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1

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitis than comparisons.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of...

3

Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

Archuleta, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

Archuleta, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard The classification of waste as hazardous could soon be assessed in Europe using largely the hazard properties of its knowledge of the component constituents of a given waste will therefore be necessary. An analytical protocol

Boyer, Edmond

8

Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

Amiri, G. Ghodrati [Iran University of Science and Technology--Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord, Narmak, Tehran 16846 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dehkordi, M. Raeisi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrei, S. A. Razavian [College of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kamali, M. Koohi [Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-112-1372, Culley Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate worker exposure to boiler gases and coal dust, NIOSH conducted a combined environmental and medical evaluation at the Culley facility in August 1981. Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposure to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and asbestos. In addition, boiler gas leaks were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide. In addition, a potential for exposure to boiler gases exists due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. The X-ray data revealed four cases of pneumoconiosis in the Culley workers. The relative youth and the low seniority of this workforce may explain the absence of group PFT reductions. If preventive engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from process equipment, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Emergence of interest groups on hazardous waste siting: how do they form and survive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the two components of the facilitative setting that are important for group formation. The first component, the ideological component, provides the basic ideas that are adopted by the emerging group. The ideological setting for group formation is produced by such things as antinuclear news coverage and concentration of news stories on hazardous waste problems, on ideas concerning the credibility of the federal government, and on the pervasivensee of ideas about general environmental problems. The organizational component of the facilitative setting provides such things as leadership ability, flexible time, resources, and experience. These are important for providing people, organization, and money to achieve group goals. By and large, the conditions conducive to group formation, growth, and survival are outside the control of decision-makers. Agencies and project sponsors are currently caught in a paradox. Actively involving the public in the decision-making process tends to contribute to the growth and survival of various interest groups. Not involving the public means damage to credibility and conflict with values concerning participatory democracy. Resolution in this area can only be achieved when a comprehensive, coordinated national approach to hazardous waste management emerges. 26 refs.

Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

1985-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

HUCKFELDT, R.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

14

Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-278-1371, Warrick Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposures to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and inorganic metals. In addition, gas leaks from the boilers were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide, coal dust, and crystalline silica. Highest concentrations were obtained on samples worn by electrical and maintenance personnel and employees working on the positive pressure boiler (unit 4). In addition, the potential exists for employee exposure to boiler gases due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. If preventive maintenance and engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made in the body of the full report for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from boiler units, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Technical Programs and Services; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Probabilistic wind/tornado/missile analyses for hazard and fragility evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed analysis procedures and examples are presented for the probabilistic evaluation of hazard and fragility against high wind, tornado, and tornado-generated missiles. In the tornado hazard analysis, existing risk models are modified to incorporate various uncertainties including modeling errors. A significant feature of this paper is the detailed description of the Monte-Carlo simulation analyses of tornado-generated missiles. A simulation procedure, which includes the wind field modeling, missile injection, solution of flight equations, and missile impact analysis, is described with application examples.

Park, Y.J.; Reich, M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, project director, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Morton Salt Company (SIC-1479), Weeks Island, Louisiana. At Weeks Island the salt was mined from large domes, circular in shape and from a few hundred yards to a mile across. The only detectable overexposures in the mining operation were to coal-tar pitch volatiles. None of the 20 personal breathing zone and area air samples collected in the mill were above detectable limits for asbestos (1332214). The prevalences of chronic cough and chronic phlegm reported were statistically different, exceeding those reported by a group of nonexposed blue collar workers. Chronic symptoms were reported by underground workers in all smoking categories, but only by those surface workers who also smoked. There were more complaints about eye irritation and tearing of the eyes in the underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Four workers were identified through pulmonary function test results with mild obstructive lung disease and one with moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were noted. None of the 61 chest films taken read positively for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that overexposures to coal-tar pitch volatiles existed at the time of the survey. The authors recommend measures for reducing occupational exposures to workplace contaminants. A follow up medical questionnaire survey should be conducted.

Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

WIPP Recertification - An Environmental Evaluation Group Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for defense transuranic (TRU) waste, was built and is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) required initial certification of compliance of the WIPP by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, a recertification decision is required by the LWA every five years, dated from the initial receipt of TRU waste. The first TRU waste shipment arrived at the WIPP on March 26, 1999, and therefore the first recertification application is due from DOE to EPA by March 25, 2004. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) provides technical oversight of the WIPP project on behalf of the State of New Mexico. The EEG considers the first recertification as a precedent setting event. Therefore, the EEG began the identification of recertification issues immediately following the initial certification decision. These issues have evolved since that time, based on discussions with the DOE and EEG's understanding of DOE's ongoing research. Performance assessment is required by the EPA certification and its results are needed to determine whether the facility remains in compliance at the time of the recertification application. The DOE must submit periodic change reports to the EPA which summarize activities and conditions that differ from the compliance application. Also, the EPA may request additional information from the DOE that may pertain to continued compliance. These changes and new information must be considered for recertification performance assessment.

Allen, L. E.; Silva, M. K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

Brereton, S.; Shinn, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hesse, D [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States); Kaninich, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lazaro, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mubayi, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-484-1754, Detroit Fire Fighters, Detroit, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters on behalf of the Detroit Fire Fighters Association, Detroit, Michigan, a health hazard evaluation was made of respiratory symptoms and skin irritation in fire fighters involved in a large fire and explosion at a warehouse. Over 200 fire fighters from fire-fighting organizations in three communities were involved in the incident. Site runoff water contained chlordane and malathion in low parts per million; other samples were negative. Nose and throat irritation, cough, and shortness of breath were experienced by a large proportion of fire fighters following the fire, and in 14, 15, and 17 percent, respectively, symptoms persisted over 2 months. Symptoms were significantly associated with time spent at the scene and time spent in heavy smoke. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 14 cases, ten due to obstructive lung disease, three to restrictive lung disease, and one to a combination. The authors conclude that better protective equipment is needed for fire fighters at chemical fires. Recommendations include development of a hazardous-materials response team, and implementation of a routine medical surveillance program.

Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of alternative nonflame technologies for destruction of hazardous organic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) commissioned an evaluation of mixed waste treatment technologies that are alternatives to incineration for destruction of hazardous organic wastes. The purpose of this effort is to evaluate technologies that are alternatives to open-flame, free-oxygen combustion (as exemplified by incinerators), and recommend to the Waste Type Managers and the MWFA which technologies should be considered for further development. Alternative technologies were defined as those that have the potential to: destroy organic material without use of open-flame reactions with free gas-phase oxygen as the reaction mechanism; reduce the offgas volume and associated contaminants (metals, radionuclides, and particulates) emitted under normal operating conditions; eliminate or reduce the production of dioxins and furans; and reduce the potential for excursions in the process that can lead to accidental release of harmful levels of chemical or radioactive materials. Twenty-three technologies were identified that have the potential for meeting these requirements. These technologies were rated against the categories of performance, readiness for deployment, and environment safety, and health. The top ten technologies that resulted from this evaluation are Steam Reforming, Electron Beam, UV Photo-Oxidation, Ultrasonics, Eco Logic reduction process, Supercritical Water oxidation, Cerium Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation, DETOX{sup SM}, Direct Chemical Oxidation (peroxydisulfate), and Neutralization/Hydrolysis.

Schwinkendorf, W.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Musgrave, B.C. [BC Musgrave, Inc. (United States); Drake, R.N. [Drake Engineering, Inc. (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

Seitz, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-232-2138, Schulte Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a confidential request from employees of the Schulte Corporation (SIC-3496), Cincinnati, Ohio, an evaluation was undertaken of complaints of chest tightness, itching, metallic taste in the mouth, and discharge of black dust from the noses of workers in the machine shop of the facility. The facility was involved in the manufacturing and shipping of epoxy coated steel wire shelving. Total dust samples taken in the breathing zone of the workers ranged from 0.49 to 4.78mg/cu m, well below the permissible limits. Respirable dust samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.43mg/cu m. Exposures to nitrogen oxides were well below acceptable limits. Aldehydes were not detected in samples evaluating exposure to two resistance welders. The NIOSH ceiling level of 0.1 part per million for ozone (10028156) was exceeded near welders. Six workers interviewed reported symptoms including black nasal discharge, headaches, sore throat, cough, hoarseness of voice, metallic taste and chest tightness. There was a potential ergonomic problem due to repetitive wrist motion. The authors conclude that a potential hazard from ozone exposure existed. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures and development of a program for the prevention of cumulative trauma.

Venable, H.L.; Kawamoto, M.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

An evaluation of current hazardous material management procedures for the Texas Department of Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dealing with hazardous materials on a day-to-day basis requires a fine--tuned material management system to minimize risk of exposure or injury to workers or to the public. An effective hazardous material management system should also keep up...

Lovell, Cheryl Alane

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-309-1630, Inland Steel, East Chicago, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and coal-tar-pitch volatiles at the Inland Steel Company, East Chicago, Indiana in November, 1982 and September, 1984. The evaluation was requested because of concern about employee exposures during maintenance of the coke battery precipitator at the number 2 facility. Four former employees were interviewed. The cyclohexane soluble fraction of coal-tar-pitch volatiles ranged from 0.232 to 0.668 mg/m/sup 3/. The OSHA standard is 0.15mg/m/sup 3/. Naphthalene concentrations up to 0.107mg/m/sup 3/ were detected. The OSHA standard for naphthalene is 50mg/m/sup 3/. Other PAHs detected included phenanthrene, fluorene and acenaphthene. The employees reported experiencing local skin, eye, ear, nose, and throat irritation while working on the coke battery precipitator in the past. Personal protective measures such as wearing safety boots, barrier creams on exposed skin surfaces, and showering and changing clothes before leaving the facility were implemented. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard from PAHs and coal-tar-pitch volatiles is being adequately addressed by the facility. Recommendations include continuing the present personal protective measures and providing emergency rescue training.

Almaguer, D.; Orris, P.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-033-1576, Airco Carbon, St. Marys, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total particulates, and respirable free silica at the Airco Company (SIC-3624), Saint Marys, Pennsylvania in January, 1984. The evaluation was requested confidentially because of concern over exposures to soot, coal tar pitch volatiles, and sand in the car bottom and sagger bake operations. Forty-three employees were interviewed. Two of 19 total particulate samples exceeded the OSHA standard of 15 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), 17.3 and 32.7 mg/m3. Benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 mg/m3. The OSHA standard for benzene soluble fractions is 0.2 mg/m3. Two of seven samples of silica were above the limit of detection, 0.09 and 0.06 mg/m3. In bulk samples, the benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.44 to 860 mg/gram and the PAH content from 0 to 26,124 micrograms per gram. Employees working in the bake areas reported a significant excess incidence of symptoms such as skin, nose and eye irritation, cough, sore or dry throat, chest tightness, and breathing difficulty. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists at the facility. Recommendations include enclosing vehicles used in moving electrodes, cleaning up spilled dust, and controlling fumes emitted from the sagger kilns.

Hartle, R.W.; Morawetz, J.S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of environmental conditions and possible health effects among workers exposed to coke dust was conducted. Personal breathing-zone (PBZ) concentrations of total airborne dust ranged from 0.1 to 12 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3) with a median of 1.6 mg/m3; mass median particle diameter was about 8 micrometers. Very high PBZ concentrations of coke dust occurred during a semimonthly cleanup of underground coke pits; levels ranged from 98 to 190mg/m3 with a mean of 140mg/m3. Oil mists were not detected. Exposures to polynuclear aromatic compounds were below the analytical limit of detection among workers for routine jobs. Abnormal pulmonary function tests were found in 12% of those tested. Five cases of chronic bronchitis and seven of chronic cough, 10 and 13% respectively, were identified among those interviewed. The authors conclude that there were potentially hazardous exposures to high dust levels during semimonthly coke-pit cleaning jobs.

Lee, S.A.; Lipscomb, J.A.; Neumeister, C.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hazard Evaluation for a Salt Well Centrifugal Pump Design Using Service Water for Lubrication and Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) covering the new salt well pump design. The PHA identified ten hazardous conditions mapped to four analyzed accidents: flammable gas deflagrations, fire in contaminated area, tank failure due to excessive loads, and waste transfer leaks. This document also presents the results of the control decision/allocation process. A backflow preventer and associated limiting condition were assigned.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

EVALUATING ROBOT TECHNOLOGIES AS TOOLS TO EXPLORE RADIOLOGICAL AND OTHER HAZARDOUS ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a general consensus that robots could be beneficial in performing tasks within hazardous radiological environments. Most control of robots in hazardous environments involves master-slave or teleoperation relationships between the human and the robot. While teleoperation-based solutions keep humans out of harms way, they also change the training requirements to accomplish a task. In this paper we present a research methodology that allowed scientists at Idaho National Laboratory to identify, develop, and prove a semi-autonomous robot solution for search and characterization tasks within a hazardous environment. Two experiments are summarized that validated the use of semi-autonomy and show that robot autonomy can help mitigate some of the performance differences between operators who have different levels of robot experience, and can improve performance over teleoperated systems.

Curtis W. Nielsen; David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley; Miles C. Walton

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

An evaluation of the effectiveness of the US Department of Energy Integrated Safety Process (SS-21) for Nuclear Explosive Operations using quantitative hazard analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the US Department of Energy Integrated Safety Process or ``Seamless Safety (SS-21)`` program for reducing risk associated with nuclear explosive operations. A key element in the Integrated Safety Process is the use of hazard assessment techniques to evaluate process design changes in parallel or concurrently with process design and development. This concurrent hazard assessment method recently was employed for the B61-0, 2 & 5 and W69 nuclear explosive dismantlement activities. This paper reviews the SS-21 hazard assessment process and summarizes the results of the concurrent hazard assessments performed for the B61 and W69 dismantlement programs. Comparisons of quantitative hazard assessment results before and after implementation of the SS-21 design process shed light on the effectiveness of the SS-21 program for achieving risk reduction.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.; Auflick, J.; Houghton, K.; Maloney, K.; DeYoung, L.; Wilson, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

40

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 83-248-1515, Arco Philadelphia refinery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bulk sample of fractionator residue was analyzed for polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds at the catalytic cracking unit of ARCO Philadelphia Refinery (SIC-2911), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in May, 1983. The study was requested by the Atlantic Independent Union to determine if skin rashes and skin irritation occurring among refinery workers were caused by PNA in the fractionators. The authors conclude that a health hazard from exposure to chemicals at the cracking unit may exist. No specific chemical agent can be identified. Dust from the catalyst and oily residues that could contaminate workers shoes and clothing may have contributed to some of the dermatitis cases. Recommendations include laundering workers coveralls by dry cleaning to insure the removal of oily residues, providing workers with oil resistant or oil proof work boots, and repairing the ventilator in the sample preparation room adjacent to the block house.

Lewis, F.A.; Parrish, G.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

Pryor, P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hazard Evaluation for the Saltwell Chempump and a Saltwell Centrifugal Pump Design using Service Water for Lubrication and Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents results of a preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) covering the existing Crane Chempump and the new salt well pumping design. Three hazardous conditions were identified for the Chempump and ten hazardous conditions were identified for the new salt well pump design. This report also presents the results of the control decision/allocation process. A backflow preventer and associated limiting condition for operation were assigned to one hazardous condition with the new design.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA-88-377-2120, Armco Coke Oven, Ashland Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, a study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Coke Oven (SIC-3312), Ashland, Kentucky. The facility produces about 1,000,000 tons of coke annually. Of the approximately 400 total employees at the coke oven site, 55 work in the by products area. Air quality sampling results indicated overexposure to both benzene (71432) and coal tar pitch volatiles (CTPVs). Airborne levels of benzene ranged as high as 117 parts per million (ppm) with three of 17 samples being above the OSHA limit of 1ppm. Airborne concentrations of CTPVs ranged as high as 0.38mg/cu m with two of six readings being above OSHA limit of 0.2mg/cu m. Several polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also detected. The authors conclude that by products area workers are potentially overexposed to carcinogens, including benzene, CTPVs, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. An epidemiologic study is considered unlikely to yield meaningful information at this time, due to the small number of workers and the short follow up period. The authors recommend specific measures for reducing potential employee exposures, including an environmental sampling program, a preventive maintenance program, improved housekeeping procedures, and reducing exposure in operators' booths.

Kinnes, G.M.; Fleeger, A.K.; Baron, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 85-226-1839, Freshlabs, Inc. , Warren, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from workers at the Freshlabs vitamin manufacturing facility located in Warren, Michigan, a study was made of dust exposures, with specific attention to asbestos in ceiling insulation. Over half of all workers (about 70) reported watery itchy eyes, sneezing, or runny stuff noses. Symptoms of skin rashes, cough, chest tightness, and shortness of breath were also reported throughout the facility. Dust concentrations were highest in the composition area, where all workers experienced irritation of eyes, nose, and throat, and a few developed occupational asthma confirmed by company physicians. Workers were exposed to several vitamin products which were irritating to eyes and nasal and respiratory mucosa because of acidity. Some workers became hypersensitive to dusts due to protein and polysaccharide contents. Most samples showed total and respirable dust measurements well below Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limits for nuisance dusts. However, these are not common nuisance dust components. The authors suggest that the limits provide little protection for average workers exposed to such dusts. Asbestos sampling revealed potential hazard from falling insulation. Recommendations pertaining to local exhaust hoods, amended work practices, use of personal dust respirators, avoidance of skin contact, and proper ceiling insulation are offered.

Sanderson, W.T.; Ferguson, R.P.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-338-2187, IMC Corporation, Sterlington, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from an authorized representative of the Construction and General Laborers Union, Local 762, an investigation was made of potential hazards for asbestos abatement contract workers at IMC Corporation, (SIC-2869), Sterlington, Louisiana. The IMC facility consisted of two ammonia facilities, a nitroparaffin (NP) facility, and a NP derivatives facility. An explosion occurred on May 1, 1991 in the NP facility, caused by a faulty compressor. During the post explosion renovation activities, an asbestos abatement firm was working on site due to the large amounts of asbestos (1332214) insulation which had been disturbed by the explosion. Records indicated that several workers complained of ill effects and odors on June 17 and 19. The incidents were investigated but no chemical exposure explanation was found. Routine and complaint based industrial hygiene monitoring was primarily area monitoring and not substance specific. Of the 25 workers interviewed, 22 had symptoms they felt were related to their work at IMC. The symptoms included those of the upper respiratory tract, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. The most common included diarrhea, nausea, headache, dizziness, and cough, each experienced by significantly more than half the subjects. The symptoms could not be linked conclusively to any specific chemical release, job task, work location, or food or drink source.

Kiefer, M.; Tepper, A.; Miller, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 79-034-1440, Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the president of the United Rubber Workers, Local 759, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the Hatco Plastics Division, Currently known as Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi. The request indicated that several production and maintenance employees at that site had been disabled due to chemical poisoining and related illnesses. A medical survey was begun at the facility in March of 1979. Fifty employees participated by completing a questionnaire. A high prevalence of eye, nose, and throat irritation was found along with shortness of breath, cough, and skin rash among workers assigned to the Calender, Color, and Laminating Departments. Air sampling was performed in several departments. Except for methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK), the levels of substances detected were quite low. The department with the highest exposure to airborne contaminants included the Print Service with 36 to 299 parts per million (ppm) MEK, laminating at 74 to 105ppm MEK, printing at 15 to 113ppm MEK, color at 15 to 24ppm MEK, premix at 0.3 to 6.8mg/cu m total dust, and calender at 0.1 to 0.6mg/cu m total dust.

Salisbury, S.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

Sylvain, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-066-1883, Artesian Industries, Mansfield, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from workers at Artesian Industries, Mansfield, Ohio, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions. Workers were experiencing lightheadedness, shortness of breath, fainting, lung problems, and skin rashes. For 86 air samples taken, respirable crystalline silica personal exposures averaged 0.12 mg/cu m (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) for respirable crystalline silica, 0.05 mg/cu m); 38 of the samples exceeded the REL. All samples from the slip houses exceeded the NIOSH REL. The 18 samples taken in the casting area indicated that the average exposure limit was 0.06 mg/cu m, with eight samples exceeding the NIOSH REL. In the dry-finishing area 18 samples showed an average respirable silica concentration of 0.11 mg/cu m. Exposure to talc averaged 2.7 mg/cu m in the casting areas for 38 samples. Symptoms of chronic cough were noted in 20%, chronic bronchitis in 5%, and shortness of breath in 31% of the workers. Of 196 chest x-rays examined, 18 exhibited evidence of asbestos or talc exposure; five had symptoms of silicosis. The authors conclude that there is a serious, extensive problem regarding exposures to respirable silica and respirable talc dust.

Crandall, M.S.; Singal, M.; Anastas, M.Y.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 83-186-1628, Raytheon Missile Systems Division, Bristol, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for cutting-oil mists, metal working fluids, and mineral spirits at Raytheon Missile Systems Divisions, Bristol, Tennessee in July, 1985. The evaluation was requested confidentially to investigate the occurrence of skin rashes in Machine-Department employees.

Salisbury, S.; Lucas, C.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Preliminary Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Emergency Rescue Route, U.S. 60, Missouri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SANTI Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 ERIC seismically in- duced damage to critical roadways and bridges. This study included evaluation of earthquake- induced landslide potential at two bridge sites, assess- ment of liquefaction susceptibility, and risk

52

Tragic challenges and the moral hazard of humanitarian intervention : how and why ethnic groups provoke genocidal retaliation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation explores the causes of, and possible remedies for, extremely violent ethnic conflict. It starts from a robust yet under-explored finding in the literature: Most groups that fall victim to genocidal violence ...

Kuperman, Alan J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Thermal Manikin Evaluation of Liquid Cooling Garments Intended for Use in Hazardous Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal manikins are valuable tools for quantitatively evaluating the performance of protective clothing ensembles and microclimate cooling systems. The goal of this investigation was to examine the performance of Coretech personal cooling systems, designed to reduce the effects of physiological and environmental heat stress, using a sweating thermal manikin. A sweating manikin takes into account the effective physiological evaporative heat transfer. Three tubesuits containing different densities of tubing were evaluated on the thermal manikin in conjunction with body armor and two Chemical-Biological suits (SPM and JSLIST). The experiments were carried out in an environmental chamber set at a temperature of 35 C with a relative humidity of 30%. For the tubesuits, two flow rates were tested and the heat removal rates were obtained by measuring the amount of power required to maintain the manikin's surface at a constant temperature of 35 C. The sweating rates were adjusted to maintain a fully wetted manikin surface at the above environmental conditions. For fluid flow rates ranging from approximately 250 to 750 ml/min, and inlet temperatures to the tubesuit ranging from 7 to 10 C, heat removal rates between 220 W to 284 W were measured, indicating the effectiveness of tubesuits at removing excessive body heat. This research was performed at the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) in Natick, Massachusetts.

Dionne, J. P.; Semeniuk, K.; Makris, A.; Teal, W.; Laprise, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-239-1586, Ashland Super Valu, Ashland, Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental and brathing zone samples were analyzed for di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate, hydrogen-chloride, cyclohexanol, dicyclohexyl-phthalate, phthalic-anhydride, and total particulates at Ashland Super Valu, Ashland, Wisconsin in June, 1984. The evaluation was requested by a company representative due to complaints of respiratory problems by one of the meat department employees. Four meat department employees were interviewed. The authors conclude that it is not possible to determine whether or not the symptoms reported by the meat packer are due to emissions from heated meat wrap or label adhesive. Recommendations included not operating the cool rod cutter at a temperature above 280 degrees-F and installing local exhaust ventilation.

Daniels, W.J.; Donohue, M.T.; Singal, M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-030-1693, Fruehauf Corporation - Parts Plant, Delphos, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A request was received from union and management at the Fruehauf Corporations Parts Facility in Delphos, Ohio to evaluate possible exposures to total welding fume, metals, carbon-monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and ozone during welding operations. Total welding fume concentrations in 32 personal breathing zone samples ranged from 1.5 to 23.4 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m/sup 3/). Nine area samples ranged from 0.4 to 3.7mg/m/sup 3/. Three sample results exceeded OSHA standard of 15mg/m/sup 3/. Iron was the predominant metal found. Measurable quantities of aluminum, chromium, copper, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tin, and vanadium were found. Results of a questionnaire, given to 33 of the 92 welders, indicated a relatively high prevalence of reported symptoms of mucous membrane and respiratory tract irritation, including eye irritation, sinus/nasal congestion, headaches, throat irritation and cough.

Gorman, R.; Ehrenberg, R.; Hunninen, K.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-449-1778, Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union an evaluation was made of respiratory problems among workers at the Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida, which closed in 1979. Specific concern had been expressed regarding exposures to silica, coke, and asbestos. Of 108 persons participating in the study, 91 had worked at the elemental phosphorus facility (EP). Of 88 participants who had ten or more years in the phosphate industry, the 36 workers with ten or more years in the EP facility were no more likely to have chronic cough, shortness of breath, abnormal lung sounds on physical examination, pulmonary function impairment, or x-ray signs of fibrogenic dust exposure than those with less than 10 years exposure. Those working longer than 10 years in the EP facility had numerically higher prevalence of chronic bronchitis and chronic wheeze, but the differences were not statistically significant. The author concludes that no association between health and time at the EP facility could be discerned from the available data, although it is possible that the study participants were not representative of all former facility workers.

Singal, M.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hazard ranking system evaluation of CERCLA inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 2: Engineered-facility sites (HISS data base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to formally document the assessment activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that address the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program for the cleanup of inactive waste sites. The DOE orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. This methodology includes: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the Hazard Ranking System methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 13 refs.

Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.; Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-273-1928, Mid-America Dairymen, Inc. , Monett, Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from management at Mid-America Dairymen, Inc., located in Monett, Missouri, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at this site. Five workers had become ill with respiratory complaints between August of 1985 and March of 1986. Symptoms included dry cough, chest tightness, fatigue, shortness of breath, and weight loss. Of six full-time employees in the electrodialysis (ED) stack maintenance department, four were diagnosed with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). One worker among 12 in the cheese finishing department was diagnosed with asthma. The two-story facility employs about 75 workers in the production of cheese curd, whey protein, and powdered milk. The study was not able to identify a specific agent or antigen responsible for the illnesses; however, there was a clear association in time and place between cleaning stacks of electrodialysis membranes and the HP in four workers diagnosed with the disease. Stacks of ED membranes waiting to be cleaned can provide an ideal growth medium for microbiological species. The authors recommend that engineering and work practice changes be introduced.

Burr, G.A.; Cantor, F.L.; Anastas, M.Y.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 89-009-1990, Consolidation Coal Company, Humphrey No. 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of worker exposure to hydraulic fluid used on the longwall-mining operations at Consolidated Coal Company's Humphrey Number 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia. Employees were complaining of headache, eye and throat irritation, congestion, and cough. A particular emulsion oil, Solcenic-3A, was used with water in the mine's hydraulic roof-support system. An analysis of the oil indicated the presence of methyl-isobutyl-carbinol (MIBC), dipropylene glycol, and paraffin hydrocarbons. Personal breathing-zone samples for MIBC were collected from all workers on the longwall mining operation during the two days of the visit. All the analysis indicated concentrations of MIBC below the limit of quantification, which was 0.6 parts per million for an 8 hour sample. These levels were well below the exposure recommendations of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Exposure to MIBC may be occurring through skin contact with oil through hydraulic line leaks, accidents, and maintenance activity on the hydraulic machines. The report concludes that Solcenic-3A oil constituents in air did not pose a health hazard at the time of the survey.

Kullman, G.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of prospective hazardous waste treatment technologies for use in processing low-level mixed wastes at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several technologies for destroying or decontaminating hazardous wastes were evaluated (during early 1988) as potential processes for treating low-level mixed wastes destined for destruction in the Fluidized Bed Incinerator. The processes that showed promise were retained for further consideration and placed into one (or more) of three categories based on projected availability: short, intermediate, and long-term. Three potential short-term options were identified for managing low-level mixed wastes generated or stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (operated by Rockwell International in 1988). These options are: (1) Continue storing at Rocky Flats, (2) Ship to Nevada Test Site for landfill disposal, or (3) Ship to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for incineration in the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. The third option is preferable because the wastes will be destroyed. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has received interim status for processing solid and liquid low-level mixed wastes. However, low-level mixed wastes will continue to be stored at Rocky Flats until the Department of Energy approval is received to ship to the Nevada Test Site or Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Potential intermediate and long-term processes were identified; however, these processes should be combined into complete waste treatment systems'' that may serve as alternatives to the Fluidized Bed Incinerator. Waste treatment systems will be the subject of later work. 59 refs., 2 figs.

McGlochlin, S.C.; Harder, R.V.; Jensen, R.T.; Pettis, S.A.; Roggenthen, D.K.

1990-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE)/K West (KW) Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site have been used for storage of irradiated N Reactor and single-pass reactor fuel. Remaining spent fuel is continuing to be stored underwater in racks and canisters in the basins while fuel retrieval activities proceed to remove the fuel from the basins. The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is adding equipment to the facility in preparation for removing the fuel and sludge from the basins In preparing this hazard analysis, a variety of hazard analysis techniques were used by the K Basins hazard analysis team, including hazard and operability studies, preliminary hazard analyses, and ''what if'' analyses (WHC-SD-SNF-PHA-001, HNF-2032, HNF-2456, and HNF-SD-SNF-SAD-002). This document summarizes the hazard analyses performed as part of the safety evaluations for the various modification projects and combines them with the original hazard analyses to create a living hazard analysis document. As additional operational activities and modifications are developed, this document will be updated as needed to ensure it covers all the hazards at the K Basins in a summary form and to ensure the subsequent safety analysis is bounding. This hazard analysis also identifies the preliminary set of design features and controls that the facility could rely on to prevent or reduce the frequency or mitigate consequences of identified accident conditions based on their importance and significance to safety. The operational controls and institutional programs relied on for prevention or mitigation of an uncontrolled release are identified as potential technical safety requirements. All operational activities and energy sources at the K Basins are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions and external events (e.g., earthquakes) that have the potential for causing undesirable consequences to the facility worker, the onsite individual, or the public. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and complies with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

SEMMENS, L.S.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Incompatible Hazardous Materials Each material must be individually evaluated to determine where and how it should be stored. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reaction, heat, gas generation adhesives (epoxies, isocyanates) acids, oxidizers, flammables, combustibles compounds) detergents/soaps, oxidizers heat, fire hazard compressed gases (oxygen, acetylene, propane and storage requirements shall be applied. As a general rule, flammable or combustible liquids, toxic

de Lijser, Peter

65

Automated Job Hazards Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

66

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-108-2146, Asarco New Market/Young Mines, Mascot, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, Akron, Ohio, an investigation was made into possible hazardous working conditions at two American Smelting and Refining Company (SIC-1031) zinc mines (New Market and Young) in Mascot, Tennessee. Specifically, exposures to asbestos (1332214), silica (14808607), and diesel emissions were determined. At both mines overexposures were found to nitrogen-dioxide (10102440) (NO2) and coal-tar pitch volatiles. Twenty-four percent of the NO2 measurements taken were above the NIOSH recommended ceiling of 1 part per million (ppm), but none exceeded the Mine Safety and Health Administration's (MSHA) ceiling of 5ppm. Exposure to diesel particulates ranged from 0.24 to 1.06mg/cu m. None of the 52 respirable dust samples collected exceeded the calculated MSHA limits for free silica exposure. A medical evaluation was offered and 83 of the 400 current employees and one retired employee participated. Seven underground employees were found with small opacity readings of greater than 1/0. Pulmonary function tests indicated that four employees had moderate airway obstruction, 17 had mild obstruction and two had mild restriction of lung volume. Three with obstructive lung disease pattern also had positive radiographs for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that workers were overexposed to coal-tar pitch volatiles and NO2; radiographic and pulmonary function test results suggest that a chronic respiratory health effect may be related to cumulative workplace exposures. The authors recommend measures for lowering the exposures and the development of a medical surveillance program.

Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

69

Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

none,

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

INTERNAL HAZARDS ANALYSIS FOR LICENSE APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this internal hazards analysis is to identify and document the internal hazards and potential initiating events associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain. Internal hazards are those hazards presented by the operation of the facility and by its associated processes that can potentially lead to a radioactive release or cause a radiological hazard. In contrast to external hazards, internal hazards do not involve natural phenomena and external man-made hazards. This internal hazards analysis was performed in support of the preclosure safety analysis and the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. The methodology for this analysis provides a systematic means to identify internal hazards and potential initiating events that may result in a radiological hazard or radiological release during the repository preclosure period. These hazards are documented in tables of potential internal hazards and potential initiating events (Section 6.6) for input to the repository event sequence categorization process. The results of this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply to the performance of event sequence analyses for the repository preclosure period. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that internal hazards that have not been previously evaluated are identified.

R.J. Garrett

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

Health-hazard-evaluation report HETA 87-371-2000, Technical Assistance to the Jamaican Ministry of Health, Kingston, Jamaica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the Jamaican Ministry of Health, a study was made of possible health hazards existing due to the operation of a secondary lead smelter in Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica. Emission controls at the site were upgraded in 1974. A cottage industry of clandestine backyard smelters was also in operation in the area. The survey investigated the health of residents in 58 households in the Red Pond Road community and 21 households in Ebony Vale. Soil lead levels in Red Pond exceeded 500 parts per million at 24% of the households tested. Ten paint samples taken from Red Pond homes exceeded 1% lead by weight. The geometric mean blood lead level of those tested in Red Pond was more than twice the level found in those tested in Ebony Vale. Forty four percent of the children under 6 years of age in Red Pond had blood lead levels above 25 micrograms/deciliter. Soil lead contamination was the strongest predictor of blood lead levels among the Red Pond subjects under 12 years of age. Lead smelter work was an important predictor in the older subjects. The authors conclude that the backyard smelters in combination with the secondary smelter caused a high lead poisoning risk for area residents. The authors recommend that residents stop the backyard smelting operations, and that efforts be made to reduce exposure through hazard abatement, education, and establishment of clean play areas for children.

Matte, T.D.; Burr, G.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Identification of Aircraft Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

K. Ashley

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. (Revised April 1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, an investigation was made of exposures to asbestos and diesel emissions at the Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. The most significant source of particulates was diesel exhaust. None of the 20 personal breathing zone or area air samples collected in the mill exceeded limits for asbestos. An increased prevalence of chronic cough and phlegm was reported by workers. More complaints of eye irritation and tearing of the eyes were noted in underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Pulmonary function studies indicated that four workers had mild obstructive lung disease and one had moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were also noted. None of the 61 chest films taken was positive for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that a potential hazard existed from exposure to diesel exhaust.

Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Health hazard evaluation report rdHETA 90-145-2086, Map International, Fairmont, West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America, a study was conducted of possible hazardous working conditions at MAP International (SIC-3296), Fairmont, West Virginia. The facility manufactured fibrous-glass for thermal and acoustical insulation. Personal breathing zone samples and area air samples were taken and analyzed for exposure to fibrous-glass (14808607), formaldehyde (50000), phenol (108952), ammonia (7664417), and organic vapors. The levels detected were all below allowable standards. Workers were not following recommended safety and health procedures prescribed in the Material Safety Data Sheets for the materials they were using. The medical questionnaires indicated workers were experiencing symptoms consistent with exposure to fibrous-glass and the materials used in its production. Eye irritation, upper respiratory irritation, skin irritation, chronic cough, and shortness of breath were demonstrated. The author recommends specific measures to reduce exposures and improve work practices.

Cornwell, R.J.; Knutti, E.; Lyman, M.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) six-group delayed neutron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to individual precursor data (emission probabilities (P{sub n}) and neutron spectra), the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) system requires {bar {nu}}(E) and its time dependence and spectra using a few time groups. These data have been greatly extended, tested, and recently (June 1989) compared with new measurements of pulse spectra.

England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (USA)); Brady, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

78

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-476-1647, Kimball International Upholstered Products, Inc. , Jasper, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric- and magnetic-field strengths were measured around dielectric heaters to evaluate radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposures at Kimball International Upholstered Products, Jasper, Indiana at the request of the Indiana State Board of Health. The heaters are used in the production of office-furniture subassemblies.

Murray, W.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 81-459-1603, the City of New York Fire Department, New York, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A noise survey of New York City Fire Department equipment was conducted in November, 1982. The evaluation was requested by the fire department to investigate selected noise sources found at the fire scene or on vehicles used to get to and from a fire scene. The author concludes that a potential for overexposure to noise does exist for the fire department personnel. Recommendations include limiting the use of warning devices as much as legally and practically possible, relocating warning devices away from fire personnel on the vehicle, and implementing a hearing conservation program.

Tubbs, R.L.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining candidates, those of glass-ceramics (devitrified matrices) represent the best compromise for meeting the probable stricter disposal requirements in the future.

Bleier, A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other controls required to protect the public, workers, and environment.

POWERS, T.B.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hazard Baseline Documentation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This standard establishes uniform Office of Environmental Management (EM) guidance on hazard baseline documents that identify and control radiological and non-radiological hazards for all EM facilities.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-064-1844, GTE/Valenite Corporation, Westminster, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a confidential request, an evaluation of exposure to hard-metal dusts was made at GTE/VALENITE Corporation (SIC-3541), Westminster, South Carolina, employing 50 production workers. Dusts were generated during finish grinding of tungsten carbide cutting tool inserts. Personal and area air samples were analyzed for seven nitrosamines, cobalt, and tungsten. No nitrosamines were detected. Cobalt levels were nondetectable to 26.8 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m/sup 3/) (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value, 50 microg/m/sup 3/). Tungsten levels were nondetectable to 0.41 mg/m/sup 3/ (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit, 5 mg/m/sup 3/). Medical survey of 35 workers showed respiratory symptoms associated with length of employment and smoking status. Symptoms did not correlate with exposure category. Personal air samples were taken for cobalt for ten workers giving urine samples pre and post shift. All had increased urine cobalt levels over shift. There was no correlation between total airborne and urine cobalt levels, but there was a significant association for post shift urinary and respirable cobalt. The authors recommend that air sampling for tungsten carbide and cobalt be continued. Good housekeeping and personal hygiene practices should be instituted and maintained. Change to a safer cutting fluid is recommended along with a medical surveillance program and careful follow up of employees with persistent symptoms of cough, chest tightness, shortness of breath, or wheezing.

Bryant, C.J.; Rondinelli, R.; Singal, M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of the fire and explosion hazards of oil-shale mining and processing. Volume 1. Analytical studies and accident scenarios. Open file report, 16 June 1977-15 July 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this research were to identify and evaluate potential fire and explosion hazards in oil-shale mining and processing by laboratory testing to provide recommendations for mitigation safety monitoring and to establish a basis for regulation. A series of scenarios were developed describing hypothetical fire and explosion incidents that might occur in oil-shale mining. The objectives were achieved through the following accomplishments: (1) It was found that fire and explosion properties of oil shale increase with oil shale richness and decreasing particle size. (2) Data from dust loading study in several mines showed that the total potential yield of combustibles was about one-tenth the amount required to fuel a propagating explosion. (3) Aging of oil shale dusts over a period of several years reduces the content of volatile combustibles and the corresponding fire and explosion properties. (4) Data and information from the completed program indicate that the hazard of dust explosions is less severe than the hazard of fire in mine muck piles. Laboratory data were used to relate fire and explosivity properties of oil shales to those of coals and other carbonaceous materials and to assist in the identification and evaluation of potential hazardous situations that may be encountered in oil shale mining and processing.

Crookston, R.B.; Atwood, M.T.; Williams, R.E.; McGuire, M.E.

1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working with hazardous materials should receive annual training that addresses storage, use, and disposal of hazardous before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

88

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

89

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

90

Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility.

Blanchard, A.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Rainfall-induced Landslide Hazard Rating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research develops a Landslide Hazard Rating System for the rainfall-induced landslides in the Chenyulan River basin area in central Taiwan. This system is designed to provide a simplified and quick evaluation of the ...

Chen, Yi-Ting, Civ. E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a comprehensive, Statewide program to manage hazardous wastes through regulating hazardous waste generation, transportation, storage,...

94

Hazardous Waste Management (Arkansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program is carried out by the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality which administers its' program under the Hazardous Waste management Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 8-7...

95

Hazardous Waste Management (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The act authorizes the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environment Control (DNREC) to regulate hazardous waste and create a program to manage sources of hazardous waste. The act...

96

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hazard analysis results report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction Center (SPC) Watch Atmospheric conditions are right for hazardous weather ­ hazardous weather is likely to occur Issued by SPC Warning Hazardous weather is either imminent or occurring Issued by local NWS office #12;Outlooks--SPC Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Outlook=Convective Outlook Day 1 Day 2

99

Hazardous Materials and Controlled Hazardous Substances (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required to own, establish, operate, or maintain a facility in the state of Maryland that transfers quantities of a single hazardous material in excess of 100,000 pounds at any time...

100

DOE standard guidelines for use of probabilistic seismic hazard curves at Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standard is intended to provide guidance in the use of the seismic hazard curves developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Experience to-date has shown that application of these methodologies can yield significantly different results. In response to this issue, a Seismic Working Group (SWG) has been formed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters to coordinate the application of these methodologies within DOE in a consistent manner. The position developed by the SWG and contained in this Standard is intended for immediate use in developing seismic hazard estimates at DOE sites for the evaluation of new and existing, nuclear and non-nuclear DOE facilities. This Standard is needed not only to address the LLNL/EPRI issue but also to assure that state-of-the-art seismic hazard methods are incorporated into DOE standards as soon as possible. The DOE is currently involved in a joint program with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and EPRI to evaluate these existing probabilistic seismic hazard methodologies and to develop recommendations for an improved methodology for the 1990`s. The final product of this effort is expected to result in more stable hazard estimates and will supersede this Standard in approximately two years.

Not Available

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and...

102

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefings adequately address controls for the identified hazards? Examples would be lockouttagout requirements, hold points, confined space, radiological work permits, fire...

103

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

104

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

105

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

106

RCRA, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 cfr part 261) updated July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. It analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of `hazardous waste.` It explains concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the `mixture` and `derived-from` rules, the `contained-in` policy, and the hazardous waste identification rules (HWIR).

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hazardous Waste Management (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A person shall not generate, dispose, store, treat, or transport hazardous waste in this state without complying with the requirements of this article. The department, in the conduct of its duties...

108

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

109

Proceedings Hazards and Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liang-Chun Chen, Jie-Ying Wu, Yi-Chung Liu, Sung-Ying Chien HAZARDS EDUCATION BY GEOGRAPHERS: A DECADE-DISASTER CONDOMINIUM HOUSING RECONSTRUCTION AND HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS............. 35 Jie-Ying Wu, Liang-Chun Chen

Wang, Hai

110

K Basins Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

WEBB, R.H.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

MEASUREMENT AND BASIC PHYSICS COMMITTEE OF THE U.S. CROSS-SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, ANNUAL REPORT 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. Its main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF, as well as periodic modifications and updates to the file, are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the US Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the US nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the US and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

SMITH,D.L.; MCLANE,V.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation of the processes a hazardous...

Bollineni, Prasanthi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Grand Junction projects office mixed-waste treatment program, VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented VAC*TRAX mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses an indirectly heated, batch vacuum dryer to thermally desorb organic compounds from mixed wastes. This process hazards analysis evaluated 102 potential hazards. The three significant hazards identified involved the inclusion of oxygen in a process that also included an ignition source and fuel. Changes to the design of the MTU were made concurrent with the hazard identification and analysis; all hazards with initial risk rankings of 1 or 2 were reduced to acceptable risk rankings of 3 or 4. The overall risk to any population group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Bloom, R.R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Hazardous Ignitable Reactive Toxic Oxidizer Other ( explain ) Generator Building Dept. HAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL: Generator Building Dept. Please fill out the hazardous waste label on line and download labels on to a plainHAZARDOUS WASTE LABEL DEPAUL UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY 5-4170 Corrosive Non

Schaefer, Marcus

116

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

117

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Colorado Wildfire Hazard Mitigation Plan Colorado Multi-Hazards Mitigation Plan July 2002 the May 2001 Report to the Governor, Colorado Wildland Urban Interface; Section 2 includes the Hazard the status of the Wildland Urban Interface in Colorado; the hazards that exist; mitigation measures

118

Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the U.S. Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group annual report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the Us and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

Smith, D.L. [ed.] [comp.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McLane, V. [ed.] [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [ed.; comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modified Hazard Ranking System/Hazard Ranking System for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes: Software documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mHRS/HRS software package was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a uniform method for DOE facilities to use in performing their Conservation Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Phase I Modified Hazard Ranking System or Hazard Ranking System evaluations. The program is designed to remove the tedium and potential for error associated with the performing of hand calculations and the interpreting of information on tables and in reference books when performing an evaluation. The software package is designed to operate on a microcomputer (IBM PC, PC/XT, or PC/AT, or a compatible system) using either a dual floppy disk drive or a hard disk storage system. It is written in the dBASE III language and operates using the dBASE III system. Although the mHRS/HRS software package was developed for use at DOE facilities, it has direct applicability to the performing of CERCLA Phase I evaluations for any facility contaminated by hazardous waste. The software can perform evaluations using either the modified hazard ranking system methodology developed by DOE/PNL, the hazard ranking system methodology developed by EPA/MITRE Corp., or a combination of the two. This document is a companion manual to the mHRS/HRS user manual. It is intended for the programmer who must maintain the software package and for those interested in the computer implementation. This manual documents the system logic, computer programs, and data files that comprise the package. Hardware and software implementation requirements are discussed. In addition, hand calculations of three sample situations (problems) with associated computer runs used for the verification of program calculations are included.

Stenner, R.D.; Peloquin, R.A.; Hawley, K.A.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

KRIPPS, L.J.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant...

124

Environmental Hazards and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2. Pollution -Mexico. 3. Transboundary pollution. 4. Conservation of natural resources - UnitedEnvironmental Hazards and Bioresource Management in the United States- Mexico Borderlands Edited. -(Special studies ;v. 3) Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-87903-503-X 1. Pollution -United States

Murphy, Bob

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - airflow hazard visualization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single Pass Airflow General... Hazardous Materials 100 % Single Pass HVAC Notes: HVAC: Air ... Source: Ohta, Shigemi - Theory Group, Institute of Particle and Nuclear...

126

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

127

Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hazardous Waste Management (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is the designated agency to administer and coordinate a hazardous waste management program to provide for the reduction of hazardous waste generation, reuse, recovery, and...

129

Montana Hazardous Waste Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act addresses the safe and proper management of hazardous wastes and used oil, the permitting of hazardous waste facilities, and the siting of facilities. The Department of Environmental...

130

CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modified hazard ranking system for sites with mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. User manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes both the original Hazard Ranking System and the modified Hazard Ranking System as they are to be used in evaluating the relative potential for uncontrolled hazardous substance facilities to cause human health or safety problems or ecological or environmental damage. Detailed instructions for using the mHRS/HRS computer code are provided, along with instructions for performing the calculations by hand. Uniform application of the ranking system will permit the DOE to identify those releases of hazardous substances that pose the greatest hazard to humans or the environment. However, the mHRS/HRS by itself cannot establish priorities for the allocation of funds for remedial action. The mHRS/HRS is a means for applying uniform technical judgment regarding the potential hazards presented by a facility relative to other facilities. It does not address the feasibility, desirability, or degree of cleanup required. Neither does it deal with the readiness or ability of a state to carry out such remedial action, as may be indicated, or to meet other conditions prescribed in CERCLA. 13 refs., 13 figs., 27 tabs.

Hawley, K.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Stenner, R.D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Inter-relation between technical and jurisdictional aspects of hazardous waste management in Houston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hazardous waste such as dump sites, landfills, hazardous material spills, underground storage tanks and others come from journals and reports. This literature is used for background information and for evaluating the Hazardous Waste Issues Groundwater... related Transport, ation related Wastewater related Spills Transportation Pretreatment Small quantity Generators Dump sites Landfi 1 Is Plant-site contamination Underground storage tanks Figure I-Hazardous waste ismm classification current...

Vasavada, Nishith Maheshbhai

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

RCRA/UST, superfund and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to: Hazardous waste identification (40 CFR part 261) updated as of July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This module introduces a specific hazardous waste identification process, which involves asking and analyzing a series of questions about any waste being evaluated. Analyzes in detail the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) definition of hazardous waste. It explains the following concepts that are essential to identifying a RCRA hazardous waste: hazardous waste listing, hazardous waste characteristics, the mixture and derived-from rules, the contained-in policy, and the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

PUREX facility hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

135

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

136

Hazardous Materials Introduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSiteAboutRadioactiveHazardous

137

ORISE: Hazard Assessments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping ApplicationEnvironment AtGraduateHazard

138

Fire Hazards Listing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| DepartmentFindingHazards Listing

139

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

142

Hazardous Waste Transporter Permits (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transportation of hazardous wastes into or through the State of Connecticut requires a permit. Some exceptions apply. The regulations provide information about obtaining permits and other permit...

143

Nebraska Hazardous Waste Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to hazardous waste management, waste standards, permitting requirements, and land disposal...

144

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

145

Shedding a new light on hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sun's ability to detoxify waterborne chemicals has long been known; polluted streams, for example, become cleaner as they flow through sunlit areas. Solar detoxification harnesses this natural degradation process for beneficial ends, producing simple, nonhazardous substances from hazardous organic chemicals. Solar detoxification systems now being developed break down these chemicals without using the fossil fuels required by conventional technologies. Sunlight destroys hazardous waste because of the distinctive properties of photons, the packets of energy that make up sunlight. Low-energy photons add thermal energy that will heat toxic chemicals; high-energy photons add the energy needed to break the chemical bonds of these chemicals. The detoxification process discussed here takes advantage of this latter group of photons found in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. 4 figs.

Reece, N.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Peter Groenewegen, The Minor Marshallians and Alfred Marshall: An Evaluation. London: Routledge Studies in the History of Economics, Taylor and Francis Group,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Peter Groenewegen, The Minor Marshallians and Alfred Marshall: An Evaluation. London: Routledge Studies in the History of Economics, Taylor and Francis Group, 2011. ISBN 978-0-415-57020-6. Ł95 hardback. Readers of the Marshall Studies Bulletin are familiar with the literature on post-Marshallian economics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

149

WESF natural phenomena hazards survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hazardous Waste Management Standards and Regulations (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states the standards and regulations for the management of hazardous waste. No person shall construct, modify or operate a hazardous waste facility or otherwise dispose of hazardous waste...

151

Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting Board is responsible for overseeing the siting of hazardous waste facilities in Maryland, and will treat hazardous waste facilities separately from low-level...

152

Hazard Class Category  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Layer containment for Very High and High Radiotoxicity (Group 1 and 2) 1.a LBNL Lexan or aluminum sample holder with kapton tape surrounded by 2 each individual heat...

153

Combustion Group Group members  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

Wang, Wei

154

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the Gasoline Tank Advanced Membrane Systems: Recovering Wasteful and Hazardous Fuel Vapors at the...

155

Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedures manual combines the existing procedures for radiological and chemical assessment of hazardous wastes used by the Pollutant Assessments Group at the time of manuscript completion (October 1, 1990). These procedures will be revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy and support procedures. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures.

Chavarria, D.E.; Davidson, J.R.; Espegren, M.L.; Kearl, P.M.; Knott, R.R.; Pierce, G.A.; Retolaza, C.D.; Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Witt, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Conklin, N.G.; Egidi, P.V.; Ertel, D.B.; Foster, D.S.; Krall, B.J.; Meredith, R.L.; Rice, J.A.; Roemer, E.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a...

158

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the...

159

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for...

160

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION Huiying Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOG HAZARD REGRESSION by Huiying Sun Ph.D, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 1991 .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... .................................................................... THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA September, 1999 c flHuiying Sun, 1999 #12; Abstract We propose using

Heckman, Nancy E.

163

Toxic hazards of underground excavation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management- December 4, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30)

165

Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

July, 2004 Bulletin No. 233 Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated Posture Ergonomic Hazards of the Seated it is possible for these injuries to heal themselves when the ergonomic hazard is removed, cases do exist where;PAGE 2 ERGONOMIC HAZARDS of the SEATED POSTURE BULLETIN NO. 233 Ergonomic interventions to reduce

Martin, Jeff

166

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization using combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of combusted oil shale to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The oil shale used in the research was a western oil shale retorted in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor. Two combustion temperatures were used, 1550{degrees}F and 1620{degrees}F (843{degrees}C and 882{degrees}C). The five wastes selected for experimentation were an API separator sludge, creosote-contaminated soil, mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and smelter dust. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US EPA-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste), and smelter dust contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The smelter dust and mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste fail the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metalplating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the combusted oil shales to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the shales with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest.

Sorini, S.S.; Lane, D.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

An evaluation of the B&W Owners Group BAW-10182 topical report: Justification for increasing the engineered safety features actuation system on-line test intervals. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Evaluation Report provides an evaluation of the Babcock and Wilcox Owners Group (B&WOG) Technical Specifications Committee Topical Report BAW-10182, entitled, ``Justification for Increasing Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS) On-Line Test Intervals.`` This evaluation was performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The BAW-10182 report presents justification for the extension of on-line test intervals from the existing one-month interval to a three-month interval for the ESFAS system. In the BAW-10182 report, the B&WOG stated that ``{hor_ellipsis}the B&WOG proposes to increase the ESFAS test interval from one to three months and concludes that the effect on plant risk is insignificant.`` The proposed extension was based upon risk-based [i.e., probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)] methods such as reliability block diagrams, uncertainty analyses, and time-dependent system availability analyses. This use of PRA methods requires a detailed evaluation to determine whether the chosen methods and their application are valid in the context of the proposed test interval extension. The results of the evaluation agreed that the effect on plant risk is small if the ESFAS test interval is extended to three months for the ESFAS designs that were evaluated.

Smith, C.L.; Hansen, J.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 6779, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/67/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazards and Earth System Sciences Is there a trend in extremely high river temperature for the next is corrected by the medium cluster length, which represents thermal inertia of water during extremely hot-evaluate the extreme hot tempera- tures, which the rivers water could reach in the next decades, by taking the climatic

Boyer, Edmond

172

Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

Dorsch, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Katsube, T.J. [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Mineral Resources Div.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dugan, B.E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Mineral Engineering; Tourkow, L.M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

AN ENHANCED HAZARD ANALYSIS PROCESS FOR THE HANFORD TANK FARMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., has expanded the scope and increased the formality of process hazards analyses performed on new or modified Tank Farm facilities, designs, and processes. The CH2M HILL process hazard analysis emphasis has been altered to reflect its use as a fundamental part of the engineering and change control process instead of simply being a nuclear safety analysis tool. The scope has been expanded to include identification of accidents/events that impact the environment, or require emergency response, in addition to those with significant impact to the facility worker, the offsite, and the 100-meter receptor. Also, there is now an expectation that controls will be identified to address all types of consequences. To ensure that the process has an appropriate level of rigor and formality, a new engineering standard for process hazards analysis was created. This paper discusses the role of process hazards analysis as an information source for not only nuclear safety, but also for the worker-safety management programs, emergency management, environmental programs. This paper also discusses the role of process hazards analysis in the change control process, including identifying when and how it should be applied to changes in design or process.

SHULTZ MV

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (docket). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Docket (``docket``) identifies Federal facilities that may be contaminated with hazardous substances and that must be evaluated to determine if they pose a risk to public health or the environment The docket, required by Section 120(c) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), also provides a vehicle for making information about potentially contaminated facilities available to the public. Facilities listed on the docket must complete site assessments that provide the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with information needed to determine whether or not the facility should be included on he National Priorities List (NPL). This Information Brief, which revises the previous Federal Agency Hazardous Waste Compiliance Docket Information Brief, provides updated information on the docket listing process, the implications of listing, and facility status after listing.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover bodies (without needles) Container: Sturdy and leakproof with Hazardous Glass label. Either: Plastic resistant, leakproof plastic carboy with green sharps label. Do not fill these containers completely. Leave

Sheridan, Jennifer

178

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Management Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains regulations for safe disposal of hazardous waste, and establishes that a valid license is required to collect, transport, store, treat, use, or dispose of hazardous waste. Short...

179

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility...

180

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia’s version of Superfund. The Act provides for graduated fees on the disposal of hazardous waste, a trust fund to enable the EPD to clean up or plan...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Paik, I.R. [Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, , ()

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CONTROL OF HAZARDOUS ENERGY 12.A GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on or near any system that produces, uses, or stores hazardous energy, a hazardous energy control program by the contractor-managed HECP (e.g., QA's on construction sites, etc.), they shall comply with the contractor and implementation of these activities. Each shall inform the other of their HECPs and Hazardous Energy Control (HEC

US Army Corps of Engineers

184

Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hazardous solid chemicals may go in the trash. Have you disposed of "waste-like", legacy and unknown c Manage anyFocus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

Wilcock, William

185

Hazard analysis of long term viewing of visible laser light off of fluorescent diffuse reflective surfaces (post-it).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser hazard analysis is performed to evaluate if the use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors to view incident laser beams (Coherent Verdi 10W) present a hazard based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers. The use of fluorescent diffuse reflectors in the alignment process does not pose an increased hazard because of the fluorescence at a different wavelength than that of the incident laser.

Augustoni, Arnold L.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySyntheticaquiferTREATMENT,TUNL

189

Mission: Possible. Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management (CEHMM) was established in May 2004 as a nonprofit research organization. Its purpose is to develop a sustainable technical/scientific community located in Carlsbad, New Mexico, that interacts worldwide to find solutions to hazardous materials management issues. An important part of the mission is to achieve improved protection of worker safety, human health, and the environment. Carlsbad has a large technical community due to the presence of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and its many contractors and support organizations. These groups include the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring and Research Center, Washington Group International, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. These organizations form the basis of a unique knowledge community with strengths in many areas, such as geosciences, actinide chemistry, environmental monitoring, and waste transportation. CEHMM works cooperatively with these organizations and others to develop projects that will maintain this knowledge community beyond the projected closure date of WIPP. At present, there is an emphasis in bio-monitoring, air monitoring, hazardous materials educational programs, and endangered species remediation. CEHMM is also currently working with a group from the American Nuclear Society to help facilitate their conference scheduled for April 2006 in Carlsbad. CEHMM is growing rapidly and is looking forward to a diverse array of new projects. (authors)

Bartlett, W.T.; Prather-Stroud, W. [Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management, 505 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of the potential carcinogenicity of DDT (50-29-3). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DDT is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment. Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is Sufficient. and the evidence from human studies is Inadequate. The potency factor (F) for DDT is estimated to be 5.58 (mg/kg/day)(-1), placing it in potency group 2 according to the CAG's methodology for evaluating potential carcinogens. Combining the weight-of-evidence group and the potency group, DDT is assigned a MEDIUM hazard ranking.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

Roy, B.

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

1982-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtendedRural Driving Hazards

195

Evaluation of rainfall-induced landslide transit characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As landslide hazard has intensified in the past decades, the development of landslide hazard evaluation systems has become more and more important. However, not much attention is paid to discussing the landslide transition ...

Chen, Yi-Ting, Civ. E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Freeze Concentration Applied to Hazardous Waste Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steps to remove or destroy the hazardous components prior to discharge. Incineration is widely used to destroy a broad range of these hazardous components. Its disposal efficiency is often used when defining the Best Available Technology for EPA... standards. However, high water content streams are expensive to incinerate since the incinerator must be designed to handle the feed volume even though the water in the feed is in itself harmless. Some hazardous components require operating temperatures...

Ruemekorf, R.

199

Hazardous Liquid Pipelines and Storage Facilities (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute regulates the permitting, construction, monitoring, and operation of pipelines transporting hazardous liquids, including petroleum products and coal slurries. The definition used in...

200

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation regulates the generation, storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste, and wherever feasible, reduces or eliminates waste at the source. It is the policy of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides general regulations regarding hazardous waste, including landfills. Specific passages refer to the...

202

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements...

203

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

204

Mission Support Alliance, LLC Volpentest Hazardous Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Organization (FERO) roles and responsibilities, training requirements and the conduct of operations. Each project is responsible for developing and maintaining EP Hazards...

205

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

POWERS, T.B.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

207

Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality is responsible for administering the Louisiana Hazardous Waste Control Law and the regulations created under that law.

209

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

211

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Anyone who owns or operates a vessel or facility that transports, stores, or otherwise handles hazardous wastes must take reasonable steps to prevent the discharge of those materials.

212

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

1993-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Deterministic hazard quotients (HQs): Heading down the wrong road  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of deterministic hazard quotients (HQs) in ecological risk assessment is common as a screening method in remediation of brownfield sites dominated by total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contamination. An HQ {ge} 1 indicates further risk evaluation is needed, but an HQ {le} 1 generally excludes a site from further evaluation. Is the predicted hazard known with such certainty that differences of 10% (0.1) do not affect the ability to exclude or include a site from further evaluation? Current screening methods do not quantify uncertainty associated with HQs. To account for uncertainty in the HQ, exposure point concentrations (EPCs) or ecological benchmark values (EBVs) are conservatively biased. To increase understanding of the uncertainty associated with HQs, EPCs (measured and modeled) and toxicity EBVs were evaluated using a conservative deterministic HQ method. The evaluation was then repeated using a probabilistic (stochastic) method. The probabilistic method used data distributions for EPCs and EBVs to generate HQs with measurements of associated uncertainty. Sensitivity analyses were used to identify the most important factors significantly influencing risk determination. Understanding uncertainty associated with HQ methods gives risk managers a more powerful tool than deterministic approaches.

Wilde, L.; Hunter, C.; Simpson, J. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Comparison of Hazard Analysisp y Requirements of I&C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) M di l D i A id tShip Accident (Ferry Sewol) Medical Device Accident (Therac-25) 3 NPP Accident­ Software Fault Tree Analysis ­ By AECL, Nancy Leveson Name of Software Hazards No % Remarks For construct hazard 4 7For construct hazard 4 7 Initialization hazard 4 7 IF-THEN-ELSE construct hazard 38 67 CASE

217

Frozen Ground 9 PERMAFROST HAZARDS IN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other forms of creeping mountain permafrost may be the source of a number of hazards. Rock glaciers of large rock avalanche disasters are examples of mountain hazards. In the case of the September 20, 2002, rock-ice avalanche at Kolka-Karmadon in the Russian Caucasus, a combined rock-ice avalanche

Kääb, Andreas

218

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

219

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD MANAGEMENT Offered by The College of Architecture and The Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center Texas A&M University #12;2 THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL..................................................................................3 C. Approved Courses in the College of Architecture .............................4 D. Approved

220

Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

Conrads, T.J.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy and solid/hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

None

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

324 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 324 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWHC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in six areas and provided 20 recommendations to bring the 324 Building into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A. Additionally, one observation was provided. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. The actions for recommendations associated with the safety related part of the 324 Building and operation of the cells and support areas were evaluated using the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 324 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A and RLID 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Uintah -a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uintah - a scalable framework for hazard analysis Martin Berzins Scientific Computing and Imaging of Uintah to a petascale problem in hazard analysis arising from "sympathetic" explosions in which. Devices containing such materials undergo extensive testing for hazard classification prior

Utah, University of

226

Preliminary fire hazards analysis for W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for Project W-211, Initial Tank Retrieval System (ITRS), at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The objectives of this FHA was to determine (1) the fire hazards that expose the Initial Tank Retrieval System or are inherent in the process, (2) the adequacy of the fire-safety features planned, and (3) the degree of compliance of the project with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders and related engineering codes and standards. The scope included the construction, the process hazards, building fire protection, and site wide fire protection. The results are presented in terms of the fire hazards present, the potential extent of fire damage, and the impact on employees and public safety. This study evaluated the ITRS with respect to its use at Tank 241-SY-101 only.

Huckfeldt, R.A.

1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

INL Reactor Technology Complex Out-of-Service Buried Piping Hazards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Reactor Technology Complex (RTC) buried piping and components are being characterized to determine if they should be managed as hazardous waste and subject to the Hazardous Waste Management Act /Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RTC buried piping and components involve both active piping and components from currently operating nuclear facilities, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and inactive lines from facilities undergoing D&D activities. The issue exists as to the proper methods to analyze and control hazards associated with D&D activities on facilities collocated with existing operating nuclear facilities, or future collocated facilities being considered with the resurgent nuclear industry. During initial characterization activities, it was determined that residual radioactive material in several inactive RTC lines and components could potentially exceed hazard category (HC) 3 thresholds. In addition, concerns were raised as to how to properly isolate active nuclear facility piping and components from those inactive lines undergoing RCRA actions, and whether the operating facility safety basis could be impacted. Work was stopped, and a potential inadequacy in the safety analysis (PISA) was declared, even though no clear safety basis existed for the inactive, abandoned lines and equipment. An unreviewed safety question (USQ) and an occurrence report resulted. A HC 3 or greater Nuclear Facility/Activity for the buried piping and components was also declared in the occurrence report. A qualitative hazard assessment was developed to evaluate the potential hazards associated with characterization activities, and any potential effects on the safety basis of the collocated RTC operating nuclear facilities. The hazard assessment clearly demonstrated the low hazards associated with the activities based on form and dispersiblity of the radioactive material in the piping and components. The hazard assessment developed unique controls to isolate active RTC piping and components from inactive components, and demonstrated that existing safety management programs were adequate for protection of the worker.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with...

229

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations is to help maintain accountability and track data on the hazardous and nonhazardous waste sites in...

230

DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities...

231

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

232

New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar...

233

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

234

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

Chang, R.C.W.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

283-E and 283-W hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the 200 area water treatment plants 283-E and 283-W located on the US DOE Hanford Site. Operation of the water treatment plants is the responsibility of ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide emergency planning technical basis for the water treatment plants. This document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A which requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

Sutton, L.N.

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J. (eds.)

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Group X  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

Fields, Susannah

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chemical Hazards and Safety Issues in Fusion Safety Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological inventory releases have dominated accident consequences for fusion; these consequences are important to analyze and are generally the most severe result of a fusion facility accident event. However, the advent of, or plan for, large-scale usage of some toxic materials poses the additional hazard of chemical exposure from an accident event. Examples of toxic chemicals are beryllium for magnetic fusion and fluorine for laser fusion. Therefore, chemical exposure consequences must also be addressed in fusion safety assessment. This paper provides guidance for fusion safety analysis. US Department of Energy (DOE) chemical safety assessment practices for workers and the public are reviewed. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has published some guidance on public exposure to releases of mixtures of chemicals, this guidance has been used to create an initial guideline for treating mixed radiological and toxicological releases in fusion; for example, tritiated hazardous dust from a tokamak vacuum vessel. There is no convenient means to judge the hazard severity of exposure to mixed materials. The chemical fate of mixed material constituents must be reviewed to determine if there is a separate or combined radiological and toxicological carcinogenesis, or if other health threats exist with radiological carcinogenesis. Recommendations are made for fusion facility chemical safety evaluation and safety guidance for protecting the public from chemical releases, since such levels are not specifically identified in the DOE fusion safety standard.

Cadwallader, L.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 8 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

WEBER RA

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard.

FOWLER KD

2007-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct,...

249

Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the public policy of the state of South Dakota to regulate the control and generation, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The state operates a comprehensive...

250

Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental Protection Division of the State Department of Natural Resources Emergency Operations Center when there is a spill or release of...

253

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

254

Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

J. L. Kubicek

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Canister storage building hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Krahn, D.E.

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Advanced Technology for Railway Hydraulic Hazard Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1.1 Map of Total Railway Hydraulic Hazard Events from 1982-2011 ............ 2 1.2 90 mi Effective Radar Coverage for Reliable Rainfall Rate Determination ....................................................................... 5 3... Administration (FRA) for the period of 1982-2011. This data was compiled from the FRA Office of Safety Analysis website (FRA, 2011). A map of the railway hydraulic hazard events over the same time period is displayed in Figure 1.1. Table 1.1. U.S. Railway...

Huff, William Edward 1988-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Handout for DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop,...

262

A Method for Evaluating Fire after Earthquake Scenarios for Single...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Method for Evaluating Fire After Earthquake Scenarios for Single Buildings Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell, LANL U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop...

263

Rules and Regulations for Hazardous Waste Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish permitting and operational requirements for hazardous waste facilities. They are designed to minimize...

264

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers, cabinets

Boynton, Walter R.

265

umces-safety@umces.edu Hazard Communication umces-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication umces- safety@umces.edu Hazardous chemicals can be found in laboratory refrigerators, freezers

Boynton, Walter R.

266

Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

Bernreuter, D. L

1981-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

Wasserman, Stephen R. (Darien, IL); Anderson, Kenneth B. (Lisle, IL); Song, Kang (Woodridge, IL); Yuchs, Steven E. (Naperville, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation Of Work Crew And Highway Hazard Conspicuity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Development Agreement (CRADA) between PATH and TARDEC,deliberations, TARDEC CRADA administrators determined not to

Misener, Jim

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hazard Categorization Reduction via Nature of the Process Argument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper documents the Hazard Categorization (HC) and Critical Safety Evaluation (CSE) for activities performed using an Inspection Object (IO) in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit of 700 g of U-235. By virtue of exceeding the single parameter subcritical limit and the subsequent potential for criticality, the IO HC is initially categorized as HC2. However, a novel application of the nature of the process argument was employed to reduce the IO HC from HC2 to less than HC3 (LTHC3). The IO is composed of five separate uranium metal plates that total no greater than 3.82 kg of U-235 (U(20)). The IO is planned to be arranged in various configurations. As the IO serves as a standard for experimentation aimed at establishing techniques for detection of fissionable materials, it may be placed in close proximity to various reflectors, moderators, or both. The most reactive configurations of the IO were systematically evaluated and shown that despite the mass of U-235 and potential positioning near various reflectors and moderators, the IO cannot be assembled into a critical configuration. Therefore, the potential for criticality does not exist. With Department of Energy approval, a Hazards Assessment Document with high-level (facility-level) controls on the plates negates the potential for criticality and satisfies the nature of the process argument to reduce the HC from HC2 to LTHC3.

Chelise A. Van De Graaff; Dr. Chad Pope; J. Todd Taylor

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Hazardous Material Technician Apprenticeship Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes an apprenticeship training program for hazardous material technician. This entry-level category is achieved after approximately 216 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. Procedures for evaluating performance include in-class testing, use of on-the-job checks, and the assignment of an apprentice mentor for each trainee. (TEM)

Steiner, S.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Automata groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-presentation. We also find the L-presentation for several other groups generated by three-state automata, and we describe the defining relations in the Grigorchuk groups G_w. In case when the sequence w is almost periodic these relations provide an L...

Muntyan, Yevgen

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators & knowledge management programme group Introduction Duncan Ray The programme group Biodiversity Indicators and Knowledge Management (BIKM) was established by the merger of the Biodiversity Indicators & Evaluation Programme and the Decision Support

275

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

Augustoni, Arnold L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

280

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Of Hazardous Energy Lockout/Tagout Millersville University - Office Of Environmental Health & Safety Scope & Application The Lockout/Tagout program applies to the control of energy during servicing of this program is to establish procedures for affixing appropriate lockout or tagout devices to energy

Hardy, Christopher R.

282

Burning hazardous waste in cement kilns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement manufacturing process is one of the oldest in the world, having been in practice for over 2000 years. It is also one of the most energy intensive, with up to 65 percent of the cost of the product attributable to energy consumption. In addition to high energy demand, the process conditions include extremely high temperatures. Cement clinker forms when the correct mixture of raw materials is heated to 2650/sup 0/ F. This requires combustion temperatures exceeding 3000/sup 0/ F. under oxidizing conditions. To accomplish this, gas temperatures above 2000/sup 0/ F. occur for several seconds (typically five seconds), which is much longer than residence times in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. These conditions are extremely favorable to the destruction of organic compounds and have led to extensive investigation into the potential for burning hazardous waste in cement kilns. Cement kilns consuming hazardous wastes have been tested for air emissions under various operating conditions. The substantial body of information on the emissions and handling of hazardous wastes from these studies has demonstrated that effective destruction of wastes can be accomplished with the added benefits of energy conservation and no significant change in air emissions.

Chadbourne, J.F.; Helmsteller, A.J.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

1989-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 John D. Godchaux Trinity University, San Antonio, TX Noah Hughes University of Colorado at Boulder, 2200 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80309 Key Terms: earthquake

Sheehan, Anne F.

285

DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

DeMuth, S.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Waste in the Mediterranean Regional Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAZARDOUS WASTE IN MEDITERRANEAN Moreover, the Mediterranean Protocol,Protocol Area by transboundary movements of hazardous wastes (wastes subject to this Protocol; Annex II: List of hazardous

Scovazzi, Tullio

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - agency listed hazardous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR... Hazardous Waste Management Regulations 6 NYCRR 371 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 6 NYCRR 372... Substance Bulk Storage...

288

Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

290

Design change management in regulation of nuclear fleets: World nuclear association's working groups on Cooperation in Reactor Design Evaluation and Licensing (CORDEL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 60 year life of a reactor means that a plant will undergo change during its life. To ensure continuing safety, changes must be made with a full understanding of the design intent. With this aim, regulators require that each operating organisation should have a formally designated entity responsible for complete design knowledge in regard to plant safety. INSAG-19 calls such an entity 'Design Authority'. This requirement is difficult to achieve, especially as the number of countries and utilities operating plants increases. Some of these operating organisations will be new, and some will be small. For Gen III plants sold on a turnkey basis, it is even more challenging for the operating company to develop and retain the full knowledge needed for this role. CORDEL's Task Force entitled 'Design Change Management' is investigating options for effective design change management with the aim to support design standardization throughout a fleet's lifetime by means of enhanced international cooperation within industry and regulators. This paper starts with considering the causes of design change and identifies reasons for the increased beneficial involvement of the plant's original vendor in the design change process. A key central theme running through the paper is the definition of responsibilities for design change. Various existing mechanisms of vendor-operator interfaces over design change and how they are managed in different organisational and regulatory environments around the world are considered, with the functionality of Owners Groups and Design Authority being central. The roles played in the design change process by vendors, utilities, regulators, owners' groups and other organisations such as WANO are considered The aerospace industry approach to Design Authority has been assessed to consider what lessons might be learned. (authors)

Swinburn, R. [CORDEL DCM Task Force, Rolls-Royce Plc (United Kingdom); Borysova, I. [CORDEL, WNA, 22a St.James Sq., London SW1Y 4JH (United Kingdom); Waddington, J. [CORDEL Group (United Kingdom); Head, J. G. [CORDEL Group, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy (United Kingdom); Raidis, Z. [CORDEL Group, Candu Energy (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This pilot study reports the statewide, regulatory compliance of general construction contractors in Texas who generated regulated amounts of hazardous waste during 1990, defined by existing state and federal hazardous-waste-management regulations...

Sprinkle, Donald Lee

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe applicable fees for permit application, modification, and transfer for permits related to hazardous waste management.

293

340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

T. J. Rodovsky

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

294

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be shipped directly from site and recycled through the WA State Hazardous Waste Service Contract. Please call

Wilcock, William

295

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

COVEY, L.I.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 -Working with Hazardous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH POLICY MANUAL 3034 - Working with Hazardous Materials Issuing Office: ORS/DOHS (301) 496-2960 Release Date: 3/21/06 1. Explanation of Material Transmitted: This release establishes NIH policy and procedure governing work with hazardous chemicals as described in the NIH Hazard Communication Program

Bandettini, Peter A.

297

Mapping future hazards for south east London Dr Stephen Blenkinsop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Vulnerability information Risk maps #12;Heat Outputs · 5km heat wave prediction grids. · 1km pro-rata disaggregated temperature & heat wave projection grids. · 1km relative heat wave hazard grid combining heat wave hazard (relative). · 200m heat wave risk grids combining relative heat wave hazard with predictions

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

298

Preliminary hazards analysis for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In summary, it provides: a general description of the facility and its operation; identification of hazards at the facility; and details of the hazards analysis, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions. As part of the safety analysis procedure set forth by DOE, a PHA must be performed for the NIF. The PHA characterizes the level of intrinsic potential hazard associated with a facility, and provides the basis for hazard classification. The hazard classification determines the level of safety documentation required, and the DOE Order governing the safety analysis. The hazard classification also determines the level of review and approval required for the safety analysis report. The hazards of primary concern associated with NIF are radiological and toxicological in nature. The hazard classification is determined by comparing facility inventories of radionuclides and chemicals with threshold values for the various hazard classification levels and by examining postulated bounding accidents associated with the hazards of greatest significance. Such postulated bounding accidents cannot take into account active mitigative features; they must assume the unmitigated consequences of a release, taking into account only passive safety features. In this way, the intrinsic hazard level of the facility can be ascertained.

Brereton, S.J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Diesel particles -a health hazard 1 Diesel particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel particles - a health hazard 1 Diesel particles - a health hazard #12;The Danish Ecological Council - August 20042 Diesel particles - a health hazard ISBN: 87-89843-61-4 Text by: Christian Ege 33150777 Fax no.: +45 33150971 E-mail: info@ecocouncil.dk www.ecocouncil.dk #12;Diesel particles - a health

300

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 779802, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/779/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-induced hazards that are representative for a whole class of hazards: Accidents due to nuclear power plants (NPP- ments (like embassies in the case of conventional threats) dis- play in the eye of potential aggressors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal & Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

Myneni, Satish, C

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation of alternative leachate liner materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to evaluate alternative landfill liner materials that could be utilized in conjunction with current liners in order to improve the liner's performance by preventing the release of hazardous chemicals into the subsurface...

Biles, Daniel Franklin

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

Evans, II, Thomas P. (Aiken, SC); Purohit, Jwalit J. (Evans, GA); Fazio, John M. (Orchard Park, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region" Uri S. ten Brink, William H. Bakun), Seismic hazard from the Hispaniola subduction zone: Correction to "Historical perspective on seismic

ten Brink, Uri S.

305

The HIT method: A hazard identification technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains a technique for analyzing systems and operations to identify hazards and needed controls. The HIT method can be used both as a design tool and as a risk analysis tool. As a design tool, this method identifies requirements for design criteria. As part of a risk analysis effort, HIT identifies potential accident sequences that can become part of the safety analysis documentation. Within this report the HIT method is described in detail with emphasis on application of the technique.

Howard, H.H.; Faust, C.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Methodology Using MELCOR Code to Model Proposed Hazard Scenario  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrates a methodology for using the MELCOR code to model a proposed hazard scenario within a building containing radioactive powder, and the subsequent evaluation of a leak path factor (LPF) (or the amount of respirable material which that escapes a facility into the outside environment), implicit in the scenario. This LPF evaluation will analyzes the basis and applicability of an assumed standard multiplication of 0.5 × 0.5 (in which 0.5 represents the amount of material assumed to leave one area and enter another), for calculating an LPF value. The outside release is dependsent upon the ventilation/filtration system, both filtered and un-filtered, and from other pathways from the building, such as doorways (, both open and closed). This study is presents ed to show how the multiple leak path factorsLPFs from the interior building can be evaluated in a combinatory process in which a total leak path factorLPF is calculated, thus addressing the assumed multiplication, and allowing for the designation and assessment of a respirable source term (ST) for later consequence analysis, in which: the propagation of material released into the environmental atmosphere can be modeled and the dose received by a receptor placed downwind can be estimated and the distance adjusted to maintains such exposures as low as reasonably achievableALARA.. Also, this study will briefly addresses particle characteristics thatwhich affect atmospheric particle dispersion, and compares this dispersion with leak path factorLPF methodology.

Gavin Hawkley

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The effect of surface chemical functional groups on the adsorption and desorption of a polar molecule,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon is used for envi- ronmental control of hazardous pollutants [7]. * Corresponding author. Address. It was observed that oxygen-containing functional groups exist on air cleaved HOPG. The presence of surface

Borguet, Eric

310

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part of your work assignment. The University's Hazard Communication the hazard communication training you need? A combination of hazard communication training resources

Wilcock, William

311

Method and apparatus for using hazardous waste form non-hazardous aggregate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for converting hazardous waste into non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregate, the apparatus. It comprises: a source of particulate solid materials, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products; oxidizing means comprising at least one refractory-lined, water-cooled, metal-walled vessel; means for introducing the particulate solid material, volatile gases and gaseous combustion by-products to the oxidizing means; means for inducing combustion in the oxidizing means, the heat of combustion forming molten slag and noncombustible fines from noncombustible material; means for accumulating the slag; means for introducing the noncombustible fines to the molten slag; means for removing the mixture from the apparatus; and means for cooling the mixture to form the non-hazardous, non-leaching aggregates.

Kent, J.M.; Robards, H.L. Jr.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Regulatory Analysis and Reassessment of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Listed Hazardous Waste Numbers for Applicability to the INTEC Liquid Waste System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report concludes that there are four listed hazardous waste numbers (F001, F002, F005, and U134) applicable to the waste in the Process Equipment Waste Evaporator (PEWE) liquid waste system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The chemical constituents associated with these listed hazardous waste numbers, including those listed only for ignitability are identified. The RCRA Part A permit application hazardous waste numbers identify chemical constituents that may be treated or stored by the PEWE liquid waste system either as a result of a particular characteristic (40 CFR, Subpart C) or as a result of a specific process (40 CFR 261, Subpart D). The RCRA Part A permit application for the PEWE liquid waste system identifies the universe of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hazardous waste numbers [23 characteristic (hazardous waste codes) numbers and 105 listed numbers (four F-listed hazardous waste numbers, 20 P-listed hazardous waste numbers, and 81 U-listed hazardous waste numbers)] deemed acceptable for storage and treatment. This evaluation, however, identifies only listed wastes (and their chemical constituents) that have actually entered the PEWE liquid waste system and would, therefore, be assigned to the PEWE liquids and treatment residuals.

Gilbert, K.L.; Venneman, T.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrates represent gas source, drilling hazard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates look like ordinary ice. However, if a piece of such ice is put into warm water its behavior will be different from the ordinary melting of normal ice. In contrast, gas hydrates cause bubbles in the warm water, which indicates the high content of gas in the hydrate crystals. The presence of four components is required: gas itself, water, high pressure, and low temperature. The paper discusses how hydrates form, hydrates stability, South Caspian hydrates, and hydrates hazards for people, ships, pipelines, and drilling platforms.

Bagirov, E. [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Lerche, I. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9Harvey Brooks, 1960Options forHazardous

315

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES AND INTER-JURISDICTIONAL CHALLENGESRailroad Hazardous g Materials

316

Safety analysis of exothermic reaction hazards associated with the organic liquid layer in tank 241-C-103  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety hazards associated with the interim storage of a potentially flammable organic liquid in waste Tank C-103 are identified and evaluated. The technical basis for closing the unreviewed safety question (USQ) associated with the floating liquid organic layer in this tank is presented.

Postma, A.K.; Bechtold, D.B.; Borsheim, G.L.; Grisby, J.M.; Guthrie, R.L.; Kummerer, M.; Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Plys, M.G. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Rapid guide to hazardous air pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concise and easy to use, this book brings together a wealth of hard-to-gather information in one compact pocket guide. It offers--in alphabetical order--detailed profiles of the 189 elements and compounds determined to be hazardous air pollutants by the 1990 Amendments of the Clean Air Act. The profile for each pollutant includes: fundamental identification data (CAS number, molecular formula, formula weight, synonyms); uses (primarily in the manufacture of chemicals and as a component in the manufacturing process); physical properties (such as boiling point, density, vapor pressures, color); chemical properties (such as air/water reactivity, reactivity with skin or metal, flash point, heat of combustion); health risks, including toxic exposure guidelines, toxicity data, and acute and chronic risks; hazard risks (the substance`s potential for accidents, fires, explosions, corrosion, and chemical incompatibility); exposure routes tracking the activities, environment, sources, and occupations that tend to lead to exposure; regulatory status, listing the primary laws and citations of regulated chemicals; and important additional information on symptoms, first aid, firefighting methods, protective equipment, and safe storage.

Beim, H.J.; Spero, J.; Theodore, L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

Marinkovic, Natalija [Medical School University of Zagreb, Department for Chemistry and Biochemistry, Salata 3b, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: nmarinko@snz.hr; Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar ['Andrija Stampar' School of Public Health, Medical School University of Zagreb, Rockefellerova 4, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pavic, Tomo [Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Ksaver 200, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Hazard Posed by Depleted Uranium Munitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper assesses the radiological and chemical hazards resulting from the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. Due to the low radioactivity of DU, radiological hazards to individuals would become significant in comparison to natural background radiation doses only in cases of prolonged contact---for example, when shards of a DU penetrator remain embedded in a soldier's body. Although the radiation doses to virtually all civilians would be very low, the cumulative "population dose" resulting from the dispersal of hundreds of tons of DU, as occurred during the Gulf War, could result in up to ten cancer deaths. It is highly unlikely that exposures of persons downwind from the use of DU munitions or consuming food or water contaminated by DU dust would reach the estimated threshold for chemical heavy-metal effects. The exposures of soldiers in vehicles struck by DU munitions could be much higher, however, and persons who subsequently enter such vehicles without adequate respiratory protection could potentially be at risk. Soldiers should be trained to avoid unnecessary exposure to DU, and vehicles struck by DU munitions should be made inaccessible to curious civilians. INTRODUCTION

Steve Fetter And; Steve Fetter A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M.; Im, J.; Tullis, J. A remote sensing and GIS-assisted spatial decision support system for hazardous waste site monitoring. Photogramm. Eng. Remote Sensing 2009, 75,...

324

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

325

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also establishes recordkeeping and reporting standards....

326

EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

327

Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

329

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

330

Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office 2 3 TITLE: 4 Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE...

331

Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

332

asteroid impact hazard: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Peter 2015-01-01 87 Ten years after wildfires: How does varying tree mortality impact fire hazard and forest resiliency? Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 30...

333

additive hazards model: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of spatial occurrence of landslides by discriminant analysis Boyer, Edmond 212 Lesson 1. Natural Hazards & Natural Disasters Geosciences Websites Summary: Lesson 1. Natural...

334

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

335

Prevention, Abatement, and Control of Hazardous Substance Release (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Natural Resources is authorized to establish rules regarding the prevention and mitigation of hazardous substance release. These sections contain information on the notification...

336

South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations to prevent exposure of persons, animals, or the environment to hazardous waste. The construction...

337

October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations Presentations Relative Movements for...

338

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final...

339

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RL Facility Representative Program March 21, 1995 Surveillance Guide OSS 19.5 Revision 0 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Page 6 of Error Bookmark...

340

Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

for NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), located in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 875056303 Phone (50S) 476-6000 Fax...

342

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Group Seminar Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Group Seminar Series University in this region could affect millions of people and potentially impact the world economy. The anticipated hazard practice of earthquake engineering has a relatively short history. Dr. Nikolaou will present an overview

Kamat, Vineet R.

343

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from left

Torgersen, Christian

344

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

Robert F. Grossman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

Gordon, Lloyd B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cartelli, Laura [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

327 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 1998, the 327 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-E) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in five areas and provided nine recommendations (11 items) to bring the 327 Building into compliance. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 327 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A and IUD 5480.7.

BARILO, N.F.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Potential health hazards of radiation. Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During World War II and the Cold War, the federal government developed and operated industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Some of these sites processed uranium and vanadium, and upon closure, left behind millions of cubic yards of mill tailings on the sites and throughout the nearby communities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the cleanup of these areas to minimize the risks to the public and environment from exposure to the tailings and the radon gas they produce.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Improving tamper detection for hazardous waste security  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide improved levels of security for the hazardous materials in their charge. Many low-level wastes that previously had minimal or no security must now be well protected, while high-level wastes require even greater levels of security than previously employed. This demand for improved security comes, in many cases, without waste managers being provided the necessary additional funding, personnel, or security expertise. Contributing to the problem is the fact that--at least in our experience--waste managers often fail to appreciate certain types of security vulnerabilities. They frequently overlook or underestimate the security risks associated with disgruntled or compromised insiders, or the potential legal and political liabilities associated with nonexistent or ineffective security. Also frequently overlooked are potential threats from waste management critics who could resort to sabotage, vandalism, or civil disobedience for purposes of discrediting a waste management program.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.); Garcia, A. R. E. (Anthony R. E.); Pacheco, A. N. (Adam N.); Trujillo, S. J. (Sonia J.); Martinez, R. K. (Ronald K.); Martinez, D. D. (Debbie D.); Lopez, L. N. (Leon N.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

Sharifi, Mozafar [Razi University Center for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sharifimozafar@gmail.com; Hadidi, Mosslem [Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hadidi_moslem@yahoo.com; Vessali, Elahe [Paradise Ave, Azad University, School of Agriculture, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: elahe_vesali@yahoo.com; Mosstafakhani, Parasto [Razi University Centre for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mostafakhany2003@yahoo.com; Taheri, Kamal [Regional office of Water Resource Management, Zan Boulevard, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: taheri.kamal@gmail.com; Shahoie, Saber [Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kurdistan University, University Boulevard, Sanandadj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shahoei@yahoo.com; Khodamoradpour, Mehran [Regional office of Climatology, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mehrankhodamorad@yahoo.com

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

MULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California to its main suspension bridges and the detailed shots of the Golden Gate and Brooklyn bridgesMULTI-HAZARD RESISTANT HIGHWAY BRIDGE PIERS HAVING CONCRETE-FILLED STEEL TUBE Shuichi FUJIKURA1 of a multi-hazard bridge pier concept, i.e., a bridge pier system capable of providing an adequate level

Bruneau, Michel

351

Overview of hazardous-waste regulation at federal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is organized in a fashion that is intended to explain the legal duties imposed on officials responsible for hazardous waste at each stage of its existence. Section 2 describes federal hazardous waste laws, explaining the legal meaning of hazardous waste and the protective measures that are required to be taken by its generators, transporters, and storers. In addition, penalties for violation of the standards are summarized, and a special discussion is presented of so-called imminent hazard provisions for handling hazardous waste that immediately threatens public health and safety. Although the focus of Sec. 2 is on RCRA, which is the principal federal law regulating hazardous waste, other federal statutes are discussed as appropriate. Section 3 covers state regulation of hazardous waste. First, Sec. 3 explains the system of state enforcement of the federal RCRA requirements on hazardous waste within their borders. Second, Sec. 3 discusses two peculiar provisions of RCRA that appear to permit states to regulate federal facilities more strictly than RCRA otherwise would require.

Tanzman, E.; LaBrie, B.; Lerner, K.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Open problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Current weather radar detection and prediction sys- tems primarily rely on numerical models. We proposeOpen problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Amy McGovern1, #12;Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Radar velocity Radar

McGovern, Amy

353

Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the destruction or transformation of hazardous chemical substances such as high-temperature incineration, amended activated sludge digestion, anaerobic digestion and conventional physicochemical treatment. Pulsed-power plasma discharge technology may have.... Current approaches to the treatment of hazardous chemical wastes include high temperature incineration, chemical oxidation with and UV light, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, substrate-specific biodegration, electron beam bombardment...

Hoffmann, M. R.

354

Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

McDonald, K.M.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

355

Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through prevention, minimization, and recycling · Classroom or one-on-one waste generator training, other DOE and University waste organizations · Flammable waste cans, 30-gallon, 55-gallon drums (steelCompliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated

356

Navy Technology Evaluation Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the Navy Technology Evaluation update at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

357

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hazardous waste research and development in the Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective management of hazardous waste is an issue that all countries of the Pacific Basin must address. By very rough estimates, almost 272 million metric tons of hazardous wastes are being generated every year in the region. While the data are not consistently defined and reported, they do indicate the extent of the problem. Increasing development brings along an increase in the rate of hazardous waste generation. On this basis, the developing countries of the region can be expected to experience some of the same problems of the developed countries as their economies become more industrialized. Fundamental problems are involved in the compilation of consistent hazardous-waste generation statistics in the Pacific Basin. One involves the definition of what constitutes hazardous waste.

Cirillo, R.R.; Carpenter, R.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

Fix, N.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing hazards aircraft Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have... a lower ash fall hazard. Information is based on data during the past 10,000 years. Bottom, from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

System and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating presence of substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Van Hook, Arthur (Lake Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

System and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating presence of substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Van Hook, Arthur (Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

System And Method For Identifying, Reporting, And Evaluating Presence Of Substance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Hook, Arthur Van (Lake Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Electric Motors and Generators for Use in Hazardous Locations, Class II, Groups E, F and G   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Standard represents the judgment of Undenvriters' Laboratories, Inc., as to the basic requirements for the construction and performance of the products to be Listed under this category. These requirements are based ...

Anonymous

365

Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

Kevin Larry Young

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) was issued on October 27, 1999 [1]. Since that time, the WIPP has sought modifications to clarify the permit language, provide alternative methods for meeting permit requirements and to update permit conditions. Significant advancements have been made in transuranic (TRU) waste management as the result of modifications to the HWFP. Among these advancements is a modification to obtain a drum age criteria (DAC) value to perform headspace gas sampling on drums to be super-compacted and placed in a 100-gallon overpack drum. In addition, the Section 311 permit modification request that would allow for more efficient waste characterization, and the modification to authorize the shipment and disposal of Remote-Handled (RH) TRU waste were merged together and submitted to the regulator as the Consolidated Permit Modification Request (PMR). The submittal of the Consolidated PMR came at the request of the regulator as part of responses to Notices of Deficiency (NODs) for the separate PMRs which had been submitted in previous years. Section 311 of the fiscal year 2004 Energy and Water Developments Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-137) [2] directs the Department of Energy to submit a permit modification that limits waste confirmation to radiography or visual examination of a statistical subpopulation of containers. Section 311 also specifically directs that disposal room performance standards be to be met by monitoring for volatile organic compounds in the underground disposal rooms. This statute translates into the elimination of other waste confirmation methods such as headspace gas sampling and analysis and solids sampling and analysis. These methods, as appropriate, will continue to be used by the generator sites during hazardous waste determinations or characterization activities. This modification is expected to reduce the overall cost of waste analysis by hundreds of millions of dollars [3]. Combining both the chap. 311 and RH TRU waste permit modification requests allows for both the regulator and DOE to expedite action on the modification requests. The Combined PMR reduces costs by having only one administrative process for both modification requests. (authors)

Kehrman, B.; Most, W. [Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services, 4021 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

369

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used...

370

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Parts 370-376: Hazardous Waste Management System (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations prescribe the management of hazardous waste facilities in New York State. They identify and list different types of hazardous wastes and describe standards for generators,...

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding hazards caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrows radiological hazards Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

published... . If so, the hazardous energy must be controlled using an appropriate lockout procedure (see Control... of Hazardous Energy: General Requirements). This procedure...

373

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid gas hazards Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND SCOPE Arizona State University... Management, generate a variety of hazardous chemical wastes. ASU is classified as a hazardous waste generator... ) and has been assigned...

375

Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

Thate, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Group (Devonian Black Shale) in Illinois to evaluate its characteristics as a source of hydrocarbons. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a detailed analysis of the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of the New Albany Group in Illinois to determine those characteristics of lithology, thickness, regional distribution, vertical and lateral variability, and deformation that are most relevant to the occurrence of hydrocarbons. The mineralogic and petrographic properties of the New Albany Shale in Illinois are characterized. This includes the quantitative and qualitative characterization, by optical and x-ray techniques, of the inorganic mineral constituents, the dispersed organic matter, and the fabric of the shale. Not less than 49 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in 300 to 500 shale samples, which are representative cross sections of the cores taken. Organic and mineral carbon are included; total hydrogen; total sulfur and when that exceeds 0.5%, pyritic and sulfate sulfur. Also, other elements observed during normal routine analysis are reported. The character of off-gases from approximately 10-foot intervals in cores collected in the Illinois Basin is determined. In addition, the relative distribution of hydrocarbons is determined in ten specially prepared core samples, which are the same as those in previous unit. The carbon isotopic composition of methane in off-gases is determined from core samples whenever sufficient methane can be collected. This data is compared to other pertinent data such as gas composition and vitrinite reflectance for the purpose of making interpretations as to the origin and maturity of the gas. Laboratory experiments are performed to study the relative effects and significance of chemical and isotopic fractionation that occurs as gas is released from core samples. Data accumulated can be evaluated to gain a better understanding of the origin, migration, and location of natural gas associated with the shales.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

Mandigo, R.L.

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

Job Hazard Analysis Manual Updated 10/6/04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fire hazards from area Electrical Shock Improper grounding, improper operations and maintenance Lockout Activation during repair Auto start and/or human error Lockout/Tagout Noise Equipment Operation Use Hearing

Escher, Christine

380

Trends and Opportunities in Industrial Hazardous Waste Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes trends and opportunities in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste minimization. It uses U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data gathered since 1989 from over 20,000 facilities that account for almost all...

Atlas, M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program annual progress report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Programs (HAZWRAP), a unit of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., supports the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office in broadly environmental areas, especially those relating to waste management and environmental restoration. HAZWRAP comprises six program areas, which are supported by central administrative and technical organizations. Existing programs deal with airborne hazardous substances, pollution prevention, remedial actions planning, environmental restoration, technology development, and information and data systems. HAZWRAP's mission to develop, promote, and apply-cost-effective hazardous waste management and environmental technologies to help solve national problems and concerns. HAZWRAP seeks to serve as integrator for hazardous waste and materials management across the federal government. It applies the unique combination of research and development (R D) capabilities, technologies, management expertise, and facilities in the Energy Systems complex to address problems of national importance. 24 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement In order to ensure shall follow the procedures established in this policy. Reason for Policy/Purpose Transportation # Policy Statement............................................................................... 1 Reason

Shull, Kenneth R.

383

RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit...

384

Geologic Hazards Associated With a Proposed Dam on the Yarlung-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such reports (Biron and Dodin, 2007). However, given the persistent media reports, the pressing water-resources downstream in the Brahmapu- tra system in northeastern India and Bangladesh, and hazards asso- ciated

Kidd, William S. F.

385

Order Module--self-study program: HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

also help prepare you for the practice at the end of this module and for the criterion test. Before continuing, you should obtain a copy of the regulation at Hazardous waste...

386

RFPs Due for Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy Grant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Forest Service requests proposals for the 2014 Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy (W2E) Grant.  The outcome anticipated under this funding mechanism will advance the United States Department of...

387

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

Unknown

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

392

Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

CROWE, R.D.

2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hazard classification criteria for non-nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories` Integrated Risk Management Department has developed a process for establishing the appropriate hazard classification of a new facility or operation, and thus the level of rigor required for the associated authorization basis safety documentation. This process is referred to as the Preliminary Hazard Screen. DOE Order 5481.1B contains the following hazard classification for non-nuclear facilities: high--having the potential for onsite or offsite impacts to large numbers of persons or for major impacts to the environment; moderate--having the potential for considerable onsite impacts but only minor offsite impacts to people or the environment; low--having the potential for only minor onsite and negligible offsite impacts to people or the environment. It is apparent that the application of such generic criteria is more than likely to be fraught with subjective judgment. One way to remove the subjectivity is to define health and safety classification thresholds for specific hazards that are based on the magnitude of the hazard, rather than on a qualitative assessment of possible accident consequences. This paper presents the results of such an approach to establishing a readily usable set of non-nuclear facility hazard classifications.

Mahn, J.A.; Walker, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Methodology to assess potential glint and glare hazards from concentrating solar power plants : analytical models and experimental validation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing numbers of concentrating solar power systems being designed and developed, glint and glare from concentrating solar collectors and receivers is receiving increased attention as a potential hazard or distraction for motorists, pilots, and pedestrians. This paper provides analytical methods to evaluate the irradiance originating from specularly and diffusely reflecting sources as a function of distance and characteristics of the source. Sample problems are provided for both specular and diffuse sources, and validation of the models is performed via testing. In addition, a summary of safety metrics is compiled from the literature to evaluate the potential hazards of calculated irradiances from glint and glare. Previous safety metrics have focused on prevention of permanent eye damage (e.g., retinal burn). New metrics used in this paper account for temporary flash blindness, which can occur at irradiance values several orders of magnitude lower than the irradiance values required for irreversible eye damage.

Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 26632675, 2011 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/11/2663/2011/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is responsible for studying the safety and hazards of abandoned mines. One of the main scientific aims- gan on new extraction facilities and the mine operator kindly agreed to collaborate on the experiment

Boyer, Edmond

397

Putting It Down: Hazardous-Waste Management in the Throwaway Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protocols existed for these indicators. 68 Even granting that EPA's testing criteria for hazardous waste

Stockton, Wendy

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Hazard Communication Definitions Chemical means any substance or mixture of substances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard or a health hazard, a simple asphyxiant, combustible dust, pyrophoric gas or hazard not otherwise of the following hazardous effects: explosive; flammable (gases, aerosols, liquids or solids); oxidizer (liquid a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects

Slatton, Clint

399

Reuse in Hazard Analysis: Identification and Shamus P. Smith and Michael D. Harrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for example, Hazard and Op- erability Studies (HAZOP) [11], Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) [6

Harrison, Michael

400

Evaluation of an air drilling cuttings containment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drilling at hazardous waste sites for environmental remediation or monitoring requires containment of all drilling fluids and cuttings to protect personnel and the environment. At many sites, air drilling techniques have advantages over other drilling methods, requiring effective filtering and containment of the return air/cuttings stream. A study of. current containment methods indicated improvements could be made in the filtering of radionuclides and volatile organic compounds, and in equipment like alarms, instrumentation or pressure safety features. Sandia National Laboratories, Dept. 61 11 Environmental Drilling Projects Group, initiated this work to address these concerns. A look at the industry showed that asbestos abatement equipment could be adapted for containment and filtration of air drilling returns. An industry manufacturer was selected to build a prototype machine. The machine was leased and put through a six-month testing and evaluation period at Sandia National Laboratories. Various materials were vacuumed and filtered with the machine during this time. In addition, it was used in an actual air drive drilling operation. Results of these tests indicate that the vacuum/filter unit will meet or exceed our drilling requirements. This vacuum/filter unit could be employed at a hazardous waste site or any site where drilling operations require cuttings and air containment.

Westmoreland, J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Recycling non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into structural clay ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cherokee Environmental Group (CEG)--a subsidiary of the Cherokee Sanford Group, Inc. (CSG)--has developed a system to beneficially reuse non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into the recycling process of CSG`s structural clay ceramics manufacturing operation. The wastes and soils are processed, screened, and blended with brickmaking raw materials. The resulting material is formed and fired in such a way that the bricks still exceed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) quality standards. Prior to usage, recycled materials are rigorously tested for ceramic compatibility and environmental compliance. Ceramic testing includes strength, shrinkage, and aesthetics. Environmental compliance is insured by testing for both organic and inorganic constituents. This recycling process has been fully permitted by all required state regulatory agencies in North Carolina, Maryland, and South Carolina where facilities are located. This inter-industrial synergy has eliminated landfill reliance and liability for many companies and property owners. The recycling volume of wastes and soils is high because CSG is one of the largest brick manufacturers in the nation. Together, CEG and CSG have eliminated more than 1 billion pounds of material from landfills by beneficially reusing the non-hazardous wastes.

MacRunnels, Z.D.; Miller, H.B. Jr. [Cherokee Environmental Group, Sanford, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

Kirk, N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards.

K. Ashley

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identifying air pollutants that pose a potential hazard indoors can facilitate exposure mitigation. In this study, we compiled summary results from 77 published studies reporting measurements of chemical pollutants in residences in the United States and in countries with similar lifestyles. These data were used to calculate representative mid-range and upper bound concentrations relevant to chronic exposures for 267 pollutants and representative peak concentrations relevant to acute exposures for 5 activity-associated pollutants. Representative concentrations are compared to available chronic and acute health standards for 97 pollutants. Fifteen pollutants appear to exceed chronic health standards in a large fraction of homes. Nine other pollutants are identified as potential chronic health hazards in a substantial minority of homes and an additional nine are identified as potential hazards in a very small percentage of homes. Nine pollutants are identified as priority hazards based on the robustness of measured concentration data and the fraction of residences that appear to be impacted: acetaldehyde; acrolein; benzene; 1,3-butadiene; 1,4-dichlorobenzene; formaldehyde; naphthalene; nitrogen dioxide; and PM{sub 2.5}. Activity-based emissions are shown to pose potential acute health hazards for PM{sub 2.5}, formaldehyde, CO, chloroform, and NO{sub 2}.

Logue, J.M.; McKone, T.E.; Sherman, M. H.; Singer, B.C.

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities, experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Program, and the activities listed below. Located in Nye County, Nevada, the site's southeast corner is about 88 km (55 mi) northwest of the major population center, Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km2 (1,375 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands (Figure 1.0). The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS, and slow-moving groundwater is present hundreds to thousands of feet below the land surface. The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS (Figure 2.0). The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing above or at ground surface has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) earth-cratering experiments, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing. Since the mid-1950s, testing of nuclear explosive devices has occurred underground in drilled vertical holes or in mined tunnels (DOE 1996a). No such tests have been conducted since September 23, 1992 (DOE 2000). Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center, private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses, and handling is restricted to transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in CY 2001 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and from discharges of two wells (Well U-3cn PS No. 2 and Well ER-20-5 No.3) into lined ponds, (2) onsite radio analytical laboratories, (3) the Area 5 RWMS (RWMS-5) facility, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium and re- suspension of plutonium and americium. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility.

Y. E. Townsend

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Selmer groups as flat cohomology groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a prime number p, Bloch and Kato showed how the p Selmer group of an abelian variety A over a number field K is determined by the p-adic Tate module. In general, the pm1-Selmer group Selpmn A need not be determined ...

?esnavi?ius, K?stutis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optical fiber ­ Test of the law of gravitation at extremely small distance references [1] Y. Aso, M. Ando1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group Research Subjects: Experimental Relativity, Gravitational Wave Physics, Laser Inter- ferometer Member: Kimio TSUBONO and Masaki ANDO The detection of gravitational waves

Ejiri, Shinji

409

QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a framework that details timelines, leadership, resource allocation, and an assessment plan that is clearlyQEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group The topic of the QEP should fit should be supported by a thorough understanding of the institutional context and by assessment data

Liu, Paul

410

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description AHR Scholar-Architecture Scholar ART Honors - Architecture Honors H04 Honors - Allied Medical Prof Honors H05 Honors - Arts & Sciences Honors H14 Honors - Envir&Natural Resources Honors H15 Honors - Food, Agr, & Envir Sci Honors H16 Honors

411

Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

Singer, Brett

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

Singer, Brett

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

413

Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864, Hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 threshold is 96 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Containment and stabilization technologies for mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prevalent approach to the cleanup of waste sites contaminated with hazardous chemicals and radionuclides is to contain and/or stabilize wastes within the site. Stabilization involves treating the wastes in some fashion, either in situ or above ground after retrieval, to reduce the leachability and release rate of waste constituents to the environment. This approach is generally reserved for radionuclide contaminants, inorganic hazardous contaminants such as heavy metals, and nonvolatile organic contaminants. This paper describes the recent developments in the technical options available for containing and stabilizing wastes. A brief description of each technology is given along with a discussion of the most recent developments and examples of useful applications.

Buelt, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

Stevenson, J.D. [J.D. Stevenson Consulting Engineer, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhao, Y. [Battele Energy Systems Group, Columbus, OH (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Addressing concerns related to geologic hazards at the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility , TA-63, Los Alamos National Laboratory: focus on the current Los Alamos Seismic Network earthquake catalog, proximity of identified seismic events to the proposed facility , and evaluation of prev  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical paper presents the most recent and updated catalog of earthquakes measured by the Los Alamos Seismic Network at and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), with specific focus on the site of the proposed transuranic waste facility (TWF) at Technical Area 63 (TA-63). Any questions about the data presented herein, or about the Los Alamos Seismic Network, should be directed to the authors of this technical paper. LANL and the Los Alamos townsite sit atop the Pajarito Plateau, which is bounded on its western edge by the Pajarito fault system, a 35-mile-long system locally comprised of the down-to-the-east Pajarito fault (the master fault) and subsidiary down-to-the-west Rendija Canyon, Guaje Mountain, and Sawyer Canyon faults (Figure 1). This fault system forms the local active western margin of the Rio Grande rift near Los Alamos, and is potentially seismogenic (e.g., Gardner et al., 2001; Reneau et al., 2002; Lewis et al., 2009). The proposed TWF area at TA-63 is situated on an unnamed mesa in the north-central part of LANL between Twomile Canyon to the south, Ten Site Canyon to the north, and the headwaters of Canada del Buey to the east (Figure 2). The local bedrock is the Quaternary Bandelier Tuff, formed in two eruptive pulses from nearby Valles caldera, the eastern edge of which is located approximately 6.5 miles west-northwest of the technical area. The older member (Otowi Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.61 Ma (Izett and Obradovich 1994). The younger member (Tshirege Member) of the Bandelier Tuff has been dated at 1.256 Ma (age from Phillips et al. 2007) and is widely exposed as the mesa-forming unit around Los Alamos. Several discrete cooling units comprise the Tshirege Member. Commonly accepted stratigraphic nomenclature for the Tshirege Member is described in detail by Broxton and Reneau (1995), Gardner et al. (2001), and Lewis et al. (2009). The Tshirege Member cooling unit exposed at the surface at TA-63 is Qbt3. Understanding the subtle differences between Tshirege Member cooling units and the nature of the contacts between cooling units is critical to identifying the presence or absence of faults associated with the Pajarito fault system on the Pajarito Plateau. The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) continuously monitors local earthquake activity in the Los Alamos area in support of LANL's Seismic Hazards program. Seismic monitoring of LANL facilities is a requirement of DOE Order 420.1B (Facility Safety). LASN currently consists of nine permanent seismic instrument field stations that telemeter real-time sensitive ground motion data to a central recording facility. Four of these stations are located on LANL property, with three of those within 2.5 miles of TA-63. The other five stations are in remote locations in the Jemez Mountains, Valles Caldera, St Peters Dome, and the Caja del Rio plateau across the Rio Grande from the Los Alamos area. Local earthquakes are defined as those with locations within roughly 100 miles of Los Alamos. Plate 1 shows the current LASN station locations and all local earthquakes recorded from 1973 through 2011. During this time period, LASN has detected and recorded over 850 local earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. Over 650 of these were located within about 50 miles of Los Alamos, and roughly 60 were within 10 miles. The apparent higher density of earthquakes close to Los Alamos, relative to the rest of north-central New Mexico, is due largely to the fact that LASN is a sensitive local seismic network, recording many very small nearby events (magnitude less than 1.0) that are undetectable at greater distances.

Roberts, Peter M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes and summarizes a probabilistic evaluation of ground motions for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this evaluation is to provide a basis for updating the seismic design criteria for the INEL. In this study, site-specific seismic hazard curves were developed for seven facility sites as prescribed by DOE Standards 1022-93 and 1023-96. These sites include the: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL); Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP or CPP); Power Burst Facility (PBF); Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); Naval Reactor Facility (NRF); and Test Area North (TAN). The results, probabilistic peak ground accelerations and uniform hazard spectra, contained in this report are not to be used for purposes of seismic design at INEL. A subsequent study will be performed to translate the results of this probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to site-specific seismic design values for the INEL as per the requirements of DOE Standard 1020-94. These site-specific seismic design values will be incorporated into the INEL Architectural and Engineering Standards.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation of Glint and Glare (Version 6)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With growing numbers of concentrating solar power systems being designed and developed, glint and glare from concentrating solar collectors and receivers is receiving increased attention as a potential hazard or distraction for motorists, pilots, and pedestrians. This paper provides analytical methods to evaluate the irradiance originating from specularly and diffusely reflecting sources as a function of distance and characteristics of the source.

425

UNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all students, staff, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical waste, hazardous solid chemical waste (i.e. items that have been contaminated with hazardous are preferred for all hazardous liquid chemical waste. - Plastic bags are preferred for all hazardous solidUNBC Hazardous Waste Guide Proper waste management practices are essential for the safety of all

Northern British Columbia, University of

426

Modelling and Hazard Analysis for Contaminated Sediments Using Stamp Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and Hazard Analysis for Contaminated Sediments Using Stamp Model Karim Hardy* , Franck or contaminants) of contaminated sediments have become very efficient. These technologies, which are particularly sections. The first describes the Novosol® process for treating contaminated sediments. The second

Boyer, Edmond

427

Studies on Hazard Characterization for Performance-based Structural Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based design procedures. This research examined and extended the state-of-the-art in hazard characterization (wind and surge) and risk-based design procedures (seismic). State-of-the-art hurricane models (including wind field, tracking and decay models...

Wang, Yue

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

429

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Health hazards of hydrofluoric acid Hydrofluoric acid (HF characterized by weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, and general ill health. Safe use If possible, avoid working to exposures. #12;Focus Sheet | Hydrofluoric Acid Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Programs Office

Wilcock, William

430

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

431

Phase 2 fire hazard analysis for the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fire hazard analysis assesses the risk from fire in a facility to ascertain whether the fire protection policies are met. This document provides a preliminary FHA for the CSB facility. Open items have been noted in the document. A final FHA will be required at the completion of definitive design, prior to operation of the facility.

Sadanaga, C.T., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fire Hazards Analysis for the Inactive Equipment Storage Sprung Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the fire protection objective of DOE Order 5480.1A are met. The order acknowledges a graded approach commensurate with the hazards involved.

MYOTT, C.F.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution control agency and the Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) at least ten (10) days construction and renovation projects. Asbestos is a stringently regulated hazardous material and many Construction projects which impact existing building materials must include an environmental consultant

Wilcock, William

434

Landslide hazard zonation in Namasigue and El Triunfo, Southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to test two models to determine the feasibility of creating landslide hazard maps. Data were used to determine how landslide occurrence was affected by the variables in the model. Four easily observable variables were used for both models: slope, aspect...

Perotto-Baldivieso, Humberto Lauro

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Recent Electrical Events Highlight Equipment-Failure Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent Electrical Events Highlight Equipment-Failure Hazards FOR DETAILS: Occurrence Reports: NA Investigators: Antonia Tallarico, 665-6988 Mark Hunsinger, 665-1496 Susan Voss, 667-5979 LANL Chief Electrical-OA at 665-0033. February 14, 2007 LANL 2007-0004 GUIDANCE: Resources at hand LIR 402-600-01.3, "Electrical

436

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

437

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

project having the potential to impact lead-containing building materials, including lead paint. ResultsUNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Hazardous Materials Environmental Health & Safety Design Guide Lead Basis, lead-containing materials have the potential to negatively impact the health of construction workers

Wilcock, William

438

Guidance Note 052 RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;safety data or the condition of the substance is in doubt due to its age, it should be disposed and fresh with regard to all aspects of handling hazardous substances including receipt, storage, use, transport and disposal. Likewise, DSEAR requires assessment and control of fire and explosion risks presented

439

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

loods. Earthquakes. Winter storms. Fire. Hazardous spills. Public safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, break, or cause a fire--such as a water heater or bookshelf ). Annually inspect your home for hazards to your home. What would you do if basic services--water, gas, electricity, or telephones--were cut off the water, gas, and electric- ity at the main switches. Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut

Tullos, Desiree

442

Coding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management; computer programs; coding. The Author Lee A. Paine is a forest pathologist, stationed in Berkeley in the manual on the indicated pages. Page 7, just above H. Property or Person Directly Affected, insert: CityCoding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System Lee A. Paine PACIFIC SOUTHWEST

Standiford, Richard B.

443

Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R.E. Flye

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation Version 1.1 March 2014 #12;Page: ii Document History Number Date and Sections Notes 1 August 2013 Original document 1.0 2 September information on Access to Events #12;Page: iii Table of contents Document History

446

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call...

447

HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

ANDERSON, T.J.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Pending Jobs by Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

449

Long Term by Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

450

Interagency Sustainability Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

451

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

LITERATURE SEARCH FOR METHODS FOR HAZARD ANALYSES OF AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and several air carriers under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 developed a system-engineering model of the functions of air-carrier operations. Their analyses form the foundation or basic architecture upon which other task areas are based: hazard analyses, performance measures, and risk indicator design. To carry out these other tasks, models may need to be developed using the basic architecture of the Air Carrier Operations System Model (ACOSM). Since ACOSM encompasses various areas of air-carrier operations and can be used to address different task areas with differing but interrelated objectives, the modeling needs are broad. A literature search was conducted to identify and analyze the existing models that may be applicable for pursuing the task areas in ACOSM. The intent of the literature search was not necessarily to identify a specific model that can be directly used, but rather to identify relevant ones that have similarities with the processes and activities defined within ACOSM. Such models may provide useful inputs and insights in structuring ACOSM models. ACOSM simulates processes and activities in air-carrier operation, but, in a general framework, it has similarities with other industries where attention also has been paid to hazard analyses, emphasizing risk management, and in designing risk indicators. To assure that efforts in other industries are adequately considered, the literature search includes publications from other industries, e.g., chemical, nuclear, and process industries. This report discusses the literature search, the relevant methods identified and provides a preliminary assessment of their use in developing the models needed for the ACOSM task areas. A detailed assessment of the models has not been made. Defining those applicable for ACOSM will need further analyses of both the models and tools identified. The report is organized in four chapters. Chapter 2 briefly describes ACOSM, and its structure, using the format of the Integrated Definition Function Model (IDEFO). A reader who is familiar with ACOSM may want to skip this chapter and continue with Chapter 3 that discusses the process we used for identifying applicable approaches for hazard analysis of air-carrier operations as modeled in ACOSM. It consisted of the following three main steps: (1) Search the literature containing articles related to hazard- or risk-analysis with potential applicability to air-carrier operations, (2) Review the selected publications and identify those with possible relevance to ACOSM, and (3) Group the selected publications or methods according to certain characteristics, such as their pertinence to specific areas of ACOSM. Chapter 4 discusses the applicability of the identified approaches to ACOSM, the areas of methods development, and comments related to methods development for ACOSM. The following areas were defined to identify the methods that may be applicable for ACOSM: (1) Identification of hazards associated with operations and activities; (2) Hazard-assessment techniques; (3) Modeling dependencies and interrelations leading to vulnerabilities; (4) Risk-management tools; (5) Data-assessment techniques; and (6) Risk-indicator identification. In addition, issues of human reliability and operational culture are relevant for all the above areas. They are expected to be addressed within each of them. We do not include in this report all the lists of publications that we obtained because they are voluminous. We keep them in our records which are available to the interested reader.

MARTINEZ - GURIDI,G.; SAMANTA,P.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heat strain and heat stress for workers wearing protective suits at a hazardous waste site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress when full body protective suits are worn, heart rates, oral temperatures and environmental parameters were measured for five unacclimatized male workers (25-33 years of age) who performed sampling activities during hazardous waste clean-up operations. The protective ensembles included laminated PVC-Tyvec chemical resistant hood suits with rubber boots, gloves, full facepiece dual cartridge respirators and hard hats. For comparison, measurements also were performed when the men worked at a similar level of activity while they wore ordinary work clothes. A comparison of the heart rates for the men working with and without suits indicated that wearing the suits imposed a heat stress equivalent to adding 6/sup 0/ to 11/sup 0/C (11/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/F) to the ambient WBGT index. A similar result was obtained by calculating the WBGT in the microclimate inside the suits and comparing it to the ambient WBGT. These results indicate the following: 1) there exists a significant risk of heat injury during hazardous waste work when full body protective clothing is worn, and 2) threshold limit values for heat stress established by the ACGIH must be lowered substantially before extending them to cover workers under these conditions.

Paull, J.M.; Rosenthal, F.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Hazard classification for the supercritical water oxidation test bed. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hazard classification of ``routinely accepted by the public`` has been determined for the operation of the supercritical water oxidation test bed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This determination is based on the fact that the design and proposed operation meet or exceed appropriate national standards so that the risks are equivalent to those present in similar activities conducted in private industry. Each of the 17 criteria for hazards ``routinely accepted by the public,`` identified in the EG and G Idaho, Inc., Safety Manual, were analyzed. The supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed will treat simulated mixed waste without the radioactive component. It will be designed to operate with eight test wastes. These test wastes have been chosen to represent a broad cross-section of candidate mixed wastes anticipated for storage or generation by DOE. In particular, the test bed will generate data to evaluate the ability of the technology to treat chlorinated waste and other wastes that have in the past caused severe corrosion and deposition in SCWO reactors.

Ramos, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the facility as constructed and with planned operation at the time of document preparation. Changes in facility planned and actual operation require that the identified fire risks associated with the CVDF be re-evaluated. Consequently, formal documentation and future revision of this FHA may be required.

SINGH, G.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 941954, 2006 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/6/941/2006/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the discontinuity and natural slope features. First, to obtain rock source areas (RSAs), data obtained from Sciences Determination of the rockfall source in an urban settlement area by using a rule-based fuzzy of the rockfall hazard was determined by various techniques basing on the selec- tion of a rockfall source

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

457

Electrical Hazards The greater hazards related to electricity are electrical shock and fire. Electrical shock occurs when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the amount of current, the duration of exposure, and whether the skin is wet or dry. Water is a good for the level of hazard. Lab coats (knee-length) and proper footwear are required for work involving chemicals or moving machinery. · Leave behind protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, etc.) when leaving the work

Petriu, Emil M.

458

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 8, 559571, 2008 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/8/559/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequently affect the slopes of ice-capped volcanoes. They can be triggered by volcano-ice interac- tions Hazards and Earth System Sciences Assessing lahars from ice-capped volcanoes using ASTER satellite data reservoirs are supposed to be a more realistic scenario for lahar genera- tion than sudden ice melting

Kääb, Andreas

459

LAB HAZARD CHECKLIST Please check the hazards that are associated with your lab and complete the section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Hazards ­Any work involving class 3b or 4 lasers Flammable Gas ­ Compressed gas cylinders that contain flammable gas Toxic Gas ­ Compressed gas cylinders that contain toxic gas Flammable Materials release Radioactive Materials ­ Radiochemicals and sealed radiation sources Radio Frequency or Microwave

Firestone, Jeremy

460

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous...

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Application of probabilistic consequence analysis to the assessment of potential radiological hazards of fusion reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology has been developed to provide system reliability criteria based on an assessment of the potential radiological hazards associated with a fusion reactor design and on hazard constraints which prevent fusion ...

Sawdye, Robert William

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK Littelfuse is the global leader in circuit protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK #12;Littelfuse is the global leader in circuit protection's Leading Provider of Circuit Protection Solutions #12;LITTELFuSE ELECTRICAL SAFETY HAZARDS HANDBOOK This Electrical Safety Hazards Handbook was developed for general education purposes only and is not intended

465

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health Program has been established to provide NIH employees with places and conditions of employment in which the risk of exposures to potential hazards is minimized. The NIH Hazard Communication

Bandettini, Peter A.

466

Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

467

Causal Analysis of the Inadvertent Contact with an Uncontrolled Electrical Hazardous Energy Source (120 Volts AC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 25, 2013, a Health Physics Technician (HPT) was performing preparations to support a pneumatic transfer from the HFEF Decon Cell to the Room 130 Glovebox in HFEF, per HFEF OI 3165 section 3.5, Field Preparations. This activity involves an HPT setting up and climbing a portable ladder to remove the 14-C meter probe from above ball valve HBV-7. The HPT source checks the meter and probe and then replaces the probe above HBV-7, which is located above Hood ID# 130 HP. At approximately 13:20, while reaching past the HBV-7 valve position indicator switches in an attempt to place the 14-C meter probe in the desired location, the HPT’s left forearm came in contact with one of the three sets of exposed terminals on the valve position indication switches for HBV 7. This resulted in the HPT receiving an electrical shock from a 120 Volt AC source. Upon moving the arm, following the electrical shock, the HPT noticed two exposed electrical connections on a switch. The HPT then notified the HFEF HPT Supervisor, who in turn notified the MFC Radiological Controls Manager and HFEF Operations Manager of the situation. Work was stopped in the area and the hazard was roped off and posted to prevent access to the hazard. The HPT was escorted by the HPT Supervisor to the MFC Dispensary and then preceded to CFA medical for further evaluation. The individual was evaluated and released without any medical restrictions. Causal Factor (Root Cause) A3B3C01/A5B2C08: - Knowledge based error/Attention was given to wrong issues - Written Communication content LTA, Incomplete/situation not covered The Causal Factor (root cause) was attention being given to the wrong issues during the creation, reviews, verifications, and actual performance of HFEF OI-3165, which covers the need to perform the weekly source check and ensure placement of the probe prior to performing a “rabbit” transfer. This resulted in the hazard not being identified and mitigated in the procedure. Work activities with in HFEF-OI-3165 placed the HPT in proximity of an unmitigated hazard directly resulting in this event. Contributing Factor A3B3C04/A4B5C04: - Knowledge Based Error, LTA Review Based on Assumption That Process Will Not Change - Change Management LTA, Risks/consequences associated with change not adequately reviewed/assessed Prior to the pneumatic system being out of service, the probe and meter were not being source checked together. The source check issue was identified and addressed during the period of time when the system was out of service. The corrective actions for this issue resulted in the requirement that a meter and probe be source checked together as it is intended to be used. This changed the activity and required an HPT to weekly, when in use, remove and install the probe from above HBV-7 to meet the requirement of LRD 15001 Part 5 Article 551.5. Risks and consequences associated with this change were not adequately reviewed or assessed. Failure to identify the hazard associated with this change directly contributed to this event.

David E. James; Dennis E. Raunig; Sean S. Cunningham

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BARRETT, CIAN ADAMS, NICOLE BARTON, MICHAEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA ANDERSON FITZSIMONS, DENISEBINCHY, SUSAN CARLEY, JESSE CONWAY, AILBHE BROOKE, HENRY CONLAN, DEIRDRE, CAOIMHE HESKIN, CLODAGH MC GOVERN, MARIE-CLAIREMURRAY, AINE GROGAN, CLARE GERARD, ALLISON MC QUAID, RACHEL

O'Mahony, Donal E.

469

A Second Poincare' Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of the sourceless Einstein's equation with weak and strong cosmological constants are discussed by using In\\"on\\"u-Wigner contractions of the de Sitter groups and spaces. The more usual case corresponds to a weak cosmological-constant limit, in which the de Sitter groups are contracted to the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to the Minkowski space. In the strong cosmological-constant limit, however, the de Sitter groups are contracted to another group which has the same abstract Lie algebra of the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to a 4-dimensional cone-space of infinite scalar curvature, but vanishing Riemann and Ricci curvature tensors. In such space, the special conformal transformations act transitively, and the equivalence between inertial frames is that of special relativity.

R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pressure Vessel Burst Program: Automated hazard analysis for pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, development, and use of a Windows based software tool, PVHAZARD, for pressure vessel hazard analysis is presented. The program draws on previous efforts in pressure vessel research and results of a Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study. Prior papers on the Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study have been presented to the ASME, AIAA, JANNAF, NASA Pressure Systems Seminar, and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. Development and validation is described for simplified blast (overpressure/impulse) and fragment (velocity and travel distance) hazard models. The use of PVHAZARD in making structural damage and personnel injury estimates is discussed. Efforts in-progress are reviewed including the addition of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrodynamic code analyses to supplement the simplified models, and the ability to assess barrier designs for protection from fragmentation.

Langley, D.R. [Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Chrostowski, J.D. [ACTA Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Goldstein, S. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States); Cain, M. [General Physics Corp., Titusville, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

National Environmental Policy Act Hazards Assessment for the TREAT Alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an assessment of hazards as required by the National Environmental Policy Act for the alternative of restarting the reactor at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility by the Resumption of Transient Testing Program. Potential hazards have been identified and screening level calculations have been conducted to provide estimates of unmitigated dose consequences that could be incurred through this alternative. Consequences considered include those related to use of the TREAT Reactor, experiment assembly handling, and combined events involving both the reactor and experiments. In addition, potential safety structures, systems, and components for processes associated with operating TREAT and onsite handling of nuclear fuels and experiments are listed. If this alternative is selected, a safety basis will be prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 830, “Nuclear Safety Management,” Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.”

Boyd D. Christensen; Annette L. Schafer

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caucus created a mission statement and resolution: - All Tribes with cultural ties to Yucca Mountain should be invited to join TEC - Ongoing funds to support Tribal Topic Group...

474

Trails Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA...

475

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM); Buelow, Steven J. (Los Alamos, NM); Dyer, Richard B. (Los Alamos, NM); Wander, Joseph D. (Parker, FL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

479

Fourth DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Conference: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference allowed an interchange in the natural phenomena area among designers, safety professionals, and managers. The papers presented in Volume I of the proceedings are from sessions I - VIII which cover the general topics of: DOE standards, lessons learned and walkdowns, wind, waste tanks, ground motion, testing and materials, probabilistic seismic hazards, risk assessment, base isolation and energy dissipation, and lifelines and floods. Individual papers are indexed separately. (GH)

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hazard evaluation group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components in the U.S. and creating an engineering opportunity for ILC cost reductions. It offers an early and tangible application for ILC R&D in superconducting technology, attracting participation from accelerator scientists worldwide and driving forward the technology for still higher-energy accelerators of the future, such as a muon collider. To prepare for a future decision, the Fermilab Steering Group recommends that the laboratory seek R&D support for Project X, in order to produce an overall design of Project X and to spur the R&D and industrialization of ILC linac components needed for Project X. Advice from the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will guide any future decision to upgrade the Fermilab accelerator complex, taking into account developments affecting the ILC schedule and the continuing evaluation of scientific priorities for U.S. particle physics. Fermilab should also work toward increased resources for longer-term future accelerators such as a muon collider, aiming at higher energies than the ILC would provide.

Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation’s site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides that are resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds, dust-devils) along with historically-contaminated soils on the NTS. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent (EDE) to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS for inhaling radioactive particles that may be carried by wind off of the NTS. This limit assumes that members of the public surrounding the NTS may also inhale “background levels” or radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities that come from naturally-occurring elements in the environment (e.g., radon gas from the earth or natural building materials) or from other man-made sources (e.g., cigarette smoke). The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires DOE facilities (e.g., the NTS) to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP dose limit by annually estimating the dose to a hypothetical member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI), or the member of the public who resides within an 80-kilometer (50-mile) radius of the facility who would experience the highest annual dose. This dose to a hypothetical person living close to the NTS cannot exceed 10 mrem/yr. C.1 This report has been produced annually for the EPA Region IX, and for the state of Nevada since 1992 and documents that the estimated EDE to the MEI has been, and continues to be, well below the NESHAP dose limit. The report format and level of technical detail has been dictated by the EPA and DOE Headquarters over the years. It is read and evaluated for NESHAP compliance by federal and state regulators. Each section and appendix presents technical information (e.g., NTS emission source estimates, onsite air sampling data, air transport model input parameters, dose calculation methodology, etc.), which supports the annual dose assessment conclusions. In 2005, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the estimated dose to the public from inhalation of radiological emissions from current and past NTS activities is shown to be well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. This was demonstrated by air sampling data collected onsite at each of six EPA-approved “critical receptor” stations on the NTS. The sum of measured EDEs from the four stations at the NTS boundaries is 2.5 mrem/yr. This dose is 25 percent of the allowed NESHAP dose limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, this individual receives only a small fraction of this dose. NESHAP compliance does not require DOE facilities to estimate annual inhalation dose from non-DOE activities. Therefore, this report does not estimate public radiation doses from any other sources or activities (e.g., naturally-occurring radon, global fallout).

Bechtel Nevada

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

A modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures in multi-hazard environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, much of protection planning is conducted separately for each infrastructure and hazard. Limited funding requires a balance of expenditures between terrorism and natural hazards based on potential impacts. This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research&Development (LDRD) project that created a modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures focused on multiple hazards, including terrorism. To develop this framework, three modeling elements were integrated: natural hazards, terrorism, and interdependent infrastructures. For natural hazards, a methodology was created for specifying events consistent with regional hazards. For terrorism, we modeled the terrorist's actions based on assumptions regarding their knowledge, goals, and target identification strategy. For infrastructures, we focused on predicting post-event performance due to specific terrorist attacks and natural hazard events, tempered by appropriate infrastructure investments. We demonstrate the utility of this framework with various examples, including protection of electric power, roadway, and hospital networks.

Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Dean A.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Prince, Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z