exposed during work. Dispersed nanoparticles in air can cause adverse health effects to animals not merely due to their chemical properties but due to their size, structure, shape, surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, dermal toxicity, and parent material toxicity. Nanoparticles have a greater likelihood of lung deposition and blood absorption than larger particles due to their size. Nanomaterials can also pose physical hazards due to their unusually high reactivity, which makes them useful as catalysts, but has the potential to cause fires and explosions. Characterization of the hazards (and potential for exposures) associated with nanomaterial development and incorporation in other products is an essential step in the development of nanotechnologies. Developing controls for these hazards are equally important. Engineered controls should be integrated into nanomaterial manufacturing process design according to 10CFR851, DOE Policy 456.1, and DOE Notice 456.1 as safety-related hardware or administrative controls for worker safety. Nanomaterial hazards in a nuclear facility must also meet control requirements per DOE standards 3009, 1189, and 1186. Integration of safe designs into manufacturing processes for new applications concurrent with the developing technology is essential for worker safety. This paper presents a discussion of nanotechnology, nanomaterial properties/hazards and controls.

Beaulieu, R A

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Documented Safety Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documented Safety Analysis Documented Safety Analysis FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A document that provides an adequate description of the hazards of a facility during its design, construction, operation, and eventual cleanup and the basis to prescribe operating and engineering controls through Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) or Administrative Controls (AC). REQUIREMENTS: ï‚· 10 CFR 830.204, Nuclear Safety Rule ï‚· DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization, 1992. ï‚· DOE-STD-1104-96, Change Notice 1, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Documents (documented Safety Analyses and Technical Safety Requirements), dated May 2002. ï‚· DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, Change Notice No. 2, April 2002.

291

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE handbook electrical safety  

SciTech Connect

Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Module Safety Issues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Description of how to make PV modules so that they are less likely to turn into safety hazards. Making modules inherently safer with minimum additional cost is the preferred approach for PV. Safety starts with module design to ensure redundancy within the electrical circuitry to minimize open circuits and proper mounting instructions to prevent installation related ground faults. Module manufacturers must control the raw materials and processes to ensure that that every module is built like those qualified through the safety tests. This is the reason behind the QA task force effort to develop a 'Guideline for PV Module Manufacturing QA'. Periodic accelerated stress testing of production products is critical to validate the safety of the product. Combining safer PV modules with better systems designs is the ultimate goal. This should be especially true for PV arrays on buildings. Use of lower voltage dc circuits - AC modules, DC-DC converters. Use of arc detectors and interrupters to detect arcs and open the circuits to extinguish the arcs.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microsoft Word - Nuclear Safety Reporting Criteria.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of other TSROSR requirement (3) Violation of DSA hazard control B. Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) Inadequacies (1) Positive unreviewed safety question C. Nuclear Criticality...

298

H.R. 432: A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session  

SciTech Connect

This document contains H.R. 432, A Bill to amend chapter 601 of title 49, United States Code, to improve natural gas and hazardous liquid pipeline safety, in response to the natural gas pipeline accident in Edison, New Jersey, and for other purposes. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 5, 1995.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 of 139 3.0 HAZARD ANALYSIS 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides tools for assessing electrical hazards error. This chapter does not provide an exhaustive list of sources of electrical energy

300

Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from SY-101 to 241-SY-102 (SY-102). The results of the hazards evaluation will be compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Federal Register Notice, September 12, 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hazardous materials safety; Emergency medical response; Environmental safety; Environmental remediation; and. Security for hazardous materials. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis.

Osterman, R.A.; Cox, R.

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, some naturally occurring and some man-made: the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, the ground we walk upon, and the consumer products we purchase and use. Although many might be familiar with the use of radiation to diagnose disease and treat cancer, some people, when they hear the terms “radioactive ” and “radiation, ” might recall images of mushroom clouds or monster mutants that inhabit the world of science fiction movies and comic books. Unfortunately, those false images can cause inordinate fear that is not justified regarding low levels of radioactive material. Many consumer items containing naturally occurring radioactivity can be safely used. This fact sheet describes a photo courtesy of Ray Johnson few of the more commonly encountered and familiar consumer products. Included are the items that can contain sufficient radioactive material to be distinguished from the general environmental background radiation with a simple handheld radiation survey meter. Smoke Detectors Most residential smoke detectors contain a low-activity

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in...

306

Chemistry 199 -Online Safety Self-Certification Find the "e-form" at: http://chemistry.ucsd.edu/chemistryweb/internal/Student/SafetyForm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry 199 - Online Safety Self-Certification Find the "e-form" at: http class - required of anyone doing research - provide PI your "certificate" ) Annual "on-line" EHS hazardous materials training ( everyone must do this once per calendar year, provide PI your "certificate

Gleeson, Joseph G.

307

SSC Safety Review Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety strategy of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Design Group (CDG) is to mitigate potential hazards to personnel, as far as possible, through appropriate measures in the design and engineering of the facility. The Safety Review Document identifies, on the basis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and related studies, potential hazards inherent in the SSC project independent of its site. Mitigative measures in the design of facilities and in the structuring of laboratory operations are described for each of the hazards identified.

Toohig, T.E. [ed.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination of individuals who have entered a “hot zone” during transportation incidents involving  radioactive.

309

Ferrocyanide safety program: Final report on adiabatic calorimetry and tube propagation tests with synthetic ferrocyanide materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on Fauske and Associates, Inc. Reactive System Screening Tool tests, the onset or initiation temperature for a ferrocyanide-nitrate propagating reaction is about 250 degrees Celcius. This is at about 200 degrees Celcius higher than current waste temperatures in the highest temperature ferrocyanide tanks. Furthermore, for current ambient waste temperatures, the tube propagation tests show that a ferrocyanide concentration of 15.5 wt% or more is required to sustain a propagation reaction in the complete absence of free water. Ignoring the presence of free water, this finding rules out propagating reactions for all the Hanford flowsheet materials with the exception of the ferrocyanide waste produced by the original In Farm flowsheet

Fauske, H.F. [Fauske and Associates, Inc. (United States); Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 · Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste OBJECTIVES Do you know how to do the following? If you do, skip ahead a material must be considered a hazardous chemical waste by using the Radiological-Chemical

Ford, James

311

Prediction of gas pressurization and hydrogen generation for shipping hazard analysis : Six unstabilized PU 02 samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiolysis of water to form hydrogen gas is a safety concern for safe storage and transport of plutonium-bearing materials. Hydrogen gas is considered a safety hazard if its concentration in the container exceeds five percent hydrogen by volume, DOE Docket No. 00-1 1-9965. Unfortunately, water cannot be entirely avoided in a processing environment and these samples contain a range of water inherently. Thermodynamic, chemical, and radiolysis modeling was used to predict gas generation and changes in gas composition as a function of time within sealed containers containing plutonium bearing materials. The results are used in support of safety analysis for shipping six unstabilized (i.e. uncalcined) samples from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sits (RFETS) to the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). The intent of this work is to establish a time window in which safe shipping can occur.

