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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public...

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

3

Spills of Radioactive Materials -Emergency Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to radioactive waste container. For surface decontamination, use soap and water and cleansers appropriateSpills of Radioactive Materials - Emergency Procedures Procedure: 7.53 Created: 1/16/2014 Version for injured personnel. B. Applicability/scope This policy applies to all facilities where radioactive

Jia, Songtao

4

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

5

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

6

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

7

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

8

Thermal radiation hazards associated with marine LNG spills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of hazardous distances associated with a vapor cloud resulting from a major LNG ship accident have been based on predictions...

James H. Stannard Jr.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Spills-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Installation or Modification of Retention Tanks and Small Basins to Control Runoff and 6 SWCX for Installation or Modification of Retention Tanks and Small Basins to Control Runoff and Spills- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Installation or Modification of Retention Tanks and Small Basins to Control Runoff and Spills Introduction As defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

10

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

11

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 392: Spill Sites and Construction Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the closure activities that were conducted to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 392--Spill Sites and Construction Materials located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 392 is listed on in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the NTS: CAS 05-17-02 Construction Materials/Lead Bricks; CAS 06-17-03 Cement Mud Pit; CAS 06-1 9-01 Cable Pile; Powder Piles (3); CAS 06-44-02 Paint Spill; CAS 06-44-03 Plaster Spill; CAS 06-44-04 Cutting Fluid Discharge Ditch. Closure activities were performed in two phases. Phase 1 activities consisted of collecting waste characterization samples of soil and material present on-site, and where appropriate, performing radiological screening of debris at the six CASs. Results were used to determine how waste generated during closure activities would be handled and disposed of, i.e., as nonhazardous sanitary or hazardous waste, etc. Phase 2 activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or soil, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each CAS was clean closed by visual inspection and/or by the collecting soil verification samples for laboratory analysis. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix A. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Form for each of the six CASs are included in Appendix 8. Appendix C contains a copy of the Bechtel Nevada (BN) On-site Waste Transport Manifest for the hazardous waste generated during closure of CAS 06-44-02.

R. B. Jackson

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

13

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

15

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

16

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

17

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

19

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

20

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

22

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

23

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

24

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

25

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

27

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction projects which impact existing building materials must include an environmental consultant air pollution control agency and the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) at least ten (10) daysUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Asbestos

Wilcock, William

30

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. Emergency responders participate in a training exercise in the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP), which also recently released its annual report. Administered by EM’s Office of Packaging and Transportation, TEPP ensures federal, state, tribal and local responders have access to the plans, training and technical assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to radiological transportation accidents.

31

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

32

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

33

Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials  

SciTech Connect

Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

35

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

Murray, H. Jr.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management  

SciTech Connect

The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W. [Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management, 505 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of a national spill test facility data base. Topical report, February 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, the production of gas, liquid and solid fuels and the associated chemical use accounts for significant volumes of material with the potential of becoming hazardous. Accidental spills or releases of these hazardous materials do occur, and action must be taken to minimize damage to life, property, and the environment. Because of the hazards of testing with chemical spills, a national spill test facility (STF) and an associated testing program have been established to systematically develop new data on the effects and mitigation of hazardous chemical spills Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the DOE, is developing a comprehensive national spill test data base. I The data base will be easily accessible by industry and the public on the Spill Research Bulletin Board System and will allow users to download spill test data and test descriptions, as well as an extensive bibliography. The 1990 Clean Air Act and Amendments (CAAA) requires that at least two chemicals be field tested at the STF and at least 10 chemicals be studied each year. The chemicals to be studied are chosen with priority given to those that present the greatest risk to human health. The National Spill Test Facility Data Base will include a common chemical data base covering the overlap of federal chemical lists and significant information from other sources. Also, the (CAAA) directs the DOE and EPA to work together with the STF and industry to provide a scientific and engineering basis for writing regulations for implementation of the (CAAA). The data base will be a primary resource in this effort.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk M. Rapik Saat hazardous materials transport risk by rail · Tank Car Design Optimization Model Tank car weight and capacity model Metrics to assess tank car performance Illustration of the optimization model

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

42

Journal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 1523 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hazardous Materials journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat Chromate reduction in FeJournal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 15­23 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK d Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation

Burke, Ian

43

GRR/Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies RCRA CERCLA 40 CFR 261 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The use of underground and above ground storage tanks, discovery of waste

44

HM-ACCESS Project (Framework for the Use of Electronic Shipping Papers for the Transport of Hazardous Materials)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-ACCESS Initiative James Simmons Acting Chief, Research and Development Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Engineering and Research Division May 2012 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 2 H-azardous M-aterials A-utomated C-argo C-ommunication for E-fficient and S-afe S-hipments U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Background Purpose: To identify and eliminate barriers to the use of paperless hazard communication technologies to improve the delivery of critical hazardous materials (HM) safety information throughout the transportation chain.

45

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

47

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

49

Regulations Establishing Restricted Zones for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a Shore Clearance Line which cannot be crossed except in an emergency by any vessel transporting oil or hazardous materials in bulk in Long Island Sound. For the purpose...

50

Quantification of the number of injured people due to hazardous material accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents with hazardous materials may threaten the lives of people living in the direct environment of the transportation infrastructure. In many countries, fire brigades play a major role in advising the authorities when they are dealing with issues where hazardous materials are involved. Since emergency responders have to deal with injured persons, information concerning the number of injured people and the types of injuries is relevant to them. In response to this need, we developed a method for calculating the number of injured people. This method was applied to the (re)development plans for the largest railway station in the Netherlands, Utrecht Central station. Through this intermodal transfer terminal, both passengers and substantial amounts of hazardous materials are transported. The fire brigades used the injury information to assess the spatial development plans and transportation plans for hazardous materials. Furthermore, the fire brigades used the injury information to determine their suppression tactics and equipment requirements.

Nils Rosmuller; Inge Trijssenaar; Johan Reinders; Peter Blokker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction in Darjeeling and Sikkim-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction July 2014 4pm A206a � School of Engineering ABSTRACT Interest in sustainable construction materials material resources, such as bamboo, are an integral part of sustainable development. The use of natural

Davies, Christopher

52

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Use of magnetic carbon composites from renewable resource materials for oil spill clean up and recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon material from a body of water. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of mixing a plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites with a liquid hydrocarbon material dispersed in a body of water to allow the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each to be adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material to form a mixture, applying a magnetic force to the mixture to attract the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material, and removing said plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites each adhered by an amount of the liquid hydrocarbon material from said body of water while maintaining the applied magnetic force, wherein the plurality of magnetic carbon-metal nanocomposites is formed by subjecting one or more metal lignosulfonates or metal salts to microwave radiation, in presence of lignin/derivatives either in presence of alkali or a microwave absorbing material.

Viswanathan, Tito

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

55

Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

58

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Alert people in the immediate area to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVACUATE · Alert people in the immediate area not operate any electrical devices, phones, appliances, light switches, or equipment with open flames within the affected area EVACUATE · Leave area and go to an exterior location where you can call 911 from a land line

Karonis, Nicholas T.

59

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

60

Development of an integrated decision support system for supporting offshore oil spill response in harsh environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Offshore oil spills can lead to significantly negative impacts on socio-economy and constitute a direct hazard to the marine environment and human health. The response (more)

Li, Pu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Review of the Lawrence Livermore Nationa Laboratory Identiified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages This site visit report documents the results of Office of Health, Safety and Security's review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) identification, immediate actions, communications, documentation, evaluation, reporting and follow-up to the discovery of defective Department of Transportation (DOT) UN1A2 55- and 30-gallon open head single bolt closure steel drums intended for storage and transportation of hazardous waste and materials. This review, conducted on January 26-29, 2010, was sponsored by the DOE Livermore Site Office (LSO) to support interface with the lab and this report is intended to support follow-up

63

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

Maroncelli, Mark

64

Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection  

SciTech Connect

The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

66

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 16, 2012 HMCRP Project HM-04: Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security 2 The HM-04 Team * Battelle - Prime - Bill Tate, Project Director/PI & Co-Author * Dr. Mark Abkowitz, Vanderbilt University - Co-Author * American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) - Dan Murray, Lead * Visionary Solutions, LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 Project Objectives * Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; * Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced

67

CORROSION STUDY OF REPLACEMENT MATERIALS FOR HAZARDOUS LOW LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING TANKS  

SciTech Connect

New waste tanks are to be constructed in H-area to store hazardous low level wastes. AISI Type 304L (304L) stainless steel was recommended as a suitable material of construction for these tanks. Cyclic polarization and coupon tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion resistance of 304L over a wide range of waste tank environments. The results of both tests indicated that 304L was not susceptible to attack under any of these conditions. Comparison tests were also performed with ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537) and Incoloy 825. The carbon steel corroded severely in some of the environments, while Incoloy 825 did not corrode. These tests, along with those for 304L, verified the correlation between cyclic polarization and coupon tests. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was performed to monitor the breakdown of the protective oxide film on the surface of the material as a function of time and temperature. These results also correlated with those from the cyclic polarization and coupon tests.

Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.

1991-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244­252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low 2005 Available online 4 November 2005 Abstract Paper sludge ash was partially converted into zeolites by reaction with 3 M NaOH solution at 90 C for 24 h. The paper sludge ash had a low abundance of Si

Downs, Robert T.

69

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 7591 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 75­91 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching

Florida, University of

70

Preliminary results of the APAC spills working group  

SciTech Connect

The Spills Working Group is one of 6 working groups under the DOE-DP Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. Objectives are to assess methodologies available in this area, evaluate their adequacy for accident analysis at DOE facilities, identify development needs, and define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The group focused on methodologies for estimating 4 types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills. Computer models were identified with capabilities for quantifying release rates or released amounts from spills, and a set of sample test problems was established for evaluating a specific model for some common or probable accident release scenarios. The group agreed on a set of recommended computer codes which are classified according to spill type and hazard category. Code results for a given problem varied by up to an order of magnitude; this is attributed to differences in how the physics and thermodynamics of the problems were treated by the models.

Brereton, S.; Hesse, D.; kalinich, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mubayi, V.; Shinn, J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

72

Oil and Fuel Spills EHS Contact: Lysa Holland (ljh17@psu.edu) 814-865-6391  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil and Fuel Spills EHS Contact: Lysa Holland (ljh17@psu.edu) 814-865-6391 Procedures implemented. Other spills/releases of oil containing materials must be reported if they exceed 1 quart

Maroncelli, Mark

73

Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group  

SciTech Connect

The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A review of large-scale LNG spills : experiment and modeling.  

SciTech Connect

The prediction of the possible hazards associated with the storage and transportation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) by ship has motivated a substantial number of experimental and analytical studies. This paper reviews the experimental and analytical work performed to date on large-scale spills of LNG. Specifically, experiments on the dispersion of LNG, as well as experiments of LNG fires from spills on water and land are reviewed. Explosion, pool boiling, and rapid phase transition (RPT) explosion studies are described and discussed, as well as models used to predict dispersion and thermal hazard distances. Although there have been significant advances in understanding the behavior of LNG spills, technical knowledge gaps to improve hazard prediction are identified. Some of these gaps can be addressed with current modeling and testing capabilities. A discussion of the state of knowledge and recommendations to further improve the understanding of the behavior of LNG spills on water is provided.

Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

BP Oil Spill November 10, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP Oil Spill Qiyam Tung November 10, 2011 1 Introduction Figure 1: BP Oil spill (source: http://thefoxisblack.com/2010/05/02/the-bp-oil-spill-in-the-gulf-of-mexico/) Last year, there was a major oil spill caused major techniques to minimize the threat once it happened. What kind of damage would an oil spill like this cause

Lega, Joceline

79

Vapor spill monitoring method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for continuous sampling of liquified natural gas effluent from a spill pipe, vaporizing the cold liquified natural gas, and feeding the vaporized gas into an infrared detector to measure the gas composition. The apparatus utilizes a probe having an inner channel for receiving samples of liquified natural gas and a surrounding water jacket through which warm water is flowed to flash vaporize the liquified natural gas.

Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA); McRae, Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Oil spill response resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement and support. Last, but not least, I would like to thank Lynette Schlandt for her help during my stay at this University. vu TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT. . . . . nl DEDICATION... tool for control. The State of Texas passed and implemented OSPRA (Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act) of 1991. The most significant requirement for both these laws was the need for a Facility Response Plan for the companies. This would help a...

Muthukrishnan, Shankar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-5507-2013 STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 Distribution Statement: A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services,

84

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

85

To the best of my knowledge, the following hazardous materials are/were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surfaces must be performed with an appropriate instrument. If radioactive contamination is detected Chemicals (Poisons|Toxics) Radioactive Materials 9/30/2010 #12;GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORY EQUIPMENT. Resurvey to assure contamination has been removed to less than 100 counts per minute per 100 cm2

Washington at Seattle, University of

86

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect

The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

New, P.F.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA); Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

National Spill Test Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Western Research Institute established, and ACRC continues to maintain, the National Spill Technology database to provide support to the Liquified Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (now called the National HAZMAT Spill Center) as directed by Congress in Section 118(n) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The Albany County Research Corporation (ACRC) was established to make publicly funded data developed from research projects available to benefit public safety. The founders since 1987 have been investigating the behavior of toxic chemicals that are deliberately or accidentally spilled, educating emergency response organizations, and maintaining funding to conduct the research at the DOEs HAZMAT Spill Center (HSC) located on the Nevada Test Site. ACRC also supports DOE in collaborative research and development efforts mandated by Congress in the Clean Air Act Amendments. The data files are results of spill tests conducted at various times by the Silicones Environmental Health and Safety Council (SEHSC) and DOE, ANSUL, Dow Chemical, the Center for Chemical Process Safety (CCPS) and DOE, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), OSHA, and DOT; DuPont, and the Western Research Institute (WRI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and EPA. Each test data page contains one executable file for each test in the test series as well as a file named DOC.EXE that contains information documenting the test series. These executable files are actually self-extracting zip files that, when executed, create one or more comma separated value (CSV) text files containing the actual test data or other test information.

Sheesley, David (Western Research Institute)

90

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

BP Oil Spill Update | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Oil Spill Update BP Oil Spill Update BP Oil Spill Update August 10, 2010 - 10:48am Addthis Sec. Chu working on solutions to the BP Oil spill with a member of the Federal Science Team. | Energy Department Photo | Sec. Chu working on solutions to the BP Oil spill with a member of the Federal Science Team. | Energy Department Photo | Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy "We also must remain focused on helping the people, businesses and communities in the Gulf Coast region who have been affected by this spill." Secretary Steven Chu As you may know, I've spent much of the last three months working to help contain the BP oil spill. I recently returned from my seventh trip to Houston, and I thought this would be a good opportunity to update you on our work to seal the damaged well in the Gulf.

93

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait, Middle East, oil and gas fields, oil refinery, oil waste, oil well,Equipment Kuwait Oil Co. 1991. Mideast well fire, oil spillKuwait, Persian Gulf, Saudia Arabia, Oil spill, cleanup, oil spills, crude, oil spill incidents, oil spills-pipeline, warfare, oil skimmers, oil wells,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Paul E. Hargraves: Spill, Baby, Spill: poison on the Paul E. Hargraves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul E. Hargraves: Spill, Baby, Spill: poison on the coast Paul E. Hargraves Monday, June 7, 2010 oil comes ashore, critical food web structure is disrupted. Many of the seafood products we eat

Belogay, Eugene A.

95

Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures Plan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental Protection Agency regulations 40 CFR Part 112, Oil Pollution Prevention,'' include requirements for a written Oil Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan. This document provides such an SPCC Plan for facilities at 100-N Area managed by Westinghouse Hanford Co. Should an oil spill occur at 100-N Area, the following actions should be followed: stop the flow of oil, contain the oil spill in order to prevent it from reaching the river, and notify Environmental Protection. Environmental Protection will assess the oil spill and determine if remedial action is necessary. If needed, an oil spill response team will deploy oil spill control and clean-up equipment at the river shoreline to remove any oil that enters the river.

Zoric, J P

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Spain's Earth Scientists and the Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a south to north slope current on the sea (1­11), the decision to move the vessel from about 43°N, 9.5°WSpain's Earth Scientists and the Oil Spill THE SPANISH COAST OF GALICIA IS CURRENT- ly subject to an oil spill that, given its spatial and temporal extent, could become one of the worst spills ever

Brown, James H.

97

Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix D Draft Oil Spill Response Plan DRAFT Oil Spill Response Plan CAPE WIND ASSOCIATES, LLC BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS PREPARED FOR Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 PREPARED BY ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400 East Providence, Rhode Island 02915 Project No. E159-601 December 2005 DRAFT OIL SPILL RESPONSE PLAN Cape Wind Associates, LLC Boston, Massachusetts Prepared For: Cape Wind Associates, LLC 75 Arlington Street Boston, Massachusetts 02116 Prepared By: ESS Group, Inc. 401 Wampanoag Trail, Suite 400

98

UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

79 UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-611 Transformer area (Map location 79) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS FUNCTION Spill Site OPERATIONAL STATUS NA DATES...

99

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an international oil spill as experienced in Qatar. In:oil spill: shoreline surveys and cleanup guidelines for Bahrain and Qatar.

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

102

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill associated with the historical operations of a vacuum pump oil recovery system at the E-MAD facility.

K. B. Campbell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

104

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance Background Information Mercury can be found, plumbing traps and vacuum pumps. When mercury is spilled, it forms beads or droplets that can accumulate mercury vapors can be very dangerous, depending on the amount inhaled and the length of exposure

Holland, Jeffrey

105

CONGRESS STALLS ON OIL-SPILL RESPONSE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CONGRESS STALLS ON OIL-SPILL RESPONSE ... Efforts to pass OFFSHORE DRILLING safety legislation have sputtered over the past year ... In response, the Interior Department has revised the rules governing offshore oil and natural gas drilling to include a lengthier and more extensive permitting process, and the industry has developed new well control and deepwater spill containment technology. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

106

UMass scientists tackle gas spills Underground microbesseenas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on earth could be the newest , weapon against gasoline spills. Researchers at the University spills of the gasoline additive MTBE. First added to gasoline to enhance octane, and later in much larger on sulfur, the UMass team has been. able to remove benzene, a carcino- genic component of gasoline and other

Lovley, Derek

107

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

108

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to overpressure--external to T Plant, was included for completeness but is not within the scope of the hazards evaluation. Container failures external to T Plant will be addressed as part of the transportation analysis. This document describes the HazOp analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of SNF sludge in the T Plant.

SCHULTZ, M.V.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

2010 oil spill: trajectory projections based on ensemble drifter analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 oil spill: trajectory projections based on ensemble drifter analyses Yu-Lin Chang & Leo Oey # Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract An accurate method for long-term (weeks to months) projections of oil spill released at the northern Gulf of Mexico spill site is demonstrated during the 2010 oil spill

111

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oil recovery; Technology that tames large spills  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the threat of oil spills is growing with the increasing use of larger tankers, the expansion of offshore oil exploration, and-as was demonstrated recently in the Persian Gulf-the dangers of war and terrorism. Aware of the environmental havoc that massive spills can cause, engineers are working hard to devise effective methods of scooping oil from the water's surface and cleaning contaminated shorelines. Techniques are being developed, which combine mechanical, chemical, and biological processes to contain spills.

Valenti, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Pelagic Fish Species of the Gulf of Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010 is the largest unintended marine oil spill in history. The point-source location of the spill, below the pelagic (more)

Stieglitz, John Dommerich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

When and how to end shelter-in-place protection from a release of airborne hazardous material : report on a decision-making concept and methodology.  

SciTech Connect

Shelter-in-place (SIP) is considered a credible alternative to immediate evacuation to protect the population on and around Army chemical warfare agent stockpile storage sites from accidental agent releases of short duration. To be effective, this strategy requires immediate SIP to minimize initial exposure to agent vapor, followed by timely and appropriate termination of SIP to minimize additional exposure to agent vapor accumulations in the shelter when the air outside becomes less hazardous. However, a major challenge facing emergency managers has been how to decide the best time and way to end SIP to obtain this ideal. This report describes a concept to make this decision, and suggests a methodology to apply the concept as a site-specific response tool. The major conditions that influence the exposure of a population are the source term values of the agent that is released, meteorological conditions, shelter air change rates, the distance of the shelter from the source, and th e dose-response relationship of the hazardous material. The circumstances that contribute to overall exposure associated with a SIP strategy involve exposure during the time before taking shelter, exposure while sheltered due to vapor infiltration, and additional exposure (if any) following the termination of SIP. Options to end SIP are to resume normal activities with no restrictions, to ventilate the shelter but remain indoors, to exit from the shelter and remain nearby, or to relocate to a designated facility. The optimal time and way to end SIP involves examining the relationships among the conditions and circumstances listed above to find the combination of these variables that gives the smallest area where a sheltered population might receive a certain level of toxic effect. For example, find the combination of times, conditions, and circumstances that produce the smallest area where fatalities are possible. In this case, the best time and action to end SIP to minimize fatalities is that combination of variables which produces the smallest area where this level of effect is expected. The methodology to apply the concept is to use a computer model to examine the relationships among these conditions and circumstances (many of which are pre-planned default inputs), and display the best time and action to end SIP quickly, in a user-friendly format. A computer model that was developed to prove the concept and demonstrate the methodology (called the TSIP Model) is described in the report, and the use of the TSIP Model is illustrated in a case study in an appendix to the report. The report also discusses public education and emergency instructions essential for implementing this concept, and makes recommendations for agreements, plans, and exercises relevant to deciding when and how to end SIP. This concept and methodology is independent of the atmospheric dispersion model used, and is not limited to chemical warfare agent vapor hazards. Thus it can help make decisions on when and how to end SIP following the accidental release of many other non-flammable non-reactive hazardous vapors if sufficient information is available about the characteristics of the material and the circumstances of the release.

Yantosik, G.; Lerner, K.; Maloney, D.; Wasmer, F.

2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

116

Department of Energy Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill Activities in Response to the Deepwater BP Oil Spill At the request of the President, Secretary Chu and Secretary Salazar traveled to Houston and participated in meetings today with DOE and national lab staff, industry officials and other engineers and scientists involved in finding solutions to cap the flow of oil and contain the spill. Secretary Chu assembled a group of top scientific experts from inside and outside of government to join in today's discussions in Houston about possible solutions. This team includes: * Dr. Tom Hunter, Director of the Department of Energy's Sandia National Labs * Dr. George A. Cooper, an expert in materials science and retired professor from UC Berkeley * Richard Lawrence Garwin, a physicist and IBM Fellow Emeritus

117

Oil-Spill Identification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...May-June research-article Articles Oil-Spill Identification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry...the identification of a contaminant caused by the spilling of oil or oil products in water. A capillary gas chromatography (CGC......

A. Pavlova; D. Papazova

118

Assess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workers. Millions of gallons of oil spill into the Gulf of Mexico. BP agrees to provide $1 billionAssess Plan Restore DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NRDA TRUSTEES Early Restoration, Phase III A guide DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT TRUSTEES OCTOBER 2014 2 On April 20, 2011

119

OrlandoSentinel.com OIL SPILL IN THE GULF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was gushing millions of gallons of oil, oceanographers in Miami and Tampa used satellite images and computerOrlandoSentinel.com OIL SPILL IN THE GULF Gauging BP oil spill's damage may take a decade Florida marine scientists take lead in researching oil-spill disaster's effects in Gulf By William E. Gibson

Belogay, Eugene A.

120

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, District 8 Dr. Thomas Coolbaugh, ExxonMobil, Research & Engineering, Oil Spill Response Technology Dr, January 26, 2014 Mobile, Alabama Facilitated by: Center for Spills in the Environment University, Center for Spills in the Environment (CSE) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). CSE focuses

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL SENSOR USING MULTISPECTRAL INFRARED IMAGING VIA 1 MINIMIZATION Yingying Li , Wei Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University ABSTRACT Early detection of oil spill events is the key in detecting the early onset of a small-scale oil spill event. Based on an infrared oil-water contrast model

Yin, Wotao

122

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination ofindividuals who have entered a hot zone during transportation incidents involving radioactive.

123

Oil spills underreported in Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... There is only one official source of data on pollution caused by offshore drilling in US waters: the National Response Center, an online reporting system for oil ... analyzed by Amos, an average of 14 gallons per day had been spilling from that rig for several months, says Amos. "But our image analysis shows the leak rate ...

Melissa Gaskill

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IXTOC OIL SPILL ASSESSMENT FINAL REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Prepared for : Bureau of Land Management in input of tar/oil to the Texas Gulf Coast (Geyer ;, 1981) have less of an obvious ecological impact, if any . The Brittany coast of France has been affected for several years by the acute oil input from

Mathis, Wayne N.

125

HS663(b) Pre-purchase form for hazardous materials Version 4: 19/03/2013 Reference HS316: Purchasing Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segregated storage area and if yes, is one available? Is a safe method available to transport the chemical guideline Is the chemical a Schedule 4 or Schedule 8 Drug. Some S4s and all S8s require additional: Purchasing Guidelines This form can be used to assist consider the risks of introducing new hazardous

New South Wales, University of

126

Expedited approach to a carbon tetrachloride spill interim remedial action  

SciTech Connect

Monitored natural attenuation was selected as an interim measure for a carbon tetrachloride spill site where source removal or in situ treatment cannot currently be implemented due to the surrounding infrastructure. Rather than delay action until the site is more accessible to an interim action, this more expedited approach would support a final action. Individual Hazard Substance Site (IHSS) 118.1 is a former underground storage tank at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) that stored carbon tetrachloride for process use. Inadvertent releases associated with filling and failure of the tank system resulted in an accumulation of carbon tetrachloride in a bedrock depression around a group of former process waste tanks. Access to the source of contamination is obstructed by numerous utilities, the process waste tanks, and other components of the site infrastructure that limit the ability to conduct an effective remedial action. A preremedial field investigation was conducted in September 1997 to identify and delineate the extent of the dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. Data collected from the investigation revealed that natural processes might be limiting the migration of contaminants from the source area.

Cowdery, C.; Primrose, A. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Castaneda, N. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Saudis map $450 million gulf spill cleanup  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on Saudi Arabia which has earmarked about $450 million to clean up Persian Gulf beaches polluted by history's worst oil spills, created during the Persian Gulf crisis. Details of the proposed cleanup measures were outlined by Saudi environmental officials at a seminar on the environment in Dubai, OPEC News Agency reported. The seminar was sponsored by the Gulf Area Oil Companies Mutual Aid Organization, an environmental cooperative agency set up by Persian Gulf governments. Meantime, a Saudi government report has outlined early efforts designed to contain the massive oil spills that hit the Saudi coast before oil could contaminate water intakes at the huge desalination plants serving Riyadh and cooling water facilities at Al Jubail.

Not Available

1991-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Survey to assess Persian Gulf spill effects  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that an international group is poised for an extensive survey of the Persian Gulf, including an assessment of the long term effects of last year's oil spill, a legacy of the Persian Gulf war. Saudi Arabia plans a $450 million cleanup program on beaches fouled by the massive spill. Plans for the survey were disclosed by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). It is to be carried out under the auspices of the Regional Organization for the Protection of the Marine Environment (Ropme), Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Ropme member countries are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Not Available

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costa, C. F. EPAs Alaska oil spill bioremediation project.for the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Nature 1994, 368, 413418.from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.

Atlas, R.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Microbial petroleum degradation enhancement by oil spill bioremediation products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodegradation of an artificially weathered crude oil (Alaska North Slope) was compared using 13 different oil spill bioremediation agents. All products were evaluated under identical (more)

Lee, Salvador Aldrett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Estimated Business Interruptions Losses of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A generalized framework of Economic Analysis of natural and man-made disasters is applied to the estimation of business interruption losses associated with an oil spill. (more)

Vargas, Vanessa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contamination, environment, environmental impact, environmental pollution, model, oil spill, storage facility, tank, water pollution, wave (water), additive, administration, barrier, book, brine,

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Spill Prevention and Response Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Response Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Spill Prevention and Response Website Author Alaska Department of Environmental...

135

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

136

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Composition and Biodegradation of a Synthetic Oil Spilled on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thick perennial ice cover of Lake Fryxell in Taylor Valley spilling 730 L of aviation diesel fuel (JP5. Cleanup efforts, initiated four days after the accident, recovered no more than 45% of the spilled fluids only early in the field season, from September to early November, while the ice is solidly frozen

Priscu, John C.

138

Evaluating technologies of oil spill surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Surveillance and monitoring of oil in the marine environment imposes a broad spectrum of remote sensing requirements. At the US Coast Guard Research Development Center, the environmental safety branch is sponsoring oil spill remote sensing research in four areas of technology: Synthetic aperture radar (SAR), Frequency-scanning microwave radiometry (FSR), Laser fluorosensing (LFS), and Forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagers. SAR technology uses sophisticated signal processing to overcome prior limitations, providing images of higher and more uniform spatial acuity which may enable interpreters to more-readily distinguish petroleum slicks from others. The ability to determine the distribution of oil thickness within a slick is necessary when an estimate of oil volume is desired. Scientists at MIT have formulated a new approach to radiometric oil thickness measurement that takes advantage of recent advances in electronic component technology. The initial data collected with a prototype FSR instrument have validated the FSR concept and more work is ongoing. The Coast Guard is co-funding a program to demonstrate and evaluate the capabilities of an airborne laser fluorosensor to support oil spill response operations. During a controlled test, the instrument successfully demonstrated an ability to detect oil on water, ice, and various beach surfaces. Additional testing included different oil types and allowed for weathering. Data analysis is ongoing. Recent developments in infrared imager technology have produced a wide variety of off-the-shelf, portable cameras that could potentially provide a rapid-response spill assessment capability. The R D Center has been involved in the testing of many of these sensors.

Hover, G.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

SciTech Connect

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer',  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer', BlIIlehr to: pmbommer on the fate and behavior of spilled oil. Of course, since this spill originates a mile deep, some. ~ Lehr book chapter .pdf #12;Review of modeling procedures for oil spill weathering behavior William J

Fleskes, Joe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

142

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

143

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh  

SciTech Connect

Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Statistics of Extremes in Oil Spill Risk Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of this study are very useful for oil spill risk assessment, contingency planning, and environmental impact statements on oil exploration, development, and production. ... Catastrophic oil spills, which are defined in this study as oil spills of over 1 MMbbl in volume, are rare events with potentially very high costs for society and the environment. ... To study the sensitivity of the modeled GEV distribution to parameters and observational data, three cases are investigated and compared: (1) DWH case (this is the benchmark case with 49 years of oil spill records from 1964 to 2012, including the DWH spill; the results are already presented in Figures 24), (2) no DWH case (this is the case of assuming that DWH did not happen in 2010, and the second largest spill in 2010, which is 123 bbl, is used in the analysis), and (3) 10 MMbbl case (this is the case of assuming that a spill of 10 MMbbl happened in 2013, and there are a total of 50 annual maxima from 1964 to 2013). ...

Zhen-Gang Ji; Walter R. Johnson; Geoffrey L. Wikel

2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect

The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity.

Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Natural radionuclide content and radiological hazard associated with usage of quartzite sand samples from OvacikSilifkeMersin open pit as building material in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......building materials such as gas concrete and concrete...respectively. CONCLUSIONS The natural radioactivity due to...Xiaolan Z. Measurement of natural radioactivity in sand...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus samples. J. Environ...Karahan G., Karack Z. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides......

S. Turhan; A. S. Aykamis; A. M. Kili

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

149

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

150

A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 596h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups.

Tiago M. Alves; Eleni Kokinou; George Zodiatis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Federal seafood safety response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal seafood safety response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill 10...Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA 98112;bNational Seafood Inspection Laboratory, andbNational Seafood Inspection Laboratory, andbNational Seafood Inspection...

Gina M. Ylitalo; Margaret M. Krahn; Walton W. Dickhoff; John E. Stein; Calvin C. Walker; Cheryl L. Lassitter; E. Spencer Garrett; Lisa L. Desfosse; Karen M. Mitchell; Brandi T. Noble; Steven Wilson; Nancy B. Beck; Ronald A. Benner; Peter N. Koufopoulos; Robert W. Dickey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Oil spill fluorosensing lidar for inclined onshore or shipboard operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An oil spill detection fluorosensing lidar for onshore or shipboard operation is described. Some difficulties for its operation arise from the inclined path of rays. This is due to...

Karpicz, Renata; Dementjev, Andrej; Kuprionis, Zenonas; Pakalnis, Saulius; Westphal, Rainer; Reuter, Rainer; Gulbinas, Vidmantas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill The Department of Energy's Scientific Response to the Oil Spill May 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis At the request of President Obama, Secretary Chu and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories are providing round-the-clock scientific support to help inform strategies to stop the BP oil spill. Secretary Chu has spent several days in Houston monitoring the top kill attempt, analyzing the data as it comes in and helping to develop strategies to give it the best chances of success. In the days leading up to the "top kill" attempt, the Secretary and his team of scientists provided expert advice and technical support to test the assumptions behind BP's work and to offer analytical rigor. When diagnostic and pressure tests

154

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

155

Using Booms in Response to Oil Spills -Oil spilled at sea begins to move and spread into very thin layers. The main purpose of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard Boom. Fire Boom. Using Booms in Response to Oil Spills - Oil spilled at sea begins to move boom is used to contain, deflect or exclude oil from shorelines. Hard boom is typically made of "Exclusion Boom." NOAA: Using Booms in Response to Oil Spills, May 2010 #12;Example of a boom in high

156

USF College of Marine Science Awarded $11M for Gulf Spill Research Selected as one of eight centers nationwide for continued studies of BP spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Deepwater Horizon spill from the deep ocean to the fisheries, and specific ecosystem components Horizon oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico's ocean and coastal ecosystems and to build a better ways Horizon spill on key marine ecosystem processes and species. The goals of the research project include

Meyers, Steven D.

157

Sensor for detection of liquid spills on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A surface liquid detector is disclosed for detecting liquids spilled on surfaces such as floors. A temperature-sensitive thermistor probe is used in a bridge circuit to detect the change in resistance in the thermistor due to the change in thermal conductivity that occurs when a liquid contacts the probe. The device is characterized by the ability to detect either conductive or nonconductive liquids, such as water or oil spills.

Davis, Brent C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gayle, Tom M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

159

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

160

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

Pastor, Laura

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

162

The Cumulative Ecological Effects of Normal Offshore Petroleum Operations Contrasted With Those Resulting From Continental Shelf Oil Spills [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ecological Effects of Normal Offshore Petroleum Operations Contrasted...Resulting From Continental Shelf Oil Spills [and Discussion...from normal (non-spill) offshore petroleum operations have...studies of spills of crude oil and its refined products...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Source Identification of Underground Fuel Spills by Solid-Phase Microextraction/High-Resolution Gas Chromatography/Genetic Algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Source Identification of Underground Fuel Spills by Solid-Phase Microextraction/High-Resolution Gas Chromatography/Genetic Algorithms ... Groundwater is the last remaining source of potable water for many households and communities in the southeastern United States.1 Its possible contamination by fuels stored in leaking underground tanks and pipelines has become a serious environmental problem, prompting both federal and state regulatory agencies to fund the development of new methods for the identification of fuel materials recovered from subsurface environments. ...

B. K. Lavine; J. Ritter; A. J. Moores; M. Wilson; A. Faruque; H. T. Mayfield

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, consists of 12 inactive sites located in the north and northeast section of the NTS. The 12 CAU 234 sites consist of mud pits, mud spills, mud sumps, and an open post-test cellar. The CAU 234 sites were all used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat and Rainier Mesa areas during the 1950s through the 1970s. The CASs in CAU 234 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting appropriate corrective action alternatives.

Grant Evenson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Performance-oriented packaging: A guide to identifying and designing. Identifying and designing hazardous materials packaging for compliance with post HM-181 DOT Regulations  

SciTech Connect

With the initial publication of Docket HM-181 (hereafter referred to as HM-181), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, Transportation Management Division decided to produce guidance to help the DOE community transition to performance-oriented packagings (POP). As only a few individuals were familiar with the new requirements, elementary guidance was desirable. The decision was to prepare the guidance at a level easily understood by a novice to regulatory requirements. This document identifies design development strategies for use in obtaining performance-oriented packagings that are not readily available commercially. These design development strategies will be part of the methodologies for compliance with post HM-181 U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) packaging regulations. This information was prepared for use by the DOE and its contractors. The document provides guidance for making decisions associated with designing performance-oriented packaging, and not for identifying specific material or fabrication design details. It does provide some specific design considerations. Having a copy of the regulations handy when reading this document is recommended to permit a fuller understanding of the requirements impacting the design effort. While this document is not written for the packaging specialist, it does contain guidance important to those not familiar with the new POP requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

14 - Oil spill remote sensing: A forensic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Even though the design and electronics of sensors are becoming increasingly sophisticated and sensors are becoming much less expensive, the operational use of remote sensing equipment lags behind the development of the technology. The most common forms of oil spill surveillance and mapping is done with simple still or video photography, which provide little, if any, forensic data. Remote sensing from aircraft is still the most common form of oil spill tracking. Attempts to use satellite remote sensing for oil spills, although successful, are not necessarily as claimed and are generally limited to identifying features at sites of known oil spills. The laser fluorosensor is a most useful instrument to forensics because of its unique capability to positively identify oil against most backgrounds, including water, soil, weeds, ice, and snow. Radar offers the only potential for searching in large areas and carrying out remote sensing during foul weather conditions, but offers very poor positive detection characteristics and thus low forensic capability. The usefulness of the visible spectrum for oil detection is limited. It is, however, an economical way to document oil spills and provide baseline data on shorelines or relative positions.

Merv Fingas; Carl E. Brown

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Emergency action -- Hydrocarbon spill MCB Camp Pendleton, California  

SciTech Connect

On 10 April 1991, the Camp Pendleton Natural Resources Management Office received notice that a diesel fuel pipeline located at the Naval Regional Medical Center near Lake O`Neill had leaked on 5 April 1991. The leakage occurred from an exposed, ruptured fuel line that was used to transfer fuel between 12 underground storage tanks at a fuel farm and two large underground day tanks next to the hospital boiler building. The loss consisted of approximately 8,000 gallons of diesel {number_sign}2 fuel oil. The spill saturated the soil around the pipeline as well as overflowing into downslope utility conduits and vaults with termination upon a river terrace approximately 0.5 miles downslope of the spill area, and within 500 feet of the Santa Margarita River Channel, an aquifer recharge area. Because local groundwater is the primary freshwater resource for Camp Pendleton, the concern that this spill could immediately contaminate the local groundwater supply initiated an on-site emergency task order that consisted of emergency containment, neutralization, assessment, remediation and restoration of the hydrocarbon spill. The emergency action included containment and removal of free product in electrical conduits and vaults, neutralization of existing utility containment sources, removal and assessment of contaminated soils using excavation equipment, hollow-stem auger/dual percussion/and air rotary drilling rigs, and the creation of a bioremediation treatment cell adjacent to the spill site.

O`Connor, D. [IT Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (3 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:19...

171

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4850' - June 3 2010 (2 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:13...

172

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Leak at 4840' - June 3 2010 (1 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil Spill Duration 0:15...

173

Engineering aspects of site-specific oil spill contingency planning for estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Surface tension forces between oil and water have apparently caused oil to come back together after spreading. Windrowing of spilled oil, believed to be caused by Lang- muir circulation, results in large strands of oil. Overrunning oil due to a... Surface Current Distributions for a Straight Channel and Bend. 90 3. 29 Maximum Spilled Oil Radius Vezsus Time After Spill for Various Spill Volumes. . . . . . . . . . . 97 3. 30 Slick Area for Oils with Different Surface Tension Spreading Force 98 3...

James, David Woody

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................................................................................................................14 Figures 1. Image of oil emulsion from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico offA Method for Quantitative Mapping of Thick Oil Spills Using Imaging Spectroscopy By Roger N. Clark (AVIRIS) Team, 2010, A method for quantitative mapping of thick oil spills using imaging spectroscopy: U

Torgersen, Christian

175

5/7/2010 9:22 AM Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: BP Claims Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on for subsistence use purposes have been injured, destroyed, or lost by an oil spill incident. Anyone who is the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund (OSLTF) and how can it be used? · The OSLTF can provide up to $15/7/2010 9:22 AM Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: BP Claims Information Frequently Asked Questions 1

176

Oil Spill Detection and Mapping Along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline Based on Imaging Spectrometer Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico between April and July 2010 demonstrated the importance of synoptic oil-spill monitoring in coastal environments via remote-sensing methods. This study focuses on terrestrial oil-spill detection...

Arslan, Meryem Damla

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Long-term reproductive impairment in a seabird after the Prestige oil spill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...impairment in a seabird after the Prestige oil spill alvaro Barros David alvarez Alberto...As Lagoas, Vigo 36310, Spain Large oil spills are dramatic perturbations on marine...in such events. It has been argued that oil spills may have important long-term consequences...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental factors affecting the movement and dispersal of oil spills with particular reference to the gulf  

SciTech Connect

Currents, tidal streams and winds all influence the movement and dispersal of oil spills. Examination of the surface circulation and wind climate of the Gulf highlights the coasts most likely to be at risk of pollution by spills from the major offshore production areas. Methods used in forecasting movement of spills are discussed.

Lynagh, N.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Environmental Impact on Chemical/Oil Spill in the Persian Gulf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Environmental Impact on Chemical/Oil Spill in the Persian Gulf Peter C. Chu1 , Charles L assimilation scheme, for operational planners. Keywords: Chemical Spill, Oil Spill, Persian Gulf, Strait of Hormuz, COAMPS, NCOM, HPAC, CHEMMAP, OILMAP 1. Introduction The Persian Gulf, also known as the Arabian

Chu, Peter C.

180

Effects of the Alvenus oil spill on Jamaica beach macrofauna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF THE ALVENUS OIL SPILL ON JAMAICA BEACH MACROFAUNA A Thesis by MERRILL HENRY SWEET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M U n i v e r s i t y in p a r t i a l f u l f i l l m e n t of the requirement f o r the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Zoology EFFECTS OF THE ALVENUS OIL SPILL ON JAMAICA BEACH MACROFAUNA A Thesis by MERRILL HENRY SWEET Approved as t o s t y l e and content by: s Mary K. Wicksten (Chair of Committee) r X Thomas J...

Sweet, Merrill Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE's Portal to Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon platform in the Gulf of Mexico exploded. The explosion and fire killed and injured workers on the oil rig, and caused major releases of oil and gas into the Gulf for several months. The Department of Energy, in keeping with the Obama Administrations ongoing commitment to transparency, provided online access to data and information related to the response to the BP oil spill. Included are schematics, pressure tests, diagnostic results, video clips, and other data. There are also links to the Restore the Gulf website, to the trajectory forecasts from NOAA, and oil spill information from the Environmental Protection Agency.

182

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

183

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

184

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

185

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

186

Mercury Spills EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu.edu) 814-865-6391  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Spills EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu.edu) 814-865-6391 Michael Burke (mjb7 Not Enter ­Mercury Spill" · Call EHS immediately When to Report: For large mercury spills (i.e. manometers) or spills in areas where loose mercury could be heated (>90 F degrees) and vapors released and call EHS

Maroncelli, Mark

187

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

188

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

189

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oil spill still motivates Santa Barbara to be green | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil spill still motivates Santa Barbara to be green Oil spill still motivates Santa Barbara to be green Oil spill still motivates Santa Barbara to be green May 14, 2010 - 11:58am Addthis The massive offshore oil spill in Santa Barbara in 1969 galvanized the environmental movement, locally and perhaps nationally. | Photo courtesy Bob Duncan The massive offshore oil spill in Santa Barbara in 1969 galvanized the environmental movement, locally and perhaps nationally. | Photo courtesy Bob Duncan Joshua DeLung Many residents of Santa Barbara County in California still remember the 1969 oil spill there, when an oil drill six miles off the county's coast blew out, spilling an estimated 8,000 to 10,000 barrels of crude oil. The resulting oil slick covered 800 square miles of ocean, killing thousands of birds and marine animals and depositing tar on beaches throughout the

191

Damning study blames BP oil spill for heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damning study blames BP oil spill for heart defects in fish Scientists find evidence of Deepwater also found evidence of potentially lethal heart defects in two species of tuna and one species the effect of noxious compounds. Slower heart rates, fluid accumulation, and arrhythmia The researchers found

Grosell, Martin

192

Infiltration and evaporation of small hydrocarbon spills at gas stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Small gasoline spills frequently occur at gasoline dispensing stations. We have developed a mathematical model to estimate both the amount of gasoline that infiltrates into the concrete underneath the dispensing stations and the amount of gasoline that evaporates into the typically turbulent atmosphere. Our model shows that the fraction of infiltrated gasoline can exceed the fraction that evaporates from the sessile droplets. Infiltrated gasoline then evaporates and is slowly released to the atmosphere via slow diffusive transport in pores. Tentative experiments show that our theoretical approach captures observed experimental trends. Predictions based on independently estimated model parameters roughly describe the experimental data, except for the very slow vapor release at the end of Stage II evaporation. Our study suggests that, over the lifespan of a gas station, concrete pads underneath gas dispensing stations accumulate significant amounts of gasoline, which could eventually break through into underlying soil and groundwater. Our model also shows that lifetimes of spilled gasoline droplets on concrete surfaces are on the order of minutes or longer. Therefore contamination can be carried away by foot traffic or precipitation runoff. Regulations and guidelines typically do not address subsurface and surface contaminations due to chronic small gasoline spills, even though these spills could result in non-negligible human exposure to toxic and carcinogenic gasoline compounds.

Markus Hilpert; Patrick N. Breysse

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Air quality implications of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...products rather than wind-driven oily spray...Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF-CHEM) regional...for June 10 when the wind direction was from...Time (UTC) (3 pm local time), June 10...horizontal resolution WRF-CHEM model results...periods with onshore winds from over the spill...

Ann M. Middlebrook; Daniel M. Murphy; Ravan Ahmadov; Elliot L. Atlas; Roya Bahreini; Donald R. Blake; Jerome Brioude; Joost A. de Gouw; Fred C. Fehsenfeld; Gregory J. Frost; John S. Holloway; Daniel A. Lack; Justin M. Langridge; Rich A. Lueb; Stuart A. McKeen; James F. Meagher; Simone Meinardi; J. Andrew Neuman; John B. Nowak; David D. Parrish; Jeff Peischl; Anne E. Perring; Ilana B. Pollack; James M. Roberts; Thomas B. Ryerson; Joshua P. Schwarz; J. Ryan Spackman; Carsten Warneke; A. R. Ravishankara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

195

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

196

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

199

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Cancels Chapter 3 of DOE 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1 of 9-27-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 9c canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

202

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

Muradov, Nazim (Melbourne, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

207

Selected components of an oil spill contingency plan model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as utilization of scientific and engineering information or resources are two major components which deserve particular emphasis. Oil spill contingency plans must supply a balance between the administrative aspects and the activities occurring in the field... of political strength and/or have state resources they can commit to back them up. If the State must assume supervision of oil removal operations, the TDWR may request reimbursement through the EPA or USCG for reasonable costs incurred. Additional non...

Starnater, Carol Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems ... A holding pond for coal ash collapsed, releasing billions of gallons of coal-ash sludge onto nearby farmland and into the waters of the Emory and Tennessee rivers. ... For decades, researchers, environmental advocates, local communities, and even the U.S. EPA have been concerned about the ongoing risks posed by the unregulated management of coal ash. ...

Rhitu Chatterjee

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and a Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan DOE O 461.1, 4b(2)e, "Quality Assurance Plan and Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan".. Training...

210

Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market  

SciTech Connect

Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

Not Available

1991-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

Roy, B.

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Blowout in the Gulf: The BP Oil Spill Disaster and the Future of Energy in America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inventory of accidents including the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska and violations, due to the self-rule in which oil

Ferrara, Enzo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Evaluation of geophysical methods for the detection of subsurface tetracgloroethyene in controlled spill experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

before, during, and after the PCE injection. Figure 5. Crosswas taken just before, during and after the PCE injection.A controlled Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) spill experiment was

Mazzella, Aldo; Majer, Ernest L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessing the Exposure of Fish to a Petroleum Spill in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On July 28, 1990 nearly 700,000 gallons of a petroleum product were spilled in Galveston Bay, Texas. The exposure of fish to polynuclear aromatic...

S. J. McDonald; T. L. Wade; J. M. Brooks

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic oil spill Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have to be prevented in advance ." (FI) "Cruise ships are so large... Spill Arctic weather or ice conditions can suddenly change - The inexperienced will certainly...

217

UNIT NAME -C-340 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAME -C-340 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-340 Transformer area (Map locat1on 74 )- APPROXIMATE DIMENSIDNS Unnown - FUNCTION Scill site- OPERATIONAL STATUS NA...

218

Metagenome, metatranscriptome and single cell sequencing reveal microbial response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions Group. (2010). Oil Budget Calculator Science andEngineering Team. Oil Budget Calculator Technicalmicrobial response to a deep oil spill. Science 330: 208

Mason, O.U.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Cold Weather Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

220

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

222

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Principal Inves6gator (PI) Conference Sponsored by the NSTC SOST, hosted by the University of South Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Principal Inves6gator (PI) Conference Sponsored #12;Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Principal Inves6gator (PI) Conference Sponsored

Meyers, Steven D.

223

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

225

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of serious damage to eyes. Very toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects use. METHODS FOR CLEANING UP Sweep up, place in a bag and hold for waste disposal. Avoid raising dust. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage

Choi, Kyu Yong

226

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. HMIS RATING and hold for waste disposal. Avoid raising dust. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Avoid breathing dust. Avoid contact

Choi, Kyu Yong

227

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cause fire. Toxic if swallowed. Causes severe burns. Very toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term FOR CLEANING UP Sweep up, place in a bag and hold for waste disposal. Avoid raising dust. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage ALDRICH - 232653

Choi, Kyu Yong

228

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

severe burns. Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic or soda ash, pick up, keep in a closed container, and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

229

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. Target organ for waste disposal. Avoid raising dust. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure: Do not breathe dust. Do not get in eyes, on skin

Choi, Kyu Yong

230

SIGMA-ALDRICH MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. HMIS RATING HEALTH: 2. METHODS FOR CLEANING UP Sweep up, place in a bag and hold for waste disposal. Ventilate area and wash spill site after material pickup is complete. Section 7 - Handling and Storage HANDLING User Exposure

Choi, Kyu Yong

231

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effects of a Spill of LNG on Mean Flow and Turbulence under Low Wind Speed, Slightly Stable Atmospheric Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of the many liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill experiments in the 1980 Burro and ... energy. These effects of the Burro 8 LNG spill were observed at only one instrument...

Howard C. Rodean

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Parens Patriae Litigation to Redress Societal Damages from the BP Oil Spill: The Latest Stage in the Evolution of Crimtorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP, BP Forms Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Escrow Trust (Aug. 9,Dispersants Used in Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Clean Up,discharge of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. 257 The Louisiana

Rustad, Michael L.; Koenig, Thomas H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Parens Patriae Litigation to Redress Societal Damages from the BP Oil Spill: The Latest Stage in the Evolution of Crimtorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semi-submersible oil drilling rig built by Hyundai HeavyHorizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling in its January 11,DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL AND OFFSHORE DRILLING, REPORT TO

Rustad, Michael L.; Koenig, Thomas H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Parens Patriae Litigation to Redress Societal Damages from the BP Oil Spill: The Latest Stage in the Evolution of Crimtorts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersants Used in Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Clean Up,BP, BP Forms Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Escrow Trust (Aug. 9,discharge of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. 257 The Louisiana

Rustad, Michael L.; Koenig, Thomas H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying radiation safety Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety RD-29 Rev. 1 May 2009 Radiation... ) program at UC Berkeley, radiation safety, potential hazards, and emergency procedures. After reading... material spill or...

237

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY/OIL SPILL COMMUNITY SEMINAR "Natural and Unnatural Oil in the Gulf of Mexico Initiative, Center for the Environment, Energy Center, Purdue Oil Spill Community, Purdue Water Community in the Gulf of Mexico has been cited as a factor that may have pre-conditioned the gulf ecosystem better

238

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 42 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Salt Marsh Oiling Conditions, evaluating, and responding to threats to coastal environments, including oil and chemical spills, releases to prepare for and respond to oil and chemical releases. Determines damage to natural resources from

239

PRODUCTION FACILITY SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN Operator Name, Address, Phone, Contact Facility Name, Address, Phone, Contact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources 8 Department of Fish and Game (OSPR) 800-852-7550 or 800-OILS-911 9 provide resources and liaison fuctions during oil spills. Page 3 of 9 #12;PRODUCTION FACILITY SPILL the Location and Labeling of: 1 Permanent Tanks 7 Tank & Storage Container Volumes with Contents Storedg 2

240

Heart Defects in Gulf Tuna Seen Tied to 2010 BP Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart Defects in Gulf Tuna Seen Tied to 2010 BP Oil Spill By Jim Efstathiou Jr. Mar 25, 2014 12 of Mexico spill may have led to heart defects and premature death for tuna, researchers backed hearts may reduce swimming performance, jeopardizing a fish's survival. "The timing and location

Grosell, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Long-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extending now for more than 14 years (2­5). The release of 42 million liters of Alaskan North Slope crudeLong-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Charles H. Peterson,1 * Stanley D. Rice The ecosystem response to the 1989 spill of oil from the Exxon Valdez into Prince William Sound, Alaska, shows

242

Energy-spilling reactions of Streptococcus bovis and resistance of its membrane to proton conductance.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the log of the energy-spilling rate...University, Ithaca, New York 14853. | Journal...Press, Inc., New York. 4. Bulthuis...force, adenylate energy charge and phosphorylation...ATPase-dependent energy spilling by the...John Wiley, New York. 29. Stouthamer...

G M Cook; J B Russell

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill By Scott Travis, Sun Sentinel 6:37 PM EDT, August 25, 2010 South Florida universities are well represented ecosystems, such that we can be better prepared when spills reoccur." Scott Travis can be reached at stravis@Sun

Belogay, Eugene A.

244

Advanced Oil Spill Recovery in Marine Environments Victoria Broje and Arturo A. Keller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Oil Spill Recovery in Marine Environments Victoria Broje and Arturo A. Keller Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara Almost 14,000 oil spills research will help identifying parameters having major effect on oil adhesion to the recovery surface

Keller, Arturo A.

245

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BP Oil Spill and Air Chemistry Crude oil contains various hydrocarbons NOAA and CIRES here at CU went to the oil spill in an aircraft that was equipped with instruments to measure the air quality. 1/3 of the oil dissolved into the water column (methane completely, benzene and ethane almost completely) Showed

Toohey, Darin W.

246

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was unprecedented in both its magnitude --nearly 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROBLEM The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was unprecedented in both of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This satellite image shows the oil slick off its magnitude -- nearly 5 million barrels of oil spilled over nearly three months -- and its location

Entekhabi, Dara

248

The application of hyperspectral image techniques on MODIS data for the detection of oil spills in the RSA1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of hyperspectral image techniques on MODIS data for the detection of oil spills Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, Southampton, S014 3ZH, UK ABSTRACT Oil spills pose a serious threat to the sensitive marine ecosystem of the RSA. The study aims to detect and identify oil spills using remote sensing

Quartly, Graham

249

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

250

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 01-25-02, Fuel Spill 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST 06-99-10, Tar Spills 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

252

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

254

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

255

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

256

Obtaining slow beam spills at the SSC collider  

SciTech Connect

There is substantial interest in providing slow-spill external proton beams in parallel with ``interaction running`` at the 20 TeV SSC collider. The proposal is to cause a flux of particles to impinge on a target consisting of a bent crystal extraction channel. Additionally, a slow spill onto a conventional internal target could be used as a source of secondary beams for physics or test purposes and might also be used for B-physics as proposed for HERA. The ``natural`` beam loss rates from elastic and diffractive beam gas scattering and IP collisions are not sufficient to provide suitably intense external proton beams. To prevent loss of luminosity, the rf excitation is non-linear and preferentially blows up the halo of the beam. The ``target`` is to be located at a region of high dispersion forcing particles at the edge of the momentum space onto the target. T. Lohse in this workshop has described a proposed internal target to be used at HERA that will not employ rf excitation but will use the finite loss rates observed at the HERA machine. The Hera losses are caused by a variety of sources in addition to beam gas scattering or IP interactions. Initially, the beam lifetime at HERA was too short to obtain satisfactory integrated luminosities. Subsequently, through careful attention to detail, the beam lifetime was increased to > 20 hours. Even with these changes, present loss rates provide the required intensity onto an internal target. The Tevatron and SPS proton anti-proton colliders have had similar experiences with their investigations of loss rates and also find that beam lifetimes may be substantially shorter than expected solely from beam gas and IP interactions. This paper proposes deliberately introducing controlled errors li

Ritson, D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill DOE Makes Public Detailed Information on the BP Oil Spill June 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's ongoing commitment to transparency surrounding the response to the BP oil spill, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that Department is providing online access to schematics, pressure tests, diagnostic results and other data about the malfunctioning blowout preventer. Secretary Chu insisted on making the data widely available to ensure the public is as informed as possible, and to ensure that outside experts making recommendations have access to the same information that BP and the government have. The site will be updated with additional data soon. "Transparency is not only in the public interest, it is part of the

259

Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts May 21, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu will postpone a trip to China, scheduled for next week, at the request of President Obama and stay in the country to continue his work on response efforts to the BP oil spill. "Finding a solution to this crisis is a matter of national importance," Secretary Chu said. "I want to continue to play a role in assisting in the efforts and stopping this leak as soon as possible." Secretary Chu was originally scheduled to visit Beijing and Shanghai and discuss further progress on bilateral clean energy cooperation.

260

Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in Gulf of Mexico waters, biodegradation of oil proceedsthe largest oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and the secondThe Gulf of Mexico has more natural seeps of oil then any

Atlas, R.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

New insights into microbial responses to oil spills from the Deepwater Horizon incident  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sea in the Gulf of Mexico to oil emanating from the MacondoPhotos of the oil spill from the Gulf of Mexico. Figure 3.Gulf of Mexico experiences multiple, natural, episodic oil

Mason, O.U.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CDOM Optical Properties Near DWH Site, Gulf of Mexico: Post Oil Spill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Deep Water Horizon (DWH) oil spill resulted in the largest accidental release of crude oil in U.S. waters with both short- and long-term effects (more)

Li, Zhi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

How severely was the Persian Gulf affected by oil spills following the 1991 Gulf War?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ostracods from 14 surface sediment samples taken from the northwest part of the Persian Gulf (Iranian side) at water depths of ... pollution caused by oil spills following the 1991 Gulf War. With the exception...

Nasser Mostafawi

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

Chan, Godine Kok Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the Deepwater Horizon spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-sea bacteria enriched by oil and dispersant from the510- Running title: Enrichment of oil degraders from Gulf ofThe Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in a massive influx

Baelum, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Top Hat Procedure at 4850'...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Hat Procedure at 4850' - June 3 2010 (4 of 4) BP Oil Spill Footage (High Def) - Top Hat Procedure at 4850' - June 3 2010 (4 of 4) Addthis Description Footage of the BP Oil...

267

Utah. Code. Ann. 19-5-115: Spills or discharges of oil or...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah. Code. Ann. 19-5-115: Spills or discharges of oil or other substance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute:...

268

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

269

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

270

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

272

Characterization, Weathering, and Application of Sesquiterpanes to Source Identification of Spilled Lighter Petroleum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Finally, two case studies are presented to illustrate the unique utility of sesquiterpanes for fingerprinting and identifying unknown diesel spills. ... A thick layer of oil (Sample 2) was found between a bunker boat and the quay next to the bunker center, and it was suspected that something had gone wrong during the bunkering of the vessel. ... Employees of the ship and the bunker center, however, both disclaimed responsibility for the spill. ...

Zhendi Wang; Chun Yang; Merv Fingas; Bruce Hollebone; Xianzhi Peng; Asger B. Hansen; Jan H. Christensen

2005-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Alvenus oil spill debris disposal and the potential of land treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALVENUS OIL SPILL DEBRIS DISPOSAL AND THE POTENTIAL OF LAND TREATMENT A Thesis by KENNETH GREGORY CLARK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1988 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ALVENUS OIL SPILL DEBRIS DISPOSAL AND THE POTENTIAL OF LAND TREATMENT A Thesis by KENNETH GREGORY CLARK Approved as to style and content by: y W. Harm, r. (Chair of Committee) / r ( Charles...

Clark, Kenneth Gregory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fish. Exposure assessment for Kuwaiti consumers after the gulf oil spill of 1991  

SciTech Connect

This investigation involves a preliminary assessment of public health hazards associated with exposure to PAHs in locally consumed fish from oil-impacted areas after the Gulf oil spill in 1991. Based on levels of 10 PAHs determined in edible parts of fish collected during the NOAA-Mt. Mitchell scientific cruise (April-May 1992), two exposure scenarios were hypothesized. The first scenario considers that the extent of exposure to PAHs is influenced by the frequency of occurrence and the mean concentration of individual PAH compounds. In the second scenario, the maximum detected PAH concentrations are considered as potential extremes in exposure based on the likely preference of consumption of highly contaminated fish. The mean concentration of the frequently occurring pyrene (75%) poses 3.8, 2.37, and 5.85 times the carcinogenic equivalency, carcinogenic potency, and mutagenic potency, respectively, posed by the mean B(a)P concentration. The maximum concentration of pyrene poses 5.81, 3.62, 8.94 times the carcinogenic equivalency, carcinogenic potency, and mutagenic potency, respectively, posed by the maximum B(a)P concentration. The mean concentration of anthracene (frequency of occurrence = 10%) poses 8.05 and 1.51 times the carcinogenic potency and mutagenic potency, respectively, posed by the mean B(a)P concentration. 16 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Al-Yakoob, S.N.; Saeed, T.; Al-Hashash, H. (Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

276

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

277

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Growth of barley exposed to solvent refined coal (SRC) materials added to soil  

SciTech Connect

The growth of barley plants (Hordeum vulgare) grown in Ritzville silt loam soil, treated with solvent refined coal material, SRC solid (SRC I) and SRC liquid (SRC II) was examined. Although the SRC materials will not be introduced to soil or surface waters in normal uses, they could be spilled during transportation. Such spills could contaminate surface waters and agricultural, rangeland and forest soils, possibly causing acute or chronic damage to plants and also provide a way for certain inorganic and organic materials to enter food chains.

Cline, J.F.; Rickard, W.H.; Thiede, M.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards or steel reinforced concrete, these ferromagnetic materials may have an effect on the magnetic field environmental temperature control is required (2) Structural support for heavy equipment and vibration control

Maroncelli, Mark

280

Deepwater, Deep Ties, Deep Trouble: A State-Corporate Environmental Crime Analysis of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill was one of the worst environmental disasters of all time. Using the concept of state-corporate environmental crime, (more)

Bradshaw, Elizabeth A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DISTRIBUTION AND IMPACTS OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN LOUISIANA TIDAL MARSH SEDIMENTS FOLLOWING THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill, sediment cores were analyzed from marshes at various levels of oiling to determine how deeply oil penetrated sediment (more)

Hatch, Rachel S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

284

Global warming and oil spills could cool shoaling reefs  

SciTech Connect

High water temperature generated on reef flats have been implicated as one of the factors determining the ecological patterns and structural morphologies peculiar to shoaling reefs. In approximately ten years of water temperature and water level data from a shoaling reef flat at Punta Galeta (Caribbean Panama), water temperatures were dependent on water levels. Water temperatures ranged up to 38[degrees]C when daily minimum water depths over the reef crest were < 12 cm, but never exceeded 30[degrees]C when the minimum water levels were > 12 cm. If conservative predictions of sea level rise caused by global warming are correct, normal vertical accretion rates of the reef flat could keep pace with rising sea level until the middle of the next century; after that the occurrence of high water temperatures would be rapidly reduced. However, damage from an oil spill at Punta Galeta in 1986 was concentrated at the seaward margin of the reef flat, where biogenic processes control the overall vertical accretion of the reef platform. By slowing rates of vertical accretion, oil impact could potentially accelerate the effects of global warming on the ecology and morphology of the reef.

Cubit, J.D. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Inst., Apdo (Panama))

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-annual annually 12-FP0034 Inspections Current Services Inspecting for 5-year Test Completed Deterioration and 112313 LeaksSpills Semi-Annual Completed 32814 Fire...

287

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Materials Safety Data Sheets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

Schweik, Charles M.

290

Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management  

SciTech Connect

A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

Grebenyuk, V.D. [Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Grebenyuk, O.V. [Dega Enterprises of NY, Inc., Flushing, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ionising Radiation emitters Spill Procedure Page 1 of 3 Version: 3.2, 5/02/2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as necessary to reduce contamination close to background levels. For spills involving radioactive iodine, use.......................................................................................................3 1. Purpose and Scope Immediate control procedures for radioactive spillages of gamma Procedure Instructions In the Event of a Radioactive Spill in this Room Immediate control procedures

New South Wales, University of

293

January 3, 2011 18:46 GulfOilSpill010310 International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific Publishing Company Measurable Dynamics Analysis of Transport in the Gulf of Mexico During the Oil-shore oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, started the worst human-caused submarine oil spill ever. Though publicly and widely underscored by the oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico during the spring

Bollt, Erik

294

Relationship between Intracellular Phosphate, Proton Motive Force, and Rate of Nongrowth Energy Dissipation (Energy Spilling) in Streptococcus bovis JB1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...acetate, formate, and ethanol; and the energy-spilling rate decreased...acetate, formate, and ethanol (ratio of 1 to 2 to...utilize Trypticase as an energy source for growth...acetate, formate, and ethanol; and the energy-spilling rate decreased...

Daniel R. Bond; James B. Russell

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling THE AMOUNT AND FATE OF THE OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling THE AMOUNT AND FATE OF THE OIL ---Draft--- Staff Working Paper No. 3 Staff Working Papers are written by the staff of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling for the use of members

Meyers, Steven D.

296

Hindcast of oil-spill pollution during the Lebanon crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean, JulyAugust 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hindcast of oil-spill pollution during the Lebanon crisis in the Eastern Mediterranean, July, Athens, Greece a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Lebanese oil-pollution event Oil-spill modeling Oceanography Network http://www.moon-oceanforecasting.eu) pro- vides near-real-time information on oil

Georgiou, Georgios

297

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed Jemie Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

298

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

299

Ecological effects of a major oil spill on Panamanian coastal marine communities  

SciTech Connect

In 1986 more than 8 million liters of crude oil spilled into a complex region of mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs just east of the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal. This was the largest recorded spill into coastal habitats in the tropical Americas. Many populations of plants and animals in both oiled and unoiled sites had been studied previously, thereby providing an unprecedented measure of ecological variation before the spill. Documentation of the spread of oil and its biological effects begun immediately. Intertidal mangroves, seagrasses, algae, and associated invertebrates were covered by oil and died soon after. More surprisingly, there was also extensive mortality of shallow subtidal reef corals and infauna of seagrass beds. After 1.5 years only some organisms in areas exposed to the open sea have recovered.

Jackson, J.B.C.; Cubit, J.D.; Keller, B.D.; Batista, V.; Burns, K.; Caffey, H.M.; Caldwell, R.L.; Garrity, S.D.; Getter, C.D.; Gonzalez, C.; Guzman, H.M.; Kaufmann, K.W.; Knap, A.H.; Levings, S.C.; Marshall, M.J.; Steger, R.; Thompson, R.C.; Weil, E. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa (Panama))

1989-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Oil spills - increasing US dependence on oil imports heightens risks to environment  

SciTech Connect

Calamitous oil spills in recent years have focused attention on the devastation the world`s leading energy source can wreak on the environment. In Alaska, the 1989 grounding of the supertanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound caused the worst U.S. oil spill ever and promoted Congress to pass stringent oil-pollution legislation. In the Persian Gulf, {open_quotes}eco-terroism{close_quotes} committed by Iraqi forces during the gulf war left hundreds of wells burning and oil free-flowing out of Kuwait`s refineries and oil-shipping terminals. With the United States and much of the global community increasingly dependent on petroleum moved by supertankers, oil spills will continue to threaten the environment for the foreseeable future.

NONE

1992-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fish exposed to BP oil spill 'swim slower' Study finds the speed of mahi-mahi exposed to BP's Gulf of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Mexico oil spill has fallen 37pc The 87-day-long spill dumped an estimated 4.9m barrels of oil of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers said they used oil concentrations similar to those measuredFish exposed to BP oil spill 'swim slower' Study finds the speed of mahi-mahi exposed to BP's Gulf

Grosell, Martin

302

Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands  

SciTech Connect

A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

Burns, K.A.; Codi, S. [Australian Inst. of Marine Sciences, Townsville (Australia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

304

Responding to a Disaster: The Gulf Oil Spill Activity Station Support Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In areas where the intertidal zone is wide (e.g., wide tidal flats, wave-cut rocky platforms), the habitat

305

The impact of alternative oil spill cleanup responses on Spartina alterniflora  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE IMPACT OF AL~VrE OIL SPILL CLEANUP BESPCVSES OH SPAHI INR. ALTERNIFLORA A Thesis RUSSELL ~ KIESLING Submits to the Graduat College of Twas ASM University in Partial fulfill of the reguixemts for the degv of FASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987... Pbjor Subject: azoology THE INPACT OF ALTERNATIVE OIL SPILL ~ RESPONSES ON SPARTINA ALTERNIFIgRA A Th sis by RIJSSELL WAYNE KIESLING Approved as to style and content by: Steve K. Al~w r -chairman of ' ttee) No?rrill H. Sweet (Co...

Kiesling, Russell Wayne

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The IXTOC I oil spill: the Federal Scientific Response. Special report  

SciTech Connect

On 3 June 1979, a Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory well, IXTOC I, blew out in the Bay of Campeche, about 80 km northwest of Ciudad del Carmen, Mexico. The spill, not brought under control until 27 March 1980, became the largest oil spill in history. The following summary described the numerous operation support activities and scientific studies performed under the purview of the Federal Scientific Support Coordinator. The primary purpose of the physical, chemical, and biological activities described herein was to provide the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (OSC) with timely information concerning the location, toxicity, and potential ecological impact of the oil on the Texas coastline.

Hooper, C.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss the objectives and requirements associated with this rule from the code of federal regulations. We have provided an example to help familiarize you with the material. The example will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste operations and emergency response or through the course manager. You may need to refer to these documents to complete the example, practice, and criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations

310

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

311

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 `Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.` The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92.

Brumburgh, G.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102  

SciTech Connect

Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

316

Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Dosimetric calculations gave a dose conversion coefficient of 15 mSv/WLM, which is higher than the value 5 m rights reserved. Keywords: Radon; Radon progeny; Human respiratory tract; Dose conversion coefficient serve as an indicator of underground uranium ores. It can also pass the surface between the soil

Yu, K.N.

317

Societyof Petroleum Engineers Cleaning Up Spilled Gasoline With Steam: Compo~itional Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societyof Petroleum Engineers SPE 25257 Cleaning Up Spilled Gasoline With Steam: Compo Copyright 1993, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 121h reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are sUbject to correctlo~ by the author(s). The

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

318

hboi.fau.edu P. 1 Drill for Oil Spill Answers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hboi.fau.edu P. 1 Drill for Oil Spill Answers Dr. Peter McCarthy examines the differences, Deepwater Horizon explosion, oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico for nearly three months before a temporary Associate Amber Garr are working in their lab to determine what oil and dispersant exposure does

Fernandez, Eduardo

319

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

320

Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States of America Abstract Oil spills represent a major environmental.S. Gulf of Mexico is a hub of oil and gas exploration activities that historically have impacted

Pennings, Steven C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Numerical Modelling of Boom and Oil Spill with SPH D. Violeaua,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, France ABSTRACT The protection of coastal areas against oil pollution is often addressed with the use and used to depict criteria for oil leakage. It appears that oil leakage by entrainment occurs when of the most widely spread equipment used to respond to an oil spill in marine or inland waters (figure 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

Spill-Minimizing Rules For Parallel Reservoirs: Quantity and Quality Javier Paredes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to incorporate constraints on conservative constituents. Willey et al. (1996) #12;modified the water allocation is considered, with different pools having different water quality characteristics. This fragmentation This paper presents a spill-minimizing operating policy for refill of reservoirs in parallel for water supply

Lund, Jay R.

323

Degradation and resilience in Louisiana salt marshes after the BPDeepwater Horizon oil spill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sediment delivery rates . Geology 39 ( 5...ET ( 1978 ) No. 2 fuel oil spill in Bourne...Initiative through the Florida Institute...of oil on erosion rates, that variation in measured marsh erosion rates could be attributable...relative to wave energy, we used...

Brian R. Silliman; Johan van de Koppel; Michael W. McCoy; Jessica Diller; Gabriel N. Kasozi; Kamala Earl; Peter N. Adams; Andrew R. Zimmerman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An Effective Dispersant for Oil Spills Based on Food-Grade Amphiphiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examined the ability of food-grade amphiphiles to disperse (emulsify) crude oil in seawater. Our studies to coalescence for a much longer time. The smaller size and stability of crude oil droplets are believed-4 In the case of a large oil spill such as the Deepwater Horizon event in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, over 2

Rubloff, Gary W.

325

Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil spill nears the beaches of Florida, and the leak may not be plugged before Christmas By David Gardner Last updated at 11:32 AM on 3rd June 2010 BP's giant oil slick was bearing down on Florida holidaymakers a year visit Florida and state leaders fear the oil will devastate a tourist industry

Belogay, Eugene A.

326

Did BP's oil-dissolving chemical make the spill By Kate Spinner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Did BP's oil-dissolving chemical make the spill worse? By Kate Spinner Published: Monday, May 30, 2011 at 8:47 p.m. BP succeeded in sinking the oil from its blown well out of sight -- and keeping much chemicals. But the impact on the ecosystem as a whole may have been more damaging than the oil alone

Belogay, Eugene A.

327

Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom BY JIM WAYMER from the nation's worst-ever oil mess. Oceanographers want to know the paths of underwater oil plumes. Biologists wonder if nesting sea turtles that accidentally gulped oil will lay viable eggs or whether eggs

Belogay, Eugene A.

328

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

Does the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Street, Suite 450, Austin, Texas, 78701, USA Summary: Fly ash, a waste material from coal-fired power of fly ash [9]. Fly ash is a waste material from coal fired power plants; when added to concrete, fly ashDoes the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1 , M. Juenger1 and J

Siegel, Jeffrey

331

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

332

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.Threat and Unconventional Weapon Robert Jones, MD Brandonand as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fuel storage tanks, heating oil tanks, emergency generator tanks, industrial activities and landfills from an underground storage tank (UST) or associated piping are required within 24 hours of discovery Handling Facilities classify and manage petroleum-contaminated soils by the concentration of gas-, diesel

Wilcock, William

334

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 273 (2014) 272279  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural University, Shangdong 271018, China c Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida , Jun Luoa, , Lena Q. Maa,c, a State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School on Corresponding authors at: State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School

Ma, Lena

335

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

336

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 185 (2011) 983989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), a carcinogenic metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment. Human activities including mining, smelting, and As to arsenic via drinking con- taminated water (>50 g/L) leads to cancers, birth defects, and other diseases [3

Ma, Lena

337

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kilopascals kilopascals 0.14504 pounds per square inch 062001 Source: Engineering Unit Conversions, M. R. Lindeburg, PE., Third Ed., 1990, Professional Publications, Inc.,...

338

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

340

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

342

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

343

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

344

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the equal energy hypothesisthe notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazardis that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 67 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA correction for intermittency is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

346

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

347

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

348

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

349

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

351

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

352

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

353

Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System  

SciTech Connect

The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

38th Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Oct. 2010 Spill-over effects of ICT use in school to Thai communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38th Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Oct. 2010 1 Spill-over effects of ICT use institutions to which the authors have been affiliated with. #12;38th Telecommunications Policy Research

Peha, Jon M.

355

Prediction of Barrier-Island Inundation and Overwash: Application to the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction of Barrier-Island Inundation and Overwash: Application to the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill 0 10.5 Kilometers 0 0.25 0.5 Miles Photo: NOAA Photo: NOAA Low Risk: No inundation

Torgersen, Christian

356

The Fate in the Marine Environment of a Minor Diesel Fuel Spill from an Antarctic Research Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monitoring was undertaken of the fate in the marine environment of an accidental spill of diesel fuel (1000 litres) from Faraday Research Station, ... local background levels within one week. The fuel had an imme...

G. C. Cripps; J. Shears

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Vanadium and nickel content of Nowruz spill tar flakes on the Saudi Arabian coastline and their probable environmental impact  

SciTech Connect

The Arabian Gulf is experiencing the worst oil spill in its history. The spill originates from two war damaged Iranian oil wells in the Nowruz oil field. Much of the oil is entering Saudi Arabian waters and washes ashore in the form of tar like flakes. In late March and early April 1983, fish, snake, turtle, and bird kills of different magnitude were noted along the Saudi Arabian coastline. In the early days of the spill Saudi Arabian authorities suspected sources other than the Nowruz spill to be causing the kills. Research was initiated to identify the origin of tar like flakes, their environmental impact and the cause of fish, snake, turtle and bird kills. This paper discusses some of the results of this research.

Sadiq, M.; Zaidi, T.H.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

359

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

360

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

364

Development of a GIS for environmental assessment incorporating known potential environmental hazards and remote sensing  

SciTech Connect

The development of a Geographic Information System (GIS) application to evaluate potential environmental hazards within the Bushkill watershed in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, is described by the authors. Information identifying hazardous materials used by businesses within the watershed was obtained from databases of the Environmental Protection Agency. These databases were supplemented and updated by visual reconnaissance and by a review of current tax maps, zoning information and aerial photographs. Information regarding the use or storage of substances considered hazardous was collected from various agencies as well as any known violations of environmental regulations by the businesses. Geographic information including remotely sensed data and maps of surface water bodies, geology and soil types was also obtained for the study area. A GIS was used to integrate the geographic information with the hazardous substance database resulting in a tool for use in environmental site assessments, planning for subsequent site characterization, and for environmental educational purposes.

Shaffer, D.L. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States); Roth, M.J.S.; Ruggles, R. [Lafayette Coll., Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

The BP oil spill and the adherence to reductionist principles: moving toward a precautionary tomorrow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability to successfully extract fossil fuels and mitigate the potential for social, economic, ecological and health-related impacts is of great importance. In April of 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico with 11 known fatalities. The disaster left the USA pressed to find a solution to solve the community health and safety issues associated with the offshore petroleum extraction industry in a policy and regulatory environment based on the reductionist perspective. However, in order to begin to address these issues, the regulatory environment must change their perspective to a precautionary one. This paper uses the BP oil spill as an example of what can happen when society continues to hold to reductionist principles, and advocates for a shift in thinking toward the precautionary perspective.

Jason D. Rivera; DeMond S. Miller; Christopher Gonzalez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

367

Research implications: an evaluation of residential evacuation practices following a train derailment/oleum spill incident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research paper outlines the specific elements involved in the evacuation of approximately 3000 residents following a train derailment in the spring of 2002 in a suburban community in the Southeastern United States (USA). The derailment caused the release of an oleum (sulphuric acid) spill/plume. A major focus is the post-accident assessment of the procedures used for the evacuation, including recommended improvements/modifications. These recommendations were designed to improve future compliance with evacuation procedures in residential neighbourhoods.

Susan M. Smith; Tyler Kress; Mary Jane Tremethick; Sean Lennon; Alan Lawson; Holt Clark; Jerry Harnish

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ARAC dispersion modeling of the July 26, 1993 oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results from the real-time response on the day of the spill followed by a re-assessment of the spill. Worst-case source terms and readily available meteorological data (met data) were used for the real-time response. ARAC employs a three-dimensional, diagnostic, finite-difference dispersion modeling system for estimating the consequences from accidental atmospheric releases. MATHEW (Mass-Adjusted Three- Dimensional Wind field), a Eulerian wind field code, and ADPIC (Atmospheric Diffusion by Particle-In-Cell), a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian dispersion model, from the core of the system. For a particular incident a model grid is selected to encompass the area of concern and is generated using underlying terrain from on-line data. Meteorological data from multiple surface and upper air stations are automatically acquired in real time primarily from local airports and formatted to initialize the wind field model. Dispersion parameters are determined from meteorological data and the source term from available information. The system is designed to simulate releases from single or multiple radioactive releases, such as ventings, spills, fires, or explosions. Solid and liquid aerosols and neutrally-buoyant gases are modeled. Particle size distributions are input for each aerosol source and modeled using gravitational settling and wet and dry deposition, if applicable. The system can be readily applied to neutrally-bouyant, nonradioactive chemical releases which do not undergo significant physical or chemical conversion processes.

Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III; Pobanz, B.M. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

371

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

372

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

373

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

374

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

379

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

380

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

382

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the Cornell-McGuire method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radioactivity level in soil of a palaeo beach in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh and evaluation of radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......outdoor and indoor radiation hazard indices...annual effective dose rates. MATERIALS...Denundation of the Bay of Bengal extending along...kg). Gamma radiation hazard indices...based on the estimation that 1 Bq kg...gamma radiation dose rates. The index......

Ashna Islam; Mahfuza Sharifa Sultana; Aleya Begum; Selina Yeasmin

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

390

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Environmental hazards: real or exaggerated?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0223-302067, FAX (44) 0223-302068 Send materials to Science Advertising, 1333 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005. m Information for Contributors appears on pages 40-42 of the 1 January 1993 issue. Editorial correspondence, includ-ing requests...

MD Green

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

Air pollution control: Indoor hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the need for further study of the health effects of indoor air pollution, ranging from radon emitted by building materials to the second-hand effects of cigarette smoke, and the ... overlooked in research on the health effects of environmental pollutants. In some cases,such as radon, the report says that there is an "urgent need" to study such health ...

David Dickson

1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

396

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

397

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

398

Fisheries vol 36 no 7 july 2011 www.fisheries.org332 Potential Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizon Oil Spill on Commercial Fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico Feature: FISHERIES RESEARCH Impacto known accidental oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Eco- system (LME), a region valued for its of Mexico large marine ecosystem (LME), it is im- perative to quantify the potential impacts

Pauly, Daniel

399

Response and Rescue Plans for Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response and Rescue Plans for Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico The Wildlife Branch of the Unified Command has organized trained wildlife that will be impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The marine mammal and sea turtle response teams include

400

The BP Oil Spill: One Year Later College Station, September 19 The Mosbacher Institute brought together an expert panel to discuss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BP Oil Spill: One Year Later College Station, September 19 ­ The Mosbacher Institute brought at the Macondo oil well last year. The panel spoke to an audience of some 70 faculty and students at the Bush for the discussion, Jim Griffin reminded the audience that the oil spill that began on April 20, 2010 is the largest

Boas, Harold P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ESTIMATE: UPDATE JUNE 11, 2010 by Professor Satish Nagarajaiah, Rice University (www.ruf.rice.edu/~nagaraja &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL ESTIMATE: UPDATE JUNE 11, 2010 by Professor Satish Nagarajaiah, Rice. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/11/us/11spill.html?hp New Estimates Double Rate of Oil Flowing on Thursday essentially doubled its estimate of how much oil has been spewing from the out-of-control BP well

Nagarajaiah, Satish

402

A Monte Carlo simulation based two-stage adaptive resonance theory mapping approach for offshore oil spill vulnerability index classification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation based two-stage adaptive resonance theory mapping (MC-TSAM) model was developed to classify a given site into distinguished zones representing different levels of offshore Oil Spill Vulnerability Index (OSVI). It consisted of an adaptive resonance theory (ART) module, an ART Mapping module, and a centroid determination module. Monte Carlo simulation was integrated with the TSAM approach to address uncertainties that widely exist in site conditions. The applicability of the proposed model was validated by classifying a large coastal area, which was surrounded by potential oil spill sources, based on 12 features. Statistical analysis of the results indicated that the classification process was affected by multiple features instead of one single feature. The classification results also provided the least or desired number of zones which can sufficiently represent the levels of offshore OSVI in an area under uncertainty and complexity, saving time and budget in spill monitoring and response.

Pu Li; Bing Chen; Zelin Li; Xiao Zheng; Hongjing Wu; Liang Jing; Kenneth Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

404

Biological Sciences Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

405

Clinical Skills Building Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

406

Social Sciences Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

407

Science Theatre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

408

Mathematical Sciences -Trailer B Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

409

MacKimmie Block Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

410

Arts Building & Parkade Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

411

Professional Faculties Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

412

Kinesiology A Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

413

MacKimmie Tower Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

414

Mechanical Engineering Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

415

Child Development Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

416

Mathematical Sciences Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

417

Veterinary Sciences Research Station Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

418

Craigie Hall E Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

419

MacEwan Student Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

420

Varsity Courts Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

High Density Library Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

422

General Services Building Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

423

Olympic Volunteer Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights the emergency call Campus Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt

de Leon, Alex R.

424

Use of Chemical Fingerprinting to Establish the Presence of Spilled Crude Oil in a Residential Area Following Hurricane Katrina, St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional oil spill fingerprinting protocols and two-component mixing models (crude oil/lube oil and crude oil/NOM) were used to confirm the presence of the spilled crude oileven when mixed at low concentrations with other hydrocarbon sourcesas a means to develop and govern a settlement and remedial program with the affected property owners. ... The source and impact of waterborne oil spills intentionally or accidentally discharged into the environment are frequently investigated using chemical fingerprinting (1). ... The success of fingerprinting investigations stems from the chemical specificity of different crude oils and refined petroleum products (2), which affords the opportunity to correlate a spilled oil with its potential source(s) and with potentially impacted environmental matrices, usually sedi ments and biota, sometimes years after the spill event (3?7). ...

Scott A. Stout; Bo Liu; Glenn C. Millner; Dyron Hamlin; Edward Healey

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Health Science Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

Habib, Ayman

426

University Research Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

427

Downtown Campus Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

428

Yamnuska Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

429

Childcare Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

430

Weather Station Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

431

Olympus Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

432

Grounds Building Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

433

Reeve Theatre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

434

Olympic Oval Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

435

Norquay Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

436

Rozsa Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

437

Wild Life Research Station Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

438

Rundle Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

439

Administration Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

440

MacEwan Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Heritage Medical Research Building Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

442

Education Tower Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

443

Kananaskis Field Station Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

444

Cascade Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

445

Murray Fraser Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

446

Taylor Family Digital Library Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

447

Glacier Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

448

Kananaskis Field Station -RB Miller Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

449

Scurfield Hall -Trailer J Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

450

Heating Plant Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

451

Physical Plant Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

452

Emergency Instructions In the event of an EMERGENCY dial 403-220-5333 for Campus Security or dial 9-1-1 for Police, Fire or Ambulance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

453

Rothney Astrological Observatory (Priddis) Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

454

Dining Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

455

Emergency Instructions In the event of an EMERGENCY dial 403-220-5333 for Campus Security or dial 9-1-1 for Police, Fire or Ambulance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

456

Earth Sciences Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

457

Hotel Alma / International House Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

458

Energy Environment Experiential Learning Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

459

Kananaskis Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

460

Engineering C Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Castle Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

462

Calgary Centre for Innovative Technology Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

463

Health Research Innovation Centre Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill to an armed assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

464

Information & Communication Technology Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill you are comfortable dealing - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter, as a last resort, fight for survival

de Leon, Alex R.

465

Brewster Hall Emergency Instructions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security at 403-220-5333 from a safe location Hazardous Materials Spill Only attempt to clean up a spill assailant, run away from the subject Hide - if you cannot flee, or do not know the location of the shooter, hide in a locked or barricaded room and turn out the lights Fight ­ if confronted by the shooter

de Leon, Alex R.

466

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Materialism and materiality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accountants and auditors in recent financial scandals have been pictured as materialistic, simply calculating consequences and ignoring duties. This paper potentially explains this apparently materialistic behaviour in what has historically been a truthtelling profession. Materiality, which drives audit priorities, has been institutionalised in accounting and auditing standards. But a materiality focus inherently implies that all amounts that are not 'materially' misstated are equally true. This leads to habitual immaterial misstatements and promotes the view that auditors do not care about truth at all. Auditors' lack of commitment to truth undermines their claim to be professionals in the classic sense.

Michael K. Shaub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

470

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

471

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Materials Characterization Paul McConnell, (505) 844-8361 The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials, i.e., mixed waste, packaging is to enable this waste type to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this goal, regulations have been written establishing general design requirement for such packagings. Based on these regulatory requirements, a Mixed Waste Chemical Compatibility Testing Program is intended to assure regulatory bodies that the issue of packaging compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. Such a testing program has been developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories. Materials Characterization Capabilities

473

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Radiocarbon evidence that carbon from the Deepwater Horizon spill entered the planktonic food web of the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon (Macondo) oil spill released large volumes of oil and gas of distinct carbon isotopic composition to the northern Gulf of Mexico, allowing Graham etal (2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 045301) to use stable carbon isotopes (?13C) to infer the introduction of spilled oil into the planktonic food web. Surface ocean organic production and measured oil are separated by 57 in stable carbon isotope (?13C) space, while in radiocarbon (?14C) space these two potential sources are separated by more than 1000. Thus radiocarbon isotopes provide a more sensitive tracer by which to infer possible introduction of Macondo oil into the food web. We measured ?14C and ?13C in plankton collected from within 100km of the spill site as well as in coastal and offshore DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon or ?CO2) to constrain surface production values. On average, plankton values were depleted in 14C relative to surface DIC, and we found a significant linear correlation between ?14C and ?13C in plankton. Cumulatively, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbon released from the Deepwater Horizon spill contributed to the offshore planktonic food web. Our results support the findings of Graham etal (2010 Environ. Res. Lett. 5 045301), but we infer that methane input may be important.

J P Chanton; J Cherrier; R M Wilson; J Sarkodee-Adoo; S Bosman; A Mickle; W M Graham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Distribution and concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons associated with the BP/Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We examined the geographic extent of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in sediment, seawater, biota, and seafood during/after the BP/Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (April 20July 15, 2010; 28.736667N, ?88.386944W). TPH, PAHs, and 12 compound classes were examined, particularly C1-benzo(a)anthracenes/chrysenes, C-2-/C-4-phenanthrenes/anthracenes, and C3-naphthalenes. Sediment TPH, PAHs, and all classes peaked near Pensacola, Florida, and Galveston, Texas. Seawater TPH peaked off Pensacola; all of the above classes peaked off the Mississippi River, Louisiana and Galveston. Biota TPH and \\{PAHs\\} peaked near the Mississippi River; C-3 napthalenes peaked near the spill site. Seafood TPH peaked near the spill site, with \\{PAHs\\} and all classes peaking near Pensacola. We recommend that oil concentrations continued to be monitored in these media well after the spill has ceased to assist in defining re-opening dates for fisheries; closures should be maintained until hydrocarbon levels are deemed within appropriate limits.

Paul W. Sammarco; Steve R. Kolian; Richard A.F. Warby; Jennifer L. Bouldin; Wilma A. Subra; Scott A. Porter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 2: Technical report  

SciTech Connect

On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France b Department of Environmental Science, Hunan Agricultural polluted with As, Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu. The contamination levels were in the order of GYBNSZYNJTC showing

Mailhes, Corinne

479

Proceedings of the 23 Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program Meeting, Vancouver, Canada. Vol. 1., 59-68  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blucher Institute ­ Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412, USA with dichloromethane and analysis using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon or TPH/TPH combined procedure can be used to quantify meso-scale to large-scale spills in experimental or natural

Louchouarn, Patrick

480

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material spill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source January 18, 2012 Beamline Operation: HC1 APS Base Low Temperatures: HC2 Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures: HC3.1 Electric Furnace HC3.2 Optical Furnace HC3.3 Other High Temperature Lasers: HC4.2 Laser, Class 2 HC4.3a Laser, Class 3a HC4.3b Laser, Class 3b HC4.4 Laser, Class 4 High Pressures: HC5.1 High Pressure, DAC HC5.2 High Pressure, LVP HC5.3 High Pressure Vessels HC5.4 High Pressure Comp. Gas Chemicals: HC6.0 Chemicals, General HC6.1 Chemicals, Carcinogen HC6.2 Chemicals, Corrosive HC6.3 Chemicals, Toxic HC6.4 Chemicals, Flammable HC6.5 Chemicals, Oxidizer HC6.6 Chemicals, Other HC6.7 Chemicals, Explosive/Energetic Materials Biosafety: HC7.1 Biosafety Level 1 HC7.2 Biosafety Level 2 HC7.3 Biosafety Level 3

482

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Evolution of the optical properties of seawater influenced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluorescence excitationemission matrix (EEM) technique coupled with parallel factor (PARAFAC) modeling and measurements of bulk organic carbon and other optical properties were used to characterize the oil components released from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and to examine the chemical evolution and transformation of oil in the water column. Seawater samples were collected from the Gulf of Mexico during October 2010 and October 2011, three months and fifteen months, respectively, after the oil spill was stopped. Together with previous results from samples collected during the oil spill in May/June 2010, these time series samples allow us to elucidate changes in the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the time of maximum oil impact to its recovery, 15 months after the spill. Although the oil had profoundly altered the optical properties of the DOM in the entire water column during the oil spill, naturally occurring DOM became predominant in surface waters by October 2010, three months after the spill. Anomalous DOM with high optical yields, however, still resided in deep waters even 15 months after the oil spill in October 2011, showing a persistent influence of the oil in deep waters. Based on fluorescence EEM data and PARAFAC modeling, three oil components and one natural humic-like DOM could be readily identified. The most prominent oil component had its maximum fluorescence intensity at Ex/Em 224/328nm, and the other two centered on Ex/Em 264/324 and 232/346nm, respectively. The humic-like DOM component had its wide emission peak from 390 to 460nm over the excitation wavelength at ~248nm. We hypothesized that component-2 (264/324nm) was mostly derived from photochemical degradation and the component-3 (232/346nm) could be a degradation product from both microbial and photochemical degradation, although both C2 and C3 are subject to degradation at different rates. The oil component ratios, such as C2/C1 and C3/C1, were closely related to degradation states of oil and can be used as a sensitive index to track the fate, transport and transformation of oil in the water column.

Zhengzhen Zhou; Laodong Guo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

485

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

486

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

487

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

488

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit 07-09-01, Mud Pit 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit 10-09-01, Mud Pit 12-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 19-09-03, Mud Pit 19-09-04, Mud Pit 19-25-01, Oil Spill 19-99-06, Waste Spill 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-02, Mud Pit 20-09-03, Mud Pit 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) 20-09-06, Mud Pit 20-09-07, Mud Pit 20-09-10, Mud Pit 20-25-04, Oil Spills 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

491

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

492

ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

493

ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth rules...

494

EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

495

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

496

6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract This...

497

ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal Abstract...

498

EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

499

EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Safety Hazard at SRS EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is H-Canyon, where workers recently dissolved the last...

500

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials