National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hazard evaluation group

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-392-2099, Loral Systems Group, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    In response to a request from the International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), an evaluation was undertaken of possible health hazards at the Loral Systems Group (SIC-3728) located in Akron, Ohio. Concern was voiced about possible asbestos (1332214) exposure. The company produces wheels and brakes for civilian and military aircraft and currently employs about 1560 persons at the Akron facility. At the time of the study there were about 2300 living retirees. The precise number who had worked in one of the four areas of particular interest was unkown. Of the 166 persons found eligible for inclusion in the health hazard evaluation (15 or more years of potential asbestos exposure in at least one of the four identified programs and still residing in Ohio), 129 participated in a medical evaluation consisting of a chest x-ray, pulmonary function test, and completion of a questionnaire to detail medical and prior work histories. Abnormal pulmonary function results were noted in 39 of these individuals of whom 30 demonstrated an obstructive pattern, three a restrictive pattern, and six both an obstructive and restrictive component. Nonsmoking participants were more likely to report chronic cough, chronic phlegm, and chronic bronchitis than comparisons.

  2. Classification of poison inhalation hazard materials into severity groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griego, N.R.; Weiner, R.F.

    1996-02-01

    Approximately 1.5 billion tons of hazardous materials (hazmat) are transported in the US annually, and most reach their destinations safely. However, there are infrequent transportation accidents in which hazmat is released from its packaging. These accidental releases can potentially affect the health of the exposed population and damage the surrounding environment. Although these events are rare, they cause genuine public concern. Therefore, the US Department of Transportation Research & Special Programs Administration (DOT- RSPA) has sponsored a project to evaluate the protection provided by the current bulk (defined as larger than 118 gallons) packagings used to transport materials that have been classified as Poison Inhalation Hazards (PIH) and recommend performance standards for these PIH packagings. This project was limited to evaluating bulk packagings larger than 2000 gallons. This project involved classifying the PIH into severity categories so that only one set of packaging performance criteria would be needed for each severity category rather than a separate set of performance criteria for each individual PIH. By grouping the PIH into Hazard Zones, Packaging Groups and performance standards for these Hazard Zones can be defined. Each Hazard Zone can correspond to a Packaging Group or, as in 49CFR173 for non-bulk packagings, one Packaging Group may cover more than one Hazard Zone. If the packaging groups are chosen to correspond to the classification categories presented in this report, then the maximum allowable leak rates used to define these categories could be used as the maximum allowable leak rates for the performance oriented packaging standards. The results discussed in this report are intended to provide quantitative guidance for the appropriate authorities to use in making these decisions.

  3. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  4. Hazard Evaluation for 244-CR Vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAMS, W.H.

    1999-08-19

    This document presents the results of a hazards identification and evaluation performed on the 244-CR Vault to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities.

  5. Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Rucker J. ...

  6. TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group As a part of the United States Nuclear Data Network and the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators' Network, the Nuclear Data group at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is responsible for evaluations of nuclei in the mass range A = 3 - 20. The current status of these evaluations is summarized below: Nuclear Mass: Latest Publication: Evaluated By: A = 3 Nucl. Phys. A848 (2010) 1 TUNL A = 4 Nucl. Phys. A541 (1992) 1 TUNL (#) A

  7. Hazards evaluation of plutonium metal opening and stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, L.E.

    1999-08-31

    Hazards evaluation is the analysis of the significance of hazardous situations associated with an activity OK process. The HE used qualitative techniques of Hazard and Operability (HazOp) analysis and What-If analysis to identify those elements of handling and thermal stabilization processing that could lead to accidents.

  8. Hazardous waste site inspectors and operators: Their perceptions of the media and environmental groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graber, D.R.; Musham, C.

    1995-12-01

    This study assesses and compares the views and opinions of two groups (representing the `regulators` and the `regulated`) in one area of environmental management - the operation of commercial hazardous waste sites. A survey, sent to 141 managers of commercial treatment, storage, and disposal sites and 110 hazardous waste inspectors. This paper reports on their views of the role and influence of the media. In addition, the expectations for hazardous waste management by several stakeholder groups was examined.

  9. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review Cold Smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    Cold Smoke is a dense white smoke produced by the reaction of titanium tetrachloride and aqueous ammonia aerosols. Early studies on the toxicity of this nonpyrotechnically generated smoke indicated that the smoke itself is essentially non-toxic (i.e. exhibits to systemic toxicity or organ damage due to exposure) under normal deployment conditions. The purpose of this evaluation was to review and summarize the recent literature data available on the toxicity of Cold Smoke, its chemical constituents, and its starting materials.

  10. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  11. Evaluation of cement kiln laboratories testing hazardous waste derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Cement kiln operators wishing to burn hazardous waste derived fuels in their kilns must submit applications for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. One component of each permit application is a site-specific Waste Analysis Plan. These Plans describe the facilities` sampling and analysis procedures for hazardous waste derived fuels prior to receipt and burn. The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted on-site evaluations of several cement kiln facilities that were under consideration for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. The purpose of these evaluations was to determine if the on-site sampling and laboratory operations at each facility complied with their site-specific Waste Analysis Plans. These evaluations covered sampling, laboratory, and recordkeeping procedures. Although all the evaluated facilities were generally competent, the results of those evaluations revealed opportunities for improvement at each facility. Many findings were noted for more than one facility. This paper will discuss these findings, particularly those shared by several facilities (specific facilities will not be identified). Among the findings to be discussed are the ways that oxygen bombs were scrubbed and rinsed, the analytical quality control used, Burn Tank sampling, and the analysis of pH in hazardous waste derived fuels.

  12. Robots, systems, and methods for hazard evaluation and visualization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Curtis W.; Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.; Hartley, Robert S.; Gertman, David I.; Kinoshita, Robert A.; Whetten, Jonathan

    2013-01-15

    A robot includes a hazard sensor, a locomotor, and a system controller. The robot senses a hazard intensity at a location of the robot, moves to a new location in response to the hazard intensity, and autonomously repeats the sensing and moving to determine multiple hazard levels at multiple locations. The robot may also include a communicator to communicate the multiple hazard levels to a remote controller. The remote controller includes a communicator for sending user commands to the robot and receiving the hazard levels from the robot. A graphical user interface displays an environment map of the environment proximate the robot and a scale for indicating a hazard intensity. A hazard indicator corresponds to a robot position in the environment map and graphically indicates the hazard intensity at the robot position relative to the scale.

  13. Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Motion Model | Department of Energy Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model Rucker J. Williams, PE - Geotechnical Engineering Lead Shawn Carey, PhD, PE - Structural Mechanics, Structural Lead Jay Amin - Structural Mechanics, Principal Engineer Presentation to DOE NPH Workshop October

  14. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-112-1372, Culley Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01

    To evaluate worker exposure to boiler gases and coal dust, NIOSH conducted a combined environmental and medical evaluation at the Culley facility in August 1981. Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposure to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and asbestos. In addition, boiler gas leaks were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide. In addition, a potential for exposure to boiler gases exists due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. The X-ray data revealed four cases of pneumoconiosis in the Culley workers. The relative youth and the low seniority of this workforce may explain the absence of group PFT reductions. If preventive engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from process equipment, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  15. An evaluation of approximations of acute hazard indices based on chronic hazard indices for California fossil-fuel power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gratt, L.B.; Levin, L.

    1998-12-31

    The measures for evaluating risk under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 are yet to be defined. Many risk assessments have used only chronic risk measures (lifetime cancer probability and chronic hazard index) based on yearly averages of long-term dispersion of substances into ambient air. In California, many facilities prepared risk assessments using hourly meteorological data and short-term emission rates, allowing the calculation of an acute hazard index. These risk assessments are more costly and labor-intensive than those using the annualized meteorological data. A simple scheme to estimate the acute hazard index from the chronic index is proposed. This scheme is evaluated for four electric power stations in Southern California. The simple scheme was found lacking due to the inability to reasonably estimate both the hourly emission rates from annual averages and hourly concentrations from annual concentrations. The need for the acute risk measure for stack emission can be questioned based on the more detailed risk assessments performed in California.

  16. Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUCKFELDT, R.A.

    1999-02-24

    In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

  17. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 81-278-1371, Warrick Generating Station, Yankeetown, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zey, J.N.; Donohue, M.

    1983-09-01

    Environmental samples were collected to evaluate employee exposures to airborne concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, coal dust, fly ash, crystalline silica, and inorganic metals. In addition, gas leaks from the boilers were evaluated. While the majority of personal samples were below current criteria, a health hazard did exist for some employees exposed to sulfur dioxide, coal dust, and crystalline silica. Highest concentrations were obtained on samples worn by electrical and maintenance personnel and employees working on the positive pressure boiler (unit 4). In addition, the potential exists for employee exposure to boiler gases due to boiler leaks. Respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm production, and wheezing were twice the expected rate for this group of workers. If preventive maintenance and engineering measures are employed, the occurrence of continued group health effects will likely be reduced. Recommendations are made in the body of the full report for an improved respiratory protection program, reducing leaks from boiler units, and for periodic environmental monitoring of the employees.

  18. WIPP Recertification - An Environmental Evaluation Group Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, L. E.; Silva, M. K.

    2003-02-25

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for defense transuranic (TRU) waste, was built and is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) required initial certification of compliance of the WIPP by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, a recertification decision is required by the LWA every five years, dated from the initial receipt of TRU waste. The first TRU waste shipment arrived at the WIPP on March 26, 1999, and therefore the first recertification application is due from DOE to EPA by March 25, 2004. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) provides technical oversight of the WIPP project on behalf of the State of New Mexico. The EEG considers the first recertification as a precedent setting event. Therefore, the EEG began the identification of recertification issues immediately following the initial certification decision. These issues have evolved since that time, based on discussions with the DOE and EEG's understanding of DOE's ongoing research. Performance assessment is required by the EPA certification and its results are needed to determine whether the facility remains in compliance at the time of the recertification application. The DOE must submit periodic change reports to the EPA which summarize activities and conditions that differ from the compliance application. Also, the EPA may request additional information from the DOE that may pertain to continued compliance. These changes and new information must be considered for recertification performance assessment.

  19. An evaluation of the effectiveness of lead paint hazard reduction when conducted by homeowners and landlords

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etre, L.A.; Reynolds, S.J.; Burmeister, L.F.; Whitten, P.S.; Gergely, R.

    1999-08-01

    This research project was conducted in collaboration with the Iowa Department of Public Health to evaluate whether property owners who follow recommended procedures for lead-based paint removal/repair can do the work safely and effectively. This study included 29 homes where a lead-based paint hazard had been identified and lead-based paint was removed or repaired (hazard reduction). Exposure evaluation included pre-project surface dust wipe sampling, air monitoring during lead-based paint removal, post-project surface dust wipe sampling, and pre- and post-project blood samples from adult study participants. The comparison of surface dust wipe samples taken before and after lead paint hazard reduction was used to evaluate the effectiveness of lead paint hazard reduction. The lead loadings on window sill surfaces in the work area were significantly lower after completion of the project, and the lead-based paint removal did not contaminate the adjoining living area. The proportion of homes with surface dust lead loading exceeding Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance standard was 73% pre-project and 38% post-project. Personal airborne exposures during lead removal activities reinforce the need to respiratory protection and good hygiene. There was no difference in adult pre-/post-blood levels, indicating that participants die remove lead in a safe manner with respect to their own exposures. The results indicate that hazard reduction can be done effectively when recommended procedures for the removal of lead-based paint are followed.

  20. Natural phenomena hazards evaluation of equipment and piping of Gaseous Diffusion Plant Uranium Enrichment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singhal, M.K.; Kincaid, J.H.; Hammond, C.R.; Stockdale, B.I.; Walls, J.C.; Brock, W.R.; Denton, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    In support of the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report Upgrade program (GDP SARUP), a natural phenomena hazards evaluation was performed for the main process equipment and piping in the uranium enrichment buildings at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants. In order to reduce the cost of rigorous analyses, the evaluation methodology utilized a graded approach based on an experience data base collected by SQUG/EPRI that contains information on the performance of industrial equipment and piping during past earthquakes. This method consisted of a screening walkthrough of the facility in combination with the use of engineering judgment and simple calculations. By using these screenings combined with evaluations that contain decreasing conservatism, reductions in the time and cost of the analyses were significant. A team of experienced seismic engineers who were trained in the use of the DOE SQUG/EPRI Walkdown Screening Material was essential to the success of this natural phenomena hazards evaluation.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

    1991-11-01

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, project director, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Morton Salt Company (SIC-1479), Weeks Island, Louisiana. At Weeks Island the salt was mined from large domes, circular in shape and from a few hundred yards to a mile across. The only detectable overexposures in the mining operation were to coal-tar pitch volatiles. None of the 20 personal breathing zone and area air samples collected in the mill were above detectable limits for asbestos (1332214). The prevalences of chronic cough and chronic phlegm reported were statistically different, exceeding those reported by a group of nonexposed blue collar workers. Chronic symptoms were reported by underground workers in all smoking categories, but only by those surface workers who also smoked. There were more complaints about eye irritation and tearing of the eyes in the underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Four workers were identified through pulmonary function test results with mild obstructive lung disease and one with moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were noted. None of the 61 chest films taken read positively for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that overexposures to coal-tar pitch volatiles existed at the time of the survey. The authors recommend measures for reducing occupational exposures to workplace contaminants. A follow up medical questionnaire survey should be conducted.

  2. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  3. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, Jagdish C

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  4. Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.; Shinn, J.; Hesse, D; Kaninich, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mubayi, V.

    1997-08-01

    The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.

  5. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  6. Displaying and evaluating engineering properties and natural hazards using geomorphic mapping techniques: Telluride, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, I.; Giardino, J.R.; Tchakerian, V.P. . Geography Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Telluride, located in the San Juan mountains of southwestern Colorado, is situated in a glacially carved, fluvially modified alpine valley. Today this chic setting is experiencing rapid urban development resulting from flourishing tourist traffic during both the winter ski season and the summer vacation period. A new development, Mountain Village, is being built on an extensive and complex landslide that has only received superficial scrutiny. Recent fast growth is placing considerable pressure on pristine, undeveloped land. This timely quandary incorporates the interaction between prospective development, geomorphic processes, engineering factors, economic feasibility, and landuse adjudication. In an attempt to respond to these issues the State of Colorado enacted Senate Bill 35 (1972) and House Bills 1034 (1974) and 1041 (1974), all mandating assessment of the natural hazards of an area, preparatory to development. The key to evaluating the natural hazards is to comprehend the geomorphic processes. The area is highly-faulted with associated mineralization. Whereas the upper slopes are composed of massive rhyodacitic-tuff breccias and flows, the valley is sculpted from shales, sandstones, and conglomerates. Several periods of glaciation occurred in the area. Glacial till, talus slopes, avalanche chutes and cones, rock glaciers, alluvium, and landslides have been identified in the field and mapped on aerial photographs. Many of the slopes in the area are active. The authors have constructed a geomorphic map (1:12,500) that shows geology, landforms, geomorphic processes and engineering properties. This map can be used by regulatory agencies in identifying areas of natural hazards potentially sensitive to development.

  7. Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0-2002 January 2002 Superseding DOE-STD-1020-94 April 1994 DOE STANDARD NATURAL PHENOMENA HAZARDS DESIGN AND EVALUATION CRITERIA FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA NPHZ Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375,

  8. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-484-1754, Detroit Fire Fighters, Detroit, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters on behalf of the Detroit Fire Fighters Association, Detroit, Michigan, a health hazard evaluation was made of respiratory symptoms and skin irritation in fire fighters involved in a large fire and explosion at a warehouse. Over 200 fire fighters from fire-fighting organizations in three communities were involved in the incident. Site runoff water contained chlordane and malathion in low parts per million; other samples were negative. Nose and throat irritation, cough, and shortness of breath were experienced by a large proportion of fire fighters following the fire, and in 14, 15, and 17 percent, respectively, symptoms persisted over 2 months. Symptoms were significantly associated with time spent at the scene and time spent in heavy smoke. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 14 cases, ten due to obstructive lung disease, three to restrictive lung disease, and one to a combination. The authors conclude that better protective equipment is needed for fire fighters at chemical fires. Recommendations include development of a hazardous-materials response team, and implementation of a routine medical surveillance program.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

    1989-02-01

    A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

  10. Stormwater runoff water quality evaluation and management program for hazardous chemical sites: Development issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G.F.; Jones-Lee, A.

    1998-12-31

    The deficiencies in the typical stormwater runoff water quality monitoring from hazardous chemical sites and an alternative approach (Evaluation Monitoring) for monitoring that shifts the monitoring program from periodic sampling and analysis of stormwater runoff for a suite of chemical parameters to examining the receiving waters to determine what, if any, water quality use impairments are occurring due to the runoff-associated constituents is presented in this paper. Rather than measuring potentially toxic constituents such as heavy metals in runoff, the monitoring program determines whether there is aquatic life toxicity in the receiving waters associated with the stormwater runoff. If toxicity is found, its cause is determined and the source of the constituents causing the toxicity is identified through forensic analysis. Based on this information, site-specific, technically valid stormwater runoff management programs can be developed that will control real water quality impacts caused by stormwater runoff-associated constituents.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-232-2138, Schulte Corporation, Cincinnati, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venable, H.L.; Kawamoto, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    In response to a confidential request from employees of the Schulte Corporation (SIC-3496), Cincinnati, Ohio, an evaluation was undertaken of complaints of chest tightness, itching, metallic taste in the mouth, and discharge of black dust from the noses of workers in the machine shop of the facility. The facility was involved in the manufacturing and shipping of epoxy coated steel wire shelving. Total dust samples taken in the breathing zone of the workers ranged from 0.49 to 4.78mg/cu m, well below the permissible limits. Respirable dust samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.43mg/cu m. Exposures to nitrogen oxides were well below acceptable limits. Aldehydes were not detected in samples evaluating exposure to two resistance welders. The NIOSH ceiling level of 0.1 part per million for ozone (10028156) was exceeded near welders. Six workers interviewed reported symptoms including black nasal discharge, headaches, sore throat, cough, hoarseness of voice, metallic taste and chest tightness. There was a potential ergonomic problem due to repetitive wrist motion. The authors conclude that a potential hazard from ozone exposure existed. The authors recommend measures to reduce exposures and development of a program for the prevention of cumulative trauma.

  12. Hazard evaluation for cutting tank 241-A-101 salt well casing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Board, B.D.

    1997-01-10

    This document identifies the hazards of using an abrasive water jet to add perforations to the salt well screen in tank 241-A-101.

  13. Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) at Rocky Flats Plant: An overview of practical management issues for evaluation of natural phenomena hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badwan, F.M.; Herring, K.S.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the buildings at the Rocky Flats Plant were designed and built before modern standards were developed, including standards for protection against extreme natural phenomenon such as tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods. The purpose of the SEP is to establish an integrated approach to assessing the design adequacy of specific high and moderate hazard Rocky Flats facilities from a safety perspective and to establish a basis for defining any needed facility improvements. The SEP is to be carried out in three Phases. In Phase 1, topics to be evaluated and an evaluation plan for each topic were developed. Any differences between Current Design Requirements (CDR) or acceptance criteria and the design of existing facilities, will be identified during Phase 2 and assessed using an integrated systematic approach during Phase 3. The integrated assessment performed during Phase 3 provides a process for evaluating the differences between existing facility design and CDRs so that decisions on corrective actions can be made on the basis of relative risk reduction and cost effectiveness. These efforts will ensure that a balanced and integrated level of safety is achieved for long-term operation of these buildings. Through appropriate selection of topics and identification of the structures, systems, and components to be evaluated, the SEP will address outstanding design issues related to the prevention and mitigation of design basis accidents, including those arising from natural phenomena. The objective of the SEP is not to bring these buildings into strict compliance with current requirements, but rather to ensure that an adequate level of safety is achieved in an economical fashion.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-033-1576, Airco Carbon, St. Marys, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartle, R.W.; Morawetz, J.S.

    1985-09-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total particulates, and respirable free silica at the Airco Company (SIC-3624), Saint Marys, Pennsylvania in January, 1984. The evaluation was requested confidentially because of concern over exposures to soot, coal tar pitch volatiles, and sand in the car bottom and sagger bake operations. Forty-three employees were interviewed. Two of 19 total particulate samples exceeded the OSHA standard of 15 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), 17.3 and 32.7 mg/m3. Benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 mg/m3. The OSHA standard for benzene soluble fractions is 0.2 mg/m3. Two of seven samples of silica were above the limit of detection, 0.09 and 0.06 mg/m3. In bulk samples, the benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.44 to 860 mg/gram and the PAH content from 0 to 26,124 micrograms per gram. Employees working in the bake areas reported a significant excess incidence of symptoms such as skin, nose and eye irritation, cough, sore or dry throat, chest tightness, and breathing difficulty. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists at the facility. Recommendations include enclosing vehicles used in moving electrodes, cleaning up spilled dust, and controlling fumes emitted from the sagger kilns.

  15. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.A.; Lipscomb, J.A.; Neumeister, C.E.

    1986-04-01

    An evaluation of environmental conditions and possible health effects among workers exposed to coke dust was conducted. Personal breathing-zone (PBZ) concentrations of total airborne dust ranged from 0.1 to 12 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3) with a median of 1.6 mg/m3; mass median particle diameter was about 8 micrometers. Very high PBZ concentrations of coke dust occurred during a semimonthly cleanup of underground coke pits; levels ranged from 98 to 190mg/m3 with a mean of 140mg/m3. Oil mists were not detected. Exposures to polynuclear aromatic compounds were below the analytical limit of detection among workers for routine jobs. Abnormal pulmonary function tests were found in 12% of those tested. Five cases of chronic bronchitis and seven of chronic cough, 10 and 13% respectively, were identified among those interviewed. The authors conclude that there were potentially hazardous exposures to high dust levels during semimonthly coke-pit cleaning jobs.

  16. Preliminary evaluation of non-hazardous explosives for security training and testing (NESTT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, G.L.; Pruneda, C.O.; Simpson, R.L.; Kury, J.W.; Dumais, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    A series of materials has been prepared that have authentic properties of explosives but are non-hazardous. These NESTT materials are prepared by coating a few micron layer of an explosive on a non-reactive substrate. This produces a formulation with an authentic vapor signature. Authentic x-ray and oxygen/nitrogen density signatures can also be obtained through the appropriate choice of substrate. Sensitivity tests on the materials made to date show that they are non-hazardous. One such material is now in use for canine training at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. The evaluation of an analytical protocol for the determination of substances in waste for hazard classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennebert, Pierre; Papin, Arnaud; Padox, Jean-Marie; Hasebrouck, Benoît

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Knowledge of wastes in substances will be necessary to assess HP1–HP15 hazard properties. • A new analytical protocol is proposed for this and tested by two service laboratories on 32 samples. • Sixty-three percentage of the samples have a satisfactory analytical balance between 90% and 110%. • Eighty-four percentage of the samples were classified identically (Seveso Directive) for their hazardousness by the two laboratories. • The method, in progress, is being normalized in France and is be proposed to CEN. - Abstract: The classification of waste as hazardous could soon be assessed in Europe using largely the hazard properties of its constituents, according to the the Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) regulation. Comprehensive knowledge of the component constituents of a given waste will therefore be necessary. An analytical protocol for determining waste composition is proposed, which includes using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) screening methods to identify major elements and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS) screening techniques to measure organic compounds. The method includes a gross or indicator measure of ‘pools’ of higher molecular weight organic substances that are taken to be less bioactive and less hazardous, and of unresolved ‘mass’ during the chromatography of volatile and semi-volatile compounds. The concentration of some elements and specific compounds that are linked to specific hazard properties and are subject to specific regulation (examples include: heavy metals, chromium(VI), cyanides, organo-halogens, and PCBs) are determined by classical quantitative analysis. To check the consistency of the analysis, the sum of the concentrations (including unresolved ‘pools’) should give a mass balance between 90% and 110%. Thirty-two laboratory samples comprising different industrial wastes (liquids and solids) were tested by two routine service laboratories, to give circa 7000 parameter results. Despite discrepancies in some parameters, a satisfactory sum of estimated or measured concentrations (analytical balance) of 90% was reached for 20 samples (63% of the overall total) during this first test exercise, with identified reasons for most of the unsatisfactory results. Regular use of this protocol (which is now included in the French legislation) has enabled service laboratories to reach a 90% mass balance for nearly all the solid samples tested, and most of liquid samples (difficulties were caused in some samples from polymers in solution and vegetable oil). The protocol is submitted to French and European normalization bodies (AFNOR and CEN) and further improvements are awaited.

  18. Evaluation of bulk paint worker exposure to solvents at household hazardous waste collection events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, M.

    1995-09-01

    In fiscal year 93/94, over 250 governmental agencies were involved in the collection of household hazardous wastes in the State of California. During that time, over 3,237,000 lbs. of oil based paint were collected in 9,640 drums. Most of this was in lab pack drums, which can only hold up to 20 one gallon cans. Cost for disposal of such drums is approximately $1000. In contrast, during the same year, 1,228,000 lbs. of flammable liquid were collected in 2,098 drums in bulk form. Incineration of bulked flammable liquids is approximately $135 per drum. Clearly, it is most cost effective to bulk flammable liquids at household hazardous waste events. Currently, this is the procedure used at most Temporary Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facilities (THHWCFs). THHWCFs are regulated by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) under the new Permit-by Rule Regulations. These regulations specify certain requirements regarding traffic flow, emergency response notifications and prevention of exposure to the public. The regulations require that THHWCF operators bulk wastes only when the public is not present. [22 CCR, section 67450.4 (e) (2) (A)].Santa Clara County Environmental Health Department sponsors local THHWCF`s and does it`s own bulking. In order to save time and money, a variance from the regulation was requested and an employee monitoring program was initiated to determine actual exposure to workers. Results are presented.

  19. Evaluations in support of regulatory and research decisions by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency for the control of toxic hazards from hazardous wastes, glyphosate, dalapon, and synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scofield, R.

    1984-01-01

    This report includes toxicological and regulatory evaluations performed in support of U.S. EPA regulation of toxic materials and hazardous wastes. The first section of the report describes evaluations which support: (a) the regulation of small-volume generators of hazardous wastes, (b) the regulation of hazardous wastes from pesticide manufacturing, and (c) the disposal of the herbicide, silvex. The second section describes the environmental fate, transport, and effect of glyphosate and dalapon. The third section deals with synthetic fuels, including evaluations of synfuel-product toxicity, uncontrolled air emissions, and particular focus on the toxicity of products from several indirect coal liquefaction processes including methanol synthesis, Fischer-Tropsch, Mobil M-Gasoline, and Lurgi gasification technologies. Three direct coal liquefaction processes were examined for product toxicity and air emissions: Solvent Refined Coal (I and II) and the Exxon Donor Solvent Process. Also described in the third section is an evaluation of environmental and health hazards associated with the use of synthetic fuels from indirect coal liquefaction, direct coal liquefaction, and shale oil. Finally, the fourth section discusses some problems associated with performing, on a contractual basis, scientific and technical evaluations in support of U.S. EPA regulatory and research decisions.

  20. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  1. Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M.

    2008-07-08

    A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

  2. Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HHA-80-238-931, new York Port Authority, Brooklyn, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.; Fannick, N.

    1981-08-01

    In August 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a Health Hazard Evaluation from the Carpenters Union, Local 1456, AFL-CIO, to evaluate coal tar creosote exposure among dock builders. Specifically, the request concerned six employees engaged in pile-driving creosote-preserved wood logs for a dock underpinning in Brooklyn, New York. NIOSH concluded that coal tar products, including creosote, are carcinogenic (have the potential to cause cancer). Inhalation of CTPVs may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Direct skin contact with creosote causes acute irritation and can lead to the development of skin tumors, including skin cancer. Recommendations on personal protection and hygiene, respirator usage, and medical monitoring are presented.

  3. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, P.

    1985-08-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

  5. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 79-034-1440, Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salisbury, S.

    1984-03-01

    In response to a request from the president of the United Rubber Workers, Local 759, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the Hatco Plastics Division, Currently known as Intex Plastics, Corinth, Mississippi. The request indicated that several production and maintenance employees at that site had been disabled due to chemical poisoining and related illnesses. A medical survey was begun at the facility in March of 1979. Fifty employees participated by completing a questionnaire. A high prevalence of eye, nose, and throat irritation was found along with shortness of breath, cough, and skin rash among workers assigned to the Calender, Color, and Laminating Departments. Air sampling was performed in several departments. Except for methyl-ethyl-ketone (MEK), the levels of substances detected were quite low. The department with the highest exposure to airborne contaminants included the Print Service with 36 to 299 parts per million (ppm) MEK, laminating at 74 to 105ppm MEK, printing at 15 to 113ppm MEK, color at 15 to 24ppm MEK, premix at 0.3 to 6.8mg/cu m total dust, and calender at 0.1 to 0.6mg/cu m total dust.

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 85-226-1839, Freshlabs, Inc. , Warren, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, W.T.; Ferguson, R.P.

    1987-08-01

    In response to a request from workers at the Freshlabs vitamin manufacturing facility located in Warren, Michigan, a study was made of dust exposures, with specific attention to asbestos in ceiling insulation. Over half of all workers (about 70) reported watery itchy eyes, sneezing, or runny stuff noses. Symptoms of skin rashes, cough, chest tightness, and shortness of breath were also reported throughout the facility. Dust concentrations were highest in the composition area, where all workers experienced irritation of eyes, nose, and throat, and a few developed occupational asthma confirmed by company physicians. Workers were exposed to several vitamin products which were irritating to eyes and nasal and respiratory mucosa because of acidity. Some workers became hypersensitive to dusts due to protein and polysaccharide contents. Most samples showed total and respirable dust measurements well below Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limits for nuisance dusts. However, these are not common nuisance dust components. The authors suggest that the limits provide little protection for average workers exposed to such dusts. Asbestos sampling revealed potential hazard from falling insulation. Recommendations pertaining to local exhaust hoods, amended work practices, use of personal dust respirators, avoidance of skin contact, and proper ceiling insulation are offered.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-338-2187, IMC Corporation, Sterlington, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiefer, M.; Tepper, A.; Miller, R.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from an authorized representative of the Construction and General Laborers Union, Local 762, an investigation was made of potential hazards for asbestos abatement contract workers at IMC Corporation, (SIC-2869), Sterlington, Louisiana. The IMC facility consisted of two ammonia facilities, a nitroparaffin (NP) facility, and a NP derivatives facility. An explosion occurred on May 1, 1991 in the NP facility, caused by a faulty compressor. During the post explosion renovation activities, an asbestos abatement firm was working on site due to the large amounts of asbestos (1332214) insulation which had been disturbed by the explosion. Records indicated that several workers complained of ill effects and odors on June 17 and 19. The incidents were investigated but no chemical exposure explanation was found. Routine and complaint based industrial hygiene monitoring was primarily area monitoring and not substance specific. Of the 25 workers interviewed, 22 had symptoms they felt were related to their work at IMC. The symptoms included those of the upper respiratory tract, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. The most common included diarrhea, nausea, headache, dizziness, and cough, each experienced by significantly more than half the subjects. The symptoms could not be linked conclusively to any specific chemical release, job task, work location, or food or drink source.

  8. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvain, D.C.

    1996-10-01

    In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-066-1883, Artesian Industries, Mansfield, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, M.S.; Singal, M.; Anastas, M.Y.

    1988-03-01

    In response to a request from workers at Artesian Industries, Mansfield, Ohio, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions. Workers were experiencing lightheadedness, shortness of breath, fainting, lung problems, and skin rashes. For 86 air samples taken, respirable crystalline silica personal exposures averaged 0.12 mg/cu m (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL) for respirable crystalline silica, 0.05 mg/cu m); 38 of the samples exceeded the REL. All samples from the slip houses exceeded the NIOSH REL. The 18 samples taken in the casting area indicated that the average exposure limit was 0.06 mg/cu m, with eight samples exceeding the NIOSH REL. In the dry-finishing area 18 samples showed an average respirable silica concentration of 0.11 mg/cu m. Exposure to talc averaged 2.7 mg/cu m in the casting areas for 38 samples. Symptoms of chronic cough were noted in 20%, chronic bronchitis in 5%, and shortness of breath in 31% of the workers. Of 196 chest x-rays examined, 18 exhibited evidence of asbestos or talc exposure; five had symptoms of silicosis. The authors conclude that there is a serious, extensive problem regarding exposures to respirable silica and respirable talc dust.

  10. Health hazard evaluation report HETA-95-0393-2633, Clinch River Power Plant, Cleveland, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattorano, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    In response to a request fromm the Building and Construction Trades Department oof the AFL-CIO, an investigation was begun into possible exposures during rebuilding of coal fired boilers at the Clinch River Power Plant (SIC-4911), Cleveland, Virginia. During the sampling period, boilermakers removed secondary inlet and secondary outlet boiler elements and removed and replaced portions of the steel boiler casting, exposing them to fly ash and fumes from air arc gouging, welding, and torch cutting. Laborers maintained the walkways and prepared work areas using sweeping and vacuuming techniques, primarily exposing them to fly ash. The highest personal breathing zone (PBZ) air sample concentrations of arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, nickel, lead, and respirable dust occurred when boilermakers performed job tasks inside the boiler and outside the boiler on the steel boiler casing. Air arc gouging, welding, oxyacetylene torch cutting, or grinding on or near the scale greatly increased the potential for the generation of airborne particles. Cristobalite was found in one PBZ sampel at 0.03mg/m3. The author concludes that there appears to be a potential for a health hazard at job sites where similar activities take place. The author recommends lowering worker exposures through the use of engineering controls and improvements in housekeeping procedures.

  11. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  12. Performance evaluation of the quarter-scale Russian retrieval equipment for the removal of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enderlin, C.W.; Mullen, O.D.; Terrones, G.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the test program for evaluating the Russian Retrieval Equipment fabricated by the Integrated Mining Chemical Company (IMCC) and delivered to the US by Radiochem Services Company (RCSC), both of Russia. The testing and fabrication of this equipment were sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests described in this report were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the DOE Hanford Site by the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (RPD and E) team of the Tank Focus Area program (TFA). Tests were carried out jointly by Russian and US personnel for the purpose of evaluating the Russian Retrieval Equipment for potential deployment within the DOE complex. Section 1.0 of this report presents the objectives and a brief background for the test program. The Russian Equipment is described in Section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the approach taken for testing the equipment. The results of the tests and an analysis of the data are described in Section 4.0. The results and observations obtained from the tests are discussed in Section 5.0. Recommendations and conclusions are presented in Section 6.0.

  13. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 85-030-1693, Fruehauf Corporation - Parts Plant, Delphos, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, R.; Ehrenberg, R.; Hunninen, K.

    1986-06-01

    A request was received from union and management at the Fruehauf Corporations Parts Facility in Delphos, Ohio to evaluate possible exposures to total welding fume, metals, carbon-monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and ozone during welding operations. Total welding fume concentrations in 32 personal breathing zone samples ranged from 1.5 to 23.4 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m/sup 3/). Nine area samples ranged from 0.4 to 3.7mg/m/sup 3/. Three sample results exceeded OSHA standard of 15mg/m/sup 3/. Iron was the predominant metal found. Measurable quantities of aluminum, chromium, copper, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, tin, and vanadium were found. Results of a questionnaire, given to 33 of the 92 welders, indicated a relatively high prevalence of reported symptoms of mucous membrane and respiratory tract irritation, including eye irritation, sinus/nasal congestion, headaches, throat irritation and cough.

  14. Supplemental Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment - Hydrotreater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-04-01

    A supplemental hazard analysis was conducted and quantitative risk assessment performed in response to an independent review comment received by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from the U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest Field Office (PNSO) against the Hydrotreater/Distillation Column Hazard Analysis Report issued in April 2013. The supplemental analysis used the hazardous conditions documented by the previous April 2013 report as a basis. The conditions were screened and grouped for the purpose of identifying whether additional prudent, practical hazard controls could be identified, using a quantitative risk evaluation to assess the adequacy of the controls and establish a lower level of concern for the likelihood of potential serious accidents. Calculations were performed to support conclusions where necessary.

  15. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-449-1778, Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, M.

    1987-02-01

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union an evaluation was made of respiratory problems among workers at the Agrico Chemical Company, Pierce, Florida, which closed in 1979. Specific concern had been expressed regarding exposures to silica, coke, and asbestos. Of 108 persons participating in the study, 91 had worked at the elemental phosphorus facility (EP). Of 88 participants who had ten or more years in the phosphate industry, the 36 workers with ten or more years in the EP facility were no more likely to have chronic cough, shortness of breath, abnormal lung sounds on physical examination, pulmonary function impairment, or x-ray signs of fibrogenic dust exposure than those with less than 10 years exposure. Those working longer than 10 years in the EP facility had numerically higher prevalence of chronic bronchitis and chronic wheeze, but the differences were not statistically significant. The author concludes that no association between health and time at the EP facility could be discerned from the available data, although it is possible that the study participants were not representative of all former facility workers.

  17. Evaluation of prospective hazardous waste treatment technologies for use in processing low-level mixed wastes at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGlochlin, S.C.; Harder, R.V.; Jensen, R.T.; Pettis, S.A.; Roggenthen, D.K.

    1990-09-18

    Several technologies for destroying or decontaminating hazardous wastes were evaluated (during early 1988) as potential processes for treating low-level mixed wastes destined for destruction in the Fluidized Bed Incinerator. The processes that showed promise were retained for further consideration and placed into one (or more) of three categories based on projected availability: short, intermediate, and long-term. Three potential short-term options were identified for managing low-level mixed wastes generated or stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (operated by Rockwell International in 1988). These options are: (1) Continue storing at Rocky Flats, (2) Ship to Nevada Test Site for landfill disposal, or (3) Ship to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for incineration in the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. The third option is preferable because the wastes will be destroyed. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has received interim status for processing solid and liquid low-level mixed wastes. However, low-level mixed wastes will continue to be stored at Rocky Flats until the Department of Energy approval is received to ship to the Nevada Test Site or Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Potential intermediate and long-term processes were identified; however, these processes should be combined into complete waste treatment systems'' that may serve as alternatives to the Fluidized Bed Incinerator. Waste treatment systems will be the subject of later work. 59 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-273-1928, Mid-America Dairymen, Inc. , Monett, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Cantor, F.L.; Anastas, M.Y.

    1988-09-01

    In response to a request from management at Mid-America Dairymen, Inc., located in Monett, Missouri, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at this site. Five workers had become ill with respiratory complaints between August of 1985 and March of 1986. Symptoms included dry cough, chest tightness, fatigue, shortness of breath, and weight loss. Of six full-time employees in the electrodialysis (ED) stack maintenance department, four were diagnosed with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). One worker among 12 in the cheese finishing department was diagnosed with asthma. The two-story facility employs about 75 workers in the production of cheese curd, whey protein, and powdered milk. The study was not able to identify a specific agent or antigen responsible for the illnesses; however, there was a clear association in time and place between cleaning stacks of electrodialysis membranes and the HP in four workers diagnosed with the disease. Stacks of ED membranes waiting to be cleaned can provide an ideal growth medium for microbiological species. The authors recommend that engineering and work practice changes be introduced.

  19. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 89-009-1990, Consolidation Coal Company, Humphrey No. 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kullman, G.J.

    1989-09-01

    An evaluation was made of worker exposure to hydraulic fluid used on the longwall-mining operations at Consolidated Coal Company's Humphrey Number 7 Mine, Pentress, West Virginia. Employees were complaining of headache, eye and throat irritation, congestion, and cough. A particular emulsion oil, Solcenic-3A, was used with water in the mine's hydraulic roof-support system. An analysis of the oil indicated the presence of methyl-isobutyl-carbinol (MIBC), dipropylene glycol, and paraffin hydrocarbons. Personal breathing-zone samples for MIBC were collected from all workers on the longwall mining operation during the two days of the visit. All the analysis indicated concentrations of MIBC below the limit of quantification, which was 0.6 parts per million for an 8 hour sample. These levels were well below the exposure recommendations of the Mine Safety and Health Administration. Exposure to MIBC may be occurring through skin contact with oil through hydraulic line leaks, accidents, and maintenance activity on the hydraulic machines. The report concludes that Solcenic-3A oil constituents in air did not pose a health hazard at the time of the survey.

  20. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-070-2181, HUD Lead-Based Paint Abatement Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussell, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Officer for Policy Development and Research, an investigation was made into possible hazardous working conditions during the HUD Lead Based Paint Abatement Demonstration (SIC-1521). The demonstration took place in 172 vacant housing units in several different cities. The abatement methods used included abrasive removal, chemical removal, heat gun removal, encapsulation, enclosure, and replacement. Evaluations were made during the demonstrations and it was determined that the workers were exposed to lead (7439921) with the highest exposure levels coming during the heat gun method of removal. Exposures to volatile organic compounds were low. Maximum personal and general area airborne lead concentrations were 916 micrograms/cubic meter and 1296 micrograms/cubic meter, respectively. Soil sampling indicated that lead paint abatement in some cases resulted in increases in soil lead levels 1 to 3 feet from the exterior walls. The author concludes that workers were potentially overexposed to lead during lead abatement. The author recommend specific measures concerning training, work practices, engineering controls, safety programs, risk assessment, respiratory protection programs, medical monitoring and surveillance.

  1. Achieving dust lead clearance standards after lead hazard control projects: An evaluation of the HUD-recommended cleaning procedure and an abbreviated alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, S. ); Tohn, E. ); Rupp, R. ); Clark, S. . Dept. of Environmental Health)

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD's) Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing strongly recommend that after lead hazard control interventions all walls, ceiling, floors, and other horizontal surfaces be cleaned using a three-step process to reduce lead-contaminated dust and debris. The three steps are: an initial vacuuming using a machine equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter (HEPA vacuum), wet wash with a lead cleaner, and a final HEPA vacuum. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two cleaning protocols: (1) the HUD-recommended three-step procedure, and (2) an abbreviated two-step cleaning procedure that omits the final HEPA vacuum. Cleaning procedures were evaluated in 27 dwelling units that had undergone significant lead hazard control interventions likely to produce lead dust. Dust lead samples were collected on floors and in window sills and troughs prior to the lead control hazard intervention, after the wet wash step of the cleaning procedure, and after completion of the second HEPA vacuuming. The results of the study demonstrate that dust lead surface loading on smooth and cleanable surfaces following the three-step and two-step cleaning procedures can achieve 1995 federal guidance dust clearance levels and levels substantially lower. Although the dust lead clearance rates before and after the second HEPA vacuum were the same, the time saved by omitting the second HEPA is small relative to the other elements of the cleaning process.

  2. Hazardous Location

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Hazardous (Classified) Location IDENTIFIER Y-2000-OR-BJCETTP-0101 DATE January 6, 2000 LESSONS LEARNED STATEMENT- Radios that were not certified as approved for Class I,...

  3. ORISE: Hazard Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazard Assessments The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) analyzes accumulated data to identify potential workplace hazards to which individuals or groups of workers may be exposed. ORISE assesses both chemical and radiation exposures, and conducts both internal and external radiation dose assessments. Our capabililities include: Linkage of exposure data to site rosters Assessment of retrospective exposures Preparation of assessment protocols Design and testing of dose

  4. Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

  5. Automated Job Hazards Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AJHA Program - The Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) computer program is part of an enhanced work planning process employed at the Department of Energy's Hanford worksite. The AJHA system is routinely used to performed evaluations for medium and high risk work, and in the development of corrective maintenance work packages at the site. The tool is designed to ensure that workers are fully involved in identifying the hazards, requirements, and controls associated with tasks.

  6. Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

  7. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0109-2494, Pan American Health Organization National Smelting Company, Oruro, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussell, A.; Singal, M.

    1995-03-01

    In response to a request from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), an investigation was begun into possible exposures to heavy metals and sulfur-dioxide at Empresa Metalurigica Vinto, a large tin smelter near Oruro, Bolivia. Fifteen workers were selected for exposure monitoring. Of the 15, 14 had exposures greater than the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit or the OSHA Permissible Exposure Level to arsentic; 11 had hazardous exposures to cadmium, and eight had hazardous exposures to sulfur-dioxide. Surfaces throughout the facility were highly contaminated with heavy metals. Fifteen workers participated in biological monitoring studies. The median value for urinary arsenic (UA) was 78 micrograms per gram creatinine. Nine of the 15 workers had UA levels exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Biological Exposure Index. The median blood lead level was 19 micrograms per deciliter.

  8. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Communications Topic Group was convened in April 1998 to improve internal and external strategic level communications regarding DOE shipments of radioactive and other hazardous materials.

  10. Development of candidate chemical simulant list: the evaluation of candidate chemical simulants which may be used in chemically hazardous operations. Final report 15 Jun-15 Dec 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The objectives of this task were threefold: (1) to provide additional data for the proposed candidate simulates dipentene, methyl benzoate and benzyl alcohol by means of in-depth literature searches encompassing both computerized data bases and a manual search of the older literature; (2) to fully evaluate twelve possible candidate simulants under more flexible simulant criteria; and (3) to develop a list of candidate simulants in the low and non-volatile categories. Computerized literature searches were conducted for the twelve possible candidate simulants under more flexible intake simulant criteria as well as for dimethyl methylphosphonate, a compound selected for evaluation by the USAF. The twelve possible candidates included: cyclohexanone, n-dodecanethiol, methyl salicylate, dihexyl ether, dypnone, n-aminopropyl morpholine, n-(2-hydroxyethyl) morpholine, butyl salicylate, di(2-ethyl hexyl) ether, 2-undecanol, 2-hydroxyethyl-n-octyl sulfide and n,n-diethyl-m-toluamide. Full assessments of the potential health hazards associated with exposure to n-dodecanethiol, methyl salicylate, butyl salicylate and n,n-diethyl-m-toluamide were completed. All of these compounds meet the majority of USAF criteria for candidate simulants. Cyclohexanone was disqualified for reasons of toxicity, while the available toxicological data for the seven remaining candidates were considered inadequate for full assessment of hazard.

  11. Health hazard evaluation report rdHETA 90-145-2086, Map International, Fairmont, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornwell, R.J.; Knutti, E.; Lyman, M.

    1990-11-01

    In response to a request from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, and Helpers of America, a study was conducted of possible hazardous working conditions at MAP International (SIC-3296), Fairmont, West Virginia. The facility manufactured fibrous-glass for thermal and acoustical insulation. Personal breathing zone samples and area air samples were taken and analyzed for exposure to fibrous-glass (14808607), formaldehyde (50000), phenol (108952), ammonia (7664417), and organic vapors. The levels detected were all below allowable standards. Workers were not following recommended safety and health procedures prescribed in the Material Safety Data Sheets for the materials they were using. The medical questionnaires indicated workers were experiencing symptoms consistent with exposure to fibrous-glass and the materials used in its production. Eye irritation, upper respiratory irritation, skin irritation, chronic cough, and shortness of breath were demonstrated. The author recommends specific measures to reduce exposures and improve work practices.

  12. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 88-391-2156, Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. (Revised April 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, R.P.; Knutti, E.B.

    1993-04-01

    In response to a request from the International Chemical Workers Union, an investigation was made of exposures to asbestos and diesel emissions at the Morton Salt Company, Weeks Island, Louisiana. The most significant source of particulates was diesel exhaust. None of the 20 personal breathing zone or area air samples collected in the mill exceeded limits for asbestos. An increased prevalence of chronic cough and phlegm was reported by workers. More complaints of eye irritation and tearing of the eyes were noted in underground workers, consistent with diesel byproduct exposure. Pulmonary function studies indicated that four workers had mild obstructive lung disease and one had moderate obstructive lung disease. Three workers with mild restriction of lung volume were also noted. None of the 61 chest films taken was positive for pneumoconiosis. The authors conclude that a potential hazard existed from exposure to diesel exhaust.

  13. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  14. Evaluating stress corrosion and corrosion aspects in supercritical water oxidation systems for the destruction of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitton, D.B.; Zhang, S.H.; Hautanen, K.E.; Cline, J.A.; Han, E.H.; Latanision, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    There is, currently, simultaneous public resistance to traditional waste handling procedures and a compelling need to destroy both military and civilian hazardous waste. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is one developing technology particularly appropriate for treating a broad range of dilute aqueous organic wastes. Above its critical point (374 C and 221 atm) water is a low density fluid possessing properties intermediate between those of a liquid and a gas, and solvation characteristics more typical of a low polarity organic than water. Although this is a promising technology, a critical issue in its development will be the ability to overcome severe degradation problems of the materials of construction. While titanium and platinum liners have shown promise for some hazardous military feed streams, costs are high. Although nickel alloys are considered important for severe service, the indication is that they will not survive certain SCWO environments. Nevertheless, there is evidence that judicious feed modification may be employed to mitigate corrosion and reduce fabrication cost. Exposure studies have been accomplished for various alloys over a range of temperatures from 300--600 C. Experiments have been carried out in environments as innocuous as deionized water and as aggressive as highly chlorinated aqueous organic feed streams. Analysis of a number of failed components has provided enlightenment on degradation mechanisms and cracking, pitting and elevated corrosion rates are all observed in these systems. For chlorinated feed streams, both dealloying and cracking have been observed for alloy C-276. Samples exposed to a highly chlorinated organic indicate that the high-nickel alloys behave significantly better at 600 C than stainless steel type 316.

  15. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining candidates, those of glass-ceramics (devitrified matrices) represent the best compromise for meeting the probable stricter disposal requirements in the future.

  16. Extractive industries and sustainable development: an evaluation of World Bank Group experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andres Liebenthal; Roland Michelitsch; Ethel Tarazona

    2005-07-01

    How effectively has the World Bank Group assisted its clients in enhancing the contribution of the extractive industries to sustainable development? (Extractive industries include oil, gas, and mining of minerals including coals and metals.) This evaluation finds that with its global mandate and experience, comprehensive country development focus, and overarching mission to fight poverty, the World Bank Group is well positioned to help countries overcome the policy, institutional, and technical challenges that prevent them from transforming resource endowments into sustainable benefits. Furthermore, the World Bank Group's achievements are many. On the whole, its extractive industries projects have produced positive economic and financial results, though compliance with its environmental and social safeguards remains a challenge. Its research has broadened and deepened understanding of the causes for the disappointing performance of resource-rich countries. Its guidelines for the mitigation of adverse environmental and social impacts have been widely used and appreciated. More recently, it has begun to address the challenge of country governance with a variety of instruments. The World Bank Group can, however, do much to improve its performance in enhancing the extractive industry sector's contribution to sustainable development and poverty reduction. The report identifies three main areas for improvement - formulating an integrated strategy, strengthening implementation and engagement of stakeholders. 5 annexes.

  17. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  18. Hazard Class Category

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Material sample holder catalog 01/05/2015 Hazard Class Category Containment # 3 Layer containment for Very High and High Radiotoxicity (Group 1 and 2) 1.a LBNL Lexan or aluminum sample holder with kapton tape surrounded by 2 each individual heat sealed plastic bag. Layer 1- Kapton Tape, sealed Layer 2- Heat sealed plastic bag Layer 3- Heat sealed plastic bag Physical Approvals: Ambient temperature 1.b LANL cryostat sample holder Sample holder with kapton windows and indium seam Layer

  19. Hazards Control, 3/9/35

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and...

  20. Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

  1. Evaluation of innovative volatile organic compound and hazardous air-pollutant-control technologies for U. S. Air Force paint spray booths. Final report, Aug 88-Aug 89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritts, D.H.; Garretson, C.; Hyde, C.; Lorelli, J.; Wolbach, C.D.

    1990-10-01

    Significant quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants are released into the atmosphere during USAF maintenance operations. Painting operations conducted in paint spray booths are major sources of these pollutants. Solvent based epoxy primers and solvent-based polyurethane coatings are typically used by the Air Force for painting aircraft and associated equipment. Solvents used in these paints include methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene, lacquer thinner, and other solvents involved in painting and component cleaning. In this report, carbon paper adsorption/catalytic incineration (CPACI) and fluidized-bed catalytic incineration (FBCI) were evaluated as control technologies to destroy VOC emissions from paint spray booths. Simultaneous testing of pilot-scale units was performed to evaluate the technical performance of both technologies. Results showed that each technology maintained greater than 99 percent Destruction and Removal Efficiencies (DREs). Particulate emissions from both pilot-scale units were less than 0.08 grains/dry standard cubic foot. Emissions of the criteria pollutants--sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide--were also below general regulatory standards for incinerators. Economic evaluations were based on a compilation of manufacturer-supplied data and energy consuption data gathered during the pilot scale testing. CPACM and FBCI technologies are less expensive than standard VOC control technologies when net present costs for a 15-year equipment life are compared.

  2. Tank farms hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  3. Fire Hazards Listing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazards Listing Fire Hazards Listing Focusing on fire prevention and protection. Contact Fire Management Officer Manuel J. L'Esperance Emergency Management (505) 667-1692 Email Currently reported fire hazards Below are the currently reported fire hazards. The list is updated each day by the close of business. Current fire hazards Hazard Description Date Submitted Status No hazards currently reported. Legend: R=Resolved, P=Pending, NAR=No Action Required

  4. Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

    1990-10-01

    Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-04-15

    This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

  6. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-375-1861, International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), Los Angeles, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters, a study was made of possible toxic exposures experienced by fire fighters from the Los Angeles Fire Department, paramedics, and police officers during a chemical warehouse fire at Research Organic, Inorganic Chemical Corporation, Sun Valley, California. Numerous flammable, corrosive, and reactive compounds were stored at the warehouse at the time of the fire. Dermatological problems with rashes lasting more than 1 day after the fire were reported by 18 fire fighters and nine police officers. Neurotoxic symptoms of fatigue, forgetfulness, irritability, headaches, and difficulty sleeping were also reported. The neurotoxic symptoms lasted from a month to over a year. The authors conclude that the symptoms experienced by those working at the fire site are associated with exposures during the fire. Recommendations arising from the fire include the establishment of a response team with comprehensive training, state of the art protective equipment, protocols for addressing medical evaluation and decontamination issues, environmental sampling capability, and coordination with other emergency disaster responders.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-064-1844, GTE/Valenite Corporation, Westminster, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, C.J.; Rondinelli, R.; Singal, M.

    1987-10-01

    In response to a confidential request, an evaluation of exposure to hard-metal dusts was made at GTE/VALENITE Corporation (SIC-3541), Westminster, South Carolina, employing 50 production workers. Dusts were generated during finish grinding of tungsten carbide cutting tool inserts. Personal and area air samples were analyzed for seven nitrosamines, cobalt, and tungsten. No nitrosamines were detected. Cobalt levels were nondetectable to 26.8 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m/sup 3/) (American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value, 50 microg/m/sup 3/). Tungsten levels were nondetectable to 0.41 mg/m/sup 3/ (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit, 5 mg/m/sup 3/). Medical survey of 35 workers showed respiratory symptoms associated with length of employment and smoking status. Symptoms did not correlate with exposure category. Personal air samples were taken for cobalt for ten workers giving urine samples pre and post shift. All had increased urine cobalt levels over shift. There was no correlation between total airborne and urine cobalt levels, but there was a significant association for post shift urinary and respirable cobalt. The authors recommend that air sampling for tungsten carbide and cobalt be continued. Good housekeeping and personal hygiene practices should be instituted and maintained. Change to a safer cutting fluid is recommended along with a medical surveillance program and careful follow up of employees with persistent symptoms of cough, chest tightness, shortness of breath, or wheezing.

  8. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 91-0292-2467, Magnetics Division of Spang and Company, Butler, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blade, L.M.; Bresler, F.T.

    1994-11-01

    In response to an employee request, an investigation was begun into possible exposures to paint, paint thinners, and Freon at the Magnetics Division of Spang and Company (SIC-3679), Butler, Pennsylvania. The division employed about 450 people and manufactured two types of magnetic cores used in a variety of electronic devices. Workers in the Tape Core Paint Room had experienced light headedness or fainted episodes. Only one sample contained measurable levels of 2-ethoxyethyl-acetate (111159) but the level was 0.25 parts per million (ppm), one half of the NIOSH recommended exposure limit for full shift time weighted average exposure. Methylene-chloride (75092) was detected in all but one of the air samples with levels ranging up to 35ppm. One personal breathing zone sample had a lead (7439921) concentration of 36 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m3) which exceeded the OSHA action level for lead of 30 microg/m3. The paint booth exhaust systems appeared to be operating efficiently and there were good work practices among the painters. The authors conclude that workers were exposed to methylene-chloride, considered by NIOSH to be a potential occupational carcinogen. Exposures to lead and 2-ethoxyethyl-acetate may exceed the evaluation criteria. Some workers may experience symptoms when working near solvents and paints, even though the measured exposures were below the permissible exposure limits. The authors recommend that efforts be made to reduce exposures in the paint room.

  9. Hanford Site Hazards Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site Hazards Guide 2016 Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited Hanford Site Hazards Guide Contents ASBESTOS .............................................................................................................................................. 2 BERYLLIUM ........................................................................................................................................... 4 CHEMICAL SAFETY

  10. Hazard Baseline Documentation

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-12-04

    This standard establishes uniform Office of Environmental Management (EM) guidance on hazard baseline documents that identify and control radiological and non-radiological hazards for all EM facilities.

  11. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  12. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor`s controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first.

  13. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  14. Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard ...

  15. Automated Hazard Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-06-26

    The Automated Hazard Analysis (AHA) application is a software tool used to conduct job hazard screening and analysis of tasks to be performed in Savannah River Site facilities. The AHA application provides a systematic approach to the assessment of safety and environmental hazards associated with specific tasks, and the identification of controls regulations, and other requirements needed to perform those tasks safely. AHA is to be integrated into existing Savannah River site work control andmore » job hazard analysis processes. Utilization of AHA will improve the consistency and completeness of hazard screening and analysis, and increase the effectiveness of the work planning process.« less

  16. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

  17. Hazard baseline documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This DOE limited technical standard establishes uniform Office of Environmental Management (EM) guidance on hazards baseline documents that identify and control radiological and nonradiological hazards for all EM facilities. It provides a road map to the safety and health hazard identification and control requirements contained in the Department`s orders and provides EM guidance on the applicability and integration of these requirements. This includes a definition of four classes of facilities (nuclear, non-nuclear, radiological, and other industrial); the thresholds for facility hazard classification; and applicable safety and health hazard identification, controls, and documentation. The standard applies to the classification, development, review, and approval of hazard identification and control documentation for EM facilities.

  18. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the US cross-section evaluation working group. Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1996-11-01

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with the responsibility for organizing and overseeing the U.S. cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official U.S. evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the U.S. nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the U.S. were declining at an alarming rate and needed all possible encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain a network of experimentalists in the U.S. that would provide needed encouragement to the national nuclear data measurement effort through improved communication and facilitation of collaborative activities. In 1994, an additional charge was added to the responsibilities of this Committee, namely, to serve as an interface between the more applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. This annual report is the second such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from eleven laboratories in the U.S. which have been prepared by members of the Committee and submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing. It is hoped that the information provided here on the work that is going on at the reporting laboratories will prove interesting and stimulating to the readers.

  19. Hazard communication program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, E.A.

    1994-10-04

    Implements Internal Publication No. WHC-IP-0914. Section 1.1, providing management and employee guidance for working with hazardous chemicals and physical agents.

  20. Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (accessegress) Hazard Trees (falling, fire hazard) Utilities (Lab employees: use Form 1821 (pdf) to report utility...

  1. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  4. Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Flood hazard models for Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savy, J.B.; Murray, R.C.

    1988-05-01

    For eight sites, the evaluation of flood hazards was considered in two steps. First, a screening assessment was performed to determine whether flood hazards may impact DOE operations. The screening analysis consisted of a preliminary flood hazard assessment that provides an initial estimate of the site design basis. The second step involves a review of the vulnerability of on-site facilities by the site manager; based on the results of the preliminary flood hazard assessment and a review of site operations, the manager can decide whether flood hazards should be considered a part of the design basis. The scope of the preliminary flood hazard analysis was restricted to evaluating the flood hazards that may exist in proximity to a site. The analysis does not involve an assessment of the potential of encroachment of flooding at specific on-site locations. Furthermore, the screening analysis does not consider localized flooding at a site due to precipitation (i.e., local run-off, storm sewer capacity, roof drainage). These issues were reserved for consideration by the DOE site manager. 9 refs., 18 figs.

  5. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  6. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Documents Documents Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework Tri-Party Agreement Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Hanford Site Budget Hanford Site Safety Standards DOE - ORP Contracts/Procurements DOE - RL Contracts/Procurements Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan Single-Shell Tank Evaluations Deep Vadose Zone 100-F RI/FS Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Environmental Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Email

  7. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel Meeting. PDF icon Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities More Documents & Publications Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Preliminary Assessment of the Impact of 2014 Seismic Study on WTP Design Evaluation of the SRS Seismic Hazard Considering the EPRI 2013 Ground Motion Model

  8. Hazard Communication Training- Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard - OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.1200, Hazard Communication Standard.

  9. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  10. Hazard classification process at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildum, J. S., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    An essential part of Integrated Safety Management is the identification of hazards in the workplace and the assessment of possible consequences of accidents involving those hazards. The process of hazard classification suggested by the DOE orders on Safety Analysis is the formalization of this identification and assessment for hazards that might cause harm to the public or workers external to the operation. Possible injury to workers in the facility who are exposed to the hazard is not considered in the designation of the hazard classification for facilities at LLNL, although worker safety is discussed in facility Safety Basis documentation.

  11. Guidance manual for hazardous waste incinerator permits. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The manual provides guidance to the permit writer for designating facility - specific operating conditions necessary to comply with the RCRA standards for hazardous waste incinerators. Each section of the incineration regulation is addressed, including: waste analysis, designation of principal organic hazardous constituents and requirements for operation, inspection and monitoring. Guidance is also provided for evaluating incinerator performance data and trial burn procedures.

  12. Mr. James Bearzi, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 October 12, 2010 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Results of Evaluation of Sampling Line Loss, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number NM4890139088 - TSDF Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition IV.F.5.e, the Permittees are hereby notifying the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the results of the evaluation of the loss of

  13. Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplace MUST complete the new Hazard Communications Standard Training, per 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by DECEMBER 1, 2013.

  14. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2006-07-31

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  15. Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Preliminary flood hazards estimates for screening Department of Energy sites, Albuquerque Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, M.W. Jr.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1988-05-01

    As part of an ongoing program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is directing the Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project (NPHMP) on behalf of the Department of Energy (DOE). A major part of this effort is the development of probabilistic definitions of natural phenomena hazards; seismic, wind, and flood. In this report the first phase of the evaluation of flood hazards at DOE sites is described. Unlike seismic and wind events, floods may not present a significant threat to the operations of all DOE sites. For example, at some sites physical circumstances may exist that effectively preclude the occurrence of flooding. As a result, consideration of flood hazards may not be required as part of the site design basis. In this case it is not necessary to perform a detailed flood hazard study at all DOE sites, such as those conducted for other natural phenomena hazards, seismic and wind. The scope of the preliminary flood hazard analysis is restricted to evaluating the flood hazards that may exist in proximity to a site. The analysis does involve an assessment of the potential encroachment of flooding on-site at individual facility locations. However, the preliminary flood hazard assessment does not consider localized flooding at a site due to precipitation (i.e., local run-off, storm sewer capacity, roof drainage). These issues are reserved for consideration by the DOE site manager. 11 refs., 84 figs., 61 tabs.

  16. EA-0688: Hazardous Waste Staging Facility, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct the Hazardous Waste Staging Facility that would help to alleviate capacity problems as well as provide a single compliant...

  17. A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Updates Review for Two DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Updates Review for Two DOE Sites Lawrence Salomone Pinnacle Specialty Group, Inc. DOE NPH Meeting October 21-22, 2014

  18. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group and Biosafety Level Definitions European Economic Community (DIRECTIVE 93/88/EEC, Oct. 1993) (1) Group 1 biological agent means one that is unlikely to cause human disease; (2) Group 2 biological agent means one that can cause human disease and might be a hazard to workers; it is unlikely to spread to the community; there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (3) Group 3 biological agent means one that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to

  19. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  20. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

    2007-09-10

    This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

  1. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contents 10.0 Hazard Calculations and Results .................................................................................................. 10.1 10.1 Hazard Software and Hazard Runs ...................................................................................... 10.1 10.1.1 Hazard Calculations and Quality Assurance of Hazard Calculations ...................... 10.5 10.2 Seismic Hazard Results and Sensitivity at Priority Sites ..................................................... 10.5

  2. TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms Hazardous Materials Exercise Evaluation Forms PDF icon Exercise Evaluation Forms More Documents & Publications...

  3. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G - SSC Data Summary Tables Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 G.1 Appendix G SSC Data Summary Tables This appendix presents the data summary tables that were developed by the seismic source characterization (SSC) Technical Integration Team. As discussed in Section 8.1.2.1, data tables are used to assist in the documentation of the SSC data evaluation process. The data tables begin with the basic reference information for data that were identified by the TI Team and

  4. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E.; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method.

  5. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D - Final Hazard Input Documents Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 D.1 Appendix D Final Hazard Input Documents Appendixes D.1 and D.2, respectively, contain the final hazard input documents (HIDs) for the seismic source and ground motion characterization models for the Hanford sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis project. Each provides sufficient information for the hazard analyst to input the characterization models into the hazard code for calculations. Each

  6. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday, October

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    21st Session Presentations | Department of Energy Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Tuesday, October 21st Session Presentations Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites - An Update Opportunities for Improving Regulations Governing the

  8. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B - PPRP Closure Letter Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 B.1 Appendix B PPRP Closure Letter 2014 Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis B.2 Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 B.3 2014 Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis B.4 Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 B.5

  9. Hazardous waste cleanup: the preliminaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos, K.

    1985-08-01

    This article describes the lengthiness and cost of the preliminary steps in a hazardous waste cleanup. The article describes the S-Area lawsuit, an area near Niagara Falls, New York which was an inactive chemical dump. Contaminated sludge was found at a nearby water treatment plant and was traced back to S-Area. In the past five years, S-Area negotiations have cost the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency two million dollars for advice on how work should proceed for the plant and the landfill. This lawsuit was one of the first in the U.S. against a chemical company for endangering the public through unsound waste disposal practices. Negotiation was selected instead of a trial for several reasons which are outlined. S-Area may serve as a model for other such settlements, as it provides for a flexible plan, open to consideration of alternate technologies that may be developed in the future. It contains a phased approach to both defining and evaluating existing problems, then suggesting remedies. It also requires monitoring for at least 35 years or until no danger remains.

  10. Automated design synthesis of robotic/human workcells for improved manufacturing system design in hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Joshua M.

    2012-06-12

    Manufacturing tasks that are deemed too hazardous for workers require the use of automation, robotics, and/or other remote handling tools. The associated hazards may be radiological or nonradiological, and based on the characteristics of the environment and processing, a design may necessitate robotic labor, human labor, or both. There are also other factors such as cost, ergonomics, maintenance, and efficiency that also effect task allocation and other design choices. Handling the tradeoffs of these factors can be complex, and lack of experience can be an issue when trying to determine if and what feasible automation/robotics options exist. To address this problem, we utilize common engineering design approaches adapted more for manufacturing system design in hazardous environments. We limit our scope to the conceptual and embodiment design stages, specifically a computational algorithm for concept generation and early design evaluation. In regard to concept generation, we first develop the functional model or function structure for the process, using the common 'verb-noun' format for describing function. A common language or functional basis for manufacturing was developed and utilized to formalize function descriptions and guide rules for function decomposition. Potential components for embodiment are also grouped in terms of this functional language and are stored in a database. The properties of each component are given as quantitative and qualitative criteria. Operators are also rated for task-relevant criteria which are used to address task compatibility. Through the gathering of process requirements/constraints, construction of the component database, and development of the manufacturing basis and rule set, design knowledge is stored and available for computer use. Thus, once the higher level process functions are defined, the computer can automate the synthesis of new design concepts through alternating steps of embodiment and function structure updates/decomposition. In the process, criteria guide function allocation of components/operators and help ensure compatibility and feasibility. Through multiple function assignment options and varied function structures, multiple design concepts are created. All of the generated designs are then evaluated based on a number of relevant evaluation criteria: cost, dose, ergonomics, hazards, efficiency, etc. These criteria are computed using physical properties/parameters of each system based on the qualities an engineer would use to make evaluations. Nuclear processes such as oxide conversion and electrorefining are utilized to aid algorithm development and provide test cases for the completed program. Through our approach, we capture design knowledge related to manufacturing and other operations in hazardous environments to enable a computational program to automatically generate and evaluate system design concepts.

  11. Natural Phenomena Hazards Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Phenomena Hazards Program Natural Phenomena Hazards Program Natural Phenomena Hazards Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomena Hazards Program develops and maintains state-of-the-art program standards and guidance for DOE facilities exposed to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs). This program applies to both conventional, nuclear hazard category 1, 2, and 3, and radiological facilities. Direction and guidance is given for seismic, extreme wind, tornado, precipitation,

  12. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation PDF icon Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents & ...

  13. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  14. Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety by Ashok Kapoor Functional areas: Hazardous Materials, Packaging and Transportation, Safety and Security, Work...

  15. Vermont Hazardous Waste Management Regulations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Management Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Vermont Hazardous Waste Management...

  16. Sandia Energy - Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Solar...

  17. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials Program Manager. PDF icon Enhancing Railroad Hazardous...

  18. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  19. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  20. ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on

  1. Seismic hazard analysis at Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is being conducted for the DOE Rocky Flats Plant, Jefferson County, Colorado. This is part of the overall review of the seismic exposure to facilities being conducted by DOE. The study has four major elements. (1) The historical seismicity in Colorado is being reviewed and synthesized to estimate historical rates of earthquake activity in the region of the site. (2) The geologic and tectonic evidence in Colorado and along the Front Range is being reviewed to determine appropriate seismic zones, potentially active faults, and constraints on fault slip rates. (3) Earthquake ground motion equations are being derived based on seismological knowledge of the earth`s crust. Site specific soil amplification factors are also being developed using on-site shear wave velocity measurements. (4) The probability of exceedence of various seismic ground motion levels is being calculated based on the inputs developed on tectonic sources, faults, ground motion, and soil amplification. Deterministic ground motion estimates are also being made. This study is a state-of-the-art analysis of seismic hazard. It incorporates uncertainties in the major aspects governing seismic hazard, and has a documented basis founded on solid data interpretations for the ranges of inputs used. The results will be a valid basis on which to evaluate plant structures, equipment, and components for seismic effects.

  2. Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savings Portfolio (122013) Energy Smart Grocer Impact Evaluation (102013) Energy Smart Industrial - Energy Management Pilot Impact Evaluation (22013) Clark PUD Home...

  3. The use of representative cases in hazard analysis of the tank waste remediation system at Hanford. The information in this document is a combination of HNF-SA-3168-A {ampersand} HNF-SA-3169-A - The control identification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J.

    1997-04-24

    During calendar year 1996, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford, Inc. conducted a safety analysis in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94 as part of the development of a Final Safety Analysis Report (TSAR) for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) at the DOE Hanford site. The scope of the safety analysis of TWRS primarily addressed 177 large underground liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment for transferring waste to and from tanks. The waste in the tanks was generated by the nuclear production and processing facilities at Hanford. The challenge facing the safety analysis team was to efficiently analyze the system within the time and budget allotted to provide the necessary and sufficient information for accident selection, control identification, and justification on the acceptability of the level of safety of TWRS. It was clear from the start that a hazard and accident analysis for each of the 177 similar tanks and supporting equipment was not practical nor necessary. For example, many of the tanks were similar enough that the results of the analysis of one tank would apply to many tanks. This required the development and use of a tool called the ''Hazard Topography''. The use of the Hazard Topography assured that all tank operations and configurations were adequately assessed in the hazard analysis and that the results (e.g., hazard identification and control decisions) were appropriately applied to all tanks and associated systems. The TWRS Hazard Topography was a data base of all the TWRS facilities (e.g., tanks, diversion boxes, transfer lines, and related facilities) along with data on their configuration, material at risk (MAR), hazards, and known safety related phenomenological issues. Facilities were then classified into groups based on similar combinations of configuration, MAR, hazards and phenomena. A hazard evaluation was performed for a tank or facility in each group. The results of these evaluations, also contained in a data base, were then mapped back to all TWRS facilities and used to select candidate accidents for the SAR. The Hazard Topography and hazard evaluation results were then used to support the identification of controls that address all TWRS facilities.

  4. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Final Hazard Category Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUTH, L.L.

    2001-06-06

    The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility was designed to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate and other liquid waste streams for treatment at the 200 East Area Effluent Treatment Facility. The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility has been previously classified as a Category 3 Nonreactor Nuclear Facility. As defined in Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (DOE 1992, DOE 1997), Category 3 Nuclear Facilities have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. However, based on current facility design, operations, and radioactive constituent concentrations, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences and is categorized as a Radiological Facility. This report documents the final hazard categorization process performed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. This report describes the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility. Also included is a preliminary hazard categorization, which is based on current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, a preliminary hazards and accident analysis, and a final hazard category determination. The results of the hazards and accident analysis, based on the current configuration and operations of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and the current and proposed radioactive and hazardous material inventories, demonstrate that the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility does not have the potential for significant localized (radiological) consequences. Based on the final hazard category analysis, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility is a Radiological Facility. The final hazard category determination is based on a comparative evaluation of the consequence basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities to the calculated consequences for credible releases The basis for the Category 3 threshold quantities is 10 rem-equivalent man at 30 meters (98 feet) (DOE 1992, DOE 1997). The calculated 12 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, are 3.50 rem and 1.32 rem, respectively, which based upon the original hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1992) classified the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility. Comparison of the calculated 24 hour consequences to an individual located at 30 meters (98 feet) for two credible scenarios, spray release and a pool release, 7.00 rem and 2.64 rem respectively, confirmed the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility classification as a Radiological Facility under the current hazard categorization criteria (DOE 1997). Both result in dose consequence values less than the allowable, 10 rem, meeting the requirements for categorizing the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility as a Radiological Facility.

  5. CRAD, Hazardous Waste Management- December 4, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hazardous Waste Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-30)

  6. Hazardous Waste Certification Plan: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of hazardous waste (HW) handled in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). The plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end- product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; and executive summary of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. The plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Systems Group Manager to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with several requirements of the Federal Resource Conservation and Resource Recovery Act (RCRA), the Federal Department of Transportation (DOT), and the State of California, Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 22.

  7. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  8. WIPP Documents - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) effective April 15, 2011 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to manage, store, and dispose of contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic mixed waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Mixed waste contains radioactive and chemically hazardous components. Information Repository Documents related to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit

  9. H. R. 527: A Bill to authorize research and evaluation programs for monitoring, detecting, and abating lead based paint and other lead exposure hazards in housing, and for other purposes, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, January 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Lead poses a significant environmental health problem since adverse effects have been conclusively demonstrated at relatively low exposures. H.R.527 was introduced into the US House of Representatives on January 14 1991 to authorize research and evaluation programs for monitoring, detecting, and abating lead based paint and other lead exposure hazards in housing. Attention is focused on the following: laboratory analysis standardization; detection technologies; research on abatement and in-place management techniques; abatement products; lead exposure in children; public education; and authorization of appropriations.

  10. PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment

  11. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  13. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  14. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  15. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  16. Seismic hazard analysis for Jayapura city, Papua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robiana, R. Cipta, A.

    2015-04-24

    Jayapura city had destructive earthquake which occurred on June 25, 1976 with the maximum intensity VII MMI scale. Probabilistic methods are used to determine the earthquake hazard by considering all possible earthquakes that can occur in this region. Earthquake source models using three types of source models are subduction model; comes from the New Guinea Trench subduction zone (North Papuan Thrust), fault models; derived from fault Yapen, TareraAiduna, Wamena, Memberamo, Waipago, Jayapura, and Jayawijaya, and 7 background models to accommodate unknown earthquakes. Amplification factor using geomorphological approaches are corrected by the measurement data. This data is related to rock type and depth of soft soil. Site class in Jayapura city can be grouped into classes B, C, D and E, with the amplification between 0.5 – 6. Hazard maps are presented with a 10% probability of earthquake occurrence within a period of 500 years for the dominant periods of 0.0, 0.2, and 1.0 seconds.

  17. 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, Sonja L.; English, Charles J.

    2015-08-24

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention are inherent goals within the operating procedures of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). The US Department of Energy (DOE) and LANS are required to submit an annual hazardous waste minimization report to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in accordance with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. The report was prepared pursuant to the requirements of Section 2.9 of the LANL Hazardous Waste Facility Permit. This report describes the hazardous waste minimization program (a component of the overall Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention [WMin/PP] Program) administered by the Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES). This report also supports the waste minimization and pollution prevention goals of the Environmental Programs Directorate (EP) organizations that are responsible for implementing remediation activities and describes its programs to incorporate waste reduction practices into remediation activities and procedures. LANS was very successful in fiscal year (FY) 2013 (October 1-September 30) in WMin/PP efforts. Staff funded four projects specifically related to reduction of waste with hazardous constituents, and LANS won four national awards for pollution prevention efforts from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In FY13, there was no hazardous, mixedtransuranic (MTRU), or mixed low-level (MLLW) remediation waste generated at the Laboratory. More hazardous waste, MTRU waste, and MLLW was generated in FY13 than in FY12, and the majority of the increase was related to MTRU processing or lab cleanouts. These accomplishments and analysis of the waste streams are discussed in much more detail within this report.

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually

  19. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of ?{sub matter}?0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  20. NRS 459 Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    59 Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: NRS 459 Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Nevada statute setting...

  1. Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Array Irradiance Models at Locations across the United States Matthew Lave, Member, IEEE, William Hayes, Andrew Pohl, and Clifford W. Hansen Abstract-We report an evaluation of...

  2. D-Area Preliminary Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.; Paik, I.R.

    1998-04-01

    A comprehensive review of hazards associated with the D-Area was performed to identify postulated event scenarios.

  3. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glare Hazard Analysis Tool - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  4. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  5. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  6. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-12-31

    To establish hazardous waste management procedures for facilities operated under authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA). The procedures will follow. to the extent practicable, regulations issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Although Department of Energy (DOE) operations conducted under authority other than the AEA are subject to EPA or State regulations conforming with RCRA, facilities administered under the authority of the AEA are not bound by such requirements.

  7. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-17

    SGHAT predicts the occurrence and intensity of glare caused by a user-specified solar panel array when viewed from one or more observation points. An interactive mapping interface is used to determine the latitude, longitude and elevation of the array and observation points. The presence and intensity of glare is then calculated along a given time interval throughout the year, based on the position of the sun. The potential ocular hazard is also reported. The maximummore »energy production of the solar array is also estimated so that alternative designs can be compared to determine the design that yields the most energy production while mitigating glare.« less

  8. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-08-25

    SGHAT predicts the occurrence and intensity of glare caused by a user-specified solar panel array when viewed from one or more observation points. An interactive mapping interface is used to determine the latitude, longitude and elevation of the array and observation points. The presence and intensity of glare is then calculated along a given time interval throughout the year, based on the position of the sun. The potential ocular hazard is also reported. The maximummore »energy production of the solar array is also estimated so that alternative designs can be compared to determine the design that yields the most energy production while mitigating glare.« less

  9. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-08-25

    SGHAT predicts the occurrence and intensity of glare caused by a user-specified solar panel array when viewed from one or more observation points. An interactive mapping interface is used to determine the latitude, longitude and elevation of the array and observation points. The presence and intensity of glare is then calculated along a given time interval throughout the year, based on the position of the sun. The potential ocular hazard is also reported. The maximum energy production of the solar array is also estimated so that alternative designs can be compared to determine the design that yields the most energy production while mitigating glare.

  10. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-17

    SGHAT predicts the occurrence and intensity of glare caused by a user-specified solar panel array when viewed from one or more observation points. An interactive mapping interface is used to determine the latitude, longitude and elevation of the array and observation points. The presence and intensity of glare is then calculated along a given time interval throughout the year, based on the position of the sun. The potential ocular hazard is also reported. The maximum energy production of the solar array is also estimated so that alternative designs can be compared to determine the design that yields the most energy production while mitigating glare.

  11. Draft STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization) Methodology Draft STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization) Methodology Presentation from...

  12. Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, ... Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement ...

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Publications Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Management of Mercury...

  14. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J

    2008-12-18

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

  15. Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G.; Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H.

    1994-11-01

    Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

  16. Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

  17. ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, B.

    2009-04-28

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility with no segmentation. Since it was the first time any facility at SRS tried this alternate approach safety analyst had to face substantial resistance and reservations from both the facility and local DOE customers which were eventually overcome with approval and acceptance from DOE-HQ.

  18. AGREEMENT BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU AND WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT PERMITTEES REGARDING A TIME EXTENSION FOR DISPUTE RESOLUTION RELATED TO FINAL AUDIT...

  19. Vermont Conditionally Exempt Generator Handbook: A Hazardous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conditionally Exempt Generator Handbook: A Hazardous Waste Management Guide for Smaller Vermont Business Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bulk Packaging Placarding Requirements - Placarding of Packages vs. Placarding Vehicle * LSASCO Scenarios - 7 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  1. Mr. James Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad. New Mexico 88221 May 26, 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo...

  2. Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-30

    To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  3. Seismic & Natural Phenomena Hazards | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    designed to withstand the hazards. CNS maintains a panel of experts known as the Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel, which meets periodically to discuss seismic issues impacting DOE...

  4. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

  5. International Power Group Ltd IPWG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Ltd (IPWG) Place: Sussex, NJ, New Jersey Zip: 07461-0326 Product: IPWG's waste-to-energy module is capable of combusting a minimum of 180 tons of solid and hazardous...

  6. Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J Digital Seismic Hazard Products J.1 Appendix J Digital Seismic Hazard Products This appendix contains the digital data associated with the seismic hazard results presented in Chapter 10 for use in subsequent development of soil hazard curves for various facilities. These results include mean and fractile baserock hazard curves, mean and fractile baserock uniform hazard response spectra (UHRS), magnitude and distance deaggregation of the mean rock hazard, and deaggregation earthquake (DE)

  7. Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Material Shipments GET (General Employee Training): General Information: Materials and Transportation personnel perform domestic and international shipping activities associated with hazardous materials transported onsite and offsite. All activities are performed by personnel who have been trained for their respective transportation functions, as required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and International Air Transport Association (IATA). Shipments are made for the research and

  8. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  9. Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. ORNL grouting technologies for immobilizing hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, L.R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Cement and Concrete Applications Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed versatile and inexpensive processes to solidify large quantities of hazardous liquids, sludges, and solids. By using standard off the shelf processing equipment, these batch or continuous processes are compatible with a wide range of disposal methods, such as above-ground storage, shallow-land burial, deep geological disposal, sea-bed dumping, and bulk in-situ solidification. Because of their economic advantages, these latter bulk in-situ disposal scenarios have received the most development. ORNL's experience has shown that tailored cement-based formulas can be developed which tolerate wide fluctuations in waste feed compositions and still maintain mixing properties that are compatible with standard equipment. In addition to cements, these grouts contain pozzolans, clays and other additives to control the flow properties, set-times, phase separations and impacts of waste stream fluctuation. The cements, fly ashes and other grout components are readily available in bulk quantities and the solids-blends typically cost less than $0.05 to 0.15 per waste gallon. Depending on the disposal scenario, total disposal costs (material, capital, and operating) can be as low as $0.10 to 0.50 per gallon.

  11. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  12. Hazard categorization and classification for the sodium storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1994-08-30

    The Sodium Storage Facility is planned to be constructed in the 400 area for long term storage of sodium from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). It will contain four large sodium storage tanks. Three of the tanks have a capacity of 80,000 gallons of sodium each, and the fourth will hold 52,500 gallons. The tanks will be connected by piping with each other and to the FFTF. Sodium from the FFTF primary and secondary Heat Transport Systems (HTS), Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to the facility, and stored there in a frozen state pending final disposition. A Hazard Classification has been performed in order to evaluate the potential toxic consequences of a sodium fire according to the provisions of DOE Order 5481.1B. The conclusion of these evaluations is that the Sodium Storage Facility meets the requirements of the lowest Hazard Category, i.e., radiological facility, and the Hazard Classification is recommended to be moderate.

  13. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  14. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, R.C.W.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

  15. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Robert C. W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

  16. 324 Building fire hazards analysis implementation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARILO, N.F.

    1999-05-10

    In March 1998, the 324 Building Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) (Reference 1) was approved by the U S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) for implementation by B and W Hanford Company (BWHC). The purpose of the FHA was to identify gaps in compliance with DOE Order 5480.7A (Reference 2) and Richland Operations Office Implementation Directive (RLID) 5480.7 (Reference 3), especially in regard to loss limitation. The FHA identified compliance gaps in six areas and provided 20 recommendations to bring the 324 Building into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A. Additionally, one observation was provided. A status is provided for each recommendation in this document. The actions for recommendations associated with the safety related part of the 324 Building and operation of the cells and support areas were evaluated using the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process BWHC will use this Implementation Plan to bring the 324 Building and its operation into compliance with DOE Order 5480 7A and RLID 5480.7.

  17. Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Groups Research Group Homepages: Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Sherry Yennello's Research Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Group...

  18. Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building Safety Information Document (SID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatell, L.B.; Woolsey, G.B.

    1993-04-15

    This Safety Information Document (SID) provides a description and analysis of operations for the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Treatment Building (the Treatment Building). The Treatment Building has been classified as a moderate hazard facility, and the level of analysis performed and the methodology used are based on that classification. Preliminary design of the Treatment Building has identified the need for two separate buildings for waste treatment processes. The term Treatment Building applies to all these facilities. The evaluation of safety for the Treatment Building is accomplished in part by the identification of hazards associated with the facility and the analysis of the facility`s response to postulated events involving those hazards. The events are analyzed in terms of the facility features that minimize the causes of such events, the quantitative determination of the consequences, and the ability of the facility to cope with each event should it occur. The SID presents the methodology, assumptions, and results of the systematic evaluation of hazards associated with operation of the Treatment Building. The SID also addresses the spectrum of postulated credible events, involving those hazards, that could occur. Facility features important to safety are identified and discussed in the SID. The SID identifies hazards and reports the analysis of the spectrum of credible postulated events that can result in the following consequences: Personnel exposure to radiation; Radioactive material release to the environment; Personnel exposure to hazardous chemicals; Hazardous chemical release to the environment; Events leading to an onsite/offsite fatality; and Significant damage to government property. The SID addresses the consequences to the onsite and offsite populations resulting from postulated credible events and the safety features in place to control and mitigate the consequences.

  19. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  20. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  1. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1988-07-01

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  2. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  3. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  4. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 PDF icon Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste ...

  5. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 Seismic Hazard Analysis | Department of Energy The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 Seismic Hazard Analysis The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 Seismic Hazard Analysis Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel Meeting. PDF icon Seismic Hazard Definition: SSHAC Level 1 PSHA at MFC More Documents & Publications The INL Seismic Risk

  6. Seismic Hazard Assessment for Western Kentucky, Northeastern Kentucky and Southeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, James C; Wang, Zhenming; Woolery, Edward W; Kiefer, John D

    2002-07-01

    Earthquakes pose a seismic hazards and risk to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Furthermore, the seismic hazards and risk vary throughout the Commonwealth. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the seismic hazard maps developed by the US Geological Survey for seismic safety regulation for nuclear facilities. Under current US Geological Survey's seismic hazard assessment it is economically unfeasible to build a new uranium plant near Paducah relative to the Portsmouth, Ohio site. This is not to say that the facility cannot be safely engineered to withstand the present seismic load, but enormously expensive to do so. More than 20 years observations and research at UK have shown that the US Geological Survey has overestimated seismic hazards in western Kentucky, particularly in the Jackson Purchase area that includes Paducah. Furthermore, our research indicates underestimated seismic hazards in northeastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. Such overestimation and underestimation could jeopardize possible site selection of PGDP for the new uranium plant. The existing database, research experience, and expertise in UK's Kentucky Geological Survey and Department of Geological Science put this institution in a unique position to conduct a comprehensive seismic hazard evaluation.

  7. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard. This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 8 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  8. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as a waste group B (or A) tank identifies the potential for an induced flammable gas release hazard, the hazard only exists for specific operations that can release the retained gas in the tank at a rate and quantity that results in reaching 100% of the lower flammability limit in the tank headspace. The identification and evaluation of tank farm operations that could cause an induced flammable gas release hazard in a waste group B (or A) tank are included in other documents. The third criterion is the buoyancy ratio. This criterion addresses tanks that are not waste group C double-shell tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0. For these double-shell tanks, the buoyancy ratio considers whether the saturated solids can retain sufficient gas to exceed neutral buoyancy relative to the supernatant layer and therefore have buoyant displacement gas release events. If the buoyancy ratio is {ge} 1.0, that double-shell tank is assigned to waste group A. These tanks are considered to have a potential spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard in addition to a potential induced flammable gas release hazard.

  9. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with ...

  10. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective The Adequacy ...

  11. Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there were no actual or potential hazards to human health or the environment due to exposure to hazardous waste or waste constituents. Further assessment of actual or...

  12. Draft STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization) Methodology Patrick Cahalane NNSA NA-00-10 Revised Hazard Category 2 value for tritium (water) Revised value based...

  13. New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Maximizes Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar installations. ...

  14. DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities DOE Standard 1020 - Natural Phenomena Hazard analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities ...

  15. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  16. Sandia Energy - Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Available for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool Available for Download Home Renewable Energy Energy News News & Events Photovoltaic Solar Solar Newsletter Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...

  17. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Tuesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Hazard Analysis for Nuclear Facilities at the Hanford Site, Eastern Washington, USA Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook A Probabilistic Approach to...

  18. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This ...

  19. Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Requirements Currently Applied to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH)...

  20. Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical...

  1. HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 You are ...

  2. Utah Department of Environmental Quality Hazardous Waste Permits...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Permits Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Utah Department of Environmental Quality Hazardous Waste Permits...

  3. Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Section Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage Abstract This webpage...

  4. Title 40 CFR 260: Hazardous Waste Management System: General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    : Hazardous Waste Management System: General Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 40 CFR 260: Hazardous...

  5. Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Hazardous Waste Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Solid and Hazardous Waste Branch Address: 919 Ala Moana Boulevard 212 Place: Honolulu,...

  6. Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, ... Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental 3 Impact Statement ...

  7. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 Seismic Hazard Analysis Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel ...

  8. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona ...

  9. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL On ...

  10. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  11. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  12. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  13. Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-20

    The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

  14. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gresham, Garold Linn

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  15. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Biographies of Project Participants A.1 Appendix A Biographies of Project Participants A.1 Technical Integrator Leads Kevin J Coppersmith, PhD, of Coppersmith Consulting, Inc., is the Project Technical Integrator and the Technical Integration (TI) Lead of the Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) Team for the Hanford Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) Project. He has 33 years of consulting experience, with primary emphasis in probabilistic hazard analyses (seismic, volcanic, and

  16. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C Earthquake Catalog Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 C.1 Appendix C Earthquake Catalog This appendix describes the uniform moment magnitude catalogs of crustal and subduction earthquakes, and the databases of earthquakes that were assembled as part of the Hanford Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) project to obtain these catalogs. Section C.4 describes the database of earthquakes used to derive the magnitude conversion relations used to obtain a uniform

  17. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F - Seismicity Relocation Analyses Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 F.1 Appendix F Seismicity Relocation Analyses Final Report: High-Resolution Seismicity Study of the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt Region, Washington Prepared by Clifford H. Thurber Department of Geoscience University of Wisconsin-Madison 1215 W. Dayton St. Madison, WI 53706 January 31, 2014 Final Report: Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA): High-Resolution Seismicity Analysis

  18. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  19. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  20. Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

  1. WIPP Hosts All-Hazards Planning Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 26, 2015 WIPP Hosts All-Hazards Planning Meeting On February 20, 2015 WIPP hosted the first annual All- Hazards, Offsite Interface Briefing and Regional Radiological Response Planning Meeting to provide information on changes and enhancements to WIPP's Emergency Management Program and how these changes would be coordinated with WIPP's offsite partners. The meeting was attended by local, state and federal agencies with emergency response roles related to incidents or accidents at the

  2. Hazard analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facilty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    This hazard analysis (HA) has been prepared for the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility (Facility), in compliance with the requirements of Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) controlled manual WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual, and to the direction of WHC-IP-0690, Safety Analysis and Regulation Desk Instructions, (WHC 1992). An HA identifies potentially hazardous conditions in a facility and the associated potential accident scenarios. Unlike the Facility hazard classification documented in WHC-SD-NR-HC-004, Hazard Classification for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, (Huang 1993), which is based on unmitigated consequences, credit is taken in an HA for administrative controls or engineered safety features planned or in place. The HA is the foundation for the accident analysis. The significant event scenarios identified by this HA will be further evaluated in a subsequent accident analysis.

  3. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Working Group Translator Update Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Outline 1. Data development in support of CMWG * Climate modeling best estimate data * Extended and updated TWP-ICE forcing and evaluation data * Radiative heating and cloud microphysics data for TWP-ICE * BBHRP for SGP * Other relevant data 2. Survey results for data used by CMWG and future forcing data development Initial data list * Cloud fraction from ARSCL and TSI * Liquid water path and

  4. Three multimedia models used at hazardous and radioactive waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The report provides an approach for evaluating and critically reviewing the capabilities of multimedia models. The study focused on three specific models: MEPAS version 3.0, MMSOILS Version 2.2, and PRESTO-EPA-CPG Version 2.0. The approach to model review advocated in the study is directed to technical staff responsible for identifying, selecting and applying multimedia models for use at sites containing radioactive and hazardous materials. In the report, restrictions associated with the selection and application of multimedia models for sites contaminated with radioactive and mixed wastes are highlighted.

  5. DOE-STD-1020 Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... (3) - (3) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, OH 90 96 - (3) - (3) Nevada Test Site, ... Accelerator Center, CA 85 91 111 128 - Savannah River Site, SC 100 107 - 169 - 213 1. Although ...

  6. Field evaluation of hazardous waste site bioassessment protocols. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J.M.; Cline, J.F.; Gano, K.A.; McShane, M.C.; Rogers, J.E.; Rogers, L.E.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The overall goal of the plan was to demonstrate that honeybees could be used in detecting likely areas of chemical pollution, to demonstrate the usefulness of microbial and plant phytoassays, and to demonstrate a relationship between laboratory derived phytotoxicity results and field observations of plant community structure and diversity. Field studies were conducted through a cooperative arrangement with the US Army arsenal in Commerce City, Colorado.

  7. 49 CFR Parts 171-177: Hazardous Materials Regulations (DOT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration regulates the transport of hazardous materials through Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), Subchapter C, "Hazardous Materials Regulations." Parts 171-177 provide general information on hazardous materials and regulation for their packaging and their shipment by rail, air, vessel, and public highway.

  8. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  9. Progress for the Industry Application External Hazard Analyses Early Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L.; Prescott, Steven; Coleman, Justin; Ryan, Emerald; Bhandari, Bishwo; Sludern, Daniel; Pope, Chad; Sampath, Ram

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current progress and status related to the Industry Application #2 focusing on External Hazards. For this industry application within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) R&D Pathway, we will create the Risk-Informed Margin Management (RIMM) approach to represent meaningful (i.e., realistic facility representation) event scenarios and consequences by using an advanced 3D facility representation that will evaluate external hazards such as flooding and earthquakes in order to; Identify, model and analyze the appropriate physics that needs to be included to determine plant vulnerabilities related to external events; Manage the communication and interactions between different physics modeling and analysis technologies; and Develop the computational infrastructure through tools related to plant representation, scenario depiction, and physics prediction. One of the unique aspects of the RISMC approach is how it couples probabilistic approaches (the scenario) with mechanistic phenomena representation (the physics) through simulation. This simulation-based modeling allows decision makers to focus on a variety of safety, performance, or economic metrics. In this report, we describe the evaluation of various physics toolkits related to flooding representation. Ultimately, we will be coupling the flooding representation with other events such as earthquakes in order to provide coupled physics analysis for scenarios where interactions exist.

  10. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  11. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  12. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coyne, Martin J.; Fiscus, Gregory M.; Sammel, Alfred G.

    1998-01-01

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  13. Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver Memorandum for Tritium Focus Group Members from Bill Weaver Official Position of the Tritium Focus Group on Hazard Category 2 and 3 Threshold Values for Tritium. PDF icon Memorandum from Bill Weaver More Documents & Publications Draft STD-1027 Supplemental Directive (Alternate Hazard Categorization) Methodology DOE-HDBK-1129-99 DOE-HDBK-1129-2007

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links:

  15. Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernreuter, D. L

    1981-08-08

    As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

  16. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Structural Analyses and Quaternary Investigations in Support of the Hanford PSHA Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 iii Structural Analyses and Quaternary Investigations in Support of the Hanford PSHA Mr. Ryan Coppersmith Coppersmith Consulting, Inc. Ms. Kathryn Hanson AMEC Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. Dr. Jeff Unruh Lettis Consultants International, Inc. Mr. Christopher Slack AMEC Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. September 2014 Hanford Sitewide

  17. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P.

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  18. Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-02-22

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) hazardous and radioactive mixed waste policies and requirements and to implement the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) within the framework of the environmental programs established under DOE O 5400.1. This directive does not cancel any directives.

  19. Relative Hazard and Risk Measure Calculation Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Elder, Matthew S.

    2004-03-20

    The relative hazard (RH) and risk measure (RM) methodology and computer code is a health risk-based tool designed to allow managers and environmental decision makers the opportunity to readily consider human health risks (i.e., public and worker risks) in their screening-level analysis of alternative cleanup strategies. Environmental management decisions involve consideration of costs, schedules, regulatory requirements, health hazards, and risks. The RH-RM tool is a risk-based environmental management decision tool that allows managers the ability to predict and track health hazards and risks over time as they change in relation to mitigation and cleanup actions. Analysis of the hazards and risks associated with planned mitigation and cleanup actions provides a baseline against which alternative strategies can be compared. This new tool allows managers to explore “what if scenarios,” to better understand the impact of alternative mitigation and cleanup actions (i.e., alternatives to the planned actions) on health hazards and risks. This new tool allows managers to screen alternatives on the basis of human health risk and compare the results with cost and other factors pertinent to the decision. Once an alternative or a narrow set of alternatives are selected, it will then be more cost-effective to perform the detailed risk analysis necessary for programmatic and regulatory acceptance of the selected alternative. The RH-RM code has been integrated into the PNNL developed Framework for Risk Analysis In Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) to allow the input and output data of the RH-RM code to be readily shared with the more comprehensive risk analysis models, such as the PNNL developed Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) model.

  20. Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Example Application of Approach 3 to Develop Soil Hazard Curves Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 Appendix K - Example Application of Approach 3 to Develop Soil Hazard Curves The seismic hazard results presented in Chapter 10.0 represent the hazard at the baserock horizon defined to be at the top of the Wanapum basalts, which is encountered at depths of between 332 and 446 m at the hazard calculation Sites A-E. As discussed in Section 10.5, the recommended approach

  1. Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Revision 1) Example Application of Approach 3 to Develop Soil Hazard Curves Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 K.1 Appendix K - Example Application of Approach 3 to Develop Soil Hazard Curves The seismic hazard results presented in Chapter 10.0 represent the hazard at the baserock horizon defined to be at the top of the Wanapum basalts, which is encountered at depths of between 332 and 446 m at the hazard calculation Sites A-E. As discussed in Section 10.5, the

  2. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  3. ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help...

  4. Hazard categorization of 105-KE basin debris removal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meichle, R.H.

    1996-01-25

    This supporting document provides the hazard categorization for 105-KE Basin Debris Removal Project activities planned in the K east Basin. All activities are categorized as less than Hazard Category 3.

  5. 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CCR 1007-3: Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 6 CCR 1007-3: Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract...

  6. EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: EPA Hazardous Waste TSDF GuideLegal Abstract Guidance document prepared by the EPA for hazardous waste...

  7. Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Fact...

  8. RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste...

  9. ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Managing Hazardous Waste Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Managing Hazardous Waste HandbookLegal...

  10. NMED Hazardous Waste Bureau website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Bureau website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: NMED Hazardous Waste Bureau websiteLegal Abstract The...

  11. ADEQ Hazardous Waste Management website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Management website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: ADEQ Hazardous Waste Management websiteLegal...

  12. Oregon DEQ Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DEQ Hazardous Waste Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Oregon DEQ Hazardous Waste Fact...

  13. NMAC 20.4 Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NMAC 20.4 Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Regulations...

  14. ARM 17-53 - Hazardous Waste | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 - Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: ARM 17-53 - Hazardous WasteLegal Abstract Sets forth...

  15. EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Citizens Guide to Hazardous Waste Permitting...

  16. Rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph V; Tibrea, Steven L; Shull, Davis J; Coleman, Jerry T; Shuler, James M

    2015-04-28

    A rapid deployable global sensing hazard alert system and associated methods of operation are provided. An exemplary system includes a central command, a wireless backhaul network, and a remote monitoring unit. The remote monitoring unit can include a positioning system configured to determine a position of the remote monitoring unit based on one or more signals received from one or more satellites located in Low Earth Orbit. The wireless backhaul network can provide bidirectional communication capability independent of cellular telecommunication networks and the Internet. An exemplary method includes instructing at least one of a plurality of remote monitoring units to provide an alert based at least in part on a location of a hazard and a plurality of positions respectively associated with the plurality of remote monitoring units.

  17. Split driveshaft pump for hazardous fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, II, Thomas P.; Purohit, Jwalit J.; Fazio, John M.

    1995-01-01

    A pump having a split driveshaft for use in pumping hazardous fluids wherein only one driveshaft becomes contaminated by the fluid while the second remains isolated from the fluid. The pump has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion contains a pump motor, the first driveshaft, a support pedestal, and vapor barriers and seals. The second portion contains a second, self-lubricating driveshaft and an impeller. The first and second driveshafts are connected together by a releasable coupling. A shield and a slinger deployed below the coupling prevent fluid from the second portion from reaching the first portion. In operation, only the second assembly comes into contact with the fluid being pumped, so the risk of contamination of the first portion by the hazardous fluid is reduced. The first assembly can be removed for repairs or routine maintenance by decoupling the first and second driveshafts and disconnecting the motor from the casing.

  18. North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.M. Ruonavaara

    1995-01-18

    The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

  19. Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard May 1, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis The upcoming implementation date for the new Hazard Communication Standard requires all Federal and Contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplace must be in compliance with all modified revisions of this final rule, except: The distributors shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical

  20. 340 Waste handling Facility Hazard Categorization and Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2010-10-25

    The analysis presented in this document provides the basis for categorizing the facility as less than Hazard Category 3.

  1. HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation Live 27928, Test 27929 HMPT: Hazardous Waste Transportation (Live 27928, suggested one time and associated Test 27929, required initially and every 36 months) addresses the Department of Transportation (DOT) function-specific training requirements of the hazardous materials packagings and transportation (HMPT) Los Alamos

  2. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... EARTHQUAKES; HAZARDS; SEISMICITY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; GROUND MOTION; PROBABILITY; RISK ASSESSMENT; MOTION; SEISMIC EVENTS 200203* -- Fossil-Fueled Power Plants-- Waste ...

  3. Laboratory measurement verification of laser hazard analysis for miles weapon simulators used in force on force exercises.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-08-01

    Due to the change in the batteries used with the Small Arm Laser Transmitters (SALT) from 3-volts dc to 3.6-volts dc and changes to SNL MILES operating conditions, the associated laser hazards of these units required re-evaluation to ensure that the hazard classification of the laser emitters had not changed as well. The output laser emissions of the SNL MILES, weapon simulators and empire guns, used in Force-On-Force (FOF) training exercises, was measured in accordance to the ANSI Standard Z136.4-2005, ''Recommended Practice for Laser Safety Measurements for Hazard Evaluation''. The laser hazard class was evaluated in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, ''Safe Use of Lasers'', using ''worst'' case conditions associated with these MILES units. Laser safety assessment was conducted in accordance with the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2005, ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The laser hazard evaluation of these MILES laser emitters was compared to and supersedes SAND Report SAND2002-0246, ''Laser Safety Evaluation of the MILES and Mini MILES Laser Emitting Components'', which used ''actual'' operating conditions of the laser emitters at the time of its issuance.

  4. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PNNL-23361 Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis November 2014 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Under Contract DE-AC06076RL01830, and Energy Northwest 2 Printed versions of the front matter, including the Executive Summary, and Appendixes A and B of this document are receiving limited distribution to the client. The full report is being delivered on a CD, copies of which are included in the back cover of each truncated printed deliverable. PNNL-23361 Hanford Sitewide

  5. Mr. James Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bearzi Hazardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad. New Mexico 88221 May 26, 2009 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87502 Subject: Requesllo Invoke Dispute Resolution Related to Final Audit Report A-09 - 08 of the Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project Reference: Letter From Mr. James Bearzi to Dr. Dave Moody and Mr. Farok Sharif dated May 18, 2009 Dear Mr. Bearzi: This letter is

  6. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  7. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

    1995-12-31

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification.

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on...

  9. The global coastal hazards data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); White, T.W. )

    1989-01-01

    A rise of sea level between 0.5 and 1.5 m, caused by predicted climate warming in the next century, could jeopardize low-lying radioactive waste disposal sites near the coast, due to permanent and episodic inundation, increased shoreline retreat, and changes in the water table. The effects of global sea level rise on the shoreline will not be spatially uniform. Therefore, site selection will depend on assessment of these differential vulnerabilities, in order to avoid high-risk coasts. The coastal hazards data base described here could provide an appropriate framework. The coastal hazards data base integrates relevant topographic, geologic, geomorphologic, erosional and subsidence information in a Geographic Information System (GIS), to identify high-risk shorelines characterized by low coastal relief, an erodible substrate, present and past evidence of subsidence, extensive shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Data for seven variables relating to inundation and erosion hazards are incorporated into the ORNL ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS). Data compilation has been completed for the US and is being extended to North America, and ultimately the world. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) has been designed to flag high risk coastal segments. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  11. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  12. Preliminary hazards analysis for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J.

    1993-10-01

    This report documents the Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In summary, it provides: a general description of the facility and its operation; identification of hazards at the facility; and details of the hazards analysis, including inventories, bounding releases, consequences, and conclusions. As part of the safety analysis procedure set forth by DOE, a PHA must be performed for the NIF. The PHA characterizes the level of intrinsic potential hazard associated with a facility, and provides the basis for hazard classification. The hazard classification determines the level of safety documentation required, and the DOE Order governing the safety analysis. The hazard classification also determines the level of review and approval required for the safety analysis report. The hazards of primary concern associated with NIF are radiological and toxicological in nature. The hazard classification is determined by comparing facility inventories of radionuclides and chemicals with threshold values for the various hazard classification levels and by examining postulated bounding accidents associated with the hazards of greatest significance. Such postulated bounding accidents cannot take into account active mitigative features; they must assume the unmitigated consequences of a release, taking into account only passive safety features. In this way, the intrinsic hazard level of the facility can be ascertained.

  13. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

  14. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  15. Monitoring genetic damage to ecosystems from hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1992-03-01

    Applications of ecological toxicity testing to hazardous waste management have increased dramatically over the last few years, resulting in a greater awareness of the need for improved biomonitoring techniques. Our laboratory is developing advanced techniques to assess the genotoxic effects of environmental contamination on ecosystems. We have developed a novel mutagenesis assay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is potentially applicable for multimedia studies in soil, sediment, and water. In addition, we are conducting validation studies of a previously developed anaphase aberration test that utilizes sea urchin embryos. Other related efforts include field validation studies of the new tests, evaluation of their potential ecological relevance, and analysis of their sensitivity relative to that of existing toxicity tests that assess only lethal effects, rather than genetic damage.

  16. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  17. Hazard analysis of compressed natural gas fueling systems and fueling procedures used at retail gasoline service stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-28

    An evaluation of the hazards associated with operations of a typical compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station is presented. The evaluation includes identification of a typical CNG fueling system; a comparison of the typical system with ANSI/NFPA (American National Standards Institute/National Fire Protection Association) Standard 52, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Vehicular Fuel System, requirements; a review of CNG industry safety experience as identified in current literature; hazard identification of potential internal (CNG system-specific causes) and external (interface of co-located causes) events leading to potential accidents; and an analysis of potential accident scenarios as determined from the hazard evaluation. The study considers CNG dispensing equipment and associated equipment, including the compressor station, storate vessels, and fill pressure sensing system.

  18. Methodology Using MELCOR Code to Model Proposed Hazard Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavin Hawkley

    2010-07-01

    This study demonstrates a methodology for using the MELCOR code to model a proposed hazard scenario within a building containing radioactive powder, and the subsequent evaluation of a leak path factor (LPF) (or the amount of respirable material which that escapes a facility into the outside environment), implicit in the scenario. This LPF evaluation will analyzes the basis and applicability of an assumed standard multiplication of 0.5 × 0.5 (in which 0.5 represents the amount of material assumed to leave one area and enter another), for calculating an LPF value. The outside release is dependsent upon the ventilation/filtration system, both filtered and un-filtered, and from other pathways from the building, such as doorways (, both open and closed). This study is presents ed to show how the multiple leak path factorsLPFs from the interior building can be evaluated in a combinatory process in which a total leak path factorLPF is calculated, thus addressing the assumed multiplication, and allowing for the designation and assessment of a respirable source term (ST) for later consequence analysis, in which: the propagation of material released into the environmental atmosphere can be modeled and the dose received by a receptor placed downwind can be estimated and the distance adjusted to maintains such exposures as low as reasonably achievableALARA.. Also, this study will briefly addresses particle characteristics thatwhich affect atmospheric particle dispersion, and compares this dispersion with leak path factorLPF methodology.

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter experts concerned with secure transport of spent nuclear...

  20. Hazard Analysis Reports for Nuclear Explosive Operations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NA-STD-3016-2006 May 2006 DOE LIMITED STANDARD HAZARD ANALYSIS REPORTS FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-NA-STD-3016-2006 iii FORWARD This Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  1. U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    JUL 2 3 1982 Col. John 0. Spence - U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Katerials Agency (DRxTH-AS) Department of the Army Aberdeen Roving Ground, Kd. 21010 .I' r\. Dear Col. Spence: In response to your letter of May 17, 1982. requesting the identification of sites where radiological materials amy have been left or burl& on U.S. Anny Installations, I am enclosing littlngs of military installatlans that may have been involved with the Manhattan Engineer District/Atomic Energy Camnlssion (KED/AEC)

  2. JLF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLF User Group NIF and Jupiter User Group Meeting 2016 The 2016 NIF User Group Meeting will take place the first week of February. The exact dates are Sunday evening, January 31th,...

  3. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Protocols Topic Group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the protocols process. The Topic Group was formed to review a series of transportation protocols developed in response to a request for DOE to be more consistent in its approach to transportation.

  4. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 25-26, 2011, the DOE Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) hosted a Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) working meeting in Germantown, Maryland. The meeting brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact critical facilities. The meeting was valuable for sharing and discussing research in NPH analysis and mitigation, as well as best practices and lessons learned. Representatives from DOE Headquarters and site offices, four National Laboratories, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and several DOE prime contractors and other private sector firms participated in the meeting. The meeting featured thirty five discussion topics over the two days. Presentation slides from most of these topics are available here, as well as papers on several topics from those speakers who chose to provide them. Questions about the NPH meeting can be directed to Dr. Steve McDuffie of the CNS staff at 509-373-6766, or stephen.mcduffie@rl.doe.gov.

  5. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, Natalija Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavic, Tomo

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  6. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  7. Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenberg, Jacob

    1990-01-01

    An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments.

  9. Final Report: Seismic Hazard Assessment at the PGDP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhinmeng

    2007-06-01

    Selecting a level of seismic hazard at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for policy considerations and engineering design is not an easy task because it not only depends on seismic hazard, but also on seismic risk and other related environmental, social, and economic issues. Seismic hazard is the main focus. There is no question that there are seismic hazards at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant because of its proximity to several known seismic zones, particularly the New Madrid Seismic Zone. The issues in estimating seismic hazard are (1) the methods being used and (2) difficulty in characterizing the uncertainties of seismic sources, earthquake occurrence frequencies, and ground-motion attenuation relationships. This report summarizes how input data were derived, which methodologies were used, and what the hazard estimates at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant are.

  10. Hazards Assessment Document of the New Waste Transfer Facility (NWTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Hazards Assessment Document for the New Waste Transfer Facility (NWTF) has been prepared in accordance with the Interim Hazards Classification Guide for Non-Reactor Facilities at Savannah River Site. The conclusion of this assessment is that the facility is a High Hazard Nuclear Facility. The NWTF consists of all facilities installed by Project S-3122. The NWTF contains three segments. Segment 1 consists of the cells containing the diversion box and pump pits, with a Facility Segment Use Category (FSUC) determined to be High Hazard. Segment 2 is the building that encloses the cells. The FSUC of Segment 2 has been determined to be Low Hazard. Segment 3 consists of all parts of the facility external to the main building; this segment contains the ventilation system and HEPA filters and includes the diesel fuel tank. The FSUC of Segment 3 is Low Hazard.

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This group is responsible for the update of DOE Manual 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual.  This manual was issued on September 23, 2002, and establishes a set of...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rail Topic Group has the responsibility to identify and discuss current issues and concerns regarding rail transportation of radioactive materials by the Department of Energy (DOE). The group’s...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a...

  14. Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L - Glossary of Key Terms and Symbols Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 Appendix L Glossary of Key Terms and Symbols Definitions provided in this glossary were compiled from multiple sources, including the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) guidance in NUREG/CR-6372 (Budnitz et al. 1997), NUREG-2117 (NRC 2012), and McGuire (2004). The glossary definitions are consistent with the use of the terms in the Hanford Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA)

  15. Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REMAIZE, J.A.

    2000-09-27

    The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

  16. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ER-B-97-04 | Department of Energy of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 PDF icon Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs, ER-B-97-04 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: CR-B-97-04 Audit Report: IG-0443 Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1997

  17. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - October 2014 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 4 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - October 2014 On October 21-22, 2014, the DOE Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) hosted a Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) working meeting in Germantown, Maryland. The meeting brought together approximately 80 experts involved in the characterization of, and mitigation against, natural hazards that can impact critical facilities. The meeting was valuable for sharing and discussing research in NPH analysis and mitigation, as well as best practices

  18. JLab Users Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Users Group Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? JLab Users Group User Liaison Home Users Group Program Advisory Committee User/Researcher Information print version UG Resources Background & Purpose Users Group Wiki By Laws Board of Directors Board of Directors Minutes Directory of Members Events At-A-Glance Member Institutions News Users Group Mailing

  19. Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, Anna; Cour Jansen, Jes la; Aspegren, Henrik

    2011-03-15

    Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

  20. Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approaches for Developing Uniform Hazard Spectra at Critical Facilities Andrew Maham, Tom Houston, Carl J. Costantino DOE NPH Meeting, Germantown, MD October 2014

  1. Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The strategy shall mitigate the flood (i.e., reducing the flood hazards, hardening the facility, building a levee to prevent flood encroachment) to an extent that facility ...

  2. Mr. Steve lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P o. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 FEB I 3110 New Mexico Environment Department...

  3. Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

  4. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis ... concept of unmitigated consequences from accident analysis to designate Safety-Class ...

  5. Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    submittals, is an acceptable methodology for use in calculating seismic hazard ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA ...

  6. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hazards (NPH) Meeting. Presentations Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Validation of the SASSI2010...

  7. Chemical Process Hazards Analysis (DOE-HDBK-1100-2004)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    February 1996 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL PROCESS HAZARDS ANALYSIS U.S. Department ... The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements ...

  8. Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT) - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT) ...

  9. Vermont Flood Hazard Area and River Corridor General Permit Applicatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the developer should provide a map generated from the ANR Natural Resources Atlas showing the river corridor and flood hazard area; A written description of the...

  10. Natural Phenomena Hazards Program Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As material and research is completed the reports will be added below. Reports: NFSP-2015-TD01, Report on the Implementation of Periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment ...

  11. EIS-0286: Hanford Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) analyzes the proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site.

  12. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  13. OAR 340-105 - DEQ Hazardous Management Facility Permits | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: OAR 340-105 - DEQ Hazardous Management Facility PermitsLegal Abstract Establishes basic permitting requirements for...

  14. Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20-2012, Natural Phenomena Hazard Analysis and Design Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities by Diane Johnson This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1020-2012,...

  15. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by B&W Technical Services, Pantex and Pro2Serve October, 2011

  16. Oregon Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Procedure and Criteria for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage or Disposal Permits Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  17. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Flood Hazard Area & River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Flood Hazard Area & River Corridor...

  18. Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by Rule | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Hazardous Waste Generator Treatment Permit by RulePermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook...

  19. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe, NM 87502-5469 Subject: Request for Additional Extension of Storage Time at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Facility, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number...

  20. Vermont Instructions for Preparing the VT Hazardous Waste Handler...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Instructions for Preparing the VT Hazardous Waste Handler Site ID Form Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance -...

  1. Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency...

  2. EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generators Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Hazardous Waste Generators Website Abstract This webpage provides general...

  3. Montana Hazardous Waste Program Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waste Program Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Hazardous Waste Program Webpage Abstract Provides overview of permitting...

  4. A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High Coulombic Efficiency Si Electrodes Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and ...

  5. Standoff Spectroscopy Using a Conditioned Target Identifies Hazardous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the necessity of close and potentially hazardous contact. It combines tunable infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy techniques to target identifying properties of...

  6. Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final ...

  7. Program Review, Workplace Inspections, Hazards Analysis And Abatement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides guidance information and suggested procedures for performing program review, workplace inspections, hazards analysis, and abatement, successfully at DOE Federal employee worksites.

  8. Audit of Selected Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program Costs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HAZARDOUS WASTE REMEDIAL ACTIONS PROGRAM COSTS The Office of Inspector General wants to make the distribution of its reports as customer friendly and cost effective as possible. ...

  9. Dust: A major environmental hazard on the earth's moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Vaniman, D.; Lehnert, B.

    1990-01-01

    On the Earth's Moon, obvious hazards to humans and machines are created by extreme temperature fluctuations, low gravity, and the virtual absence of any atmosphere. The most important other environmental factor is ionizing radiation. Less obvious environmental hazards that must be considered before establishing a manned presence on the lunar surface are the hazards from micrometeoroid bombardment, the nuisance of electro-statically-charged lunar dust, and an alien visual environment without familiar clues. Before man can establish lunar bases and lunar mining operations, and continue the exploration of that planet, we must develop a means of mitigating these hazards. 4 refs.

  10. Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Moltech Power Systems Group (MPS Group) Place: China Product: China-based subsidiary of Shanghai Huayi Group...

  11. Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group aka Huarui Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd (formerly Farsighted Group, aka...

  12. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pion Group

  13. Method for disposing of hazardous wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl- 2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  14. Hazardous Gas Production by Alpha Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay A. LaVerne, Principal Investigator

    2001-11-26

    This project focused on the production of hazardous gases in the radiolysis of solid organic matrices, such as polymers and resins, that may be associated with transuranic waste material. Self-radiolysis of radioactive waste is a serious environmental problem because it can lead to a change in the composition of the materials in storage containers and possibly jeopardize their integrity. Experimental determination of gaseous yields is of immediate practical importance in the engineering and maintenance of containers for waste materials. Fundamental knowledge on the radiation chemical processes occurring in these systems allows one to predict outcomes in materials or mixtures not specifically examined, which is a great aid in the management of the variety of waste materials currently overseen by Environmental Management.

  15. Hazards of explosives dusts: Particle size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cashdollar, K L; Hertzberg, M; Green, G M

    1992-02-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. In this report, the effect of particle size for HMX, HNS, RDX, TATB, and TNT explosives dusts is studied in detail. The explosibility data for these dusts are also compared to those for pure fuel dusts. The data show that all of the sizes of the explosives dusts that were studied were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air. The finest sizes (<10 [mu]m) of explosives dusts were less reactive than the intermediate sizes (20 to 60 [mu]m); this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. At the largest sizes studied, the explosives dusts become somewhat less reactive as dispersed dust clouds. The six sizes of the HMX dust were also studied as dust clouds dispersed in nitrogen.

  16. Ground freezing for containment of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayles, F.N.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1998-07-01

    The freezing of ground for the containment of subsurface hazardous waste is a promising method that is environmentally friendly and offers a safe alternative to other methods of waste retention in many cases. The frozen soil method offers two concepts for retaining waste. One concept is to freeze the entire waste area into a solid block of frozen soil thus locking the waste in situ. For small areas where the contaminated soil does not include vessels that would rupture from frost action, this concept may be simpler to install. A second concept, of course, is to create a frozen soil barrier to confine the waste within prescribed unfrozen soil boundaries; initial research in this area was funded by EPA, Cincinnati, OH, and the Army Corps of Engineers. The paper discusses advantages and limitations, a case study from Oak Ridge, TN, and a mesh generation program that simulates the cryogenic technology.

  17. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  18. A complete electrical hazard classification system and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Lloyd B; Cartelli, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, and relevant OSHA electrical safety standards evolved to address the hazards of 60-Hz power that are faced primarily by electricians, linemen, and others performing facility and utility work. This leaves a substantial gap in the management of electrical hazards in Research and Development (R&D) and specialized high voltage and high power equipment. Examples include lasers, accelerators, capacitor banks, electroplating systems, induction and dielectric heating systems, etc. Although all such systems are fed by 50/60 Hz alternating current (ac) power, we find substantial use of direct current (dc) electrical energy, and the use of capacitors, inductors, batteries, and radiofrequency (RF) power. The electrical hazards of these forms of electricity and their systems are different than for 50160 Hz power. Over the past 10 years there has been an effort to develop a method of classifying all of the electrical hazards found in all types of R&D and utilization equipment. Examples of the variation of these hazards from NFPA 70E include (a) high voltage can be harmless, if the available current is sufficiently low, (b) low voltage can be harmful if the available current/power is high, (c) high voltage capacitor hazards are unique and include severe reflex action, affects on the heart, and tissue damage, and (d) arc flash hazard analysis for dc and capacitor systems are not provided in existing standards. This work has led to a comprehensive electrical hazard classification system that is based on various research conducted over the past 100 years, on analysis of such systems in R&D, and on decades of experience. Initially, national electrical safety codes required the qualified worker only to know the source voltage to determine the shock hazard. Later, as arc flash hazards were understood, the fault current and clearing time were needed. These items are still insufficient to fully characterize all types of electrical hazards. The new comprehensive electrical hazard classification system uses a combination of voltage, shock current available, fault current available, power, energy, and waveform to classify all forms of electrical hazards. Based on this electrical hazard classification system, many new tools have been developed, including (a) work controls for these hazards, (b) better selection of PPE for R&D work, (c) improved training, and (d) a new Severity Ranking Tool that is used to rank electrical accidents and incidents with various forms of electrical energy.

  19. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift zone of Kilauea.

  20. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, June 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Grossman

    2005-06-01

    The sources of radionuclides include current and previous activities conducted on the NTS. The NTS was the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the Continental U.S. between 1951 and 1992. Historical testing has included (1) atmospheric testing in the 1950s and early 1960s, (2) underground testing between 1951 and 1992, and (3) open-air nuclear reactor and rocket engine testing (DOE, 1996a). No nuclear tests have been conducted since September 23,1992 (DOE, 2000), however; radionuclides remaining on the soil surface in many NTS areas after several decades of radioactive decay are re-suspended into the atmosphere at concentrations that can be detected by air sampling. Limited non-nuclear testing includes spills of hazardous materials at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (formerly called the Hazardous Materials Spill Center), private technology development, aerospace and demilitarization activities, and site remediating activities. Processing of radioactive materials is limited to laboratory analyses; handling, transport, storage, and assembly of nuclear explosive devices or radioactive targets for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) gas gun; and operation of radioactive waste management sites (RWMSs) for low-level radioactive and mixed waste (DOE, 1996a). Monitoring and evaluation of the various activities conducted onsite indicate that the potential sources of offsite radiation exposure in calendar year (CY) 2004 were releases from (1) evaporation of tritiated water (HTO) from containment ponds that receive drainage water from E Tunnel in Area 12 and water pumped from wells used to characterize the aquifers at the sites of past underground nuclear tests, (2) onsite radioanalytical laboratories, (3) the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS facilities, and (4) diffuse sources of tritium (H{sup 3}) and re-suspension of plutonium ({sup 239+240}Pu) and americium ({sup 241}Am) at the sites of past nuclear tests. The following sections present a general description of the present sources on the NTS and at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). At the NLVF, parts of Building A-1 were contaminated with tritium by a previous contractor in 1995. The incident involved the release of tritium as HTO. This unusual occurrence led to a very small potential exposure to an offsite person. The HTO emission has continued at lower levels (probably re-emanation from building materials), even after cleanup activities in November and December 1997. A description of the incident and the potential effective dose equivalent (EDE) for offsite exposure are set forth in Appendix A.

  1. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:43

  2. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  3. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

  4. Proposed Risk-Informed Seismic Hazard Periodic Reevaluation Methodology for Complying with DOE Order 420.1C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammerer, Annie

    2015-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities must comply with DOE Order 420.1C Facility Safety, which requires that all such facilities review their natural phenomena hazards (NPH) assessments no less frequently than every ten years. The Order points the reader to Standard DOE-STD-1020-2012. In addition to providing a discussion of the applicable evaluation criteria, the Standard references other documents, including ANSI/ANS-2.29-2008 and NUREG-2117. These documents provide supporting criteria and approaches for evaluating the need to update an existing probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). All of the documents are consistent at a high level regarding the general conceptual criteria that should be considered. However, none of the documents provides step-by-step detailed guidance on the required or recommended approach for evaluating the significance of new information and determining whether or not an existing PSHA should be updated. Further, all of the conceptual approaches and criteria given in these documents deal with changes that may have occurred in the knowledge base that might impact the inputs to the PSHA, the calculated hazard itself, or the technical basis for the hazard inputs. Given that the DOE Order is aimed at achieving and assuring the safety of nuclear facilities—which is a function not only of the level of the seismic hazard but also the capacity of the facility to withstand vibratory ground motions—the inclusion of risk information in the evaluation process would appear to be both prudent and in line with the objectives of the Order. The purpose of this white paper is to describe a risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA consistent with the DOE Order. While the development of the proposed methodology was undertaken as a result of assessments for specific SDC-3 facilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and it is expected that the application at INL will provide a demonstration of the methodology, there is potential for general applicability to other facilities across the DOE complex. As such, both a general methodology and a specific approach intended for INL are described in this document. The general methodology proposed in this white paper is referred to as the “seismic hazard periodic review methodology,” or SHPRM. It presents a graded approach for SDC-3, SDC-4 and SDC-5 facilities that can be applied in any risk-informed regulatory environment by once risk-objectives appropriate for the framework are developed. While the methodology was developed for seismic hazard considerations, it can also be directly applied to other types of natural hazards.

  5. Interagency Working Groups

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works closely with agencies and partner organizations to coordinate interagency working groups

  6. Tritium Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tritium Focus Group Tritium Focus Group The purpose of the TFG, a Standing DOE Working Group, is to promote cost-effective improvements in tritium safety, handling, transportation, storage, and operations, and to enhance communication across the Department of Energy (DOE) (inclusive of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)) on all matters related to tritium. Contacts Mike Rogers (505) 665-2513 Email Chandra Savage Marsden (505) 664-0183 Email The Tritium Focus Group consists of

  7. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procurement - Routing criteriaemergency preparedness Tribal Issues Topic Group * TEPP Navajo Nation (Tom Clawson) - 1404 - Needs Assessment * Identified strengths and...

  8. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on July 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Cindy Taylor, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the June 12, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on June 18, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the May 21, 2013 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  11. EIS-0200: Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States.

  12. Nilsson Group Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stanford top slac line home group research line Welcome to the Nilsson group. Primary research interests in the Nilsson group includes using x-ray spectroscopies to understand: The Structure of water Bond breakage and formation during catalytic reactions on surfaces The fundamental studies of electrochemistry for energy conversion

  13. SSRL ETS Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint ASD: Schedule Priorites Accelerator tech support - Call List Documentation: Engineering Notes, Drawings, and Accelerator Safety Documents Mechanical Systems: Accelerator Drawings Accelerator Pictures Accelerator Vacuum Systems (SSRL) LCW Vacuum Projects: Last Updated: February 8, 2007 Ben Scott

  14. Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, K.M.

    1995-09-28

    This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

  15. A high capability teleoperated vehicle for hazardous applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudar, A.M.; Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing a high performance teleoperated vehicle for use in radioactive and hazardous environments. The three-wheeled vehicle incorporates a highly dexterous 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF), hydraulically-powered manipulator made by Schilling Development, Inc. The teleoperator is called Little MoRT (MObile Radio-controlled Teleoperator) and is a modified version of a commercially available, battery-powered, warehouse vehicle. Little MoRT is controlled remotely by a universal robot controller either through a radio frequency link or a tethered cable. Six video cameras and a microphone provide the operator with audio-visual feedback of the vehicle and its surrounding environment. The vehicle also incorporates a hydraulic power unit consisting of a propane-driven engine for powering the Schilling manipulator. Little MoRT is capable of operating in outdoor as well as indoor environments and is well suited for decontamination and decommissioning activities such as dismantling, sorting, and surveying of radioactive waste.

  16. WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit - 2008 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrman, R.F.; Most, W.A.

    2008-07-01

    Important new changes to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) were implemented during 2007. The challenge was to implement these changes without impacting shipping schedules. Many of the changes required advanced preparation and coordination in order to transition to the new waste analysis paradigm, both at the generator sites and at the WIPP without interrupting the flow of waste to the disposal facility. Not only did aspects of waste characterization change, but also a new Permittees' confirmation program was created. Implementing the latter change required that new equipment and facilities be obtained, personnel hired, trained and qualified, and operating procedures written and approved without interruption to the contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste shipping schedule. This was all accomplished successfully with no delayed or cancelled shipments. Looking forward to 2008 and beyond, proposed changes that will deal with waste in the DOE TRU waste complex is larger than the TRUPACT-IIs can handle. Size reduction of the waste would lead to unnecessary exposure risk and ultimately create more waste. The WIPP is working to have the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certify the TRUPACT-III. The TRUPACT-III will be able to accommodate larger sized TRU mixed waste. Along with this new NRC-certified shipping cask, a new disposal container, the Standard Large Box, must be proposed in a permit modification. Containers for disposal of TRU mixed waste at the WIPP must meet the DOT 7A standards and be filtered. Additionally, as the TRUPACT-III/Standard Large Box loads and unloads from the end of the shipping cask, the proposed modification will add horizontal waste handling techniques to WIPP's vertical CH TRU waste handling operations. Another major focus will be the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit reapplication. The WIPP received its HWFP in October of 1999 for a term of ten years. The regulations and the HWFP require that a new permit application be submitted 180-days before the expiration date of the HWFP. At that time, the WIPP will request only one significant change, the permitting of Panel 8 to receive TRU mixed waste. (author)

  17. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  18. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  19. Large Group Visits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Group Visits Large Group Visits All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Contact Us thumbnail of Bradbury Science Museum (505) 667-4444 Email Let us know if you plan to bring a group of 10 or more. All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Parking for buses and RVs is available on Iris Street behind the Museum off of 15th St. See attached map (pdf).

  20. Zurich`s hazard analysis process: A systematic team approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frei, H.

    1997-06-01

    The Zurich method of hazard analysis (ZHA) is a process designed to facilitate the systematic identification, assessment and reduction or elimination of hazard and risk in almost any product, system or process. It has been particularly successful as a front-end screening tool in the petrochemical, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries. The complexity and the regulation of these industries and the requirement for management of change have created a demand for highly efficient, yet thorough, hazard analysis techniques capable of capturing and managing the total risk perspective while clearly illuminating the risk priorities. Only when these priorities have been segregated and economically addressed as an organization fully leveraged the power of any hazard analysis tool. This paper will outline the Zurich Hazard Analysis process and will highlight the elements and strategies central to its success as an efficient, yet thorough methodology.

  1. Hazardous waste research and development in the Pacific Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirillo, R.R.; Carpenter, R.A.; Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI )

    1989-01-01

    The effective management of hazardous waste is an issue that all countries of the Pacific Basin must address. By very rough estimates, almost 272 million metric tons of hazardous wastes are being generated every year in the region. While the data are not consistently defined and reported, they do indicate the extent of the problem. Increasing development brings along an increase in the rate of hazardous waste generation. On this basis, the developing countries of the region can be expected to experience some of the same problems of the developed countries as their economies become more industrialized. Fundamental problems are involved in the compilation of consistent hazardous-waste generation statistics in the Pacific Basin. One involves the definition of what constitutes hazardous waste.

  2. K Basins fuel encapsulation and storage hazard categorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.

    1994-12-01

    This document establishes the initial hazard categorization for K-Basin fuel encapsulation and storage in the 100 K Area of the Hanford site. The Hazard Categorization for K-Basins addresses the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K-Basins and their supporting facilities. The Hazard Categorization covers the hazards associated with normal K-Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. The criteria categorizes a facility based on total curies per radionuclide located in the facility. Tables 5-3 and 5-4 display the results in section 5.0. In accordance with DOE-STD-1027 and the analysis provided in section 5.0, the K East Basin fuel encapsulation and storage activity and the K West Basin storage are classified as a {open_quotes}Category 2{close_quotes} Facility.

  3. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda and presentations from the Catalysis Working Group held on June 16, 2014, in Washington, D.C., in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting.

  4. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: May 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information from the Catalysis Working Group meeting held on May 15, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting.

  5. Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EHSS A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHSS Internal Groups JHA Training Whom to Call Databases Ergonomics References EHS Quick Links 1 Minute 4 Safety Accident Narratives Accident...

  6. Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis

    2004-06-15

    This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS PDF icon Proposed Task Plan - Routing Topic Group More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group...

  8. NIF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    users NIF User Group The National Ignition Facility User Group provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who use NIF for "Science Use of NIF" experiments and NIF management. Responsibility for NIF and the research programs carried out at NIF resides with the NIF Director. The NIF User Group advises the NIF Director on matters of concern to users, as well as providing a channel for communication for NIF users with funding agencies and

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 15, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on January 15, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the December 18, 2012 meeting. One issue

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on December 17, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:07 PM on May 26, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Scot

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:05 PM on October 22, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Joan Kessner (Washington Closure Hanford (WCH)), Karl Pool (Pacific

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2016 The meeting was called to order by Jonathan Sanwald, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on January 26, 2016 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)), Jeff Cheadle (DOE-ORP), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred

  14. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharifi, Mozafar Hadidi, Mosslem Vessali, Elahe Mosstafakhani, Parasto Taheri, Kamal Shahoie, Saber Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-15

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  15. NERSC Users Group (NUG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group Monthly NUG Webinars Annual Meetings NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List...

  16. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all...

  17. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print...

  18. Detector Support Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    browser. Concerns? Hall B Navigation DSG Home Staff Presentations Notes print version Detector Support Group Spotlight Archive Index Rotation test for the SVT detector EPICS...

  19. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on October 16, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. New personnel have joined the Focus Group since the last

  20. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on November 27, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Steve Trent, and Rich Weiss. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the October 16, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on July 23, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Joan Kessner, Charleston Ramos, Chris Sutton, Steve Smith, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the June 18, 2013 meeting. One Focus Group member provided a comment on the June

  2. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on August 20, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Steve Smith, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the July 23, 2013 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they had

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 15, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the March 18, 2014 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they

  4. Hazardous waste identification: A guide to changing regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stults, R.G. )

    1993-03-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was enacting in 1976 and amended in 1984 by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). Since then, federal regulations have generated a profusion of terms to identify and describe hazardous wastes. Regulations that5 define and govern management of hazardous wastes are codified in Title 40 of the code of Federal Regulations, Protection of the environment''. Title 40 regulations are divided into chapters, subchapters and parts. To be defined as hazardous, a waste must satisfy the definition of solid waste any discharged material not specifically excluded from regulation or granted a regulatory variance by the EPA Administrator. Some wastes and other materials have been identified as non-hazardous and are listed in 40 CFR 261.4(a) and 261.4(b). Certain wastes that satisfy the definition of hazardous waste nevertheless are excluded from regulation as hazardous if they meet specific criteria. Definitions and criteria for their exclusion are found in 40 CFR 261.4(c)-(f) and 40 CFR 261.5.

  5. ORISE Resources: Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partners with CDC to develop Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment to identify gaps in planning efforts The Hospital All-Hazards Self-Assessment, or HAH, is designed to help hospitals assess and identify potential gaps in their facility's all-hazards emergency plan(s). Upon completing the HAH, hospitals can use it to modify aspects of these plan(s). Hospitals are encouraged to update the HAH as changes to the plan(s) are made, and to include the HAH with their preparedness planning documents. The

  6. Geological hazards programs and research in the U. S. A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filson, J.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Geological hazards have been studied for centuries, but government support of research to lessen their effects is relatively new. This article briefly describes government programs and research underway in the U.S.A. that are directed towards reducing losses of life and property from earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides. The National Earthquake program is described, including four basic research areas: plate tectonics; estimation of the earthquakes; and effects and hazards assessment. The Volcano Studies Program has three areas of research: fundamentals of volcanoes; hazards assessments; and volcano monitoring. Three research areas are included in landslide studies: land slide processes; prediction; inventory and susceptibility studies.

  7. Health and Safety Procedures Manual for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thate, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chemical Assessments Team (ORNL/CAT) has developed this Health and Safety Procedures Manual for the guidance, instruction, and protection of ORNL/CAT personnel expected to be involved in hazardous waste site assessments and remedial actions. This manual addresses general and site-specific concerns for protecting personnel, the general public, and the environment from any possible hazardous exposures. The components of this manual include: medical surveillance, guidance for determination and monitoring of hazards, personnel and training requirements, protective clothing and equipment requirements, procedures for controlling work functions, procedures for handling emergency response situations, decontamination procedures for personnel and equipment, associated legal requirements, and safe drilling practices.

  8. Hazard classification assessment for the High Voltage Initiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogan, J.D.

    1994-04-19

    An investigation was conducted to determine whether the High Voltage Initiator (Sandia p number 395710; Navy NAVSEA No. 6237177) could be assigned a Department of Transportation (DOT) hazard classification of ``IGNITERS, 1.4G, UN0325`` under Code of Federal Regulations, 49 CFR 173.101, when packaged per Mound drawing NXB911442. A hazard classification test was performed, and the test data led to a recommended hazard classification of ``IGNITERS, 1.4G, UN0325,`` based on guidance outlined in DOE Order 1540.2 and 49 CFR 173.56.

  9. Lessons learned from the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste subcontract and ESH&Q liability assessment process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N.J.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and disposal contracts were first consolidated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1992 by EG&G Idaho, Inc. At that time, disposition of Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act hazardous waste, Toxic Substance Control Act waste, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act hazardous substances and contaminated media, and recyclable hazardous materials was consolidated under five subcontracts. The wastes were generated by five different INEL M&O contractors, under the direction of three different Department of Energy field offices. The consolidated contract reduced the number of facilities handling INEL waste from 27 to 8 qualified treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, with brokers specifically prohibited. This reduced associated transportation costs, amount and cost of contractual paperwork, and environmental liability exposure. EG&G reviewed this approach and proposed a consolidated hazardous waste subcontract be formed for the major EG&G managed DOE sites: INEL, Mound, Rocky Flats, Nevada Test Site, and 10 satellite facilities. After obtaining concurrence from DOE Headquarters, this effort began in March 1992 and was completed with the award of two master task subcontracts in October and November 1993. In addition, the effort included a team to evaluate the apparent awardee`s facilities for environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) and financial liability status. This report documents the evaluation of the process used to prepare, bid, and award the EG&G consolidated hazardous waste transportation, treatment, recycling, and/or disposal subcontracts and associated ESH&Q and financial liability assessments; document the strengths and weaknesses of the process; and propose improvements that would expedite and enhance the process for other DOE installations that used the process and for the re-bid of the consolidated subcontract, scheduled for 1997.

  10. Microsoft Word - Appendix C - Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page C-1 Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process Purpose: The purpose of this Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process is to identify hazards and regulatory requirements so that appropriate work control steps, including regulatory agency and/or engineering approvals, are implemented to address and mitigate the hazard and/or

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group PDF icon May 17, 2007 PDF icon January 16, 2007 PDF icon...

  12. DOE-STD-1027-92; Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... The decision criteria blocks shown immediately ... represent a level of hazard for which significant management attention is ... Use Hazard Analysis Low-complexity operations ...

  13. EERE Success Story-New Mexico: Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratories developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), a free Web-based tool that can quickly calculate potential visual hazards from proposed solar installations. ...

  14. Category 3 threshold quantities for hazard categorization of nonreactor facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandigo, R.L.

    1996-02-13

    This document provides the information necessary to determine Hazard Category 3 threshold quantities for those isotopes of interest not listed in WHC-CM-4-46, Section 4, Table 1.''Threshold Quantities.''

  15. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ANS Standards to Support DOE NPH Design Tornado vs. Hurricane Which is More Critical for Design of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants? Review of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH)...

  16. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL On October ... in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The PNOV cites four violations of DOE worker safety and health ...

  17. ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ORS 466 - Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Hazardous Waste and Materials Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS...

  18. Title 40 CFR 261 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 40...

  19. Vermont Hazardous Waste Handler Site ID Form | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit Application: Vermont Hazardous Waste Handler Site ID FormLegal Abstract This form is used to notify the Vermont Agency of...

  20. Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Hazardous Waste Part A Permit ApplicationLegal Abstract Detailed instructions for filing a RCRA...

  1. Title 40 CFR 270: EPA Administered Programs: The Hazardous Waste...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    270: EPA Administered Programs: The Hazardous Waste Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 40 CFR...

  2. Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Section 60.020 Hazardous...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    60.020 Hazardous Waste Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 18 Alaska Administrative Code Section 60.020...

  3. A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis Update Review for Two DOE Sites and NGA-East Project Overview and Status Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel ...

  4. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet

  5. Group key management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  6. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 15, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on May 15, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Michael Barnes, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Larry Markel, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on June 12, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thomson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on August 21, 2012 in an alternate Conference Room in 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton. Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, and Rich Weiss. I. Because the meeting was scheduled to take place in Room 308 and a glitch in

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:08 PM on December 18, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the November 27,

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on February 26, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannon Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Dave St. John, Steve Smith, Steve Trent and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the January 22, 2013 meeting. No

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on March 19, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 The beginning of the meeting was delayed due to an unannounced loss of the conference room scheduled for the meeting. After securing another meeting location, the meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:18 PM on April 16, 2013 in Conference Room 156 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool,

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:00 PM on May 21, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the April 16, 2013

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on October 15, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rick Warriner, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on November 19, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Mike Barnes, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 28, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 28, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on February 25, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any

  18. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 18, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the February 25, 2014

  19. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on May 20, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the

  20. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on June 12, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Sara Champoux, Glen Clark, Jim Douglas, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the presence of new and/or infrequent

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on June 17, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Robert Elkins, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton and Rich Weiss. I. Because of the short time since the last meeting, Huei Meznarich stated that the minutes from the June 12, 2014 meeting have not yet

  2. Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Events at LANL | Department of Energy Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL Fact Sheet, Preliminary Notice of Violation: Four Hazardous Energy Control Events at LANL On October 17, 2012, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) for violations of Department of Energy (DOE) worker safety and health program requirements. LANS is the management and

  3. Process development accomplishments: Waste and hazard minimization, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homan, D.A.

    1991-11-04

    This report summarizes significant technical accomplishments of the Mound Waste and Hazard Minimization Program for FY 1991. The accomplishments are in one of eight major areas: environmentally responsive cleaning program; nonhalogenated solvent trials; substitutes for volatile organic compounds; hazardous material exposure minimization; nonhazardous plating development; explosive processing waste reduction; tritium capture without conversion to water; and robotic assembly. Program costs have been higher than planned.

  4. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1: methodology. Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity

  5. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report Aided by its consultant, the US Geologic Survey (USGS), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed ''Seismic Hazard Methodology for

  6. Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United States:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect central and Eastern United States: Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seismic hazard methodology for the central and Eastern United States: Volume 1, Part 1: Theory: Final report The NRC staff concludes that SOG/EPRI Seismic Hazard Methodology, as documented in the topical report and associated submittals, is an acceptable methodology for use in calculating seismic

  7. Method of recovering hazardous waste from phenolic resin filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); McFee, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Burdge, Bradley G. (Idaho Falls, ID); McConnell, Jr., John W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a process for the recovery of hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and radioactive elements from phenolic resin filter by a circulating a solution of 8 to 16 molar nitric acid at a temperature of 110 to 190 degrees F. through the filter. The hot solution dissolves the filter material and releases the hazardous material so that it can be recovered or treated for long term storage in an environmentally safe manner.

  8. New tool helps reduce use of hazardous chemicals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tool Helps Reduce Use Of Hazardous Chemicals Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit New tool helps reduce use of hazardous chemicals The "Green Chemical Alternatives Purchasing Wizard," will begin to help employees choose the most benign substances possible for their work. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs

  9. Seismic Hazards at Kilauea and Mauna LOA Volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Fred W.

    1994-04-22

    A significant seismic hazard exists in south Hawaii from large tectonic earthquakes that can reach magnitude 8 and intensity XII. This paper quantifies the hazard by estimating the horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) in south Hawaii which occurs with a 90% probability of not being exceeded during exposure times from 10 to 250 years. The largest earthquakes occur beneath active, unbuttressed and mobile flanks of volcanoes in their shield building stage.

  10. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    22nd Session Presentations | Department of Energy Session Presentations October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at

  11. Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Program - Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (NPH) Program - Guidelines Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Program - Guidelines Current Natural Phenomena Hazards Program requirements of the Department reside in the documents listed below separated out by Federal Government Wide Requirements to Primary Department of Energy Documents. Key industry consensus standards and guidance documents are also listed below for reference. Federal Government-wide Requirements Public Law 101-614 Executive Order 12941 Primary DOE Requirements Documents 10

  12. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-07

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

  13. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  14. Agencies complete comprehensive investigation for radioactive and hazardous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste landfill Printer-friendly icon Printer-Friendly June 29, 2007 Agencies complete comprehensive investigation for radioactive and hazardous waste landfill; agree to extend document submittal milestone The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have completed a CERCLA (Superfund) Remedial Investigation and Baseline Risk Assessment and Feasibility Study of a radioactive and hazardous waste landfill

  15. An Environmentally Safe Detector for Hazardous Gas - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Find More Like This Return to Search An Environmentally Safe Detector for Hazardous Gas Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary ORNL researchers developed a breakthrough design for a hazardous-gas detector that is environmentally safe and inexpensive and that includes both sensing and detecting means. The invention can detect and identify volatile organic and inorganic substances in vapors faster than conventional methods.

  16. Arc Vault Significantly Reduces Electrical Hazards | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arc Vault Significantly Reduces Electrical Hazards Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Arc Vault Significantly Reduces Electrical Hazards GE Global Research 2012.05.01 Recently, technology developed at GE Global Research received high praise from industry leaders for its ability to shield industrial -

  17. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.0 Seismic Source Characterization .................................................................................................. 8.1 8.1 Building the SSC Model: Overview and Approach ............................................................ 8.1 8.1.1 Criteria for Defining Seismic Sources ....................................................................... 8.1 8.1.2 Data Evaluation Process ............................................................................................ 8.3

  18. Review of earthquake hazard assessments of plant sites at Paducah, Kentucky and Portsmouth, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    Members of the US Geological Survey staff in Golden, Colorado, have reviewed the submissions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) staff and of Risk Engineering, Inc. (REI) (Golden, Colorado) for seismic hazard estimates for Department of Energy facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. We reviewed the historical seismicity and seismotectonics near the two sites, and general features of the LLNL and EPRI/SOG methodologies used by LLNL and Risk Engineering respectively, and also the separate Risk Engineering methodology used at Paducah. We discussed generic issues that affect the modeling of both sites, and performed alternative calculations to determine sensitivities of seismic hazard results to various assumptions and models in an attempt to assign reasonable bounding values of the hazard. In our studies we find that peak acceleration values of 0.08 g for Portsmouth and 0.32 g for Paducah represent central values of the, ground motions obtained at 1000-year return periods. Peak accelerations obtained in the LLNL and Risk Engineering studies have medians near these values (results obtained using the EPRI/SOG methodology appear low at both sites), and we believe that these medians are appropriate values for use in the evaluation of systems, structures, and components for seismic structural integrity and for the seismic design of new and improved systems, structures, and components at Portsmouth and Paducah.

  19. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory Building 878 hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, C.; Thornton, W.; Swihart, A.; Gilman, T.

    1994-07-01

    The introduction of the hazards assessment process is to document the impact of the release of hazards at the Advanced Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (AMPL) that are significant enough to warrant consideration in Sandia National Laboratories` operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment is prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requirement that facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment provides an analysis of the potential airborne release of chemicals associated with the operations and processes at the AMPL. This research and development laboratory develops advanced manufacturing technologies, practices, and unique equipment and provides the fabrication of prototype hardware to meet the needs of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The focus of the hazards assessment is the airborne release of materials because this requires the most rapid, coordinated emergency response on the part of the AMPL, SNL/NM, collocated facilities, and surrounding jurisdiction to protect workers, the public, and the environment.

  20. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  1. Strategic Initiatives Work Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Work Group, comprised of members representing DOE, contractor and worker representatives, provides a forum for information sharing; data collection and analysis; as well as, identifying best practices and initiatives to enhance safety performance and safety culture across the Complex.

  2. Date Times Group Speakers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Research Meeting Toms Arias Mon, 3-10 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Richard Robinson Fri, 3-14 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Michael Zachman (Kourkoutis) & Deniz...

  3. Tritium Focus Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall 2015 Tritium Focus Group Meeting November 3 - 5, 2015 Meeting location: J.R. Oppenheimer Study Center TA 3, Building 207, Main Floor Technical Area 3 Map (pdf) Directions via Google Maps Meeting Information Tritium Focus Group Charter (pdf) Hotel Information Classified Session Information Los Alamos Restaurants (pdf) LANL Information Visting Los Alamos Area Map Weather Contacts Mike Rogers (505) 665-2513 mrogers@lanl.gov Chandra Savage Marsden (505) 664-0183 chandra@lanl.gov

  4. DOE STGWG Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia,

  5. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, and Keri Troutman. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and publicity, and

  6. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:03 PM on November 16, 2010 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Paula Ciszak, Glen Clark, Doug Duvon, Kathi Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Thompson, Eric Wyse. New members to the Focus Group were

  7. Vertical Velocity Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are

  8. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with

  9. Good Energy Group Plc previously Monkton Group Plc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plc previously Monkton Group Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Good Energy Group Plc (previously Monkton Group Plc) Place: Chippenham, Wiltshire, United Kingdom Zip: SN15 1EE...

  10. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Washington, DC TEC Meeting - 180(c) Group Summary - March 15, 2006 More...

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary More Documents &...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocols Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Protocols Topic Group Summary -...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon Atlanta TEC...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon ...

  16. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. South Carolina ETV Socratic Dialog II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the script from a videotaped dialogue concerning a hypothetical hazardous waste/community health risk scenario presented as a Round Table Forum. Various issues are explored, ranging from the scientific and technical aspects of environmental studies and remedial action, to public information and community involvement, to the economic impact on local communities. The roles of the media, local government and federal and state agencies are examined as well as sources for funding. In an attempt to gauge audience response and reaction, evaluation cards were distributed, and the comments and recommendations are included here.

  17. Characterization of the Potential Hazards Associated with Potential RCRA Treatment Noncompliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, David Lewis

    2015-08-20

    The purpose of this document is to provide a hazard evaluation of the noncompliances and whether any new actions are required to mitigate potential risk to the worker or the public. In short, we have reviewed the noncompliances and have concluded that the possibility of exothermic reactions leading to radioactive release is not credible, and in one case, inconceivable, stemming from the fact that the majority fraction of the waste is compatible with organic absorbents and neutralizers. It is not expected that the noncompliances would generate or produce uncontrolled flammable fumes, gases, extreme heat, pressure, fire, explosions, or violent reactions.

  18. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-06-01

    This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

  19. Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

  20. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  1. ENN Group aka XinAo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENN Group aka XinAo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ENN Group (aka XinAo Group) Place: Langfang, Hebei Province, China Zip: 65001 Product: Chinese private industrial...

  2. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  3. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  4. The Chaninik Wind Group

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chaninik Wind Group It started as a small, simple idea..., now we are headed to become," the heartbeat of the region." William Igkurak, President USDoE Tribal Energy Program, Annual Program Review, November 13-16, 2012, Denver, Colorado Department of Energy Tribal Energy Chaninik Wind Group Villages Kongiganak pop.359 Kwigillingok pop. 388 Kipnuk pop.644 Tuntutuliak pop. 370 On average, 24% of families are below the poverty line. Chaninik's Goal is to become "The

  5. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 20, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the February 21, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  6. Greenko Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenko Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenko Group Place: Hyderabad, India Zip: 500 033 Product: Focused on clean energy projects in Asia. References: Greenko Group1...

  7. Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinocome Group Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector...

  8. Valesul Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valesul Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Valesul Group Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian ethanol producer. References: Valesul Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  9. Angeleno Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angeleno Group Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Angeleno Group Name: Angeleno Group Address: 2029 Century Park East, Suite 2980 Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90067 Region:...

  10. MTorres Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: MTorres Group Place: Murcia, Spain Zip: 30320 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturer References: MTorres Group1 This...

  11. Ferrari Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ferrari Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ferrari Group Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Sao Paulo-based ethanol producer. References: Ferrari Group1 This article is a...

  12. Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett

    2013-07-22

    For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

  13. Looking for Hazardous Pollutants in Your Kitchen

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett

    2014-05-13

    For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health. In Berkeley Lab's test kitchen scientist Brett Singer and his team are measuring the pollutants emitted by cooking foods and evaluating how effective various range hoods are in capturing the pollutants. In an unprecedented recent study, the scientists estimated that 60 percent of homes in California that cook at least once a week with a gas stove can reach pollutant levels that would be illegal if found outdoors.

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications Topic Group Summary - July 1998 PDF icon Inaugural Group Meeting - April 1998 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup PDF icon April 6, 2006 PDF icon February 23, 2006 Draft PDF icon January 24, 2006 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup

  17. DOE-DP-STD-3016-99; DOE Limited Standard Hazard Analysis Reports...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... . . . . 2 5. HAZARD ANALYSIS SCOPE AND INTERFACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5.2 INTERFACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  18. 49 CFR Subchapter C, Parts 171-177: Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration regulates the transport of hazardous materials through Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), Subchapter C, "Hazardous Materials Regulations." Parts 171-177 provide general information on hazardous materials and regulation for their packaging and their shipment by rail, air, vessel, and public highway.

  19. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Soil Structure Interaction Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations for the Soil Structure Interaction session at the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting.

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Conference Call Summaries

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon May 13, 1999 PDF icon April 8, 1999 PDF icon March 1, 1999 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries