Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

GRR/Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies RCRA CERCLA 40 CFR 261 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The use of underground and above ground storage tanks, discovery of waste

2

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

6

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

7

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

8

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials...

9

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

10

Thoughts on Hazard Assessment (Oct)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences J.M. Logue, T.E. McKone, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2010 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, and by the California Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3650-E 1 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States

11

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

12

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed “Jemie” Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

14

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

15

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

16

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 41300 The objective of this surveillance is to...

17

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Fluorescent are hazardous waste, so take care to ensure the tubes remain intact during removal and storage. Fluorescent

Wilcock, William

19

Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

22

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

23

Implementing DOE guidance for hazards assessments at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazards Assessments are performed for a variety of activities and facilities at Rocky Flats Plant. Prior to 1991, there was no guidance for performing Hazards Assessments. Each organization that performed Hazards Assessments used its own methodology with no attempt at standardization. In 1991, DOE published guidelines for the performance of Hazards Assessments for Emergency Planning (DOE-EPG-5500.1, ``Guidance for a Hazards Assessment Methodology``). Subsequently, in 1992, DOE published a standard for the performance of Hazards Assessments (DOE-STD-1027-92, ``Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis, Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports``). Although these documents are a step in the direction of standardization, there remains a great deal of interpretation and subjective implementation in the performance of Hazards Assessments. Rocky Flats Plant has initiated efforts to develop a uniform and standard process to be used for Hazards Assessments.

Zimmerman, G.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimizing Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk M. Rapik Saat hazardous materials transport risk by rail · Tank Car Design Optimization Model Tank car weight and capacity model Metrics to assess tank car performance Illustration of the optimization model

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

25

ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

26

Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: A Case Study from Band Aceh, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas. 2007. Assessment and prediction of natural hazardsAssessment of Natural Hazard Damage and Reconstruction: AWorking Paper Series Assessment of Natural Hazard Damage and

Gillespie, Thomas; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Braughton, Matt; Cooke, Abigail M.; Armenta, Tiffany; Thomas, Duncan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

28

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

29

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

30

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

31

Quantification of the number of injured people due to hazardous material accidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accidents with hazardous materials may threaten the lives of people living in the direct environment of the transportation infrastructure. In many countries, fire brigades play a major role in advising the authorities when they are dealing with issues where hazardous materials are involved. Since emergency responders have to deal with injured persons, information concerning the number of injured people and the types of injuries is relevant to them. In response to this need, we developed a method for calculating the number of injured people. This method was applied to the (re)development plans for the largest railway station in the Netherlands, Utrecht Central station. Through this intermodal transfer terminal, both passengers and substantial amounts of hazardous materials are transported. The fire brigades used the injury information to assess the spatial development plans and transportation plans for hazardous materials. Furthermore, the fire brigades used the injury information to determine their suppression tactics and equipment requirements.

Nils Rosmuller; Inge Trijssenaar; Johan Reinders; Peter Blokker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

33

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH REGULATIONS (COSHH) and the DANGEROUS SUBSTANCES AND EXPLOSIVE ATMOSPHERES Involving the Use of Hazardous Chemicals. COSHH requires health risks to be assessed and controlled by dangerous substances. The sections below correspond approximately to the sections in the form. The major

36

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction projects which impact existing building materials must include an environmental consultant air pollution control agency and the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) at least ten (10) daysUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Asbestos

Wilcock, William

37

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. Emergency responders participate in a training exercise in the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP), which also recently released its annual report. Administered by EM’s Office of Packaging and Transportation, TEPP ensures federal, state, tribal and local responders have access to the plans, training and technical assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to radiological transportation accidents.

39

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

40

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

43

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

44

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY HAZARDOUS WASTE STAGING FACILITY Project 39GF71024-GPDI21000000 . PANTEX PLANT AMARILLO, TEXAS DOE/EA-0688 JUNE 1993 MASTER DiSTRiBUTiON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITEI) ffrl TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 Need for Action 1 2.0 Description of Proposed Facility Action 3.0 Location of the Action 8 4.0 Alternatives to Proposed Action 9 4.1 No Action 9 4.2 Redesign and Modify Existing staging Facilities 9 4.3 Use Other Existing Space at Pantex Plant 9 4.4 Use Temporary Structures 9 4.5 Stage Waste at Other Sites 10 4.6 Stage Wastes Separately 10 5.0 Environmental Impacts of Proposed Action 10 5.1 Archeology 10 5.2 FloodplainlW etlands 10 5.3 Threatened and Endangered Species 10 5.4 Surrounding La,nd Use 11 5.5 Construction 11 5.6 Air Emissions 11

45

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

Murray, H. Jr.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Title Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3650E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Thomas E. McKone, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Start Page 92 Issue 2 Pagination 92-109 Date Published 04/2011 Keywords resave Abstract Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants were representative of concentrations in residences in the United States. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants are identified as contaminants of concern for chronic health effects in a large fraction of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on robustness of reported concentration data and fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3- butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM2.5. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM2.5, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO2.

48

Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W. [Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management, 505 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of a GIS for environmental assessment incorporating known potential environmental hazards and remote sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a Geographic Information System (GIS) application to evaluate potential environmental hazards within the Bushkill watershed in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, is described by the authors. Information identifying hazardous materials used by businesses within the watershed was obtained from databases of the Environmental Protection Agency. These databases were supplemented and updated by visual reconnaissance and by a review of current tax maps, zoning information and aerial photographs. Information regarding the use or storage of substances considered hazardous was collected from various agencies as well as any known violations of environmental regulations by the businesses. Geographic information including remotely sensed data and maps of surface water bodies, geology and soil types was also obtained for the study area. A GIS was used to integrate the geographic information with the hazardous substance database resulting in a tool for use in environmental site assessments, planning for subsequent site characterization, and for environmental educational purposes.

Shaffer, D.L. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Newark, NJ (United States); Roth, M.J.S.; Ruggles, R. [Lafayette Coll., Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations personnel in determining the industrial hazards, vulnerability assessments and health risk assessments to continental United States military installations. These techniques and procedures support the Department of Defense Force Protection measures, which provides awareness of a terrorism threat, appropriate measures to prevent terrorist attacks and mitigate terrorism's effects in the event that preventive measures are ineffective.

Jeffrey S Kirkpatrick; Jacqueline M Howard; David A Reed

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

55

Application of probabilistic consequence analysis to the assessment of potential radiological hazards of fusion reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology has been developed to provide system reliability criteria based on an assessment of the potential radiological hazards associated with a fusion reactor design and on hazard constraints which prevent fusion ...

Sawdye, Robert William

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all, (2) develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects, and (3) identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program quarterly report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) stated in the proposal to DOE are to: develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication that recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all; develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third quarter (January--March) of the third year of the grant. It reports progress against these grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. Questions, comments, or requests for further information concerning the activities under this grant can be forwarded to Jack Davis in the EHAP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (803) 727-6450.

NONE

1995-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Journal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 1523 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hazardous Materials journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat Chromate reduction in FeJournal of Hazardous Materials 194 (2011) 15­23 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK d Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation

Burke, Ian

59

HM-ACCESS Project (Framework for the Use of Electronic Shipping Papers for the Transport of Hazardous Materials)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-ACCESS Initiative James Simmons Acting Chief, Research and Development Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Engineering and Research Division May 2012 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 2 H-azardous M-aterials A-utomated C-argo C-ommunication for E-fficient and S-afe S-hipments U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Background Purpose: To identify and eliminate barriers to the use of paperless hazard communication technologies to improve the delivery of critical hazardous materials (HM) safety information throughout the transportation chain.

60

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

62

Seismic Hazard Assessment of the Sheki-Ismayilli Region, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic hazard assessment is an important factor in disaster management of Azerbaijan Republic. The Shaki-Ismayilli region is one of the earthquake-prone areas in Azerbaijan. According to the seismic zoning map, the region is located in intensity IX zone. Large earthquakes in the region take place along the active faults. The seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region is studied using macroseismic and instrumental data, which cover the period between 1250 and 2003. Several principal parameters of earthquakes are analyzed: maximal magnitude, energetic class, intensity, depth of earthquake hypocenter, and occurrence. The geological structures prone to large earthquakes are determined, and the dependence of magnitude on the fault length is shown. The large earthquakes take place mainly along the active faults. A map of earthquake intensity has been developed for the region, and the potential seismic activity of the Shaki-Ismayilli region has been estimated.

Ayyubova, Leyla J. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

65

Regulations Establishing Restricted Zones for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish a Shore Clearance Line which cannot be crossed except in an emergency by any vessel transporting oil or hazardous materials in bulk in Long Island Sound. For the purpose...

66

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction in Darjeeling and Sikkim-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Hazard Resistant Construction Using Indigenous Materials -Bamboo Construction July 2014 4pm A206a � School of Engineering ABSTRACT Interest in sustainable construction materials material resources, such as bamboo, are an integral part of sustainable development. The use of natural

Davies, Christopher

67

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

68

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Environmental hazard assessment of coal fly ashes using leaching and ecotoxicity tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental hazard assessment of coal fly ashes using leaching and ecotoxicity tests V. Tsiridis t The environmental hazard of six coal fly ash samples collected from various coal incineration plants were examined- bustion, considerable amounts of coal fly ash are still produced. Although coal fly ash can be moderately

Short, Daniel

70

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

71

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

Applying radiological emergency planning experience to hazardous materials emergency planning within the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear industry has extensive radiological emergency planning (REP) experience that is directly applicable to hazardous materials emergency planning. Recently, the Feed Materials Production Center near Cincinnati, Ohio, successfully demonstrated such application. The REP experience includes conceptual bases and standards for developing plans that have been tested in hundreds of full-scale exercises. The exercise program itself is also well developed. Systematic consideration of the differences between chemical and radiological hazards shows that relatively minor changes to the REP bases and standards are necessary. Conduct of full-scale, REP-type exercises serves to test the plans, provide training, and engender confidence and credibility.

Foltman, A.; Newsom, D.; Lerner, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Deformable Mirror Materials Issue Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was a pleasure to speak with you and Dr. Olivier Guyon about your project to develop a coronagraph and in particular about materials science considerations in the development of the deformable mirror (DM) for the coronagraph. The coronagraph application will demand more of a DM than previous applications with regard to precision, and since the characterization and modeling tools are currently under development, you asked me to comment on materials issues that might impact the DM design and testing. I have not conducted research on this question, and my own research on modeling MEMS has not included DM systems. I am only in a position to discuss some general considerations that may help in developing a research plan for the DM system. As I understand it, the relevant points about the DM system are as follows. The DM surface needs to be positioned to less than 1 {angstrom} RMS of the desired shape, and be stable to 0.3 {angstrom} RMS for an hour. In the ultimate application in space the stability requirements may be greater. For example, the DM shape can be set using a bright star and then allow the coronagraph to be turned to a dim star to collect data for several hours, counting on the mirror shape to be stable. The DM is made of a polysilicon membrane coated with one or more metal layers for the reflective surface and actuated by 32x32 or 64x64 electrostatic actuators on the back side. The uncertainty in the position of any one actuator should be at the few-picometer level or less averaged over the 300-{micro}m region of the actuator. Currently, experiments are conducted that can characterize the surface shape to the 1 nm level, and it is anticipated that the experiments will be able to characterize the shape at the sub-Angstrom level but not in the immediate future. Regarding stability, under relatively large deformations (10's of nm), the DM mirror surface shows no hysteresis at the measurable nm level. Let me begin by saying that I am not aware of any article in the literature that directly assesses surface position stability at the sub-Angstrom level across 100's of microns of surface. Interferometry is typically used for precise metrology over areas this large, but not typically at the sub-Angstrom level. For the purpose of these comments, I assume that it will be possible to measure the precision of the mirror shape and stability at the requisite sub-Angstrom level at some point during the coronagraph development using interferometers or some other high-precision metrology technique. The hope is that the comments at this point may identify some potential issues that can be resolved early in the development to avoid costly surprises in the later stages.

Rudd, R E

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Assessment of Building Damage Hazard Caused by Earthquake: Integration of FNN and GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this research is to develop an integrated system that implements FNN and GIS to evaluate the building damage hazard caused by earthquake and to calculate the economic losses of damage. This research comprises of four steps which is the development of building damage hazard zones, the development of building database, the assessment of building damage hazard and the impact of economic losses in of damage. The result of the analysis showed that more than 97 percent of the functions of buildings in research location is a low hazard of building damage, where residential/commercial type and educational/religious facilities majority is in moderate to high hazard zone of building damage. The direct economic loss due to building damages caused by earthquake in Banda Aceh city Indonesia is estimated around 1,518,831,150,000 in Indonesia rupiah (168,759,016 in US Dollars).

E. Irwansyah; Sri Hartati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Material Analysis for a Fire Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consolidates technical information on several materials and material classes for a fire assessment. The materials include three polymeric materials, wood, and hydraulic oil. The polymers are polystyrene, polyurethane, and melamine- formaldehyde foams. Samples of two of the specific materials were tested for their behavior in a fire - like environment. Test data and the methods used to test the materials are presented. Much of the remaining data are taken from a literature survey. This report serves as a reference source of properties necessary to predict the behavior of these materials in a fire.

Brown, Alexander; Nemer, Martin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Model Averaging in Proportional Hazard Models: Assessing the Risk of a Stroke Chris T In the context of the Cardiovascular Health Study, a comprehensive investigation into the risk factors for stroke of assessing who is at high risk for stroke. 1 Introduction Stroke is the third leading cause of death among

Volinsky, Chris

78

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS ­ EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD assessment of contaminated aquatic sediments has to consider both sediment hydraulics and ecology. Since layers of contaminated sediments are often buried under less polluted deposits, the risk of erosion

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

79

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

80

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Alert people in the immediate area to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEVERE WEATHER EXPLOSION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EVACUATE · Alert people in the immediate area not operate any electrical devices, phones, appliances, light switches, or equipment with open flames within the affected area EVACUATE · Leave area and go to an exterior location where you can call 911 from a land line

Karonis, Nicholas T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organohalogen contaminants (dioxins, PCB, PBDE andInvestigation into levels of dioxins, furans, PCBs and PBDEsfor risk assessment of dioxin-contaminated sites. Ambio 36:

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

Fix, N.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A stochastic approach to risk assessment of hazardous waste sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A deterministic risk assessment model was evaluated for the variability in its input parameters, Information on these variables was gathered to characterize the variability. Statistical distributions were assigned to the variables based...

Arangath, Vishwanathan Vasu

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Multi-hazard Reliability Assessment of Offshore Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A probabilistic framework is developed to assess the structural reliability of offshore wind turbines. Probabilistic models are developed to predict the deformation, shear force and bending moment demands on the support structure of wind turbines...

Mardfekri Rastehkenari, Maryam 1981-

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Review of the Lawrence Livermore Nationa Laboratory Identiified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages This site visit report documents the results of Office of Health, Safety and Security's review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) identification, immediate actions, communications, documentation, evaluation, reporting and follow-up to the discovery of defective Department of Transportation (DOT) UN1A2 55- and 30-gallon open head single bolt closure steel drums intended for storage and transportation of hazardous waste and materials. This review, conducted on January 26-29, 2010, was sponsored by the DOE Livermore Site Office (LSO) to support interface with the lab and this report is intended to support follow-up

86

Biotests for hazard assessment of biofuel fermentation Sebastian Heger,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotests for hazard assessment of biofuel fermentation Sebastian Heger,a Kerstin Bluhm,a Matthew T accelerated during the last decade. In this context, biofuels are one potential replacement for fossil fuels on toxicity of biofuels and biofuel combustion. Furthermore, for a complete understanding of the environmental

Angenent, Lars T.

87

Geologic factors controlling patterns of small-volume basaltic volcanism: Application to a volcanic hazards assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazards assessment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Charles B. Connor,1 John A. Stamatakos,1 David A. Ferrill,1 are often required for facilities, such as nuclear power plants and high-level radioactive waste ­105 years [e.g., Krauskopf, 1988; U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, 1994; U.S. National

Connor, Charles

88

Integrated Assessment Systems for Chemical Warfare Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army must respond to a variety of situations involving suspect discovered, recovered, stored, and buried chemical warfare materiel (CWM). In some cases, the identity of the fill materiel and the status of the fusing and firing train cannot be visually determined due to aging of the container, or because the item is contained in an over-pack. In these cases, non-intrusive assessments are required to provide information to allow safe handling, storage, and disposal of the materiel. This paper will provide an overview of the integrated mobile and facility-based CWM assessment system prototypes that have been, and are being developed, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the US Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Project. In addition, this paper will discuss advanced sensors being developed to enhance the capability of the existing and future assessment systems. The Phase I Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) is currently being used by the Army's Technical Escort Unit (TEU) at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. This system includes equipment for non-intrusively identifying the munitions fill materiel and for assessing the condition and stability of the fuzes, firing trains, and other potential safety hazards. The system provides a self-contained, integrated command post including an on-board computer system, communications equipment, video and photographic equipment, weather monitoring equipment, and miscellaneous safety-related equipment. The Phase II MMAS is currently being tested and qualified for use by the INEEL and the US Army. The Phase II system contains several new assessment systems that significantly enhance the ability to assess CWM. A facility-based munitions assessment system prototype is being developed for the assessment of CWM stored in igloos at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas. This system is currently in the design and fabrication stages. Numerous CWM advanced sensors are being developed and tested, and pending successful test results, may be incorporated in the various munitions assessment systems in the future. These systems are intended to enhance CWM fill materiel identification, agent air monitoring, agent or agent degradation product detection by surface analysis, and real-time x-ray capabilities.

A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; G. L. Thinnes; K. D. Watts; R. J. McMorland

1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL PERFORMANCE IN DEMO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sufficient time. Reliable estimates of component lifetimes are an important part of power plant design The basic DEMO design used in the present study is a 1.8 GW device (2.2 GW total thermal power ­ including simulation models and capabilities to assess material performance under the neutron irradiation conditions

92

Modeling Exposure to Persistent Chemicals in Hazard and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fate and exposure modeling has not thus far been explicitly used in the risk profile documents prepared to evaluate significant adverse effect of candidate chemicals for either the Stockholm Convention or the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. However, we believe models have considerable potential to improve the risk profiles. Fate and exposure models are already used routinely in other similar regulatory applications to inform decisions, and they have been instrumental in building our current understanding of the fate of POP and PBT chemicals in the environment. The goal of this paper is to motivate the use of fate and exposure models in preparing risk profiles in the POP assessment procedure by providing strategies for incorporating and using models. The ways that fate and exposure models can be used to improve and inform the development of risk profiles include: (1) Benchmarking the ratio of exposure and emissions of candidate chemicals to the same ratio for known POPs, thereby opening the possibility of combining this ratio with the relative emissions and relative toxicity to arrive at a measure of relative risk. (2) Directly estimating the exposure of the environment, biota and humans to provide information to complement measurements, or where measurements are not available or are limited. (3) To identify the key processes and chemical and/or environmental parameters that determine the exposure; thereby allowing the effective prioritization of research or measurements to improve the risk profile. (4) Predicting future time trends including how quickly exposure levels in remote areas would respond to reductions in emissions. Currently there is no standardized consensus model for use in the risk profile context. Therefore, to choose the appropriate model the risk profile developer must evaluate how appropriate an existing model is for a specific setting and whether the assumptions and input data are relevant in the context of the application. It is possible to have confidence in the predictions of many of the existing models because of their fundamental physical and chemical mechanistic underpinnings and the extensive work already done to compare model predictions and empirical observations. The working group recommends that modeling tools be applied for benchmarking PBT/POPs according to exposure-to-emissions relationships, and that modeling tools be used to interpret emissions and monitoring data. The further development of models that couple fate, long-range transport, and bioaccumulation should be fostered, especially models that will allow time trends to be scientifically addressed in the risk profile.

Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E.; McLachlan, Michael S.; Arnot, Jon A.; MacLeod, Matthew; McKone, Thomas E.; Wania, Frank

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 23, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FG01-92EW50625 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). The objectives of the EHAP program stated in the proposal to DOE are to: (1) Develop a holistic, national basis for risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication which recognizes the direct impact of environmental hazards on the health and well-being of all. (2) Develop a pool of talented scientists and experts in cleanup activities, especially in human health aspects; and (3) Identify needs and develop programs addressing the critical shortage of well-educated, highly-skilled technical and scientific personnel to address the health oriented aspects of environmental restoration and waste management. This report describes activities and reports on progress for the second year of the grant.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Journal of Hazardous Materials 132 (2006) 98110 Assessment of environmental radon hazard using human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dosimetric calculations gave a dose conversion coefficient of 15 mSv/WLM, which is higher than the value 5 m rights reserved. Keywords: Radon; Radon progeny; Human respiratory tract; Dose conversion coefficient serve as an indicator of underground uranium ores. It can also pass the surface between the soil

Yu, K.N.

97

Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 4: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s (MUSC) vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. The significant growth in the number of environmental/health information systems that has occurred over the past few years has made data access challenging. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: immunological consequences of beryllium exposure; assessment of genetic risks to environmental diseases; low dose-rate radiation health effects; environmental risk perception in defined populations; information support and access systems; and environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The contribution of pattern recognition of seismic and morphostructural data to seismic hazard assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reliable statistical characterization of the spatial and temporal properties of large earthquakes occurrence is one of the most debated issues in seismic hazard assessment, due to the unavoidably limited observations from past events. We show that pattern recognition techniques, which are designed in a formal and testable way, may provide significant space-time constraints about impending strong earthquakes. This information, when combined with physically sound methods for ground shaking computation, like the neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA), may produce effectively preventive seismic hazard maps. Pattern recognition analysis of morphostructural data provide quantitative and systematic criteria for identifying the areas prone to the largest events, taking into account a wide set of possible geophysical and geological data, whilst the formal identification of precursory seismicity patterns (by means of CN and M8S algorithms), duly validated by prospective testing, provides useful constraints about impend...

Peresan, Antonella; Soloviev, Alexander; Panza, Giuliano F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

Babayev, Gulam R. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29A, H. Javid Ave., Baku AZ1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 16, 2012 HMCRP Project HM-04: Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security 2 The HM-04 Team * Battelle - Prime - Bill Tate, Project Director/PI & Co-Author * Dr. Mark Abkowitz, Vanderbilt University - Co-Author * American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) - Dan Murray, Lead * Visionary Solutions, LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 Project Objectives * Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; * Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced

102

Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecological Assessment of Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Research Laboratory 200 S. W. 35th Street Corvallis, OR 97333 ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: A FIELD AND LABORATORY REFERENCE DOCUMENT Edited By William Warren-Hicks l Benjamin R. Parkhurst 2 Samuel S. Baker, Jr. 1 1 Kilkelly Environmental Associates Highway 70 West - The Water Garden Raleigh, NC 27622 2 Western Aquatics, Inc. P.O. BOX 546 203 Grand Avenue Laramie, WY 82070 DISCLAIMER T h e i n f o r m a t i o n i n t h i s d o c u m e n t h a s b e e n f u n d e d b y t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s Environmental Protection Agent h by Contract Number 68-03-3439 to Kilkelly Environmenta] Associates, Raleig , NC 27622. It has been subject to the Agency's peer and administrative review, and it has been approved for publication as an EPA

103

Hazardous waste assessment and reduction options in an auto service station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hazardous waste assessment was performed and options for reduction of waste antifreeze and car wash wastewater were studied for Thompson`s Freeway Amoco, a gasoline station with a small repair shop and car wash, located in Duluth, Minnesota. In 1992, 1,310 gallons of waste aqueous antifreeze solution (50 vol% ethylene glycol, 50 vol% water), 6,580 gallons of waste oil, 138 gallons of waste parts washer solvent, and 2,702 lbs of waste oil filters, all classified as hazardous waste, were generated by this and three other sister stations of similar size under the same ownership. In addition, 779,810 gallons of car wash wastewater, not classified as hazardous waste, were also produced and discharged into the sewer. Various options were studied for reductions in waste antifreeze and car was wastewater by recycling and reuse. The economic evaluations are presented with the conclusions that on-site recycling of antifreeze is viable but not car wash wastewater recycling.

Baria, D.N.; Dorland, D.; Miller, K.C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Environmental hazards assessment program. Annual report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third year of the DOE grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). It reports progress against grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. As the program has evolved, more projects have been funded and many existing projects have become more complex. Thus, to accomplish better the objectives over the years and retain a solid focus on the total mission, we have reorganized the grant effort from three to five majoe elements: Public and professional outreach; Clinical programs; Science programs; Information systems; and, Program management.

NONE

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Advances in National Capabilities for Consequence Assessment Modeling of Airborne Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes ongoing advancement of airborne hazard modeling capabilities in support of multiple agencies through the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Atmospheric Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). A suite of software tools developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and collaborating organizations includes simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end user's computers, Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced 3-D flow and atmospheric dispersion modeling tools and expert analysis from the national center at LLNL, and state-of-the-science high-resolution urban models and event reconstruction capabilities.

Nasstrom, J; Sugiyama, G; Foster, K; Larsen, S; Kosovic, B; Eme, B; Walker, H; Goldstein, P; Lundquist, J; Pobanz, B; Fulton, J

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

MARSAME Initial Assessment of Materials and Equipment 2 INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND EQUIPMENT 2.1 Introduction The initial assessment (IA) is the first step in the investigation of materials Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM 2002). The purpose of the IA is to collect and evaluate of impacted M&E (e.g., clearance, increased radiological controls, remediation, or disposal). Project managers

107

Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tsunami hazard is a very low-probability, but potentially high-risk natural hazard, posing unique challenges to scientists and policy makers trying to mitigate its impacts. These challenges are illustrated in this assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin. Seismic activity along the U.S. Atlantic margin in general is low, and confirmed paleo-tsunami deposits have not yet been found, suggesting a very low rate of hazard. However, the devastating 1929 Grand Banks tsunami along the Atlantic margin of Canada shows that these events continue to occur. Densely populated areas, extensive industrial and port facilities, and the presence of ten nuclear power plants along the coast, make this region highly vulnerable to flooding by tsunamis and therefore even low-probability events need to be evaluated. We can presently draw several tentative conclusions regarding tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic coast. Landslide tsunamis likely constitute the biggest tsunami hazard to the coast. Only a small number of landslides have so far been dated and they are generally older than 10,000 years. The geographical distribution of landslides along the margin is expected to be uneven and to depend on the distribution of seismic activity along the margin and on the geographical distribution of Pleistocene sediment. We do not see evidence that gas hydrate dissociation contributes to the generation of landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin. Analysis of landslide statistics along the fluvial and glacial portions of the margin indicate that most of the landslides are translational, were probably initiated by seismic acceleration, and failed as aggregate slope failures. How tsunamis are generated from aggregate landslides remains however, unclear. Estimates of the recurrence interval of earthquakes along the continental slope may provide maximum estimates for the recurrence interval of landslide along the margin. Tsunamis caused by atmospheric disturbances and by coastal earthquakes may be more frequent than those generated by landslides, but their amplitudes are probably smaller. Among the possible far-field earthquake sources, only earthquakes located within the Gulf of Cadiz or west of the Tore-Madeira Rise are likely to affect the U.S. coast. It is questionable whether earthquakes on the Puerto Rico Trench are capable of producing a large enough tsunami that will affect the U.S. Atlantic coast. More information is needed to evaluate the seismic potential of the northern Cuba fold-and-thrust belt. The hazard from a volcano flank collapse in the Canary Islands is likely smaller than originally stated, and there is not enough information to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of flank collapse from the Azores Islands. Both deterministic and probabilistic methods to evaluate the tsunami hazard from the margin are available for application to the Atlantic margin, but their implementation requires more information than is currently available.

U.S. ten Brink; J.D. Chaytor; E.L. Geist; D.S. Brothers; B.D. Andrews

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

CORROSION STUDY OF REPLACEMENT MATERIALS FOR HAZARDOUS LOW LEVEL WASTE PROCESSING TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New waste tanks are to be constructed in H-area to store hazardous low level wastes. AISI Type 304L (304L) stainless steel was recommended as a suitable material of construction for these tanks. Cyclic polarization and coupon tests were performed to evaluate the corrosion resistance of 304L over a wide range of waste tank environments. The results of both tests indicated that 304L was not susceptible to attack under any of these conditions. Comparison tests were also performed with ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537) and Incoloy 825. The carbon steel corroded severely in some of the environments, while Incoloy 825 did not corrode. These tests, along with those for 304L, verified the correlation between cyclic polarization and coupon tests. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was performed to monitor the breakdown of the protective oxide film on the surface of the material as a function of time and temperature. These results also correlated with those from the cyclic polarization and coupon tests.

Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.

1991-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Hazardous Materials B132 (2006) 244­252 Zeolite synthesis from paper sludge ash at low 2005 Available online 4 November 2005 Abstract Paper sludge ash was partially converted into zeolites by reaction with 3 M NaOH solution at 90 C for 24 h. The paper sludge ash had a low abundance of Si

Downs, Robert T.

110

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 7591 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications for waste disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Hazardous Materials B114 (2004) 75­91 Leaching of CCA-treated wood: implications, and copper from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood poses possible environmental risk when disposed. Samples of un-weathered CCA-treated wood were tested using a variety of the US regulatory leaching

Florida, University of

111

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE-STD-1023-95; Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-95 3-95 March 1995 Change Notice No. 1 January 1996 Reaffirmed with Errata April 2002 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4376, Fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 487-4650. DOE-STD-1023-95 i ERRATA FOR DOE-STD-1023-95 S FOREWORD RE-WRITTEN S ADDED REFERENCE TO 10 CFR PART 830, SSHAC (1997) AND UCRL-ID-140922

113

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

Not Available

1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Environmental assessment of thermal insulation composite material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of other thermal insulation materials, the foam glass has most similar mechanical properties (PE...2008) and use (structural details exposed to high compressive loads). Therefore, it is (to a certain extend) comp...

Karel Struhala; Zuzana Stránská; Jan P?n?ík…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Pattern Method for Incorporating Tidal Uncertainty Into Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we describe a general framework for incorporating tidal uncertainty into probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment and propose the Pattern Method and a simpler special case called the $\\Delta t$ Method as effective approaches. The general framework also covers the method developed by Mofjeld et.al in 2007 that was used for the 2009 Seaside, Oregon probabilistic study by Gonzalez et.al. We show the Pattern Method is superior to past approaches because it takes advantage of our ability to run the tsunami simulation at multiple tide stages and uses the time history of flow depth at strategic gauge locations to infer the temporal pattern of waves that is unique to each tsunami source. Combining these patterns with knowledge of the tide cycle at a particular location improves the ability to estimate the probability that a wave will arrive at a time when the tidal stage is sufficiently large that a quantity of interest such as the maximum flow depth exceeds a specified level.

Adams, Loyce M; González, Frank I

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Office of Secure Transportation Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Number: HIAR-OST-2011-03-04 Site: Office of Secure Transportation (OST) Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight Independent Activity Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards Dates of Activity: 03/02/2011 - 03/04/2011 Report Preparer: Deborah Johnson Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the

120

Office of Secure Transportation Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Number: HIAR-OST-2011-03-04 Site: Office of Secure Transportation (OST) Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight Independent Activity Report for Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protective Action Recommendation Cards Dates of Activity: 03/02/2011 - 03/04/2011 Report Preparer: Deborah Johnson Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessment tool for nuclear material acquisition pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be obtained. The two types of material used in nuclear weapons are Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and Plutonium (Pu). Uranium is an element found in nature and is contained in the soil all over the world. However, certain geological formations contain a... (LEU) portion of the network ..................................... 22 Figure 11 Last seciton of the Pu (LEU) portion of the network...................................... 23 Figure 12 Plutonium Section of the Network produced via Natural Uranium...

Ford, David Grant

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Identification of Submarine Landslide for Tsunami Hazard Assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Using a Probabilistic Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF SUBMARINE LANDSLIDE FOR TSUNAMI HAZARD ASSESSMENT IN THE GULF OF MEXICO USING A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH A Thesis by LISHA LOHITHAKSHAN PARAMBATH Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.8 Probability of observed length of landslide having lognormal distribution 13 2.9 GOM location and identification of publicly available borehole data . 16 2.10 Classification and characteristics of soil at transect A, (IODP), red : indicate data...

Lohithakshan Parambath, Lisha

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

The application of ultrasonics to assess damage in composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1985 Major Subjectr Aerospace Engineering THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Approved as to style and content by: (V. . Kinra, Chairman) (D. H. Allen, Member) (R. A...

Eden, John Gregory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Assessment of ground subsidence hazard near an abandoned underground coal mine using GIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study constructs a hazard map for ground subsidence around abandoned underground coal mines (AUCMs) at Samcheok City in ... ) model, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). To evaluate the factors related...

Ki-Dong Kim; Saro Lee; Hyun-Joo Oh; Jong-Kuk Choi; Joong-Sun Won

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: Understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether there has been adequate characterization to support the risk assessment (e.g. Hanford). The assessments need to be transparent and to accommodate different opinions about the relationship between characterizations and risk assessments. This paper illustrates how many of the problems at DOE sites, and potentially at other sites in the U.S. and elsewhere, derive from a lack of either understanding of, or consensus about, the regulatory process, including the timing and types of required characterizations and data in support of site characterizations and risk assessments.

Joanna Burger; Charles Powers; Michael Gochfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Role of 3D seismic for quantitative shallow hazard assessment in deepwater sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...attention. These are global problems. In the GOM...attention. These are global problems. In the GOM...Man-made hazards include pipelines, wellheads, shipwrecks...became unusable due to buckling of the casing strings...important unknown in the global methane budget. No matter...

Nader C. Dutta; Randal W. Utech; Dianna Shelander

128

12 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of building thermal insulation materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: In this chapter thermal insulation materials and types of plaster and their properties are described. The impact of the selected thermal insulation materials and plaster on the environment is assessed using LCA analysis. A method of assessing the ecological and economic benefits resulting from thermal insulation of the external walls of buildings is proposed. On this basis, ecological and economic payback periods for thermal insulation are defined as well as the ecological efficiency of thermal insulation. The conducted analyses conclude that thermal insulation of the external walls of buildings is environmentally favourable.

R. Dylewski; J. Adamczyk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STD-5507-2013 STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 Distribution Statement: A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services,

131

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

132

To the best of my knowledge, the following hazardous materials are/were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces must be performed with an appropriate instrument. If radioactive contamination is detected Chemicals (Poisons|Toxics) Radioactive Materials 9/30/2010 #12;GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORY EQUIPMENT. Resurvey to assure contamination has been removed to less than 100 counts per minute per 100 cm2

Washington at Seattle, University of

133

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public...

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing chemical hazards Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Computer Science, University of Lethbridge Collection: Mathematics 26 RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL for LABORATORY PROCEDURES PROCEDURE IDENTIFICATION Summary: RISK...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing hazardous chemical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Computer Science, University of Lethbridge Collection: Mathematics 26 RISK ASSESSMENT TOOL for LABORATORY PROCEDURES PROCEDURE IDENTIFICATION Summary: RISK...

136

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

[Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. South Carolina ETV Socratic Dialog II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the script from a videotaped dialogue concerning a hypothetical hazardous waste/community health risk scenario presented as a Round Table Forum. Various issues are explored, ranging from the scientific and technical aspects of environmental studies and remedial action, to public information and community involvement, to the economic impact on local communities. The roles of the media, local government and federal and state agencies are examined as well as sources for funding. In an attempt to gauge audience response and reaction, evaluation cards were distributed, and the comments and recommendations are included here.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

New, P.F.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA); Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

21 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of windows and window materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Windows are a significant component in sustainable buildings in both the impacts caused by their material life cycles and by their influence on the performance of a building over its service life. Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have compared the impacts of different framing materials with mixed results. LCA has also been used to estimate the environmental payback of higher manufacturing impacts from producing better performing windows. Future sustainable window selection should make use of standardized LCA data for windows and utilize advanced technologies to optimize window performance.

J. Salazar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Combined Fire Hazards Analysis/Assessment, Building 9116- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment/analysis is intended to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the risks from fire and fire related perils in Building 9116 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The assessment/analysis has been prepared in accordance with the criteria listed in DOE Order 5480.7A.

143

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Integrity assessment plan for PNL 300 area radioactive hazardous waste tank system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, operates tank systems for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), that contain dangerous waste constituents as defined by Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040(18). Chapter 173-303-640(2) of the WAC requires the performance of integrity assessments for each existing tank system that treats or stores dangerous waste, except those operating under interim status with compliant secondary containment. This Integrity Assessment Plan (IAP) identifies all tasks that will be performed during the integrity assessment of the PNL-operated Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems (RLWS) associated with the 324 and 325 Buildings located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. It describes the inspections, tests, and analyses required to assess the integrity of the PNL RLWS (tanks, ancillary equipment, and secondary containment) and provides sufficient information for adequate budgeting and control of the assessment program. It also provides necessary information to permit the Independent, Qualified, Registered Professional Engineer (IQRPE) to approve the integrity assessment program.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Assessment of the KE Basin Sand Filter Inventory In Support of Hazard Categorization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1978, the water cleaning system for the KE Basin was upgraded by adding a sand filter and ion exchange columns. Basin water containing finely divided solids is collected by three surface skimmers and pumped to the sand filter. Filtrate from the sand filter is further treated in the ion exchange modules. The suspended solids accumulate in the sand until the pressure drop across the filter reaches established operating limits, at which time the sand filter is backwashed. The backwash is collected in the NLOP, where the solids are allowed to settle as sludge. Figure 2-1 shows a basic piping and instrumentation diagram depicting the relationship among the basin skimmers, sand filter, and NLOP. During the course of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of the K-Basins, the sand filter and its media will need to be dispositioned. The isotopic distribution of the sludge in the sand filter has been estimated in KE Basin Sand Filter Monolith DQO (KBC-24705). This document estimates the sand filter contribution to the KE hazard categorization using the data from the DQO.

Ross, Steven B.; Young, Jonathan

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Assesment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31(5) real-time assessments of natural hazards have beenAssessment and Prediction of Natural Hazards from Satellite459–470 Assessment and prediction of natural hazards from

Gillespie, Thomas; Chu, Jasmine; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Thomas, Duncan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

16 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of road pavement materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: At present the choice of materials and techniques in road construction is dictated by structural requirements and economic aspects. However, ecological factors have gained in importance due to environmental considerations in politics and society. To evaluate the environmental impact of motorways, a life cycle assessment (LCA) according to ISO 14040 was carried out for different pavement types. By investigating different case scenarios, the reduction potential of environmental impact was quantified. The biggest reduction in air pollution can be achieved by improving pavement properties (e.g., texture, stiffness and flatness) which would significantly reduce the fuel consumption of vehicles.

C. Thiel; T. Stengel; C. Gehlen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Safety assessment of a robotic system handling nuclear material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the use of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, The Weigh and Leak Check System, is to replace a manual process at the Department of Energy facility at Pantex by which nuclear material is inspected for weight and leakage. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the system had been meet. These analyses showed that the risks to people and the internal and external environment were acceptable.

Atcitty, C.B.; Robinson, D.G.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Study of Risk Assessment Programs at Federal Agencies and Commercial Industry Related to the Conduct or Regulation of High Hazard Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan (IP) for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board's Recommendation 2009-1, the DOE committed to studying the use of quantitative risk assessment methodologies at government agencies and industry. This study consisted of document reviews and interviews of senior management and risk assessment staff at six organizations. Data were collected and analyzed on risk assessment applications, risk assessment tools, and controls and infrastructure supporting the correct usage of risk assessment and risk management tools. The study found that the agencies were in different degrees of maturity in the use of risk assessment to support the analysis of high hazard operations and to support decisions related to these operations. Agencies did not share a simple, 'one size fits all' approach to tools, controls, and infrastructure needs. The agencies recognized that flexibility was warranted to allow use of risk assessment tools in a manner that is commensurate with the complexity of the application. The study also found that, even with the lack of some data, agencies application of the risk analysis structured approach could provide useful insights such as potential system vulnerabilities. This study, in combination with a companion study of risk assessment programs in the DOE Offices involved in high hazard operations, is being used to determine the nature and type of controls and infrastructure needed to support risk assessments at the DOE.

Bari, R.; Rosenbloom, S.; O'Brien, J.

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

151

Assessing Surface Fuel Hazard in Coastal Conifer Forests through the Use of LiDAR Remote Sensing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The research problem that this thesis seeks to examine is a method of predicting conventional fire hazards using data drawn from specific regions, namely the… (more)

Koulas, Christos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Nano Insulation Materials: Synthesis and Life Cycle Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The application of manufactured nanomaterials provides not only advantages resulting from their unique properties, but also disadvantages derived from the possible high energy use and CO2 burden related to their manufacture, operation, and disposal. It is therefore important to evaluate the trade-offs of process economics with the associated environmental impacts in order to strengthen the existing advantages while counteracting disadvantages of nanomaterials. This is of particular importance at the early stage of the development, where different synthetic approaches with different energy and environmental impacts may be employed. We discuss here the importance of life cycle assessment (LCA) on the synthesis of nano insulation materials (NIMs) consisting of hollow silica nanospheres (HSNSs). The results indicate that the use of recyclable and environmentally friendly raw materials can improve greatly the process environmental footprints. New synthetic procedures are developed accordingly for HSNS \\{NIMs\\} with improved environmental features as well as thermal insulation performance. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. Selection and peer-review under responsibility of the International Scientific Committee of the 21st CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering in the person of the Conference Chair Prof. Terje K. Lien.

Tao Gao; Linn Ingunn C. Sandberg; Bjørn Petter Jelle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

154

Use of hazard assessments to support risk-based decision making in the US Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Integrated Safety or ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/ fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The cornerstone of the SS-21 design process is the hazard assessment, which is performed concurrently with process and tooling design. The hazard assessment is used as the key management tool to guide overall risk management associated with the nuclear explosive activity through supporting risk-based decisions made with respect to process design.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Rainbolt, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Methods for managing uncertainly in material selection decisions : robustness of early stage life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing alternative materials is an important tactic to improve the environmental performance of products. Currently a growing array of materials candidates confronts today's product designer. While life-cycle assessment ...

Nicholson, Anna L. (Anna Louise)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

DOE/EA-1329; Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (8/10/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

329 329 Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Final Document Date Prepared: August 10, 2000 Prepared by: Department of Energy, Los Alamos Area Office Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at LANL Environmental Assessment iii August 10, 2000 Contents ACRONYMS AND TERMS ....................................................................................................................................................... v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................................................ vii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED .......................................................................................................................................................1

157

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ris-R-1736 (EN) Cohesive laws for assessment of materials failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-1736 (EN) Cohesive laws for assessment of materials failure: Theory, experimental methods resistance 0J d n , (1-8) on per unit fracture surface area. rovide a way to connect the bridging law laws for assessment of materials failure: Theory, experimental methods and application #12;#12;Cohesive

159

In-field analysis and assessment of nuclear material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has actively developed and implemented a number of instruments to monitor, detect, and analyze nuclear materials in the field. Many of these technologies, developed under existing US Department of Energy programs, can also be used to effectively interdict nuclear materials smuggled across or within national borders. In particular, two instruments are suitable for immediate implementation: the NAVI-2, a hand-held gamma-ray and neutron system for the detection and rapid identification of radioactive materials, and the portable mass spectrometer for the rapid analysis of minute quantities of radioactive materials. Both instruments provide not only critical information about the characteristics of the nuclear material for law-enforcement agencies and national authorities but also supply health and safety information for personnel handling the suspect materials.

Morgado, R.E.; Myers, W.S.; Olivares, J.A.; Phillips, J.R.; York, R.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electrical hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and certification by ANL prior to use. The Control of Hazardous Energy Sources - LockoutTagout (LOTO) Types of Energy Sources 1. Electricity 2. Gas, steam & pressurized...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment by Rule. Authors Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Published...

162

Assessment of Aging of Cork and TISAF Materials in the SAFKEG 3940A Package in KAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of the potential for aging and degradation of the resin-bonded cork and the Thermal-Insulating, Shock-Absorbing Foam materials that are components of the SAFKEG 3940A package. This package may be used for interim storage of plutonium materials in the Savannah River Site K-Area Materials Storage.

Vormelker, P.R.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Methodology to assess potential glint and glare hazards from concentrating solar power plants : analytical models and experimental validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing numbers of concentrating solar power systems being designed and developed, glint and glare from concentrating solar collectors and receivers is receiving increased attention as a potential hazard or distraction for motorists, pilots, and pedestrians. This paper provides analytical methods to evaluate the irradiance originating from specularly and diffusely reflecting sources as a function of distance and characteristics of the source. Sample problems are provided for both specular and diffuse sources, and validation of the models is performed via testing. In addition, a summary of safety metrics is compiled from the literature to evaluate the potential hazards of calculated irradiances from glint and glare. Previous safety metrics have focused on prevention of permanent eye damage (e.g., retinal burn). New metrics used in this paper account for temporary flash blindness, which can occur at irradiance values several orders of magnitude lower than the irradiance values required for irreversible eye damage.

Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

165

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Materials R&D for a timely DEMO: Key findings and recommendations of the EU Roadmap Materials Assessment Group  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The findings of the EU Fusion Programme's ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), assessing readiness of Structural, Plasma Facing (PF) and High Heat Flux (HHF) materials for DEMO, are discussed. These are incorporated into the EU Fusion Power Roadmap [1], with a decision to construct DEMO in the early 2030s. The methodology uses project-based and systems-engineering approaches, the concept of Technology Readiness Levels, and considers lessons learned from Fission reactor material development. ‘Baseline’ materials are identified for each DEMO role, and the DEMO mission risks analysed from the known limitations, or unknown properties, associated with each baseline material. R&D programmes to address these risks are developed. The DEMO assessed has a phase I with a ‘starter blanket’: the blanket must withstand ?2 MW yr m?2 fusion neutron flux (equivalent to ?20 dpa front-wall steel damage). The baseline materials all have significant associated risks, so development of ‘Risk Mitigation Materials’ (RMM) is recommended. The R&D programme has parallel development of the baseline and RMM, up to ‘down-selection’ points to align with decisions on the DEMO blanket and divertor engineering definition. ITER licensing experience is used to refine the issues for materials nuclear testing, and arguments are developed to optimise scope of materials tests with fusion neutron (‘14 MeV’) spectra before DEMO design finalisation. Some 14  MeV testing is still essential, and the Roadmap requires deployment of a ?30 dpa (steels) testing capability by 2026. Programme optimisation by the pre-testing with fission neutrons on isotopically- or chemically-doped steels and with ion-beams is discussed along with the minimum 14 MeV testing programme, and the key role which fundamental and mission-oriented modelling can play in orienting the research.

Derek Stork; Pietro Agostini; Jean-Louis Boutard; Derek Buckthorpe; Eberhard Diegele; Sergei L. Dudarev; Colin English; Gianfranco Federici; Mark R. Gilbert; Sehila Gonzalez; Angel Ibarra; Christian Linsmeier; Antonella Li Puma; Gabriel Marbach; Lee W. Packer; Baldev Raj; Michael Rieth; Min Quang Tran; David J. Ward; Steven J. Zinkle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM More Documents & Publications Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

171

When and how to end shelter-in-place protection from a release of airborne hazardous material : report on a decision-making concept and methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shelter-in-place (SIP) is considered a credible alternative to immediate evacuation to protect the population on and around Army chemical warfare agent stockpile storage sites from accidental agent releases of short duration. To be effective, this strategy requires immediate SIP to minimize initial exposure to agent vapor, followed by timely and appropriate termination of SIP to minimize additional exposure to agent vapor accumulations in the shelter when the air outside becomes less hazardous. However, a major challenge facing emergency managers has been how to decide the best time and way to end SIP to obtain this ideal. This report describes a concept to make this decision, and suggests a methodology to apply the concept as a site-specific response tool. The major conditions that influence the exposure of a population are the source term values of the agent that is released, meteorological conditions, shelter air change rates, the distance of the shelter from the source, and th e dose-response relationship of the hazardous material. The circumstances that contribute to overall exposure associated with a SIP strategy involve exposure during the time before taking shelter, exposure while sheltered due to vapor infiltration, and additional exposure (if any) following the termination of SIP. Options to end SIP are to resume normal activities with no restrictions, to ventilate the shelter but remain indoors, to exit from the shelter and remain nearby, or to relocate to a designated facility. The optimal time and way to end SIP involves examining the relationships among the conditions and circumstances listed above to find the combination of these variables that gives the smallest area where a sheltered population might receive a certain level of toxic effect. For example, find the combination of times, conditions, and circumstances that produce the smallest area where fatalities are possible. In this case, the best time and action to end SIP to minimize fatalities is that combination of variables which produces the smallest area where this level of effect is expected. The methodology to apply the concept is to use a computer model to examine the relationships among these conditions and circumstances (many of which are pre-planned default inputs), and display the best time and action to end SIP quickly, in a user-friendly format. A computer model that was developed to prove the concept and demonstrate the methodology (called the TSIP Model) is described in the report, and the use of the TSIP Model is illustrated in a case study in an appendix to the report. The report also discusses public education and emergency instructions essential for implementing this concept, and makes recommendations for agreements, plans, and exercises relevant to deciding when and how to end SIP. This concept and methodology is independent of the atmospheric dispersion model used, and is not limited to chemical warfare agent vapor hazards. Thus it can help make decisions on when and how to end SIP following the accidental release of many other non-flammable non-reactive hazardous vapors if sufficient information is available about the characteristics of the material and the circumstances of the release.

Yantosik, G.; Lerner, K.; Maloney, D.; Wasmer, F.

2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations.

Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1997-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Combined Fire Hazards Analysis/Assessment, Building 9203 & 9203A Complex- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment/analysis is intended to provide a comprehensive assessment of the risks from fire and fire related perils in the Building 9203 and 9203A Complex at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The analysis has been prepared in accordance with the criteria listed in DOE Order 5480.7A.

174

Control technology assessment of hazardous-waste-disposal operations in chemicals manufacturing: in-depth survey report of San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico, November 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A visit was made to the San Juan Cement Company, Dorado, Puerto Rico to evaluate control methods for a storage and delivery system for hazardous wastes used in a demonstration project as a supplemental fuel for cofiring a cement kiln. Analysis of the material during the visit revealed the presence of methylene chloride, carbon-tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone, hexane, ethanol, and ethyl acetate. Steel storage tanks were placed on an impermeable concrete slab surrounded by a sealed retaining wall. Steel piping with all welded joints carried the waste fuels from storage tanks to the kiln, where fuels were injected through a specially fabricated burner. Vapor emissions were suppressed by venting the displaced vapor through a recycle line. Exhaust gases from the kiln passed through a bag house type dust collector, and were vented to the atmosphere through a single stack. Half-mask air-purifying respirators were used when in the hazardous-waste storage/delivery area. Neoprene gloves were used when performing tasks with potential skin contact. Hard hats, safety glasses, and safety boots were all worn. The author concludes that the control methods used seemed effective in suppressing vapor emissions.

Crandall, M.S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT HAZARD ASSESSMENT FORM Eyes Face Head Hands-Arms Feet-Legs Body-Skin Respiratory Hearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preparation Grinding Hammering Health Care Services Janitorial Knife use Landscape maintenance Material, insects, etc.) Blood Extreme heat/cold Irritating chemicals Scrape, bruise, or cut by tools or materials: Chemical resistance Liquid/leak resistance Temperature resistance Abrasion/cut resistance Slip resistance

Russell, Lynn

176

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS): Evaluation of selected feasibility studies of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Congress and the public have mandated much closer scrutiny of the management of chemically hazardous and radioactive mixed wastes. Legislative language, regulatory intent, and prudent technical judgment, call for using scientifically based studies to assess current conditions and to evaluate and select costeffective strategies for mitigating unacceptable situations. The NCP requires that a Remedial Investigation (RI) and a Feasibility Study (FS) be conducted at each site targeted for remedial response action. The goal of the RI is to obtain the site data needed so that the potential impacts on public health or welfare or on the environment can be evaluated and so that the remedial alternatives can be identified and selected. The goal of the FS is to identify and evaluate alternative remedial actions (including a no-action alternative) in terms of their cost, effectiveness, and engineering feasibility. The NCP also requires the analysis of impacts on public health and welfare and on the environment; this analysis is the endangerment assessment (EA). In summary, the RI, EA, and FS processes require assessment of the contamination at a site, of the potential impacts in public health or the environment from that contamination, and of alternative RAs that could address potential impacts to the environment. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Whelan, G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Hartz, K.E.; Hilliard, N.D. (Beck (R.W.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NUCLEAR MATERIAL ATTRACTIVENESS: AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL ASSOCIATED WITH A CLOSED FUEL CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the various processing steps required for a closed fuel cycle. This paper combines the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR with new results for the final, repeated burning of SNM in fast-spectrum reactors: fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results of this paper suggest that all reprocessing products evaluated so far need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, or undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Wallace, R. K.; Collins, Brian A.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Jarvinen, G. D.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment of Materials and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of Materials and Equipment Assessment of Materials and Equipment (MARSAME) resources ORISE provides training and support for agencies required to use MARSAME for property clearance programs Decommissioned site The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment of Materials and Equipment manual (MARSAME) is a resource developed to help with the disposition of metals, concrete, tools, piping, furniture, solids, liquids, and gases in containers, and similar non-real property that were part of former nuclear sites that have undergone decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The MARSAME manual was published in January 2009 as a supplement to the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM 2002) and is a critical resource for federal agencies involved in property

182

A framework for assessing ecological risks of petroleum-derived materials in soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecological risk assessment estimates the nature and likelihood of effects of human actions on nonhuman organisms, populations, and ecosystems. It is intended to be clearer and more rigorous in its approach to estimation of effects and uncertainties than previously employed methods of ecological assessment. Ecological risk assessment is characterized by a standard paradigm that includes problem formulation, analysis of exposure and effects, risk characterization, and communication with a risk manager. This report provides a framework that applies the paradigm to the specific problem of assessing the ecological risks of petroleum in soil. This type of approach requires that assessments be performed in phases: (1) a scoping assessment to determine whether there is a potential route of exposure for potentially significant ecological receptors; (2) a screening assessment to determine whether exposures could potentially reach toxic levels; and (3) a definitive assessment to estimate the nature, magnitude, and extent of risks. The principal technical issue addressed is the chemically complex nature of petroleum--a complexity that may be dealt with by assessing risks on the basis of properties of the whole material, properties of individual chemicals that are representative of chemical classes, distributions of properties of the constituents of chemical classes, properties of chemicals detected in the soil, and properties of indicator chemicals. The advantages and feasibility of these alternatives are discussed. The report concludes with research recommendations for improving each stage in the assessment process.

Suter, G.W. II

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis; selection and assessment of potential release scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this part of the assessment, several accident scenarios are identified that could result in significant releases of chemicals into the environment. These scenarios include ruptures of storage tanks, large magnitude on-site spills, mixing of incompatible wastes, and off-site releases caused by tranpsortation accidents. In evaluating these scenarios, both probability and consequence are assessed, so that likelihood of occurrence is coupled with magnitude of effect in characterizing short term risks.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Medicine and the Pew Health Profession Commission have advocated that physicians broaden their participation in the envirorunental aspects of medical care. Accordingly, both organizations recommend training of future primary care physicians for greater competencies and appreciation of this area of medicine. The extent to which family practice educators are receptive to incorporating this topic into the residency curriculum is not known. A national survey of directors of family practice programs was conducted to assess their attitudes about environmental health education in family practice residency training. The ultimate goal of this study was to provide information that will guide the development of an environmental health curriculum for family practice residency programs. Videotapes supporting this program have been indexed individually.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination of individuals who have entered a “hot zone” during transportation incidents involving  radioactive.

187

A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessing the integrity of local area network materials accountability systems against insider threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE facilities rely increasingly on computerized systems to manage nuclear materials accountability data and to protect against diversion of nuclear materials or other malevolent acts (e.g., hoax due to falsified data) by insider threats. Aspects of modern computerized material accountability (MA) systems including powerful personal computers and applications on networks, mixed security environments, and more users with increased knowledge, skills and abilities help heighten the concern about insider threats to the integrity of the system. In this paper, we describe a methodology for assessing MA applications to help decision makers identify ways of and compare options for preventing or mitigating possible additional risks from the insider threat. We illustrate insights from applying the methodology to local area network materials accountability systems.

Jones, E.; Sicherman, A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

3 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of sustainable building materials: an overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The construction industry is one of the largest exploiters of both renewable and non-renewable natural resources. It was inevitable that it would find itself at the centre of concerns regarding environmental impact. The process and operation of building construction consumes a great deal of materials throughout its service life cycle. The selection and use of sustainable building materials play an important role in the design and construction of green building. This chapter sets out to present an overview of sustainable building materials and their impacts on the environment. It also discusses the life cycle assessment as a methodological principle and framework, and its limitations for the analysis of sustainable building materials.

G.K.C. Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

193

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

HS663(b) Pre-purchase form for hazardous materials Version 4: 19/03/2013 Reference HS316: Purchasing Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

segregated storage area and if yes, is one available? Is a safe method available to transport the chemical guideline Is the chemical a Schedule 4 or Schedule 8 Drug. Some S4s and all S8s require additional: Purchasing Guidelines This form can be used to assist consider the risks of introducing new hazardous

New South Wales, University of

195

14 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of wood-based building materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: In this chapter we discuss major issues regarding life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental performance analysis of wood-based building materials. We follow the life cycle of a wood product, beginning with a discussion of sustainable forestry and the growth of trees. We then discuss the processes of manufacturing wood-based building products, focusing on issues of adhesives and preservatives. We discuss the design and construction of buildings and infrastructure made of wood, with an emphasis on eco-design processes. We describe the system-wide material and energy flows associated with wood-based construction in a life cycle perspective, and discuss the climate benefits of using wood material from sustainably managed forests.

R. Sathre; S. González-García

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Non-Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Complex-Wide Multi-State Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for Transfer to EM Challenge In December 2007 the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). Transfers of facilities, materials, and waste to EM will generate liabilities that are currently unfunded. For purposes of overall planning, it is important to understand the impacts of proposed transfers with regard to technical

197

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

199

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

200

Assessment of cathode active materials from the perspective of integrating environmental impact with electrochemical performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A method was brought forward for assessing cathode active materials from a perspective that accounts for the environmental impact and the electrochemical performance. Then the integrated performance, referred to as the “final environmental impact”, was quantified into a dimensionless score, \\{EIc\\} (see Eq. (2)). Subsequently, four types of cathode active materials– LiFePO4/C, LiFe0.98Mn0.02PO4/C, LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C, and FeF3(H2O)3/C– were assessed. The results were: (1) the \\{EIc\\} sequence was LiFePO4/C (1.76E-02Pt) > LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C (1.74E-02 Pt) > LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C (1.66E-02Pt) >FeF3(H2O)3/C (4.98E-03 Pt), which meant FeF3(H2O)3/C was the optimal material and had the minimal final environmental impact. (2) With regard to the eleven impact categories, the category respiratory effects exerted by inorganics made up the largest percentage of the \\{EIc\\} for the four materials. (3) In the aspects of \\{EIm\\} (EI (Eco-indicator) value of a 1 kg cathode active material), average specific discharge capacity, and cycle life, the sub-optimal materials' sequence of theoretical potential for optimization was as follows: LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C > LiFe0.98Mn0.02PO4/C > LiFePO4/C. This meant that the final environmental impact of LiFePO4/C was the most difficult to reduce, and the impact of LiFe0.98Ti0.02PO4/C could not be reduced very easily. (4) To reduce the final environmental impact, the following concrete measures were recommended: (a) the optimization of the synthesis processes for smaller particle diameters; (b) the adoption of other surface-coating agents, utilizing (other) dopants; (c) the substitution of the energy-efficient instruments for the energy-intensive instruments; (d) the optimization of the synthesis processes to contain fewer electricity-intensive steps.

Yajuan Yu; Dong Wang; Kai Huang; Xiang Wang; Yuhan Liang; Weijun Sun; Bo Chen; Shi Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Preliminary assessment/site inspection report. Volume 6. Appendix F-J. 104th Air Control Squadron, Coos Head Air National Guard Station, Oregon National Guard, Coos Bay Oregon. Report for January 1994-February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Preliminary Assessment involved interviewing COOS Head employees (current formerly) to determine the extent of use and disposal of hazardous materials and waste. The site investigation involved field investigation of areas determined to be of concern due to use and disposal of hazardous materials/waste. Two areas of concern will further be investigated (AOC CK).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Installation restoration program. Preliminary assessment/site inspection report. Volume 3. Appendix E. 104th Air Control Squadron Coos Head Air National Guard Station. Oregon Air National Guard Coos Bay, Oregon. Report for January 1994-February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Preliminary Assessment involved interviewing, COOS Head employees (current and former) to determine the extent of use and disposal of hazardous materials and waste. The site investigation involved field investigation of areas determined to be of concern due to use and disposal of hazardous materials/waste. Two areas of concern will further be investigated (AOC CK).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Installation restoration program. Preliminary assessment/site inspection report. Volume 3. Appendix E. 104th Air Control Squadron Coos Head Air National Guard Station. Oregon Air National Guard Coos Bay, Oregon. Report for January 1994-February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Preliminary Assessment involved interviewing COOS Head employees (current and former) to determine the extent of use and disposal of hazardous materials waste. The site investigation involved field investigation of areas determined to be of concern due to use and disposal of hazardous materials/wastes. Two areas of concern will further be investigated (AOC CK).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Installation restoration program. Preliminary assessment/site inspection report. Volume 3. Appendix E. 104th Air Control Squadron Coos Head Air National Guard Station. Oregon Air National Guard Coos Bay, Oregon. Report for January 1994-February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Preliminary Assessment involved interviewing, COOS Head employees (current former) to determine the extent of use and disposal of hazardous materials and waste. The site investigation involved field investigation of areas determined to be of concern due to use and disposal of hazardous materials/wastes. Two areas of concern will further be investigated (AOC CK).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Control technology assessment of hazardous waste disposal operations in chemicals manufacturing: walk-through survey report of E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company, Chambers Works, Deepwater, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A walk through survey was conducted to assess control technology for hazardous wastes disposal operations at du Pont de Nemours and Company (SIC-2800), Deepwater, New Jersey in November 1981. Hazardous wastes generated at the facility were disposed of by incineration, wastewater and thermal treatment, and landfilling. Engineering controls for the incineration process and at the landfill were noted. At the landfill, water from a tank trailer was sprayed periodically to suppress dust generation. Vapor control devices, such as spot scrubbers, were used during transfer of organic wastes from trailers and drums to storage prior to incineration. Wastes were also recirculated to prevent build up of grit in the strainers. The company conducted area monitoring for nitrobenzene (98953) and amines at the landfill and personal monitoring for chloramines at the incinerator. Half mask dust respirators were worn by landfill operators. Operators who unloaded and emptied drums at the incinerator were required to wear face masks, rubber gloves, and boots. The author concludes that disposal of hazardous wastes at the facility is state of the art. An in depth survey is recommended.

Anastas, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

211

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

213

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility in the Santa Susana site, California, as a result of postulated damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential mass of airborne releases of plutonium (source term) that could result from wind and seismic damage is estimated for the Atomics International Company's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) at the Santa Susana site in California. The postulated source terms will be useful as the basis for estimating the potential dose to the maximum exposed individual by inhalation and to the total population living within a prescribed radius of the site. The respirable fraction of airborne particles is thus the principal concern. The estimated source terms are based on the damage ratio, and the potential airborne releases if all enclosures suffer particular levels of damage. In an attempt to provide a realistic range of potential source terms that include most of the normal processing conditions, a best estimate bounded by upper and lower limits is provided. The range of source terms is calculated by combining a high best estimate and a low damage ratio, based on a fraction of enclosures suffering crush or perforation, with the airborne release from enclosures based upon an upper limit, average, and lower limit inventory of dispersible materials at risk. Two throughput levels are considered. The factors used to evaluate the fractional airborne release of materials and the exchange rates between enclosed and exterior atmospheres are discussed. The postulated damage and source terms are discussed for wind and earthquake hazard scenarios in order of their increasing severity.

Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural radionuclide content and radiological hazard associated with usage of quartzite sand samples from Ovacik–Silifke–Mersin open pit as building material in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......building materials such as gas concrete and concrete...respectively. CONCLUSIONS The natural radioactivity due to...Xiaolan Z. Measurement of natural radioactivity in sand...concentrations in surface soils in Cyprus samples. J. Environ...Karahan G., Karack Z. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides......

S. Turhan; A. S. Aykamis; A. M. Kiliç

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

217

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

218

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

219

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

220

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pantex Needs Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pantex Needs Assessment Pantex Needs Assessment Phase I Summary and Recommendation Based upon the availability of information to access former workers, and given the knowledge regarding past exposures to hazardous agents, it is recommended that a Phase II examination program be established for former Pantex workers. This will be in keeping with other DOE mandates and programs, and will assist with the current DOE compensation program. I. Introduction and Background The Department of Energy has established a program to meet the medical oversight needs of former workers who worked at a variety of Department of Energy facilities in connection with the nuclear programs of the United States. It has been recognized that these workers might have been exposed to potentially hazardous materials, and that they were deserving of medical

223

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

224

Enabling streamlined life cycle assessment : materials-classification derived structured underspecification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As environmental footprint considerations for companies gain greater importance, the need for quantitative impact assessment tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) has become a higher priority. Currently, the cost and ...

Rampuria, Abhishek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Performance-oriented packaging: A guide to identifying and designing. Identifying and designing hazardous materials packaging for compliance with post HM-181 DOT Regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the initial publication of Docket HM-181 (hereafter referred to as HM-181), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Headquarters, Transportation Management Division decided to produce guidance to help the DOE community transition to performance-oriented packagings (POP). As only a few individuals were familiar with the new requirements, elementary guidance was desirable. The decision was to prepare the guidance at a level easily understood by a novice to regulatory requirements. This document identifies design development strategies for use in obtaining performance-oriented packagings that are not readily available commercially. These design development strategies will be part of the methodologies for compliance with post HM-181 U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) packaging regulations. This information was prepared for use by the DOE and its contractors. The document provides guidance for making decisions associated with designing performance-oriented packaging, and not for identifying specific material or fabrication design details. It does provide some specific design considerations. Having a copy of the regulations handy when reading this document is recommended to permit a fuller understanding of the requirements impacting the design effort. While this document is not written for the packaging specialist, it does contain guidance important to those not familiar with the new POP requirements.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Constant extension rate tensile tests on 304L stainless steel in simulated hazardous low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New waste tanks which handle hazardous low-level waste were proposed to be constructed in H-area. The candidate material for the tanks is AISI Type 304L (304L) stainless steel. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were conducted to assess the susceptibility of 304L to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in these waste solutions. The tests demonstrated that 304L was not susceptible to SCC in simulated wastes. Based on these tests and previous pitting corrosion studies 304L is a suitable material of construction for the new tanks. Comparison tests in the same simulants were performed on A537 carbon steel (A537), a material that is similar to material of construction for the current tanks. Stress-corrosion cracking was indicated in two of the simulants. If carbon steel tanks are utilized to handle the hazardous low-level wastes, inhibitors such as nitrite or hydroxide will be necessary to prevent corrosion.

Wiersma, B.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Measurements of activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples from Punjab province of Pakistan and assessment of radiological hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......G. Natural radioactivity of some Mongolian building materials. Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia, INIS Electronic form No. E16-20002-46 (2000). 13. Sam, A. K., Ahmed, M. M. O., El-Khangi, F. A., El-nigumi......

S. N. A. Tahir; K. Jamil; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; Nasir Ahmed; Syed Arif Ahmad

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Life cycle assessment and sustainability analysis of products, materials and technologies. Toward a scientific framework for sustainability life cycle analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are many approaches to study the environmental and sustainability aspects of production and consumption. Some of these reside at the level of concepts, e.g., industrial ecology, design for environment, and cleaner production. Other approaches are based on the use of quantitative models, e.g., life cycle assessment, material flow accounting and strategic environmental assessment. This paper focuses on the development of a framework that is able to incorporate different models for environmental analysis, with the option of a broader scope that also includes economic and social aspects, thus covering the three pillars of sustainability. This framework builds on the ISO-framework for life cycle assessment, but takes a broader view, and allows us to move from micro questions on specific products, via meso questions on life styles up to macro questions in which the entire societal structure is part of the analysis.

Reinout Heijungs; Gjalt Huppes; Jeroen B. Guinée

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dose assessment from domestic building materials used in housing sector in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......domestic building materials used in housing sector in Serbia M. Petrovic 1 D...domestic building materials used in a housing sector are presented. Natural radionuclides...is the efficiency, from the curve of energy efficiency. The activity concentration of mentioned......

M. Petrovi?; D. Vu?i?; J. Karamarkovi?

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Appendix B: Wastes and Potential Hazards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

muds and other drilling wastes 01 05 05* oil-containing drilling muds and wastes M Oil-containing muds or their compounds and should be considered under the following hazards: H5 to H7, H10, H11, or H14. 01 05 drilling and wastes should be assessed on the basis of the concentration of oil present in the waste. Typically

Siddharthan, Advaith

236

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced hazards that are representative for a whole class of hazards: Accidents due to nuclear power plants (NPP) or air traffic, and terrorism. For the analysis of accidents, risk is measured with respect to getting statistics leading to an expected value of risk. Terrorism risk is assessed by the attraction certain ele

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

239

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

240

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National WeatherWEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

242

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, 688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant facility to stage wastes at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Finding of No Significant Impact Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

243

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

244

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

245

DOE/EA-1651: Final Environmental Assessment for U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January 2010)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 51 Final Environmental Assessment for U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee January 2010 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT URANIUM-233 MATERIAL DOWNBLENDING AND DISPOSITION PROJECT AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has completed the Final Environmental Assessment for U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [DOE/EA-1651]. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of planned activities to modify selected

246

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

248

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

249

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

FURTHER ASSESSMENTS OF THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FROM A SAFEGUARDS PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of an extension to an earlier study [ ] that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the PUREX, UREX+, and COEX reprocessing schemes. This study focuses on the materials associated with the UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study also examines what is required to render plutonium as “unattractive.” Furthermore, combining the results of this study with those from the earlier study permits a comparison of the uranium and thorium based fuel cycles on the basis of the attractiveness of the SNM associated with each fuel cycle. Both studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of “attractiveness levels” that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities [ ]. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessment and evaluation of a safety factor with respect to ocean disposal of waste materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the oceans is essential if ocean dumping is to be continued. The author has surveyed the available literature, bioassay studies, and pertinent research concerning chronic effects and the risk they impose on the marine ecosystem. The main purpose... OPERATIONS 10 History of Ocean Dumping Corps of Engineers' Letters of No Objection 10 12 Types of Materials Dumped Dredge Spoils Industrial Wastes Municipal Wastes Radioactive Wastes Solid Wastes Military Wastes Construction Debris 13 13 15 15...

Zapatka, Thomas Francis

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, such as stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new NDE methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy; Malik, Shah

2011-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

Damage Assessment Technologies for Prognostics and Proactive Management of Materials Degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has undertaken a program to lay the groundwork for defining proactive actions to manage degradation of materials in light water reactors (LWRs). This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Proactive Management of Materials Degradation (PMMD) program and its application to nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The PMMD program is examining LWR component materials and the degradation phenomena that affect them. Of particular interest is how such phenomena can be monitored to predict degradation and prevent component failure. Some forms of degradation, including some modes of stress corrosion cracking, are characterized by a long initiation time followed by a rapid growth phase. Monitoring such long-term degradation will require new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods and measurement procedures. A critical analysis of all reactor components is required to determine if new inspection strategies are required to effectively manage slow degradation mechanisms that may lead to component failure. As reactor lifetimes are extended, degradation mechanisms previously considered too long-term to be of consequence (such as concrete and wiring insulation degradation) may become more important. This paper includes a review of techniques with potential for sensing and monitoring degradation in its early stages and will concisely explain the basic principles of PMMD and its relationship to in-service inspection, condition based maintenance, and advanced diagnostics and prognostics.

Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Hull, Amy B.; Malik, Shah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment of radiation exposure for materials in the LANSCE Spallation Irradiation Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials samples were irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the changes in mechanical and physical properties of materials in a spallation target environment. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including high-energy protons, mixed protons and neutrons, and predominantly neutrons. The irradiation was driven by an 800 MeV 1 mA proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.5 cm. Two irradiation campaigns were conducted in which samples were exposed for approximately six months and two months, respectively. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples were used to quantify the fluences in various locations. The STAYSL2 code was used to estimate the fluences by combining the activation foil data with calculated data from the LAHET Code System (LCS) and MCNPX. The exposure for each sample was determined from the estimated fluences using interpolation based on a mathematical fitting to the fluence results. The final results included displacement damage (dpa) and gas (H, He) production for each sample from the irradiation. Based on the activation foil analysis, samples from several locations in both irradiation campaigns were characterized. The radiation damage to each sample was highly dependent upon location and varied from 0.023 to 13 dpa and was accompanied by high levels of H and He production.

James, M. R. (Michael R.); Maloy, S. A. (Stuart A.); Sommer, W. F. (Walter F.), Jr.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Ferguson, P. D. (Phillip D.); Corzine, R. K. (R. Karen); Mueller, G. E. (Gary E.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cancels Chapter 3 of DOE 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1 of 9-27-1995 and by DOE N 251.4 & Para. 9c canceled by DOE O 231.1 of 9-30-1995.

1985-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

262

Perch population assessment in lakes reclaimed using oil-sands derived material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mining and extraction of petroleum products from oil-sands involves large areas of land and produces enormous volumes of tailings. One possible land reclamation option is to incorporate fine-tailings material into the bottoms of constructed lakes capped with natural surface water. The wet landscape method represents potential risk to aquatic biota-naphthenic acids and PAHs elute from pore water contained in the fine-tailings substrate. In spring 1995 yellow perch were stocked into a large-scale (5ha) experimental pond that consisted of fine-tailings capped with natural water as well as into two other reclaimed ponds that were constructed with oil-sands overburden material. Prior to stocking of perch, ponds had colonized with cyprinids, macrophytes and benthic invertebrates over a two year period. Perch were sampled in fall 1995 for age, condition factor, liver size, gonad size, fecundity, stomach contents, liver mixed-function oxygenase activity (MFO), bile PAH metabolites and plasma steroid hormones. When compared to the source lake, perch in the DP did not show reduced reproductive potential. Perch in all of the reclaimed ponds demonstrated exposure to organic compounds as indicated by marginally induced MFO activity and increased liver size. Exposure to naphthenates and PAHs in water as well as ecological environmental factors will be discussed.

Heuvel, M.R. van den; Dixon, D.G. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Power, M. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Boerger, H.; MacKinnon, M.D.; Meer, T. van [Syncrude Canada, Fort McMurray, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessment of Structural and Clad Materials for Fission Surface Power Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ORNL/LTR-2011/351 ORNL/LTR-2011/351 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges September 2011 Prepared by R.K. Nanstad, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and W. L. Server, ATI Consulting This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

264

Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

268

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS OF RADIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and a Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan DOE O 461.1, 4b(2)e, "Quality Assurance Plan and Packaging, Transfer, and Transportation Plan".. Training...

271

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents Y-12 RA Graphic Results Y-12 Baseline Risk Assessment Results Y-12 Screening Risk Assessment Results Bullet Graphic Risk Results Arrow Bear Creek Valley Maps Residential Landuse Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 1 - 900) Groundwater - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-4 - 1) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-5 - 10-4) Groundwater - Total Risk (range: 10-6 - 10-5) Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Hazard Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethane, 1,2- Risk Groundwater - Dichloroethene, 1,2- Hazard Groundwater - Nitrate Hazard Groundwater - Radium Risk Groundwater - Technetium-99 Risk Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Hazard Groundwater - Tetrachloroethene Risk

272

Identifying and modeling safety hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Binary mixture flammability characteristics for hazard assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculations and UNIFAC, a theoretical model that does not require experimental binary interaction parameters, are employed in the mixture flash point predictions, which are validated with experimental data. MFPB is successfully predicted using the UNIFAC model...

Vidal Vazquez, Migvia del C.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the structure and responsibilities of the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency.

Legg, W.E. [Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Critical Materials:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

277

Cold Weather Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

278

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

279

EA-1412: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1412: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE-RL) needs to provide cost-effective, additional personal protection and public safety through expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the Hanford Site. The proposed action would include constructing and operating the EVOC, which would be located on approximately 60 acres (24.2 hectares); expanding, operating, and transferring ownership of NUTS, which is located on approximately 80 acres

280

Estimation of health hazards resulting from a radiological terrorist attack in a city  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......connection with nuclear power plant accidents...and complex assessment tool, it...System for Nuclear Emergency...Nordic Nuclear Safety Research...dosimetric assessment. (1999...Hazard Release Risk Factors Skin...radiation effects Terrorism...

K. G. Andersson; T. Mikkelsen; P. Astrup; S. Thykier-Nielsen; L. H. Jacobsen; L. Schou-Jensen; S. C. Hoe; S. P. Nielsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methodology Using MELCOR Code to Model Proposed Hazard Scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates a methodology for using the MELCOR code to model a proposed hazard scenario within a building containing radioactive powder, and the subsequent evaluation of a leak path factor (LPF) (or the amount of respirable material which that escapes a facility into the outside environment), implicit in the scenario. This LPF evaluation will analyzes the basis and applicability of an assumed standard multiplication of 0.5 × 0.5 (in which 0.5 represents the amount of material assumed to leave one area and enter another), for calculating an LPF value. The outside release is dependsent upon the ventilation/filtration system, both filtered and un-filtered, and from other pathways from the building, such as doorways (, both open and closed). This study is presents ed to show how the multiple leak path factorsLPFs from the interior building can be evaluated in a combinatory process in which a total leak path factorLPF is calculated, thus addressing the assumed multiplication, and allowing for the designation and assessment of a respirable source term (ST) for later consequence analysis, in which: the propagation of material released into the environmental atmosphere can be modeled and the dose received by a receptor placed downwind can be estimated and the distance adjusted to maintains such exposures as low as reasonably achievableALARA.. Also, this study will briefly addresses particle characteristics thatwhich affect atmospheric particle dispersion, and compares this dispersion with leak path factorLPF methodology.

Gavin Hawkley

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Animals as sentinels of environmental health hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Committee on Animals as Monitors of Environmental Hazards was formed when the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry requested that the National Academy of Sciences gather an NRC committee to review and evaluate the usefulness of animal epidemiologic studies for human risk assessment and recommend the types of data that should be collected. With specific questions in mind, the committee attempted to determine how animals could be used for ecological and human health risk determinations as well as to provide an early-warning system for risk assessment and management.

Glickman, L.T.; Fairbrother, A.; Guarino, A.M.; Bergman, H.L.; Buck, W.B.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

285

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.I LALI iE REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L. -77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r...

287

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

289

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

290

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

292

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

293

FY09 recycling opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Recycling Opportunity Assessment (ROA) is a revision and expansion of the FY04 ROA. The original 16 materials are updated through FY08, and then 56 material streams are examined through FY09 with action items for ongoing improvement listed for most. In addition to expanding the list of solid waste materials examined, two new sections have been added to cover hazardous waste materials. Appendices include energy equivalencies of materials recycled, trends and recycle data, and summary tables of high, medium, and low priority action items.

McCord, Samuel Adam

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

CRAD, Work Controls Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Work Controls Assessment Plan Work Controls Assessment Plan CRAD, Work Controls Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing deficiency and condition; prescribing appropriate approvals; and including

295

Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

296

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

297

Comparison of environmental impacts of steel and concrete as building materials using the Life Cycle Assessment method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the United States, the construction industry accounts for almost 75% of total raw material used. This is an obvious drain on natural resources and has a major impact on the surrounding environment. Construction materials ...

Johnson, Timothy Werner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Office of Emergency Management Assessments | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

requiring a quantitative Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment. Works closely with other IEA offices and DOE line organizations to schedule and undertake assessments. Evaluates...

299

Methods for developing seismic and extreme wind-hazard models for evaluating critical structures and equipment at US Department of Energy facilities and commercial plutonium facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing seismic and wind hazard models for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort to establish building design criteria developed with a uniform methodology for seismic and wind hazards at the various DOE sites throughout the United States. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. Phase 2 - development of seismic and wind hazard models - is discussed in this paper, which summarizes the methodologies used by seismic and extreme-wind experts and gives sample hazard curves for the first sites to be modeled. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake (or windspeed) greater than some specified magnitude. In the final phase, the DOE will use the hazards models and LLNL-recommended uniform design criteria to evaluate critical facilities. The methodology presented in this paper also was used for a related LLNL study - involving the seismic assessment of six commercial plutonium fabrication plants licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Details and results of this reassessment are documented in reference.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.; Bernreuter, D.L.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

INTRODUCTION Few post-wildfire hazards are as potentially devastating as a debris flow. Debris flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Few post-wildfire hazards are as potentially devastating as a debris flow. Debris the influence of fire, a wildfire can transform a watershed with no recent history of debris flows are developing new techniques to assess the hazards posed by debris flows after wildfires. These techniques can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fire Hazards Analysis for the Inactive Equipment Storage Sprung Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the fire protection objective of DOE Order 5480.1A are met. The order acknowledges a graded approach commensurate with the hazards involved.

MYOTT, C.F.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

DOE/EA-1538; Environmental Assessment for the Safeguards and Security Upgrades for the Storage of Plutonium Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 December 2005 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY UPGRADES FOR STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE DOE/EA-1538 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY UPGRADES FOR STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM MATERIALS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE December 2005 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ii This page is intentionally left blank iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 3 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 3 2.1 Proposed Action 3 2.1.1 Modified Storage Capability within K Area for

306

Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

64 64 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico June 14, 2004 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office EA for the Proposed Corrective Measures at MDA H within TA-54 at LANL DOE LASO June 14, 2004 iii Contents Acronyms and Terms..................................................................................................................................v Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Purpose and Need ..............................................................................................................................1

307

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

308

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

309

Portable sensor for hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a field-portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection using active nitrogen energy transfer (ANET) excitation of atomic and molecular fluorescence (active nitrogen is made in a dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen). It should provide rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map areas of greatest contamination. Results indicate that ANET is very sensitive for monitoring heavy metals (Hg, Se) and hydrocarbons; furthermore, chlorinated hydrocarbons can be distinguished from nonchlorinated ones. Sensitivity is at ppB levels for sampling in air. ANET appears ideal for on-line monitoring of toxic heavy metal levels at building sites, hazardous waste land fills, in combustor flues, and of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels at building sites and hazardous waste dumps.

Piper, L.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

311

Department of Energy Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES&H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES&H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public.

Bickford, W.E.

1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

Sasser, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of the Kinetics of Local Plastic Deformation of Zr-2.5%Nb CANDU Pressure Tube Material.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Constant-load pyramidal indentation creep tests and high precision micro-indentation strain rate change tests were performed to assess the effect of indentation depth, irradiation damage and… (more)

Bose, Bipasha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy Production, Wins R&D 100 Award  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Air traffic controllers, motorists, and Sandia National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a Web-based tool that complies with new federal guidelines requiring quantified assessments of glare from proposed solar installations.

316

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

317

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

319

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards not found in most  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Safety Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facilities present unique hazards or steel reinforced concrete, these ferromagnetic materials may have an effect on the magnetic field environmental temperature control is required (2) Structural support for heavy equipment and vibration control

Maroncelli, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Work Controls Assessment Plan Assessment Plan Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WORK CONTROLS WORK CONTROLS Assessment Plan Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Management should have an established work control process in place with authorized, controlled and documented methods that provide an accurate status of the work to be performed. Criteria: Work planning addresses applicable laws, codes and regulations. Work planning includes operational configuration constraints; material, tool, and manpower requirements; inter-organizational coordination; operational history; special training; safety considerations; hazards protection requirements; post-maintenance testing; quality control requirements; and other considerations as necessary. The work to be accomplished is defined by identifying the existing

322

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fire Protection Program Assessment, Building 9116- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment is intended to evaluate the fire hazards, life safety and fire protection features inherent in Building 9116.

324

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

A hazard separation system for dismantlement of nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the next decade, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must retire and dismantle many nuclear weapon systems. In support of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed the Hazard Separation System (HSS). The HSS combines abrasive waterjet cutting technology and real-time radiography. Using the HSS, operators determine the exact location of interior, hazardous sub-components and remove them through precision cutting. The system minimizes waste and maximizes the recovery of recyclable materials. During 1994, the HSS was completed and demonstrated. Weapon components processed during the demonstration period included arming, fusing, and firing units; preflight control units; neutron generator subassemblies; and x-units. Hazards removed included radioactive krytron tubes and gap tubes, thermal batteries, neutron generator tubes, and oil-filled capacitors. Currently, the HSS is being operated at SNL in a research and development mode to facilitate the transfer of the technology to other DOE facilities for support of their dismantlement operations.

Lutz, J.D.; Purvis, S.T.; Hospelhorn, R.L.; Thompson, K.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A new seismic hazard analysis using FOSM algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract From recent lessons, it is evident that earthquake prediction is immature and impractical as of now. Under the circumstances, seismic hazard analysis is considered a more practical approach for earthquake hazard mitigation, by estimating the annual rate of earthquake ground motions (or seismic hazard) based on seismicity and other geological evidences. Like other earthquake studies for the high-seismicity region around Taiwan, this study aims to conduct a new seismic hazard assessment for the region using the well-established FOSM (first-order second-moment) algorithm, on the record of 55,000 earthquakes observed in the past 110 years. The new seismic hazard analysis from a different perspective shows that the annual rate for earthquake-induced PGA to exceed the current design value (i.e., 0.23g) in two major cities in Taiwan should be relatively low, with it no greater than 0.0006 per year. Besides, the FOSM estimates were found very close to those with Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS), mainly because the skewness of the three random variables (i.e., earthquake magnitude, location, and model error) considered in the probabilistic analysis is not very large.

J.P. Wang; Yih-Min Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Readiness Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets Doug Wheeler DJW Technology Michael Ulsh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-53046 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power

329

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Materials Handling Equipment Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a manufacturing readiness assessment (MRA) of fuel cell systems and fuel cell stacks for back-up power and material handling applications (MHE). To facilitate the MRA, manufacturing readiness levels (MRL) were defined that were based on the Technology Readiness Levels previously established by the US Department of Energy (DOE). NREL assessed the extensive existing hierarchy of MRLs developed by Department of Defense (DoD) and other Federal entities, and developed a MRL scale adapted to the needs of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) and to the status of the fuel cell industry. The MRL ranking of a fuel cell manufacturing facility increases as the manufacturing capability transitions from laboratory prototype development through Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. DOE can use MRLs to address the economic and institutional risks associated with a ramp-up in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell production. In 2010, NREL updated this assessment, including additional manufacturers, an assessment of market developments since the original report, and a comparison of MRLs between 2008 and 2010.

Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

332

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models.

Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Boardman, J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, J.A. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reactions of plutonium and uranium with water: Kinetics and potential hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry and kinetics of reactions between water and the metals and hydrides of plutonium and uranium are described in an effort to consolidate information for assessing potential hazards associated with handling and storage. New experimental results and data from literature sources are presented. Kinetic dependencies on pH, salt concentration, temperature and other parameters are reviewed. Corrosion reactions of the metals in near-neutral solutions produce a fine hydridic powder plus hydrogen. The corrosion rate for plutonium in sea water is a thousand-fold faster than for the metal in distilled water and more than a thousand-fold faster than for uranium in sea water. Reaction rates for immersed hydrides of plutonium and uranium are comparable and slower than the corrosion rates for the respective metals. However, uranium trihydride is reported to react violently if a quantity greater than twenty-five grams is rapidly immersed in water. The possibility of a similar autothermic reaction for large quantities of plutonium hydride cannot be excluded. In addition to producing hydrogen, corrosion reactions convert the massive metals into material forms that are readily suspended in water and that are aerosolizable and potentially pyrophoric when dry. Potential hazards associated with criticality, environmental dispersal, spontaneous ignition and explosive gas mixtures are outlined.

Haschke, J.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Materials Safety Data Sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

Schweik, Charles M.

336

Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

Grebenyuk, V.D. [Institute of Colloid and Water Chemistry, Kiev (Ukraine); Grebenyuk, O.V. [Dega Enterprises of NY, Inc., Flushing, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

339

An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Agencies complete comprehensive investigation for radioactive and hazardous  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printer-friendly icon Printer-Friendly June 29, 2007 Agencies complete comprehensive investigation for radioactive and hazardous waste landfill; agree to extend document submittal milestone The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have completed a CERCLA (Superfund) Remedial Investigation and Baseline Risk Assessment and Feasibility Study of a radioactive and hazardous waste landfill at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The results of these investigations are found in two documents: the Remedial Investigation and Baseline Risk Assessment for Operable Unit 7-13/-14 and the Feasibility Study for Operable Unit 7-13/-14. Both documents are available in the Administrative Record at http://ar.inel.gov/. The documents are also available at the INL Technical Library in Idaho Falls and Boise State University�s Albertsons Library.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Environmental, health, and safety assessment of photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential enviornmental, health, and safety (E,H and S) concerns associated with all phases of the photovoltaic (PV) energy system life cycle are identified and assessed. E,H and S concerns affecting the achievement of National PV Program goals or the viability of specific PV technologies are emphasized. The report is limited to near-term manufacturing process alternatives for crystalline silicon PV materials, addresses flat-plate and concentrator collector designs, and reviews system deployment in grid-connected, roof-mounted, residential and ground-mounted central-station applications. The PV life-cycle phases examined include silicon refinement and manufacture of PV collectors, system deployment, and decommissioning. The primary E,H and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

Rose, E.C.

1983-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

343

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the ‘add a source’ basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Laboratory Assessment of Potential Impacts to Dungeness Crabs from Disposal of Dredged Material from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dredging of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about dredging-related impacts on Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in the estuary, mouth of the estuary, and nearshore ocean areas adjacent to the Columbia River. The Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers engaged the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to review the state of knowledge and conduct studies concerning impacts on Dungeness crabs resulting from disposal during the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and annual maintenance dredging in the mouth of the Columbia River. The present study concerns potential effects on Dungeness crabs from dredged material disposal specific to the mouth of the Columbia River.

Vavrinec, John; Pearson, Walter H.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Skalski, J. R.; Lee, Cheegwan; Hall, Kathleen D.; Romano, Brett A.; Miller, Martin C.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE This module will discuss the objectives and requirements associated with this rule from the code of federal regulations. We have provided an example to help familiarize you with the material. The example will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste operations and emergency response or through the course manager. You may need to refer to these documents to complete the example, practice, and criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations

347

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals OSHA List of Hazardous Chemicals ACETALDEHYDE ACETAMIDE ACETIC ACID ACETIC ANHYDRIDE ACETONE ACETONItr ILE ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE, 2- ACETYLENE ACETYLENE DICHLORIDE ACETYLENE TETRABROMIDE ACETYLSALICYLIC ACID (ASPIRIN) ACROLEIN ACRYLAMIDE ACRYLIC ACID ACRYLONITRILE ACTINOMYCIN D ADRIAMYCIN AFLATOXINS ALDRIN ALLYL ALCOHOL ALLYL CHLORIDE ALLYL GLYCIDYL ETHER (AGE) ALLYL PROPYL DISULFIDE ALUMINA ALUMINUM, METAL DUST, AS AL ALUMINUM, PYRO POWDERS, AS AL ALUMINUM, SOLUBLE SALTS, AS AL ALUMINUM, WELDING FUMES, AS AL ALUMINUM, ALKYLS, NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED, AS AL ALUMINUM OXIDE, AS AL AMINOANTHRAQUINONE (AAQ), AMINOAZOTOLUENE, O- AMINOBIPHENYL, 4- AMINOETHANOL, 2- AMINO-2-METHYLANTHRAQUINONE, 1- AMINO-5-(5-NITRO-2-FURYL)- -1, 3,4-THIADIADIAZOLE, 2- AMINOPYRIDINE, 2- AMINO-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE, 3-

348

Materials - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

349

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

350

Alternate airborne release fraction determination for hazardous waste management storage repository hazard categorization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities are used in the handling and processing of solid and liquid radioactive, hazardous, mixed, and medical wastes generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Waste may be treated or stored in one of the HWM facility units prior to shipment off site for treatment or disposal. Planned facilities such as the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and the Building 280 Container Storage Unit are expected to handle similar waste streams. A hazard classification was preformed in each facility safety analysis report (SAR) according to the DOE Standard 1027-92 `Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.` The general methodology practiced by HWM to determine alternate airborne release fractions (ARFs) in those SARs was based upon a beyond evaluation basis earthquake accident scenario characterized by the release of the largest amount of respirable, airborne radioactive material. The alternate ARF was calculated using a three-factor formula consisting of the fraction of failed waste containers, fraction of material released from failed waste containers,and the fraction of material entrained to the environment. Recently, in deliberation with DOE-Oakland representatives, HWM decided to modify this methodology. In place of the current detailed analysis, a more straightforward process was proposed based upon material form, credible accident environments, and empirical data. This paper will discuss the methodology and derivation of ARFs specific to HWM treatment and storage facilities that are alternative to those presented in DOE-STD-1027-92.

Brumburgh, G.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

352

Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Idaho...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Safety Analysis EA Office of Enterprise Assessments EM Office of Environmental Management EMS Emergency Medical Services FHA Fire Hazard Analysis FM Fire Marshall FPE Fire...

353

CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements.

354

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the facility as constructed and with planned operation at the time of document preparation. Changes in facility planned and actual operation require that the identified fire risks associated with the CVDF be re-evaluated. Consequently, formal documentation and future revision of this FHA may be required.

SINGH, G.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2004) 4: 103116 SRef-ID: 1684-9981/nhess/2004-4-103  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Published: 9 March 2004 Part of Special Issue "Landslide and flood hazards assessment" Abstract. As over. More specifically, highly sheared quartz boulders, outcropping mylonite (a foliated fine grained

Boyer, Edmond

356

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphic Results Graphic Results Baseline Risk Assessment Results Screening Risk Assessment Results Other Risk Assessment Results Graphic Results K-25 Groundwater Residential Landuse Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-30) Bedrock Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Bedrock Wells - Total Risk Bedrock Wells - Arsenic Risk Bedrock Wells - Dichloroethene, 1,1- Risk Bedrock Wells - Trichloroethene Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 1-150) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Hazard (range: 0.1 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-4 - 1) Unconsolidated Wells - Total Risk (range:10-6 - 10-4) Unconsolidated Wells - Arsenic Risk Unconsolidated Wells - Trichloroethene Risk ORNL WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk

357

Does the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Street, Suite 450, Austin, Texas, 78701, USA Summary: Fly ash, a waste material from coal-fired power of fly ash [9]. Fly ash is a waste material from coal fired power plants; when added to concrete, fly ashDoes the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1 , M. Juenger1 and J

Siegel, Jeffrey

358

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

359

Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological, and chemical weapons of warfare and terrorism.Threat and Unconventional Weapon Robert Jones, MD Brandonand as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent

Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fuel storage tanks, heating oil tanks, emergency generator tanks, industrial activities and landfills from an underground storage tank (UST) or associated piping are required within 24 hours of discovery Handling Facilities classify and manage petroleum-contaminated soils by the concentration of gas-, diesel

Wilcock, William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 273 (2014) 272279  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural University, Shangdong 271018, China c Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida , Jun Luoa, , Lena Q. Maa,c, a State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School on Corresponding authors at: State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School

Ma, Lena

362

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY

363

Author's personal copy Journal of Hazardous Materials 185 (2011) 983989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), a carcinogenic metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment. Human activities including mining, smelting, and As to arsenic via drinking con- taminated water (>50 g/L) leads to cancers, birth defects, and other diseases [3

Ma, Lena

364

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

kilopascals kilopascals 0.14504 pounds per square inch 062001 Source: Engineering Unit Conversions, M. R. Lindeburg, PE., Third Ed., 1990, Professional Publications, Inc.,...

365

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Risk Assessment Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Documents Risk Assessment Documents ORNL RA Graphic Results ORNL Baseline Risk Assessment Results ORNL Screening Risk Assessment Results ORNL Other Risk Assessment Results ORNL RA Graphic Results WAG 2 Residential Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse Sediment - Total Risk Sediment - Cesium 137 Risk Sediment - Cobalt 60 Risk Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Recreational Landuse (No Fish) Surface Water - Total Hazard Surface Water - Total Risk Surface Water - Strontium 90 Risk Surface Water - Tritium Risk Industrial Landuse

367

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7-202.) The Hazardous Waste Program is based off of the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act set forth in 40 CFR parts 260-279. Due to the great similarity to the

368

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reactor Materials | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benefits Crosscutting Technology Development Reactor Materials Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment Advanced Methods for Manufacturing...

370

Pressure Vessel Burst Program: Automated hazard analysis for pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, development, and use of a Windows based software tool, PVHAZARD, for pressure vessel hazard analysis is presented. The program draws on previous efforts in pressure vessel research and results of a Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study. Prior papers on the Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study have been presented to the ASME, AIAA, JANNAF, NASA Pressure Systems Seminar, and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. Development and validation is described for simplified blast (overpressure/impulse) and fragment (velocity and travel distance) hazard models. The use of PVHAZARD in making structural damage and personnel injury estimates is discussed. Efforts in-progress are reviewed including the addition of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrodynamic code analyses to supplement the simplified models, and the ability to assess barrier designs for protection from fragmentation.

Langley, D.R. [Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Chrostowski, J.D. [ACTA Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Goldstein, S. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States); Cain, M. [General Physics Corp., Titusville, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

372

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

373

Hazard of intermittent noise exposures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief shortcoming of the “equal energy” hypothesis—the notion that equal products of time and intensity provide equal hazard—is that the recuperative powers of the auditory system are essentially ignored. A single sustained stimulus is regarded as no more dangerous than an intermittent one of the same total energy. A two?year study of the effect of intermittency on the TTS produced in normal young adults by 6? or 8?h exposures to octave bands of noise whose center frequencies ranged from 250 to 4000 Hz indicates that even for the most hazardous noise (the 4000?Hz OB) cutting the cumulative exposure time in half by interjecting regular quiet periods will permit an increase in level of 5 dB for constant TTS at least up to about 100 dB SPL. At 1000 Hz the trading relation is 6–7 dB for halving time and at 250 Hz is even greater. Thus the 5?dBA?per?halving?time relation employed by the present OSHA standard is essentially correct for intermittent noise except perhaps above 100 to 105 dBA where the equal?energy hypothesis may be more appropriate for spectra with high?frequency dominance. A single 5?dBA “correction for intermittency” is an oversimplification. [Research supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Public Health Service.

W. D. Ward

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) Hazardous Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Environmental Management The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Department of Environmental Management is tasked regulating hazardous waste management facilities and practices. Provisions pertaining to permitting, site approval, construction, reporting, transportation, and remediation practices and fees are discussed in these

375

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

376

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

377

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

378

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

380

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Material Disposal Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

382

Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Process Waste Assessment, Mechanics Shop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate hazardous wastes generated in the Mechanics Shop. The Mechanics Shop maintains and repairs motorized vehicles and equipment on the SNL/California site, to include motorized carts, backhoes, street sweepers, trash truck, portable emergency generators, trencher, portable crane, and man lifts. The major hazardous waste streams routinely generated by the Mechanics Shop are used oil, spent off filters, oily rags, and spent batteries. The used off and spent off filters make up a significant portion of the overall hazardous waste stream. Waste oil and spent batteries are sent off-site for recycling. The rags and spent on filters are not recycled. They are disposed of as hazardous waste. Mechanics Shop personnel continuously look for opportunities to minimize hazardous wastes.

Phillips, N.M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance

385

Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be damaged when corrosive chemicals are put down the drain. Burning hazardous wastes simply distributes themHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products containing toxic chemicals. These wastes CANNOT be disposed of in regular garbage. Any

de Lijser, Peter

386

Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Root Out Lawn and Garden Tool Hazards For many Americans, working outdoors on the lawn and in the garden is a great way to exercise and relax. However, safety experts warn that, if caution is not employed with lawn and garden tools, you could wind up spending more time indoors, starting with a trip to a hospital emergency room. "The most frequent injuries are from lawn mowers, which are unforgiving machines," cautions John Drengenberg, manager of Consumer Affairs for Underwriters Laboratories Inc., Northbrook, Ill., a not-for-profit product safety testing organization. "Statistics tell us that each year lawn mower accidents send close to 85,000 people to emergency rooms. But that's not all. Nearly 15,000 others need medical treatment for injuries from trimmers and other power garden

387

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

390

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

393

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division MAINTENANCE Assessment Plan, NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division An effective facilities maintenance program should optimize the material condition of components and equipment to support safe and effective operations and ensure the peak performance and reliability of those systems and equipment important to operations. The program, facility or operation has a Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP), or equivalent document, which defines and documents the approach to conduct of maintenance .Employees shall be encouraged to become involved in the identification and control of hazards in the workplace. (DOE O 440.1A CRD) Workers shall have the right, without reprisal, to accompany DOE worker

394

EA-1464: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

464: Final Environmental Assessment 464: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1464: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Site Office DOE, NNSA has the Congressionally assigned responsibility for the administration of LANL, including the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes generated by LANL mission support activities. As a result of historical LANL waste disposal practices, wastes disposed of within shafts at MDA H have been identified by NMED as potentially having a future adverse effect on human health and the environment. A CMS Report prepared for MDA H evaluated various corrective measure options for MDA H. DOE now

395

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

The nature of technological hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1977 ). LAVE, L.B., CONFLICTING...LOWRANCE, W.W., ACCEPTABLE RISK SCI ( 1976 ). RASMUSSEN...ofActual vs. Perceived Risks, V. Co-vello...19. P. Slovic, B. Fischhoff, S. Lichtenstein, in Soci-etal Risk Assessment: How...

C Hohenemser; RW Kates; P Slovic

1983-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Transportation System Risk Assessment (TSRA) bounding release model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation System Risk Assessments (TSRAs) document the compliance of proposed shipments of nuclear components with applicable federal regulations as well as the associated risks involved. If a relatively simple bounding analysis can show that the consequences resulting from a worst case scenario are acceptably low, a more time intensive and costly risk analysis can be avoided. Therefore, a bounding release FORTRAN model has been developed to determine the consequences of a worst case non-criticality transportation accident. The consequences of three conservative bounding accidents are determined by the model: (1) direct radiation exposure, (2) airborne release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material, and (3) release of radiological and/or hazardous solid material into a waterway and subsequent uptake by an individual through drinking water. Program output includes the direct radiation exposure (mrem), maximum downwind concentration (mg/m{sup 3}), radiation dose (mrem) received as a result of the postulated airborne release of radiological material, intake (mg) due to inhalation, radiation dose (mrem) received by an individual resulting from a release of radiological material into a waterway and uptake into drinking water, and uptake (mg) due to ingestion. This report documents the methodologies and correlations used in the numerical model to perform the bounding consequence calculations.

Anderson, J.C.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

400

Abatement of Air Pollution: Hazardous Air Pollutants (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe maximum allowable stack concentrations and hazard limiting values for the emission of hazardous air pollutants. The regulations also discuss sampling procedures for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Seismic Hazard Analysis For Nuclear Facilities At The Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

402

Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ingestion of natural uranium in food and drink, and...for the measurement of uranium in urine samples, DU...respect to potential health hazards can be detected...Assessment of exposure to depleted uranium. | In most circumstances......

P. Roth; V. Höllriegl; E. Werner; P. Schramel

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Critical Materials Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE.

404

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collection Methods, Health Effects Institute, Mickely LelandMatter Species, Health Effects Institute:HEI 130 Pt 2

Logue, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implications for indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations."concentrations of indoor nitrogen dioxide in Hamburg (westand concentrations of indoor nitrogen dioxide in Barcelona,

Logue, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

defined a generally acceptable cancer risk level for HAPs.levels based on an acceptable level of risk. Thecalculate acceptable exposure concentration for cancer risk

Logue, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference & Exhibition Healthy Buildings 2009, Syracuse, NYConference & Exhibition Healthy Buildings 2009, Syracuse, NYproceedings from the 2009 Healthy Building Conference held

Logue, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A PFUZLIMIK4RY ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE GROUND SHAKING HAZARD...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nevada, U.S. Geological Survey Administrative Report prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Project, Chapter 4, variably paged. Wong, I.G., Green, R.K., Olig,...

409

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Thermal hazard evaluations of 18650 lithium-ion batteries by an adiabatic calorimeter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the thermal hazard features of various lithium-ion batteries, such as LiCoO2 and LiFePO4..., were assessed properly by calorimetric techniques. Vent sizing package 2 (VSP2), an adiabatic calorimete...

Tien-Yuan Lu; Chung-Cheng Chiang…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public and environment from radiological hazards with a focus on hazardous nuclear facilities and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance of the Department’s mission.

415

An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

Dixon, Sherry L. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)], E-mail: sdixon@nchh.org; Fowler, Cecile [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Martinez, Yolanda [City of Phoenix, Neighborhood Services Department, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Jacobs, David E. [National Center for Healthy Housing, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

All Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazard Hazard Awareness Employee Pocket Guide produced by Emergency Services Program For emergencies dial x7911 911 from cell phones berkeley lab Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Emergency Preparedness Response FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Pocket Guide 3 FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE x7911 911 from cell phones Employee Emergency Response Expectations Before an emergency: * Accept personal responsibility for your own safety. * Prepare your personal/family emergency plan. * Review your Building Emergency Plan (BEP) or Emergency Response Guide. * Know the location of all your building's exits and Assembly Areas. * Know the specific hazards in your area and the response procedures for each hazard. * Understand how to report an emergency.

417

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Owning Hazard, A Tragedy Barbara Young Welke*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Minnesota. This play is part of her ongoing research on the history of products liability. In addition in the ownership of hazard from the individuals who suffered injury, to the enterprises involved in manufacturing

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

419

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Lab optimizes burning of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermal destruction laboratory has gone into operation at Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Mo. The bench-scale facility, which can accommodate gram quantities of hazardous wastes in liquid, slurry, or solid forms, is used to determine ...

WARD WORTHY

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Probabilistic seismic hazard maps in term of Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity are derived by applying the ‘Cornell-McGuire’ method to four earthquake source zones in Panama and adjacent areas. The maps contain es...

Aristoteles Vergara Muñoz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gis Technology in Mapping Landslide Hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the recent years, the ever-increasing diffusion of GIS technology has facilitated the application of quantitative ... potential of such technological advancements, landslide hazard mapping remains a major, lar...

Alberto Carrara; Mauro Cardinali…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Home insulation may increase radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... pose a potential health hazard, by increasing exposure to low levels of the radioactive gas radon. ... .Radon-222 is produced as part of the decay chain of uranium-238. Both the ...

David Dickson

1978-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radioactivity level in soil of a palaeo beach in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh and evaluation of radiation hazard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......outdoor and indoor radiation hazard indices...annual effective dose rates. MATERIALS...Denundation of the Bay of Bengal extending along...kg). Gamma radiation hazard indices...based on the estimation that 1 Bq kg...gamma radiation dose rates. The index......

Ashna Islam; Mahfuza Sharifa Sultana; Aleya Begum; Selina Yeasmin

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

427

Environmental hazards: real or exaggerated?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0223-302067, FAX (44) 0223-302068 Send materials to Science Advertising, 1333 H Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005. m Information for Contributors appears on pages 40-42 of the 1 January 1993 issue. Editorial correspondence, includ-ing requests...

MD Green

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

428

Air pollution control: Indoor hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the need for further study of the health effects of indoor air pollution, ranging from radon emitted by building materials to the second-hand effects of cigarette smoke, and the ... overlooked in research on the health effects of environmental pollutants. In some cases,such as radon, the report says that there is an "urgent need" to study such health ...

David Dickson

1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Zhang, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Deep Geological Environments, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

432

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

433

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

434

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing respiratory impairment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

levels and make recommendations upon request. Respiratory... protection, employees must wear personal protective equipment. Hazard Assessment and Equipment Selection 2... .02...

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess sediment quality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD Summary: bulk density profiles (-ray densiometer) vertical profiles of sediment quality...

436

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing short medium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk Assessment Potential Hazards to Consider (tick box) Electrical FireIgnition Cable pathway Noise Source: Australian National University, Centre for Antimatter-Matter...

437

Fire Protection Program Assessment, Building 9203 & 9203A Complex- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This assessment is intended to evaluate the fire hazards, life safety and fire protection features inherent in the Building 9203 and 9203A complex.

438

Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to overpressure--external to T Plant, was included for completeness but is not within the scope of the hazards evaluation. Container failures external to T Plant will be addressed as part of the transportation analysis. This document describes the HazOp analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of SNF sludge in the T Plant.

SCHULTZ, M.V.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

439

Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

93 93 FINAL Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 - USDA Regulated Soil 2 - USDA Regulated Soil Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving soils regulated by the United States Department of Agricultute (USDA). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving this hazard class categorized as low risk experiments unless other hazard classes apply. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - None required. Procedural Controls - All work with regulated soils must be performed in compliance with the APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil. The APS protocols state the requirements for handling, storage, shipment, and disposal of regulated

442

Comprehensive Nuclear Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke [Osaka University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

NONE

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fire hazards analysis for the uranium oxide (UO{sub 3}) facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) documents the deactivation end-point status of the UO{sub 3} complex fire hazards, fire protection and life safety systems. This FHA has been prepared for the Uranium Oxide Facility by Westinghouse Hanford Company in accordance with the criteria established in DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection and RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection. The purpose of the Fire Hazards Analysis is to comprehensively and quantitatively assess the risk from a fire within individual fire areas in a Department of Energy facility so as to ascertain whether the objectives stated in DOE Order 5480.7, paragraph 4 are met. Particular attention has been paid to RLID 5480.7, Section 8.3, which specifies the criteria for deactivating fire protection in decommission and demolition facilities.

Wyatt, D.M.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

Packaging and transportation manual. Chapter on the packaging and transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to outline the requirements that Los Alamos National Laboratory employees and contractors must follow when they package and ship hazardous and radioactive waste. This chapter is applied to on-site, intra-Laboratory, and off-site transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste. The chapter contains sections on definitions, responsibilities, written procedures, authorized packaging, quality assurance, documentation for waste shipments, loading and tiedown of waste shipments, on-site routing, packaging and transportation assessment and oversight program, nonconformance reporting, training of personnel, emergency response information, and incident and occurrence reporting. Appendices provide additional detail, references, and guidance on packaging for hazardous and radioactive waste, and guidance for the on-site transport of these wastes.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Background studies in support of a feasibility assessment on the use of copper-base materials for nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report combines six work units performed in FY`85--86 by the Copper Development Association and the International Copper Research Association under contract with the University of California. The work includes literature surveys and state-of-the-art summaries on several considerations influencing the feasibility of the use of copper-base materials for fabricating high-level nuclear waste packages for the proposed repository in tuff rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The general conclusion from this work was that copper-base materials are viable candidates for inclusion in the materials selection process for this application. 55 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Kundig, K.J.A.; Lyman, W.S.; Prager, M.; Meyers, J.R.; Servi, I.S. [CDA/INCRA Joint Advisory Group, Greenwich, CT (USA)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30, 1993 30, 1993 EA-0921: Final Environmental Assessment Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University July 1, 1993 EA-0847: Final Environmental Assessment Live Fire Range at the Central Training Academy, Albuquerque, New Mexico June 25, 1993 EA-0841: Final Environmental Assessment Import of Russian Plutonium-238 June 3, 1993 EA-0923: Final Environmental Assessment Winnett School District Boiler Replacement Project June 1, 1993 EA-0792: Final Environmental Assessment Nonnuclear Consolidation Environmental Assessment April 2, 1993 EA-0822: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility January 29, 1993 EA-0688: Final Environmental Assessment Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

448

Materials Compatibility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Publications Mechanical Properties of Structural Steels in Hydrogen Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Report on Assessment of...

449

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Materialism and materiality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accountants and auditors in recent financial scandals have been pictured as materialistic, simply calculating consequences and ignoring duties. This paper potentially explains this apparently materialistic behaviour in what has historically been a truthtelling profession. Materiality, which drives audit priorities, has been institutionalised in accounting and auditing standards. But a materiality focus inherently implies that all amounts that are not 'materially' misstated are equally true. This leads to habitual immaterial misstatements and promotes the view that auditors do not care about truth at all. Auditors' lack of commitment to truth undermines their claim to be professionals in the classic sense.

Michael K. Shaub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

453

Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL Order Module--THE CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) FAMILIAR LEVEL The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the purpose of 29 CFR 1910.147 and the terms associated with the standard. In the second section, we will discuss the requirements in the standard. We have provided examples throughout the module to help familiarize you with the material. The examples will also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and the criterion test. Most of what you will need to know to complete this module is contained in the module. However, before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the standard. Copies of the standard are available at

454

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Materials Characterization Paul McConnell, (505) 844-8361 The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials, i.e., mixed waste, packaging is to enable this waste type to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this goal, regulations have been written establishing general design requirement for such packagings. Based on these regulatory requirements, a Mixed Waste Chemical Compatibility Testing Program is intended to assure regulatory bodies that the issue of packaging compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. Such a testing program has been developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories. Materials Characterization Capabilities

455

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A hazards analysis of a nuclear explosives dismantlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the methodology used in a quantitative hazard assessment of a nuclear weapon disassembly process. Potential accident sequences were identified using an accident-sequence fault tree based on operational history, weapon safety studies, a hazard analysis team composed of weapons experts, and walkthroughs of the process. The experts provided an initial screening of the accident sequences to reduce the number of accident sequences that would be quantified. The accident sequences that survived the screening process were developed further using event trees. Spreadsheets were constructed for each event tree, the accident sequences associated with that event tree were entered as rows on the spreadsheet, and that spreadsheet was linked to spreadsheets with initiating-event frequencies, enabling event probabilities, and weapon response probabilities. The probability and frequency distribution estimates used in these spreadsheets were gathered from weapon process operational data, surrogate industrial data, expert judgment, and probability models. Frequency distributions were calculated for the sequences whose point-value frequency represented 99% of the total point-value frequency using a Monte Carlo simulation. Partial differential importances of events and distributions of accident frequency by weapon configuration, location, process, and other parameters were calculated.

Bott, T.F.; Eisenhawer, S.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental Quality is authorized to enact regulations pertaining to all aspects of hazardous waste storage and disposal, and the Act addresses permitting requirements for disposal

460

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source Experiment Hazard Classes at the Advanced Photon Source January 18, 2012 Beamline Operation: HC1 APS Base Low Temperatures: HC2 Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures: HC3.1 Electric Furnace HC3.2 Optical Furnace HC3.3 Other High Temperature Lasers: HC4.2 Laser, Class 2 HC4.3a Laser, Class 3a HC4.3b Laser, Class 3b HC4.4 Laser, Class 4 High Pressures: HC5.1 High Pressure, DAC HC5.2 High Pressure, LVP HC5.3 High Pressure Vessels HC5.4 High Pressure Comp. Gas Chemicals: HC6.0 Chemicals, General HC6.1 Chemicals, Carcinogen HC6.2 Chemicals, Corrosive HC6.3 Chemicals, Toxic HC6.4 Chemicals, Flammable HC6.5 Chemicals, Oxidizer HC6.6 Chemicals, Other HC6.7 Chemicals, Explosive/Energetic Materials Biosafety: HC7.1 Biosafety Level 1 HC7.2 Biosafety Level 2 HC7.3 Biosafety Level 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazardous material assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Herrmann, 1981) and secondary oil recovery in western Colorado at the Rangely oil field (Gibbs et al. 1973COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah

Sheehan, Anne F.

462

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

464

An assessment of electric vehicles: technology, infrastructure requirements, greenhouse-gas emissions, petroleum use, material use, lifetime cost, consumer acceptance and policy initiatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will have peak-power devices such as high-power batteries or...Fuel-cell passenger cars and sport utility...feedstocks (water, electricity...Comparing land, water, and materials...hybrid vehicles: power sources, models...using a motor car. Transport...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the U. S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Implementation of a Comprehensive Management Program for the Storage, Transportation, and Disposition of Potentially Reusable Uranium Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IMPMZT IMPMZT PROGR4MMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME?X FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, OAK RIDGE OPER4TIOSS IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMEKT PROGK4hl FOR THE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION, AND DISPOSITION OF POTENTIALLY REUSABLE URANJUh4 MATERIALS AGEhCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) ACTION: FINDI?iG OF NO SIGNIFICANT 1~IPAC-I SUMI\!L4RY: The U. S. DOE has completed a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PE:,4) (DOE/E?,- 1393), which is incorporated herein by this reference. Tile purpose of the PEA is in assess potential enJ?ronmental impacts of the implementation of a comprehek-e management program for potentiaIly reusable ICW enriched uranium (LEU). norr,:al uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). --l?prosimately 14,200 MTU (h?etric Tons of Uranium) of potentially reusable uranium is located at 15s

466

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los...

467

ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth rules...

468

EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

469

Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact SheetLegal Abstract Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet,...

470

6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract This...

471

ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal Abstract...

472

EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

473

EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Potential Safety Hazard at SRS EM Eliminates Potential Safety Hazard at SRS September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here is H-Canyon, where workers recently dissolved the last...

474

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

<