Moody, E. W. (Eddie W.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Lyman, J. L. (John L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Argonne CNM: Shipping MaterialsM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNM General In general, users are not permitted to transport hazardous material on the Argonne site or arrange for shipment directly to the CNM. Hazardous materials must be...

313

Table of Contents 1 Safety Philosophy.......................................................................... 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be a lifesaver; use them as you would a safety belt in a car. #12;8 · Gas Hazards Compressed gases

Tang, William C

314

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 460.1C Packaging and Transportation Safety and DOE O 460.2A Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60.1C 60.1C PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY DOE O 460.2A DEPARTMENTAL MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION AND PACKAGING MANAGEMENT DOE O 460.1C and 460.2A Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 460.1C PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY DOE O 460.2A DEPARTMENTAL MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION AND PACKAGING MANAGEMENT FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. What are the objectives of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) O 460.1C? 2. What is the DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) exemption process in DOE O 460.1C? 3. What are the onsite safety requirements specified by DOE O 460.1C? 4. What are the objectives of DOE O 460.2A?

316

Food Safety and Nutrition in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Measurement Laboratory's program area in Food Safety and Nutrition. MML Program Area: Food Safety and Nutrition. ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

International Safety Projects - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

318

Facility Safety Assessment - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

319

Safety Related Applications (Sensors and Instrumentation and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

320

Safety - Vulnerability Assessment Team - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

322

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

323

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

324

Materials Reliability Program: Safety Evaluation for Boric Acid Wastage of PWR Reactor Vessel Bottom Heads Due to Bottom-Mounted Noz zle Leakage (MRP-167)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses one of the potential safety issues associated with aging degradation of reactor vessel bottom head penetrations: bottom mounted nozzles (BMNs). Specifically, this report evaluates the concern that BMN leakage due to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of the Alloy 600 nozzle and/or Alloy 82/182 J-groove attachment weld could lead to significant wastage of the low-alloy steel head shell material due to concentration of the boric acid present in the leaking prim...

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integrating waste management with Job Hazard analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The web-based Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) system is a tool designed to help capture and communicate the results of the hazard review and mitigation process for specific work activities. In Fluor Hanford's day-to-day work planning and execution process, AJHA has become the focal point for integrating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) through industrial health and safety principles; environmental safety measures; and involvement by workers, subject-matter experts and management. This paper illustrates how AJHA has become a key element in involving waste-management and environmental-control professionals in planning and executing work. To support implementing requirements for waste management and environmental compliance within the core function and guiding principles of an integrated safety management system (ISMS), Fluor Hanford has developed the a computer-based application called the 'Automated Job Hazard Analysis' (AJHA), into the work management process. This web-based software tool helps integrate the knowledge of site workers, subject-matter experts, and safety principles and requirements established in standards, and regulations. AJHA facilitates a process of work site review, hazard identification, analysis, and the determination of specific work controls. The AJHA application provides a well-organized job hazard analysis report including training and staffing requirements, prerequisite actions, notifications, and specific work controls listed for each sub-task determined for the job. AJHA lists common hazards addressed in the U.S. Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) federal codes; and State regulations such as the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Administration (WISHA). AJHA also lists extraordinary hazards that are unique to a particular industry sector, such as radiological hazards and waste management. The work-planning team evaluates the scope of work and reviews the work site to identify potential hazards. Hazards relevant to the work activity being analyzed are selected from the listing provided in AJHA. The work team can also enter one-time hazards unique to the work activity. Because AJHA is web based, it can be taken into the field during site walk-downs using wireless or cell- phone technologies. Once hazards are selected, AJHA automatically lists mandatory and optional controls, based on the referenced codes and good work practices. The hazards selected may also require that additional specific analysis be performed, focusing on the unique characteristics of the job being analyzed. For example, the physical characteristics, packaging, handling, and disposal requirements for a specific waste type. The work team then evaluates the identified hazards and related controls and adds details as needed for the specific work activity being analyzed. The selection of relevant hazards also triggers required reviews by subject-matter experts (SMEs) and the on-line completion of necessary forms and permits. The details of the hazard analysis are reviewed on line or in a work- team group setting. SME approvals are entered on-line and are published in the job hazard analysis report. (authors)

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Material Safety Data Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

releases carbon monoxide and oxygen. Reactivity Data Dry ice sublimes; if confined in a gas tight container, it will build up a pressure of 850 psig at 70 F. Do not put dry ice...

327

Safety Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOE Workshop US DOE Workshop September 19-20, 2012 International perspective on Fukushima accident Miroslav Lipár Head, Operational Safety Section M.Lipar@iaea.org +43 1 2600 22691 2 Content * The IAEA before Fukushima -Severe accidents management * The IAEA actions after Fukushima * The IAEA Action plan on nuclear safety * Measures to improve operational safety * Conclusions THE IAEA BEFORE FUKUSHIMA 4 IAEA Safety Standards IAEA Safety Standards F undamental S afety Principles Safety Fundamentals f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material 2005 E dit ion Safety Requirements No. T S-R-1 f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Design of the Reactor Core for Nuclear Power Plants

328

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the safety envelope of the facility. The, safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should, identify preventive and mitigating measures (e.g., systems, procedures, and administrative, controls) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. (Old Core Requirement 4) Criteria 1. A DSA has been prepared by FWENC, approved by DOE, and implemented to reflect the SN process operations in the WPF. (10 CFR 830.200, DOE-STD-3009-94) 2. A configuration control program is in place and functioning such that the DSA is

329

Safety Basis Report  

SciTech Connect

As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

R.J. Garrett

2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

What is Hazardous Hazardous waste is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is Hazardous Waste? Hazardous waste is any product charac- terized or labeled as toxic, reactive, cor- rosive, flammable, combustible that is unwanted, dis- carded or no longer useful. This waste may be harmful to human health and/ or the environment. Hazardous Waste Disposal EH&S x7233 E-Waste

de Lijser, Peter

331

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hazard Analysis for In Tank Spray Leaks  

SciTech Connect

The River Protection Project (RPP) Authorization Basis (AB) contains controls that address spray leaks in tanks. However, there are no hazardous conditions in the Hazards Database that specifically identify in-tank spray leak scenarios. The purpose of this Hazards Evaluation is to develop hazardous conditions related to in-tank spray leaks for the Hazards Database and to provide more complete coverage of Tank Farm facilities. Currently, the in-tank spray leak is part of the ''Spray Leak in Structures or From Waste Transfer Lines'' accidents in Section 3.4.2.9 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG, 2000a). The accident analysis for the ''Spray Leak in Structure or From Waste Transfer Lines'' states the following regarding the location of a possible spray leak: Inside ventilated waste storage tanks (DSTs, DCRTs, and some SSTs). Aerosols could be generated inside a storage tank during a transfer because of a leak from the portion of the transfer pipe inside the tank. The tank ventilation system could help disperse the aerosols to the atmosphere should the vent system HEPA filters fail. This Hazards Evaluation also evaluates the controls currently assigned to the spray leak in structure accident and determines the applicability of the controls to the new hazardous conditions. This comparison reviews both the analysis in the FSAR and the controls found in the Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) (CHG, 2000h). If the new hazardous conditions do not match the analyzed accident conditions and controls, then additional analysis may be required. This document is not intended to authorize the activity or determine the adequacy of controls; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The Control decision process as defined in the AB will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds--cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium deselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarized the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds;evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Zweibel, K. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling object identification and tracking errors on automated spatial safety assessment of earthmoving operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent research studies have been conducted for automating the safety assessment process in order to identify risks and safety hazards on a job site without… (more)

Chi, Seok Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Lift truck safety review  

SciTech Connect

This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

FFTF railroad tank car safety evaluation for packaging  

SciTech Connect

This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides evaluations necessary to approve transfer of the 8,000 gallon Liquid Waste Tank Car (LWTC) from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to the 200 Areas. This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer cif the LWTC will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements. This fulfills onsite transportation requirements implemented in the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, WHC-CM-2-14.

Romano, T.

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Grant Program Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in order to protect public health and safety, foster economic growth and protect the environment. Pennsylvania law establishes a fund to provide to the Department the

338

Development of Onsite Transportation Safety Documents for Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) Orders require each DOE site to develop onsite transportation safety documents (OTSDs). The Nevada Test Site approach divided all onsite transfers into two groups with each group covered by a standalone OTSD identified as Non-Nuclear and Nuclear. The Non-Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive hazardous material in less than Hazard Category (HC)-3 quantities and all chemically hazardous materials. The Nuclear transfers involve all radioactive material equal to or greater than HC-3 quantities and radioactive material mated with high explosives regardless of quantity. Both OTSDs comply with DOE O 460.1B requirements. The Nuclear OTSD also complies with DOE O 461.1A requirements and includes a DOE-STD-3009 approach to hazard analysis (HA) and accident analysis as needed. All Nuclear OTSD proposed transfers were determined to be non-equivalent and a methodology was developed to determine if “equivalent safety” to a fully compliant Department of Transportation (DOT) transfer was achieved. For each HA scenario, three hypothetical transfers were evaluated: a DOT-compliant, uncontrolled, and controlled transfer. Equivalent safety is demonstrated when the risk level for each controlled transfer is equal to or less than the corresponding DOT-compliant transfer risk level. In this comparison the typical DOE-STD-3009 risk matrix was modified to reflect transportation requirements. Design basis conditions (DBCs) were developed for each non-equivalent transfer. Initial DBCs were based solely upon the amount of material present. Route-, transfer-, and site-specific conditions were evaluated and the initial DBCs revised as needed. Final DBCs were evaluated for each transfer’s packaging and its contents.

Frank Hand, Willard Thomas, Frank Sciacca, Manny Negrete, Susan Kelley

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environment Health and Safety Hazard Alert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigative work of the agents of the NASA Office of Inspector General. They also acknowledged the effortsUnited States Attorney's Office District of Columbia Jeffrey A. Taylor United States Attorney NEWS in 2005, U.S. Attorney Jeffrey A. Taylor and NASA Deputy Inspector General Thomas J. Howard announced

Habib, Ayman

340

Transportation of RCRA hazardous wastes. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) regulate the transport of hazardous wastes. Under these statutes, specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE before the shipment of hazardous wastes, including radioactive mixed wastes. The pretransport requirements are designed to help reduce the risk of loss, leakage, or exposure during shipment of hazardous materials and to communicate information on potential hazards posed by the hazardous material in transport. These goals are accomplished through the tracking of shipments, correctly packaging and labeling containers, and communicating potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling waste packages; placarding transport vehicles; choosing appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations; and record keeping and reporting. This information Brief focuses primarily on the transporter requirements both for transportation within a DOE facility and using a commercial transporter to transport RCRA hazardous wastes off-site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 Protocol, High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight - November 2012 November 2012 Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for managing and conducting Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) independent oversight of high-hazard nuclear facility projects. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) self regulatory framework for safety and security, DOE Order 227.1, Independent Oversight Program, assigns HSS the responsibility for implementing an independent oversight program. It also requires the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight to conduct independent evaluations of safety and security. This

342

Nuclear Safety. Technical Progress Journal, October--December 1991: Volume 32, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BASIS (SB) BASIS (SB) OBJECTIVE SB.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. The safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should identify preventive and mitigating measures (systems, procedures, administrative controls, etc.) that protect workers and the public form those hazards/risks. Safety structures, systems and components (SSCs) are defined and a system to maintain control over their designs and modification is established. (Core Requirement 7) Criteria 1. The TA-55 SST Facility safety basis and related documentation address the full spectrum of hazards/risks associated with operations. 2. Controls designed to mitigate the consequence of analyzed TA-55 SST Facility

344

About Fermilab - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Profiles in Safety "Safety starts days or weeks before the actual job. Think through the job and all the possible hazards that could emerge. Make a plan and a backup plan to deal with each hazard. Don't wait until you are in danger to realize you aren't prepared." Donna Hicks "In the Receiving Department, safety is always the top priority. To reduce the amount of lifting and bending, a member of our team suggested using a conveyor system to lower the potential for injury." Dennis McAuliff "Safety takes a team effort just like football. If one member of the team is injured, everyone on the team is affected. Before doing a job, just like running a play, everyone should know their part and what their teammates will do. Communication maintains a team focus."

345

Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

346

RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

International rail freight transportation in south Texas: Decreasing fuel consumption, roadway damage, and hazardous materials movement on Texas roadways. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the research were to examine impediments to the greater use of rail in the transport of freight, and to document projected reductions in congestion, roadway damage, hazards, and energy usage resulting from such a modal shift. In pursuing these objectives, an examination was made of the roles that are performed by decision-making agencies at the federal, state, and local levels. The findings of this examination are discussed in terms of how these roles interfere with the adoption of increased use of intermodal transportation. Additionally, the logistics associated with cross-border freight transportation are described, documenting the institutional and governmental inefficiencies hindering smooth flow of trade across the border. The balance of the research concerns itself with the potential of rail transportation to mitigate the negative impacts associated with truck transportation.

Roop, S.S.; Dickinson, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

Boyd D. Chirstensen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

Boyd D. Chirstensen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

Gary Mecham

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Use of a computer-assisted administrative control to enhance criticality safety in LLNL for fissile material disposition operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals primarily with the use of a two-person rule on the mass limit control. Main emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of a computer program to assist operators in carrying out mass control. An attempt will be exercised to compare the use of a mass control card system under a two-person rule with a computer-assist two-person system. The interface points relevant to criticality safety between computer and human operators will be identified. Features that will make a computer program useful in a multiple workstation application environment will be discussed along with the merits of the using the computer program. How such a computer-assist administrative control may be incorporated in the overall infrastructure for criticality safety will be analyzed. Suggestion of future development of using a computer program to enhance safety margin will also be made to stimulate further discussion on the application of computer technology for real-time criticality safety control.

Huang, Song T.; Lappa, D.A.; Chiao, Tang

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY MANUAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Steel Construction A.2.9 Demolition using Mechanical Equipment A.2.10 Training A.3 Electrical A.3 Equipment A.3.11 Electrical Safety Workbook and Permits A.4 Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout / Tagout) 4, General industry Safety Orders, Cranes and Other Hoisting Equipment and PUB-3000, Chapter 5. A.1

Knowles, David William

355

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

356

and environments and natural hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the curriculum is to provide basic knowledge and understanding of marine debris and its hazardous impact on the marine and coastal ecosystems as well as human health and safety. The primary goal of the curriculum is to provide activities which help students understand the impact of their actions on the marine environment and themselves. The curriculum will provide several hands-on activities and graphing opportunities using Microsoft Excel. The activities and graphing exercises may be modified for other grade levels.

Created Matthew Brim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

358

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400-EAA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-EAA -EAA Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References Blue Oven Temperature to 600° F voltage 208 VAC Signage 1 NA 6, 7 Physical Agents Training NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Compressed Air Line 65-130 PSI Regulator Pressure relief NA NA 6, 7 ESH119 NA NA A ASD108/400 Various Shop Tools (lathe, drill press, grinder, belt sander, shears, hand tools) Eye hazard Pinch points Abrasive Rotating machinery 120 VAC Hydraulic pressure Guarding Anti-restart devices 1 NA 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Water Flow Test Stand Pressure Slip hazard NA

359

Environment/Health/Safety/Security (EHSS): Tool Box Safety Topics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tool Box Safety Topics Tool Box Safety Topics A Review of Haz com standards A Single Second Accident Prevention Acetone Use and Care Aerial Work Platforms Afterthoughts and Regrets Alcohol & the Job Allergies, Antihistamines Appreciating the Hazards, Oxyacetylene Attitude and Behavior Avoid Common Office Injuries Avoiding Electrical Shocks Back Care Back Injury Prevention Backing into Trouble Basic Machine Safety Battery Charging Hazards Be Cautious with Sulfuric Acid Be Prepared for Emergencies Bench & Pedestal Grinders Blood Borne Pathogens Carbon Monoxide Care for Half-Mask Respirators Carelessness Cargo Dock Safety CDT's-How you prevent them Chocking and Blocking Cold Medication.Drowsiness Cold Weather Hazards for Propane Powered Vehicles Come-a-Longs, Hoists & Chains Common Sense & Accidents

360

Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Robotics for Nuclear Material Handling at LANL:Capabilities and Needs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear material processing operations present numerous challenges for effective automation. Confined spaces, hazardous materials and processes, particulate contamination, radiation sources, and corrosive chemical operations are but a few of the significant hazards. However, automated systems represent a significant safety advance when deployed in place of manual tasks performed by human workers. The replacement of manual operations with automated systems has been desirable for nearly 40 years, yet only recently are automated systems becoming increasingly common for nuclear materials handling applications. This paper reviews several automation systems which are deployed or about to be deployed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for nuclear material handling operations. Highlighted are the current social and technological challenges faced in deploying automated systems into hazardous material handling environments and the opportunities for future innovations.

Harden, Troy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lloyd, Jane A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Cameron J [CO SCHOOL OF MINES/PMT-4

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Criticality Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Left Tab EVENTS Office of Nuclear Safety (HS-30) Office of Nuclear Safety Home Directives Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Rules Nuclear Safety Workshops Technical...

363

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

364

APS Experiment Safety Approval System Instructions for Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

form and Experiment Hazard Control Plan? Part VII: What If... APS Experiment Safety Approval System Instructions for Users version 2.0 January 21, 2005 Contacts...

365

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health FY Fiscal Year HAD Hazards Assessment Document ISM Integrated Safety Management KAFB Kirtland Air Force Base MDL Microelectronics Development Laboratory NNSA...

366

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Safety of Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: ensuring safety during all stages of facility life cycle is a widely recognised responsibility of the operators, implemented under the supervision of the regulatory body and other competent authorities. As the majority of the facilities worldwide are still in operation or shutdown, there is no substantial experience in decommissioning and evaluation of safety during decommissioning in majority of Member States. The need for cooperation and exchange of experience and good practices on ensuring and evaluating safety of decommissioning was one of the outcomes of the Berlin conference in 2002. On this basis during the last three years IAEA initiated a number of international projects that can assist countries, in particular small countries with limited resources. The main IAEA international projects addressing safety during decommissioning are: (i) DeSa Project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning; (ii) R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P project on Research Reactors Decommissioning Demonstration Project; and (iii) Project on Evaluation and Decommissioning of Former Facilities that used Radioactive Material in Iraq. This paper focuses on the DeSa Project activities on (i) development of a harmonised methodology for safety assessment for decommissioning; (ii) development of a procedure for review of safety assessments; (iii) development of recommendations on application of the graded approach to the performance and review of safety assessments; and (iv) application of the methodology and procedure to the selected real facilities with different complexities and hazard potentials (a nuclear power plant, a research reactor and a nuclear laboratory). The paper also outlines the DeSa Project outcomes and planned follow-up activities. It also summarises the main objectives and activities of the Iraq Project and introduces the R{sup 2}D{sup 2} Project, which is a subject of a complementary paper.

Batandjieva, B.; Warnecke, E.; Coates, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 413  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 13 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 200 Volts DC currents < 200 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 1110-00124 31020101-00025 1110-00125 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 GESPAC Power Supply Control Units 120 VAC Fans Fan blades covered 1, 7 Power Supplies Hot Work Permit

369

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 412  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2502-00005 2502-00006 2502-00007 2502-00008 2502-00010 250201-00028 250202-00001 2502-00006 2502-00007 250206-00007 2202-00006 2202-00009 250203-00006 250204-00002 250205-00004

370

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 400  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 450 Amps Lifting < 75 lbs Supplies mounted in NEMA enclosures Rack doors locked Power source signage 120/208 VAC covered Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1,7 31020101-00025 3108-00006 310202-00089 3102-00064 2202-00006 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits 6, 7 NA NA NA A ASD108/400 Hi Power DC Power Supply DC voltages < 72 Volts DC currents < 2600 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Supplies built in NEMA enclosures

371

ASD Facility Hazard Analysis Document - Building 420  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical Safety Procedures Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Training References Radiological, Environmental & Chemical Procedures Additional Safety Tool References DC Power Supplies DC voltages < 300 Volts DC currents < 500 Amps AC voltages < 600 Volts Lifting < 350 lbs Supplies mounted in relay racks Rack doors locked or bolted closed Power source signage 120/208/480 VAC covered Lifting fixture Emergency stop buttons Flashing strobes LOTO 1, 7 2202-00006 2402-00002 240201-00002 240202-00003 240204-00003 31020101-00025 2202-00004 2202-00006 2202-00009 220209-00057 31020101-00025 Power Supplies Hot Work Permits

372

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

Smith, R.J.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

Adkins, H.E.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

374

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

375

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE CS.1 The LANL criticality safety program provides the required technical guidance and oversight capabilities to ensure a comprehensive criticality safety program for the storage of nuclear materials in SSTs. (Core Requirements 3, 4, 8) Criteria * The Criticality Safety Program is an administrative TSR and meets the General and * Specific Requirements of DOE O 420.1A, Section 4.3 Nuclear Criticality Safety. * All processes and operations involving significant quantities of fissile materials are * described in current procedures approved by line management. * Procedures contain approved criticality controls and limits, based on HSR-6 evaluations and recommendations. * Supervisors, operations personnel, and criticality safety officers have received

376

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

377

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop The Energy Department Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Workshop, sponsored by the Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, was held October 25-26, 2011, in Germantown, Maryland. The workshop brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact nuclear facilities. The workshop featured twenty presentations as well as a breakout session devoted to discussing the status of the commonly used structural analysis code SASSI, a System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction. A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings_1.pdf Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs - A Case Study of Probabilistic

378

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities, provides criteria and guidance for the analysis and design of facility structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that are necessary to implement the requirements of DOE Order (O) 420.1C, Facility Safety, and to ensure that the SSCs will be able to effectively perform their intended safety functions under the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This Standard also provides criteria and guidance for the use of industry building codes and voluntary

379

H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Department of Energy Pt. 835 H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS 1. The USQ process is an important tool to evaluate whether changes affect the safety basis. A contractor must use the USQ proc- ess to ensure that the safety basis for a DOE nuclear facility is not undermined by changes in the facility, the work performed, the associated hazards, or other factors that support the adequacy of the safety basis. 2. The USQ process permits a contractor to make physical and procedural changes to a nuclear facility and to conduct tests and ex- periments without prior approval, provided these changes do not cause a USQ. The USQ process provides a contractor with the flexi- bility needed to conduct day-to-day oper- ations by requiring only those changes and tests with a potential to impact the safety

380

H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Pt. 835 H. UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS 1. The USQ process is an important tool to evaluate whether changes affect the safety basis. A contractor must use the USQ proc- ess to ensure that the safety basis for a DOE nuclear facility is not undermined by changes in the facility, the work performed, the associated hazards, or other factors that support the adequacy of the safety basis. 2. The USQ process permits a contractor to make physical and procedural changes to a nuclear facility and to conduct tests and ex- periments without prior approval, provided these changes do not cause a USQ. The USQ process provides a contractor with the flexi- bility needed to conduct day-to-day oper- ations by requiring only those changes and tests with a potential to impact the safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Generic safety documentation model  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to be a resource for preparers of safety documentation for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico facilities. It provides standardized discussions of some topics that are generic to most, if not all, Sandia/NM facilities safety documents. The material provides a ``core`` upon which to develop facility-specific safety documentation. The use of the information in this document will reduce the cost of safety document preparation and improve consistency of information.

Mahn, J.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

383

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

384

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

385

Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

386

Work for NASA, Safety Related Applications (Sensors and Instrumentatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

387

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

388

Risk and Safety Assessments - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

389

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

390

Program desk manual for occupational safety and health -- U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations, Office of Environment Safety and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The format of this manual is designed to make this valuable information easily accessible to the user as well as enjoyable to read. Each chapter contains common information such as Purpose, Scope, Policy and References, as well as information unique to the topic at hand. This manual can also be provided on a CD or Hanford Internet. Major topics include: Organization and program for operational safety; Occupational medicine; Construction and demolition; Material handling and storage; Hoisting and rigging; Explosives; Chemical hazards; Gas cylinders; Electrical; Boiler and pressure vessels; Industrial fire protection; Industrial hygiene; and Safety inspection checklist.

Musen, L.G.

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

391

Environmental, health, and safety assessment of photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential enviornmental, health, and safety (E,H and S) concerns associated with all phases of the photovoltaic (PV) energy system life cycle are identified and assessed. E,H and S concerns affecting the achievement of National PV Program goals or the viability of specific PV technologies are emphasized. The report is limited to near-term manufacturing process alternatives for crystalline silicon PV materials, addresses flat-plate and concentrator collector designs, and reviews system deployment in grid-connected, roof-mounted, residential and ground-mounted central-station applications. The PV life-cycle phases examined include silicon refinement and manufacture of PV collectors, system deployment, and decommissioning. The primary E,H and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

Rose, E.C.

1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations - Guidance Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Documents Guidance Documents Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office Protocols Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for the Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents, July 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight, November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Required Reading, June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Small Team Oversight Activities, June 2012 (Rev. 1) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Qualification Standard for the Site Lead Program, May 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Site Leads, May 2011

393

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

395

Recent Accomplishments and Future Directions in US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program  

SciTech Connect

The US fusion program has long recognized that the safety and environmental (S&E) potential of fusion can be attained by prudent materials selection, judicious design choices, and integration of safety requirements into the design of the facility. To achieve this goal, S&E research is focused on understanding the behavior of the largest sources of radioactive and hazardous materials in a fusion facility, understanding how energy sources in a fusion facility could mobilize those materials, developing integrated state of the art S&E computer codes and risk tools for safety assessment, and evaluating S&E issues associated with current fusion designs. In this paper, recent accomplishments are reviewed and future directions outlined.

David A. Petti; Brad J. Merrill; Phillip Sharpe; L. C. Cadwallader; L. El-Guebaly; S. Reyes

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Deriving Quantified Safety Requirements in Complex Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of hazard analysis techniques have been proposed for software-based systems but individually the techniques are limited in their ability to cope with system complexity, or to derive and prioritise component safety requirements. There is also ...

Peter A. Lindsay; John A. McDermid; David J. Tombs

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development and implementation of automated radioactive materials handling systems  

SciTech Connect

Material handling of radioactive and hazardous materials has forced the need to pursue remotely operated and robotic systems in light of operational safety concerns. Manual maneuvering, repackaging, overpacking and inspecting of containers which store radioactive and hazardous materials is the present mode of operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald Ohio. The manual methods are unacceptable in the eyes of concerned site workers and influential community oversight committees. As an example to respond to the FEMP material handling needs, design efforts have been initiated to provide a remotely operated system to repackage thousands of degradated drums containing radioactive Thorium: Later, the repackaged Thorium will be shipped offsite to a predesignated repository again requiring remote operation.

Jacoboski, D.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hazards and operability study for the surface moisture monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation Tank Farms` underground waste tanks have been used to store liquid radioactive waste from defense materials production since the 1940`s. Waste in certain of the tanks may contain material in the form of ferrocyanide or various organic compounds which could potentially be susceptible to condensed phase chemical reactions. Because of the presence of oxidizing materials (nitrate compounds) and heat sources (radioactive decay and chemical reactions), the ferrocyanide or organic material could potentially fuel a propagating exothermic reaction with undesirable consequences. Analysis and experiments indicate that the reaction propagation and/or initiation may be prevented by the presence of sufficient moisture in the waste. Because the reaction would probably be initiated at the surface of the waste, evidence of sufficient moisture concentration would help provide evidence that the tank waste can continue to be safely stored. The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) was developed to collect data on the surface moisture in the waste by inserting two types of probes (singly) into a waste tank-a neutron probe and an electromagnetic inductance (EMI) probe. The sensor probes will be placed on the surface of the waste utilizing a moveable deployment arm to lower them through an available riser. The movement of the SMMS within the tank will be monitored by a camera lowered through an adjacent riser. The SMMS equipment is the subject of this study. Hazards and Operability Analysis (HAZOP) is a systematic technique for assessing potential hazards and/or operability problems for a new activity. It utilizes a multidiscipline team of knowledgeable individuals in a systematic brainstorming effort. The results of this study will be used as input to an Unreviewed Safety Question determination.

Board, B.D.

1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Safety Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Print LBNLPub-3000: Health and Safety Manual Berkeley Lab safety guide, policies and procedures. Environment, Health, and Safety (EH&S) Staff Contact information for the...

400

Nuclear Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nuclear Safety information site that provides assistance and resources to field elements in implementation of requirements and resolving nuclear safety, facility safety, and quality assurance issues.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Identifying Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

402

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: FY 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in the single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the risk of explosion. This Task Team, which is composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), an outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions on the Hanford SSTSs. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project, discussed in this report, is being conducted by PNL as part of the Waste Tank Safety Program led by WHC. The overall purpose of the WHC program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Tank Safety Project Office, is to provide technical information on ferrocyanide chemistry and its interaction and reactive behavior with other tank constituents. Ultimately, this information will be used to maintain the tanks in a safe condition, implement interim stabilization strategies, and identify optimal disposal options. While by itself ferrocyanide is a stable complex of ferrous ion and cyanide, it can be made to explode in the laboratory in the presence of oxidizing materials such as nitrates and/or nitrites temperatures above 280{degree}C or by sufficient electrical spark. The specific goal of the PNL project is so determine the conditions necessary for the ferrocyanide-bearing wastes in Hanford SSTs to represent a hazard, to determine the conditions where these same wastes am not a hazard, or to determine the conditions which are necessary to assure the wastes are safe prior to treatment for permanent disposal. This annual report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1991. The activities mainly focused on preparing and characterizing synthetic wastes and alkali nickel ferrocyanides produced using the In-Farm cesium scavenging flowsheet and pure potential nickel ferrocyanides that could be produced by all of the cesium scavenging flowsheets.

Hallen, R.T.; Burger, L.L.; Hockey, R.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: FY 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Ferrocyanide Task Team is addressing issues involving ferrocyanide precipitates in the single-shell waste storage tanks (SSTs), in particular the risk of explosion. This Task Team, which is composed of researchers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), an outside consultants, was formed in response to the need for an updated analysis of safety questions on the Hanford SSTSs. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project, discussed in this report, is being conducted by PNL as part of the Waste Tank Safety Program led by WHC. The overall purpose of the WHC program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Tank Safety Project Office, is to provide technical information on ferrocyanide chemistry and its interaction and reactive behavior with other tank constituents. Ultimately, this information will be used to maintain the tanks in a safe condition, implement interim stabilization strategies, and identify optimal disposal options. While by itself ferrocyanide is a stable complex of ferrous ion and cyanide, it can be made to explode in the laboratory in the presence of oxidizing materials such as nitrates and/or nitrites temperatures above 280{degree}C or by sufficient electrical spark. The specific goal of the PNL project is so determine the conditions necessary for the ferrocyanide-bearing wastes in Hanford SSTs to represent a hazard, to determine the conditions where these same wastes am not a hazard, or to determine the conditions which are necessary to assure the wastes are safe prior to treatment for permanent disposal. This annual report gives the results of the work conducted by PNL in FY 1991. The activities mainly focused on preparing and characterizing synthetic wastes and alkali nickel ferrocyanides produced using the In-Farm cesium scavenging flowsheet and pure potential nickel ferrocyanides that could be produced by all of the cesium scavenging flowsheets.

Hallen, R.T.; Burger, L.L.; Hockey, R.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

LNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 2 #12;LNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009 Page 2 of 2 2. The Task Hazard Analysis exposure to hazardous electrical energy/ LOTO verification. 6. Energized Electrical Work Permit (EEWPLNBL C-5 Electrical Safety Corrective Action Plan 2009 Finding Statement : LBNL has not ensured

Knowles, David William

405

Using virtual environments to support electrical safety awareness in construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety is important to the construction industry. Every year lives are lost due to accidents that could have been prevented with proper training and awareness of workplace hazards. Electrical safety hazards are the cause of about a quarter of all deaths ...

Dong Zhao; Jason Lucas; Walid Thabet

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

Gordon, Lloyd B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cartelli, Laura [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

408

Integrated Safety Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISM Day: March 10, 2010 ISM Day: March 10, 2010 ISM Day: June 6, 2008 Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Seven Principles of ISM Five Functions of ISM "Define the Scope of Work" Is the work clearly defined? Authorized? Do I know how to do the job? Do I have the proper equipment? Support? Have there been problems with tasks like this? "Analyze the Hazards" What are the hazards of the job? What can go wrong? Has the job been reviewed by a qualified person? "Develop Hazard Controls" Are all the necessary controls in place? (LOTO, PPE, Procedures etc.) Do I know what the controls are, and how to use them? What if something unexpected goes wrong? "Perform Work" Has the system responded as expected? How do I know? When will I call for assistance or stop work?

409

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Seismic Safety Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Safety analysis of the 700-horsepower combustion test facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the 700 h.p. Combustion Test Facility located in Building 93 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Extensive safety related measures have been incorporated into the design, construction, and operation of the Combustion Test Facility. These include: nitrogen addition to the coal storage bin, slurry hopper, roller mill and pulverizer baghouse, use of low oxygen content combustion gas for coal conveying, an oxygen analyzer for the combustion gas, insulation on hot surfaces, proper classification of electrical equipment, process monitoring instrumentation and a planned remote television monitoring system. Analysis of the system considering these factors has resulted in the determination of overall probabilities of occurrence of hazards as shown in Table I. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce these probabilities as indicated. The identified hazards include coal dust ignition by hot ductwork and equipment, loss of inerting within the coal conveying system leading to a coal dust fire, and ignition of hydrocarbon vapors or spilled oil, or slurry. The possibility of self-heating of coal was investigated. Implementation of the recommendations in this report will reduce the ignition probability to no more than 1 x 10/sup -6/ per event. In addition to fire and explosion hazards, there are potential exposures to materials which have been identified as hazardous to personal health, such as carbon monoxide, coal dust, hydrocarbon vapors, and oxygen deficient atmosphere, but past monitoring experience has not revealed any problem areas. The major environmental hazard is an oil spill. The facility has a comprehensive spill control plan.

Berkey, B.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Services Group (ESG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Services Group Environmental Services Group Whom To Call Operating Permits For LBNL Activities Publications Advisories Internal Documents Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration Program Weather Data Image of Chicken Creek The Environmental Services Group, within the Environment, Health and Safety Division, provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective environmental management services to Berkeley Lab by working with research and support staff. Services include: Your visit may be enhanced by upgrading or installing the latest Flash Player. ESG sampling activity Air and Water Quality Management Hazardous Materials Management Environmental Monitoring Radiological Dose and Environmental Risk Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration News & Updates

413

Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory Nanomaterials Safety Implementation Plan, Ames Laboratory Ames Laboratory has limited activities involving nanomaterials. Potential hazards associated with nanomaterials work are addressed through the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) and specifically the Readiness Review process. Readiness Review provides the identification and evaluation of potential hazards and establishes effective control mechanisms to ensure protection of the employee and the environment. To date, hazards associated with projects involving nanomaterials have been determined to be amenable to conventional controls such as ventilation and use of personal protective equipment. The Laboratory recognizes that nanotechnology is an emerging field and that

414

s I entered Mike Blayney's office on a brisk April morning, he was working on a training module entitled "Safety and Environment in the Arts". The program, which focuses on the risks and hazards inherent in craft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the College's Studio Art faculty, its students, and the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS development, managed special projects for the Branch Chief, and provided assistance to a range of governments I entered Mike Blayney's office on a brisk April morning, he was working on a training module

Myers, Lawrence C.

415

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

416

Technical safety appraisal of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing Elk Hills facilities for fluid production consist of tank settings, gas and oil/water gathering pipelines, gas plants, compressor facilities, lease automatic custody transfer units which meter the crude oil going to sales, and natural gas sales meters and pipelines, water injection and source wells, and gas injection pipelines and wells. The principal safety concerns presented by operations at Elk Hills are fire, occupational safety and industrial hygiene considerations. Transportation and motor vehicle accidents are also of great concern because of the large amount of miles driven on more than 900 miles of roads. Typical operations involve hazardous materials and processing equipment such as vessels, compressors, boilers, piping and valves. The aging facilities, specifically the 35R Gas Plant (constructed in 1952) and many of the pipelines, introduce an additional element of hazard to the operations.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Experiment Hazard Class 12 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment 2 - Electrical and Electronic Equipment Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving electrical and electronic equipment. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The inspection of electric equipment is covered under the APS Policy For User Electric Equipment Inspections. Electrical hazards does not include work involving equipment where ALL of the following apply: (1) equipment use only in accordance with operating instructions AND/OR involves just plugging/unplugging, AND; (2) The equipment is either NRTL-listed or displays an Argonne barcoded ELECTRICAL SAFETY APPROVED sticker, AND; (3) The work involves no attempts to remove covers or panels that might expose energized electrical components.

418

DOE G 420.1-1A, Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Design Guide for use with DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide provides an acceptable approach for safety design of DOE hazard category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities for satisfying the requirements of DOE O ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

420

MANAGEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION: LITERATURE SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-011 | March 2006 www.epa.gov/radiation/wipp Karst in the Area of the WIPP Some stakeholders believe that the geologic characterization of the subsurface surrounding the WIPP repository does not adequately identify of karst at WIPP and the possible impacts of the long- termcontainmentofwasteforthe2004WIPPRecertification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Cryogens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applicable guidance. Controls & Limits required for Self-Transporting Cryogens by Vehicle flow chart General Requirements General requirements are designed to minimize the...

422

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Phase I and Phase II. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed in the first step of an evaluation of the public health and safety hazards associated with non-nuclear plants is reported. This study was limited to hazards which could affect the general public outside the plant boundaries. Public health and safety hazards were identified for seven types of power plants: coal-fired conventional boiler, atmospheric fluidized bed boiler, pressurized fluidized bed-combined cycle, oil-fired, oil-fired steam turbine, combined cycle, combustion (gas) turbine, and geothermal. Major plant systems effecting the hazards were identified and are described. Potentially hazardous conditions and events were identified for normal and abnormal plant operating conditions and for accidents at the plant. A classification of each hazard was made which identifies the initiating event, the hazard source, equipment or conditions that increase, monitor or mitigate the hazard. An event tree was developed for each plant which relates the effect on the general public for each hazard and initiating event. A semi-quantitative hazard ranking was developed that provides a method of comparing the hazards and events at different types of plants. Consideration was given to the sensitivity of the hazard ranking to population density, changes in operating mode and technology changes.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

424

Job Hazard Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Step by Step Instructions - Page 1 of 2 Helpful Information STEP 1. Log in to the EH&S Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) system at https:ehswprod.lbl.govehstrainingjhalogin.aspx...

425

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Telemetry Training - EHS Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials...

426

Solar energy research at Sandia Laboratories and its effects on health and safety  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various solar energy research and development projects at Sandia Laboratories are discussed with emphasis on the primary health and safety hazard associated with solar concentration systems. This limiting hazard is chorioretinal damage. The unique safety and health hazards associated with solar energy collector and receiver systems cannot be measured yet, but progress is being made rapidly. Research is continuing, especially for eye hazards, with more extensive work planned.

Young, L.L. III

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Updating Your JHA (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Working Safely (PDF, PPT) Radiation...

428

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Safety Minute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorizations (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Updating Your JHA (PDF, PPT) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): Working Safely (PDF, PPT) Work...

429

NEHRP - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NEHRP logo National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. ... Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction. Highlights. ...

430

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) is to provide specific guidance to all LBL employees and contractors who use hazardous chemicals. This Plan, when implemented, fulfills the requirements of both the Federal OSHA Laboratory Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) for laboratory workers, and the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) for non-laboratory operations (e.g., shops). It sets forth safety procedures and describes how LBL employees are informed about the potential chemical hazards in their work areas so they can avoid harmful exposures and safeguard their health. Generally, communication of this Plan will occur through training and the Plan will serve as a the framework and reference guide for that training.

Berkner, K.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

SSRL Safety Office Memo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Office SSO 01/24/06 Safety Office SSO 01/24/06 Memo to SSRL staff concerning operation of Circuit Breakers and Disconnect Switches Recently SLAC has adopted new regulations (NFPA70E) which outline the "Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace". Specifically it requires that the Arc Flash Hazard be categorized and PPE stated for all circuit breakers and disconnect switches. This memo identifies requirement for operating circuit breakers or disconnect switches at SSRL. SSRL staff members shall be authorized to operate CB's and disconnect switches only if they meet the following requirement The staff member: 1. Has the task identified and authorized in their routine JHAM, which includes: a. Reading and understand the SSRL Breaker and Disconnect Switch Operation

433

DRAFT Bear Safety Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bear Safety Plan June 2010 Bear Safety Plan June 2010 NSA_bsp_Rev9.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Bear Safety Plan Background As a major part of DOE's participation in the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (AAO) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) exists on the North Slope of Alaska with its Central Facility near the town of Barrow. A secondary facility exists at Atqasuk, a town 100km inland from Barrow. Other instrumentation locations in more remote areas on the North Slope may be established in later stages of the project. Polar bears, and to a lesser extent, brown bears (barren ground grizzly) are significant hazards within the ACRF/NSA/AAO

434

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-CriticalitySafety.docx Description Criticality Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Criticality Safety

436

FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Safety Specialist | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Safety Specialist Nuclear Safety Specialist FAQS Qualification Card - Nuclear Safety Specialist A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-NuclearSafetySpecialist-2007.docx Description Nuclear Safety Specialist Qualification Card - 2007 FAQC-NuclearSafetySpecialist-2004.docx

437

Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

439

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

440

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous materials safety" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

Pipeline Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pipeline Safety. Summary: Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to the pipeline industry to improve safety and reliability. ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): JHA FAQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Hazards Analysis FAQ Job Hazards Analysis FAQ Topics JHA Basics Accessing the JHA Benefits of the JHA Work Lead JHA Work Groups Taking Your JHA Correcting Your JHA Training Profile JHA Basics Back to top Q: What is a JHA? A: The Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) process provides a documented mechanism to answer the question "How do I know that I'm doing my job safely?" It is a methodical analysis tool used by highly effective organizations to identify and eliminate workplace hazards before they can cause harm. Job Hazards Analysis is a tool used by LBNL to address the five core functions of Integrated Safety Management namely Plan the Work by identifying the tasks to be performed; Analyze the Hazards of the Work; Determine the Controls necessary to safely perform the Work; Perform the Work utilizing the prescribed Controls; and

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Safety for Users  

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Safety for Users Safety for Users Safety for Users Print Safety at the ALS The mission of the ALS is "Support users in doing outstanding science in a safe environment." All users and staff participate in creating a culture and environment where performing research using the proper safeguards and fulfilling all safety requirements result in the success of the facility and its scientific program. The documents and guidance below will assist users and staff to achieve these goals. How Do I...? A series of fact sheets that explain what users need to know and do when preparing to conduct experiments at the ALS. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation? Work with Biological Materials? Work with Chemicals? Work with Regulated Soil? Bring and Use Electrical Equipment at the ALS?