National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hawk buteo regalis

  1. Carol Hawk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carol Hawk is the Program Manager for Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems in the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability.

  2. Stephen Hawking

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le grand astrophysicien S.Hawking, né le 08-01-1942 à Oxford, parle de "baby universes" et la gravitation et répond aux questions.

  3. Sarah EchoHawk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sarah EchoHawk is the Chief Executive Officer of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) and is an enrolled member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. Before joining the American...

  4. Morpho-Hawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-10

    Morpho-Hawk applies projectional mathematical morphology in a fundamentally new way. Morpho-Hawk extracts object information from digital images by filtering with simple geometrical figures such as rectangles or simple curves. Two core algorithms are used to accomplish this: 1) Object Detection and Feature Extraction from Images: Using projectional morphology, Morpho-Hawk finds features of interest within an image, such as contours, shapes, colors, infrared spectra, and more. Because Morpho-Hawk identifies features based on shape or form, the method can uniquely handle different image or object conditions and directions. MorphoHawk can evaluate all possible images of the analyzed scene using the same transformations that are applied just to one image of that scene. Hence, recognizing a defect within an image or part of an image provides information to assist in recognizing other objects in the image. In addition, known background image information can be morphologically subtracted out in order to focus on the appearance or disappearance of the features of interest. 2) Object Analysis: Upon detection of an object of interest, Morpho-Hawk can analyze the object based learned information from prior images or end-user defined criteria for certain object of special interest by selecting feature (e.g., color, size, shape, apparent volume) and/or symbol (e.g., letter, number). The novel algorithm can analyze targeted objects, even as conditions of such as illumination, shadows, and spectral regions change strongly in following images as compared to the original image. This enables robust recognition, interpolation and prediction. As the analysis shows the presence of these features in the optical signal, the algorithm can make a determination based on user defined probability. The object information can be stored for later analysis using simple morphological data compression methods and/or retention of the original optical images.

  5. Morpho-Hawk

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-10

    Morpho-Hawk applies projectional mathematical morphology in a fundamentally new way. Morpho-Hawk extracts object information from digital images by filtering with simple geometrical figures such as rectangles or simple curves. Two core algorithms are used to accomplish this: 1) Object Detection and Feature Extraction from Images: Using projectional morphology, Morpho-Hawk finds features of interest within an image, such as contours, shapes, colors, infrared spectra, and more. Because Morpho-Hawk identifies features based on shape or form, themore » method can uniquely handle different image or object conditions and directions. MorphoHawk can evaluate all possible images of the analyzed scene using the same transformations that are applied just to one image of that scene. Hence, recognizing a defect within an image or part of an image provides information to assist in recognizing other objects in the image. In addition, known background image information can be morphologically subtracted out in order to focus on the appearance or disappearance of the features of interest. 2) Object Analysis: Upon detection of an object of interest, Morpho-Hawk can analyze the object based learned information from prior images or end-user defined criteria for certain object of special interest by selecting feature (e.g., color, size, shape, apparent volume) and/or symbol (e.g., letter, number). The novel algorithm can analyze targeted objects, even as conditions of such as illumination, shadows, and spectral regions change strongly in following images as compared to the original image. This enables robust recognition, interpolation and prediction. As the analysis shows the presence of these features in the optical signal, the algorithm can make a determination based on user defined probability. The object information can be stored for later analysis using simple morphological data compression methods and/or retention of the original optical images.« less

  6. Hawking from Catalan

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-12

    The Virasoro algebra determines all ‘graviton’ matrix elements in AdS3/CFT2. We study the explicit exchange of any number of Virasoro gravitons between heavy and light CFT2 operators at large central charge. These graviton exchanges can be written in terms of new on-shell tree diagrams, organized in a perturbative expansion in hH/c, the heavy operator dimension divided by the central charge. The Virasoro vacuum conformal block, which is the sum of all the tree diagrams, obeys a differential recursion relation generalizing that of the Catalan numbers. Here, we use this recursion relation to sum the on-shell diagrams to all orders, computingmore » the Virasoro vacuum block. Extrapolating to large hH/c determines the Hawking temperature of a BTZ black hole in dual AdS3 theories.« less

  7. Stephen Hawking: An Unfettered Mind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    2012-02-23

    Kitty Ferguson, biographer of physicist Stephen Hawking, will give an informal, nontechnical talk about the experience of writing her two books about the celebrated cosmologist and also of helping Hawking edit his own “The Universe in a Nutshell”. Hawking thinks and works somewhat differently from others because he must work almost entirely in his head, and he has a practice of pulling the rug out from under his own discoveries and assertions. As he has approached his recent 70th birthday, he has devoted an increasing amount of his time in efforts to share his science and particularly the adventure of it with people without a science background and young people who may be scientists of the future. Ferguson will discuss Hawking’s place in the science community (he is not and has never claimed to be on par with Einstein), the unique contributions he is able to make, and what his legacy might be.

  8. MHK Technologies/RED HAWK | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RED HAWK < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage RED HAWK.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Natural Currents Energy Services...

  9. Black Hawk County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Places in Black Hawk County, Iowa Cedar Falls, Iowa Dunkerton, Iowa Elk Run Heights, Iowa Evansdale, Iowa Gilbertville, Iowa Hudson, Iowa Janesville, Iowa Jesup,...

  10. DataHawk 1 data from COALA Engineering Evaluation (Dataset) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These are raw (uncorrected) measurements from the DataHawk 1 sensor package. This is a level 0 data product and only minimal quality control measures have been applied. It is ...

  11. Fish Hawk, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Fish Hawk is a census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida.1 References US...

  12. DataHawk 1 data from COALA Engineering Evaluation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    de Boer, Gijs

    2015-10-07

    These are raw (uncorrected) measurements from the DataHawk 1 sensor package. This is a level 0 data product and only minimal quality control measures have been applied. It is likely that substantial further corrections will be required to use these in a physically meaningful way. Please contact the PI if interested in using the dataset.

  13. Knight Hawk adapts highwall mining for Southern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-10-15

    A few years ago while planning their first underground operation and trying to decide how to mine shallow seams, Knight Hawk purchased a 'Superior Highwall Miner' (SHM). Since then this small innovative company has been pioneering the use of highwall mining in a trenching application in for example the Illinois Basin. Highwall mining is very suitable for contour mining in Appalachia. The article discusses the recent improvements and the advantages of SHM mining systems. 3 photos.

  14. Hawking radiation of scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillani, Usman A.; Rehman, Mudassar; Saifullah, K. E-mail: mudassar051@yahoo.com

    2011-06-01

    Hawking radiation of uncharged and charged scalar particles from accelerating and rotating black holes is studied. We calculate the tunneling probabilities of these particles from the rotation and acceleration horizons of these black holes. Using this method we recover the correct Hawking temperature as well.

  15. Fermionic Tunneling Effect and Hawking Radiation in a Non Commutative FRW Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouhalouf, H.; Aissaoui, H.; Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    The formalism of a non commutative gauge gravity is applied to an FRW universe and the corresponding modified metric, veirbein and spin connection components are obtained. Moreover, using the Hamilton-Jacobi method and as a pure space-time deformation effect, the NCG Hawking radiation via a fermionic tunneling transition through the dynamical NCG horizon is also studied.

  16. From wormhole to time machine: Remarks on Hawking's chronology protection conjecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, M. )

    1993-01-15

    The recent interest in time machines'' has been largely fueled by the [ital apparent] ease with which such systems may be formed in general relativity, given relatively benign initial conditions such as the existence of traversable wormholes or of infinite cosmic strings. This rather disturbing state of affairs has led Hawking to formulate his [ital chronology] [ital protection] [ital conjecture], whereby the formation of time machines'' is forbidden. This paper will use several simple examples to argue that the Universe appears to exhibit a defense in depth'' strategy in this regard. For appropriate parameter regimes, Casimir effects, wormhole disruption effects, and gravitational back reaction effects all contribute to the fight against time travel. Particular attention is paid to the role of the quantum gravity cutoff. For the class of model problems considered it is shown that the gravitational back reaction becomes large before the Planck scale quantum gravity cutoff is reached, thus supporting Hawking's conjecture.

  17. Violation of unitarity by Hawking radiation does not violate energy-momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje

    2015-04-02

    An argument by Banks, Susskind and Peskin (BSP), according to which violation of unitarity would violate either locality or energy-momentum conservation, is widely believed to be a strong argument against non-unitarity of Hawking radiation. We find that the whole BSP argument rests on the crucial assumption that the Hamiltonian is not highly degenerate, and point out that this assumption is not satisfied for systems with many degrees of freedom. Using Lindblad equation, we show that high degeneracy of the Hamiltonian allows local non-unitary evolution without violating energy-momentum conservation. Moreover, since energy-momentum is the source of gravity, we argue that energy-momentum is necessarily conserved for a large class of non-unitary systems with gravity. Finally, we explicitly calculate the Lindblad operators for non-unitary Hawking radiation and show that they conserve energy-momentum.

  18. Spin zero Hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Bonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-05-15

    Black hole greybody factors carry some quantum black hole information. Studying greybody factors may lead to understanding the quantum nature of black holes. However, solving for exact greybody factors in many black hole systems is impossible. One way to deal with this problem is to place some rigorous analytic bounds on the greybody factors. In this paper, we calculate rigorous bounds on the greybody factors for spin zero hawking radiation for non-zero-angular momentum mode from the Kerr-Newman black holes.

  19. Mirror effect induced by the dilaton field on the Hawking radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Kengo; Okamura, Takashi

    2006-11-03

    A ''stringy particle'' action is naturally derived from Kaluza-Klein compactification of a test string action coupled to the dilaton field in a conformally invariant manner. According to the standard procedure, we perform the second quantization of the stringy particle. As an interesting application, we consider evaporation of a near-extremal dilatonic black hole by Hawking radiation via the stringy particles. We show that a mirror surface which reflects them is induced by the dilaton field outside the the horizon when the size of the black hole is comparable to the Planck scale. As a result, the energy flux does not propagate across the surface, and hence the evaporation of the dilatonic black hole stops just before the naked singularity at the extremal state appears even though the surface gravity is non-zero in the extremal limit.

  20. Phantom of the Hartle–Hawking instanton: Connecting inflation with dark energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Pisin; Qiu, Taotao; Yeom, Dong -han

    2016-02-20

    If the Hartle–Hawking wave function is the correct boundary condition of our universe, the history of our universe will be well approximated by an instanton. Although this instanton should be classicalized at infinity, as long as we are observing a process of each history, we may detect a non-classicalized part of field combinations. When we apply it to a dark energy model, this non-classicalized part of fields can be well embedded to a quintessence and a phantom model, i.e., a quintom model. Because of the property of complexified instantons, the phantomness will be naturally free from a big rip singularity.more » This phantomness does not cause perturbative instabilities, as it is an effect emergent from the entire wave function. Lastly, our work may thus provide a theoretical basis for the quintom models, whose equation of state can cross the cosmological constant boundary phenomenologically.« less

  1. Quasinormal modes, scattering, and Hawking radiation of Kerr-Newman black holes in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokkotas, K. D.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2011-01-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of proper oscillations (quasinormal modes), transmission/reflection coefficients, and Hawking radiation for a massive charged scalar field in the background of the Kerr-Newman black hole immersed in an asymptotically homogeneous magnetic field. There are two main effects: the Zeeman shift of the particle energy in the magnetic field and the difference of values of an electromagnetic potential between the horizon and infinity, i.e. the Faraday induction. We have shown that 'turning on' the magnetic field induces a stronger energy-emission rate and leads to 'recharging' of the black hole. Thus, a black hole immersed in a magnetic field evaporates much quicker, achieving thereby an extremal state in a shorter period of time. Quasinormal modes are moderately affected by the presence of a magnetic field which is assumed to be relatively small compared to the gravitational field of the black hole.

  2. COLLOQUIUM - HAWKING AUDITORIUM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: 45 pm Monday March 2013 Prof. Michel Gonin Universite' Polytechnique, Paris, France SEMINAR - M102 3:45 pm Tuesday 26 March 2013 Prof. Michel Gonin Universite'...

  3. Women @ Energy: Carol Hawk | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (CEDS) Program for the office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability in the ... Collectively these programs will lead to resilience of the nation's energy delivery cyber ...

  4. A faux hawk fullerene with PCBM-like properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    San, Long K.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Larson, Bryon W.; Whitaker, James B.; Deng, S. H.M.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Rumbles, Garry; Popov, Alexey A.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xue-Bin; et al

    2014-12-16

    Reaction of C60, C6F5CF2I, and SnH(n-Bu)3 produced, among other unidentified fullerene derivatives, the two new compounds 1,9-C60(CF2C6F5)H (1) and 1,9-C60(cyclo-CF2(2-C6F4)) (2). The highest isolated yield of 1 was 35% based on C60. Depending on the reaction conditions, the relative amounts of 1 and 2 generated in situ were as high as 85% and 71%, respectively, based on HPLC peak integration and summing over all fullerene species present other than unreacted C60. Compound 1 is thermally stable in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) at 160 °C but was rapidly converted to 2 upon addition of Sn2(n-Bu)6 at this temperature. In contrast, complete conversion ofmore » 1 to 2 occurred within minutes, or hours, at 25 °C in 90/10 (v/v) PhCN/C6D6 by addition of stoichiometric, or sub-stoichiometric, amounts of proton sponge (PS) or cobaltocene (CoCp2). DFT calculations indicate that when 1 is deprotonated, the anion C60(CF2C6F5)- can undergo facile intramolecular SNAr annulation to form 2 with concomitant loss of F-. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a fullerene-cage carbanion acting as an SNAr nucleophile towards an aromatic C–F bond. The gas-phase electron affinity (EA) of 2 was determined to be 2.805(10) eV by low-temperature PES, higher by 0.12(1) eV than the EA of C60 and higher by 0.18(1) eV than the EA of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). In contrast, the relative E1/2(0/-) values of 2 and C60, -0.01(1) and 0.00(1) V, respectively, are virtually the same (on this scale, and under the same conditions, the E1/2(0/-) of PCBM is -0.09 V). Time-resolved microwave conductivity charge-carrier yield × mobility values for organic photovoltaic active-layer-type blends of 2 and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) were comparable to those for equimolar blends of PCBM and P3HT. The structure of solvent-free crystals of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The number of nearest-neighbor fullerene–fullerene interactions with centroid···centroid (⊙···⊙) distances of ≤10.34 Å is significantly greater, and the average ⊙···⊙ distance is shorter, for 2 (10 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙···⊙ distance = 10.09 Å) than for solvent-free crystals of PCBM (7 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙···⊙ distance = 10.17 Å). Finally, the thermal stability of 2 was found to be far greater than that of PCBM.« less

  5. Hawking radiation, the Stefan-Boltzmann law, and unitarization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1234134 GrantContract Number: SC0011702 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 754; Journal Issue: C;...

  6. A faux hawk fullerene with PCBM-like properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    San, Long K.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Larson, Bryon W.; Whitaker, James B.; Deng, Shihu; Kopidakis, Nikos; Rumbles, Garry; Popov, Alexey A.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xue B.; et al

    2014-12-16

    Reaction of C60, C6F5CF2I, and SnH(n-Bu)3 produced, among other unidentified fullerene derivatives, the two new compounds 1,9-C60(CF2C6F5)H (1) and 1,9-C60(cyclo-CF2(2-C6F4)) (2). The highest isolated yield of 1 was 35% based on C60. Depending on the reaction conditions, the relative amounts of 1 and 2 generated in situ were as high as 85% and 71%, respectively, based on HPLC peak integration and summing over all fullerene species present other than unreacted C60. Compound 1 is thermally stable in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) at 160 °C but was rapidly converted to 2 upon addition of Sn2(n-Bu)6 at this temperature. In contrast, complete conversion ofmore » 1 to 2 occurred within minutes, or hours, at 25 °C in 90/10 (v/v) PhCN/C6D6 by addition of stoichiometric, or sub-stoichiometric, amounts of proton sponge (PS) or cobaltocene (CoCp2). DFT calculations indicate that when 1 is deprotonated, the anion C60(CF2C6F5)- can undergo facile intramolecular SNAr annulation to form 2 with concomitant loss of F-. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a fullerene-cage carbanion acting as an SNAr nucleophile towards an aromatic C–F bond. The gas-phase electron affinity (EA) of 2 was determined to be 2.805(10) eV by low-temperature PES, higher by 0.12(1) eV than the EA of C60 and higher by 0.18(1) eV than the EA of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). In contrast, the relative E1/2(0/-) values of 2 and C60, -0.01(1) and 0.00(1) V, respectively, are virtually the same (on this scale, and under the same conditions, the E1/2(0/-) of PCBM is -0.09 V). Time-resolved microwave conductivity charge-carrier yield x mobility values for organic photovoltaic active-layer-type blends of 2 and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) were comparable to those for equimolar blends of PCBM and P3HT. The structure of solvent-free crystals of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The number of nearest-neighbor fullerene–fullerene interactions with centroid∙∙∙centroid (⊙∙∙∙⊙) distances of ≤ 10.34 Å is significantly greater, and the average ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance is shorter, for 2 (10 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance = 10.09 Å) than for solvent-free crystals of PCBM (7 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance = 10.17 Å). Finally, the thermal stability of 2 was found to be far greater than that of PCBM.« less

  7. A faux hawk fullerene with PCBM-like properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San, Long K.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Larson, Bryon W.; Whitaker, James B.; Deng, Shihu; Kopidakis, Nikos; Rumbles, Garry; Popov, Alexey A.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xue B.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2014-12-16

    Reaction of C60, C6F5CF2I, and SnH(n-Bu)3 produced, among other unidentified fullerene derivatives, the two new compounds 1,9-C60(CF2C6F5)H (1) and 1,9-C60(cyclo-CF2(2-C6F4)) (2). The highest isolated yield of 1 was 35% based on C60. Depending on the reaction conditions, the relative amounts of 1 and 2 generated in situ were as high as 85% and 71%, respectively, based on HPLC peak integration and summing over all fullerene species present other than unreacted C60. Compound 1 is thermally stable in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) at 160 °C but was rapidly converted to 2 upon addition of Sn2(n-Bu)6 at this temperature. In contrast, complete conversion of 1 to 2 occurred within minutes, or hours, at 25 °C in 90/10 (v/v) PhCN/C6D6 by addition of stoichiometric, or sub-stoichiometric, amounts of proton sponge (PS) or cobaltocene (CoCp2). DFT calculations indicate that when 1 is deprotonated, the anion C60(CF2C6F5)- can undergo facile intramolecular SNAr annulation to form 2 with concomitant loss of F-. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a fullerene-cage carbanion acting as an SNAr nucleophile towards an aromatic C–F bond. The gas-phase electron affinity (EA) of 2 was determined to be 2.805(10) eV by low-temperature PES, higher by 0.12(1) eV than the EA of C60 and higher by 0.18(1) eV than the EA of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). In contrast, the relative E1/2(0/-) values of 2 and C60, -0.01(1) and 0.00(1) V, respectively, are virtually the same (on this scale, and under the same conditions, the E1/2(0/-) of PCBM is -0.09 V). Time-resolved microwave conductivity charge-carrier yield x mobility values for organic photovoltaic active-layer-type blends of 2 and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) were comparable to those for equimolar blends of PCBM and P3HT. The structure of solvent-free crystals of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The number of nearest-neighbor fullerene–fullerene interactions with centroid∙∙∙centroid (⊙∙∙∙⊙) distances of ≤ 10.34 Å is significantly greater, and the average ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance is shorter, for 2 (10 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance = 10.09 Å) than for solvent-free crystals of PCBM (7 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙∙∙∙⊙ distance = 10.17 Å). Finally, the thermal stability of 2 was found to be far greater than that of PCBM.

  8. A faux hawk fullerene with PCBM-like properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San, Long K.; Bukovsky, Eric V.; Larson, Bryon W.; Whitaker, James B.; Deng, S. H.M.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Rumbles, Garry; Popov, Alexey A.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xue-Bin; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2014-12-16

    Reaction of C60, C6F5CF2I, and SnH(n-Bu)3 produced, among other unidentified fullerene derivatives, the two new compounds 1,9-C60(CF2C6F5)H (1) and 1,9-C60(cyclo-CF2(2-C6F4)) (2). The highest isolated yield of 1 was 35% based on C60. Depending on the reaction conditions, the relative amounts of 1 and 2 generated in situ were as high as 85% and 71%, respectively, based on HPLC peak integration and summing over all fullerene species present other than unreacted C60. Compound 1 is thermally stable in 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) at 160 °C but was rapidly converted to 2 upon addition of Sn2(n-Bu)6 at this temperature. In contrast, complete conversion of 1 to 2 occurred within minutes, or hours, at 25 °C in 90/10 (v/v) PhCN/C6D6 by addition of stoichiometric, or sub-stoichiometric, amounts of proton sponge (PS) or cobaltocene (CoCp2). DFT calculations indicate that when 1 is deprotonated, the anion C60(CF2C6F5)- can undergo facile intramolecular SNAr annulation to form 2 with concomitant loss of F-. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a fullerene-cage carbanion acting as an SNAr nucleophile towards an aromatic C–F bond. The gas-phase electron affinity (EA) of 2 was determined to be 2.805(10) eV by low-temperature PES, higher by 0.12(1) eV than the EA of C60 and higher by 0.18(1) eV than the EA of phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). In contrast, the relative E1/2(0/-) values of 2 and C60, -0.01(1) and 0.00(1) V, respectively, are virtually the same (on this scale, and under the same conditions, the E1/2(0/-) of PCBM is -0.09 V). Time-resolved microwave conductivity charge-carrier yield × mobility values for organic photovoltaic active-layer-type blends of 2 and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) were comparable to those for equimolar blends of PCBM and P3HT. The structure of solvent-free crystals of 2 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The number of nearest-neighbor fullerene–fullerene interactions with centroid···centroid (⊙···⊙) distances of ≤10.34 Å is significantly greater, and the average ⊙···⊙ distance is shorter, for 2 (10 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙···⊙ distance = 10.09 Å) than for solvent-free crystals of PCBM (7 nearest neighbors; ave. ⊙···⊙ distance = 10.17 Å). Finally, the thermal stability of 2 was found to be far greater than that of PCBM.

  9. Phantom of the Hartle-Hawking instanton: Connecting inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  10. ARM - Evaluation Product - DataHawk 1 data from COALA Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Factor Affecting the Research Occasional instrument icing, Coldwires broke often as result of flying in snow Access Restriction No access constraints are associated with this data. ...

  11. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Energy Sector Control Systems Working Group member Carol Hawk U.S. Department of Energy carol.hawk@hq.doe.gov 202-586-3247 www.oe.energy.govcontrolsecurity For more info contact:

  12. April 7 Webinar on OE's Resilient Electricity Delivery Infrastructure...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Imre Gyuk, Manager of the Energy Storage Program, and Dr. Carol Hawk, Manager of the Cybersecurity ... The awards will help communities deploy smart grid tools and technologies that ...

  13. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL...

  14. Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast Spectroscopy goes Ultra-Sensitive Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A...

  15. Natural Currents Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: RED HAWK Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNaturalCurrentsEnergySer...

  16. MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14394 Environmental Monitoring and...

  17. MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13606 Environmental Monitoring and...

  18. MHK Projects/Mohawk MHK Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14408 Environmental Monitoring and...

  19. MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14395 Environmental Monitoring and...

  20. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  1. MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14223 Environmental Monitoring and...

  2. MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14224 Environmental Monitoring and...

  3. MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  4. MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14333 Environmental Monitoring and...

  5. MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14127 Environmental Monitoring and...

  6. MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14222 Environmental Monitoring and...

  7. MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14234 Environmental Monitoring and...

  8. MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13849 Environmental Monitoring and...

  9. MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  10. MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14232 Environmental Monitoring and...

  11. MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13823 Environmental Monitoring and...

  12. MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  13. Hillsborough County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cheval, Florida Citrus Park, Florida Dover, Florida East Lake-Orient Park, Florida Egypt Lake-Leto, Florida Fish Hawk, Florida Gibsonton, Florida Greater Carrollwood, Florida...

  14. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 Environmental Sciences UAS, ERASMUS, Oliktok, DataHawk2, temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speeds Dataset File size NAView Dataset View Dataset DOI: ...

  15. The mystery of milk: SAXS, anomalous SAXS, and resonant soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Bridget Ingham, Callaghan Innovation (Wellington, New Zealand) Program Description Most of the dietary calcium in milk is contained...

  16. Hunt County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Hunt County, Texas Caddo Mills, Texas Campbell, Texas Celeste, Texas Commerce, Texas Greenville, Texas Hawk Cove, Texas Josephine,...

  17. Femtosecond X-ray Scattering as a Spatiotemporal Probe of Chemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2015 - 4:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: James Budarz, Brown University Program Description In order to relate our understanding of electronic...

  18. Charge Correlations in the Cuprates and their Relation to Superconduct...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Vivek Thampy, Brookhaven National Laboratory Program Description Charges doped into the copper oxide planes...

  19. Single particle imaging: opportunities and challenges | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single particle imaging: opportunities and challenges Thursday, December 17, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Ivan Vartaniants, DESY Program...

  20. Protecting the Grid from All Hazards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An article on cybersecurity for the grid in the October issue of The Electricity Journal by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva profiles four Smart Grid Investment Grant...

  1. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL ...

  2. GRASSLAND BIRD DISTRIBUTION AND RAPTOR FLIGHT PATTERNS IN THE COMPETITIVE RENEWABLE ENERGY ZONES OF THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Erik

    2013-08-10

    fewer detections (MacKenzie and Nichols 2004). I used occupancy models that allow for the possibility of imperfect detection and species abundance to improve estimates of occurrence probability (Royal 2004). I focused species-specific analyses on grassland birds with few detections: Cassin’s sparrow (Peucaea cassinii), eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda). Chapter III uses a multi-season dynamic site occupancy model that incorporates bird abundance to better estimate occurrence probability. 3) When I considered the topographic relief of the study sites, the proposed design of the wind facility and its location within the central U.S. migratory corridor, I expanded the study to investigate raptor abundance and flight behavior (Hoover 2002, Miller 2008). I developed a new survey technique that improved the accuracy of raptor flight height estimates and compared seasonal counts and flight heights at the plateau rim and areas further inland. I used counts and flight behaviors to calculate species-specific collision risk indices for raptors based on topographic features. I focused species-specific analyses on raptors with the highest counts: American kestrel (Falco sparverius), northern harrier (Circus cyaneus), red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Swainson’s hawk (Buteo swainsoni), and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura). Chapter IV describes patterns of seasonal raptor abundance and flight behavior and how topography modulates collision risk with proposed wind energy turbines. 4) Finally, for completeness, in Chapter V I summarize morning point count data for all species and provide estimates of relative composition and species diversity with the Shannon-Wiener Diversity Index (Shannon and Weaver 1949).

  3. Dynamic pathway of the photoinduced magnetic phase transition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic pathway of the photoinduced magnetic phase transition of multiferroic TbMnO3 Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker:...

  4. MHK Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    s Organ PowerBuoy PowerGin Protean Pulse Stream 100 Pulse Stream 1200 Pulse-Stream 120 RED HAWK Rho Cee Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT S D E SARAHS Pump SEACAP SEAREV SMART Duofloat...

  5. Property:ProjectTechnology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean +, MHK TechnologiesKensington + MHK ProjectsBW2 Tidal + MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK + MHK ProjectsBioSTREAM Pilot Plant + MHK TechnologiesbioSTREAM + MHK Projects...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 2, 2015: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  7. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  8. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2013: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. "We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature," said...

  9. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 28, 2014: Bison, birds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hawks, falcons and owls, as well as a collection of bird bones, feathers and hunting gear for children to enjoy. We want kids to come away with an appreciation of nature,...

  10. New Article on Cybersecurity Discusses DOE's Partnership with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 6, 2014 - 1:57pm Addthis A new article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the ...

  11. Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle Scattering Group, EMBL Hamburg

  12. Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitochondrial complex I - energy conversion by a giant proton pump Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Volker Zickermann, Goethe...

  13. Nevada's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2nd congressional district Arete Power Inc Biodiesel Solutions Inc BlackHawk Fund Brady Power Partners Chapeau Inc dba BluePoint Energy Inc China Recycling Energy Corp CREG...

  14. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1941 at the age of only 38. Recently, an award-winning movie about the famous physicist, Stephen Hawking, depicted the disease's devastating physical toll. ALS kills by destroying...

  15. New Article on Cybersecurity Discusses DOE’s Partnership with the Energy Sector to Keep the Grid Reliable and Secure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An article by OE’s Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid reliable and secure.

  16. Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle...

  17. QA Summit Meeting Minutes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    will be made available online at http:www.em.doe.gov... Brenda Hawks asked how Naval Reactors got past the legal ... some issues like training and what the need is for ...

  18. Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Daniel Larsson, Stanford Program Description...

  19. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A ...

  20. OE News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Secure An article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are...

  1. Science Driver Requirements for Seeded Soft X-ray Free Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Driver Requirements for Seeded Soft X-ray Free Electron Lasers Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 2:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Fulvio Parmigiani,...

  2. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of ? due to the rotation.

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Aerial Facility's Lofty Goal: Collect Crucial Arctic Climate Change Data with Unmanned Aerial Systems Bookmark and Share ARM bolsters aerial data collection capabilities with new aircraft, instruments for 2016 With a wingspan of about a meter, the DataHawk UAS can fly in relatively calm conditions, gathering data in areas not easily measured by ground-based or tethered-balloon instruments. With a wingspan of about a meter, the DataHawk UAS can fly in relatively calm conditions, gathering

  4. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Change Is in the Air" as Scientists Evaluate Data Collection with Unmanned Aircraft Bookmark and Share Data gathered during ERASMUS are already available to compare with conventional data The larger Pilatus unmanned aerial system carries a larger instrument payload than the DataHawks and measures temperature, humidity, pressure, winds, aerosols, and radiation. The larger Pilatus unmanned aerial system carries a larger instrument payload than the DataHawks and measures temperature,

  5. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reconfiguring ARM: Arctic Eyes in the Sky Bookmark and Share Beginning routine collection of spatial information using unmanned aerial systems and tethered balloon systems A DataHawk flies during a field campaign at the third ARM Mobile Facility (blue containers in the background). A DataHawk flies during a field campaign at the third ARM Mobile Facility (blue containers in the background). In 2014, the ARM Climate Research Facility began a major reconfiguration to more tightly link its

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Region Promotes Remote-Control Science Bookmark and Share ERASMUS field campaign deploys August 2015 The DataHawk, an unmanned aerial system, prepares for launch using a bungee cord to propel it to a high enough speed that it becomes airborne, after which, it is controlled via a remote. The DataHawk, an unmanned aerial system, prepares for launch using a bungee cord to propel it to a high enough speed that it becomes airborne, after which, it is controlled via a remote. With ice and snow

  7. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  8. FRW Like Cosmological Model and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe from Non Commutative Seiberg-Witten Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aissaoui, H.; Bouhalouf, H.; Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    An FRW like cosmological model in the non commutative Seiberg-Witten space-time is proposed. The pure NCG dynamical apparent horizon and Hawking temperature are obtained and explicit expressions of the scale factor, Hubble and deceleration parameters are derived. The accelerated expansion of the universe scenario is also discussed.

  9. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  10. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  11. Inflation with a Planck-scale frequency cutoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemeyer, Jens C.

    2001-06-15

    The implementation of a Planck-scale high frequency and short wavelength cutoff in quantum theories on expanding backgrounds may have potentially nontrivial implications, such as the breaking of local Lorentz invariance and the existence of a yet unknown mechanism for the creation of vacuum modes. In scenarios where inflation begins close to the cutoff scale, these effects could have observable consequences as trans-Planckian modes are redshifted to cosmological scales. In close analogy with similar studies of Hawking radiation, a simple theory of a minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter space is studied, with a high frequency cutoff imposed by a nonlinear dispersion relation. Under certain conditions the model predicts deviations from the standard inflationary scenario. We also comment on the difficulties in generalizing fluid models of Hawking radiation to cosmological space-times.

  12. Black hole evaporation in a noncommutative charged Vaidya model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M. Javed, W.

    2012-06-15

    We study the black hole evaporation and Hawking radiation for a noncommutative charged Vaidya black hole. For this purpose, we determine a spherically symmetric charged Vaidya model and then formulate a noncommutative Reissner-Nordstroem-like solution of this model, which leads to an exact (t - r)-dependent metric. The behavior of the temporal component of this metric and the corresponding Hawking temperature are investigated. The results are shown in the form of graphs. Further, we examine the tunneling process of charged massive particles through the quantum horizon. We find that the tunneling amplitude is modified due to noncommutativity. Also, it turns out that the black hole evaporates completely in the limits of large time and horizon radius. The effect of charge is to reduce the temperature from a maximum value to zero. We note that the final stage of black hole evaporation is a naked singularity.

  13. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  14. Supergravity solutions without triholomorphic U(1) isometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2008-12-15

    We investigate the construction of five-dimensional supergravity solutions that do not have any triholomorphic U(1) isometries. We construct a class of solutions that in various limits of parameters reduces to many of previously constructed five-dimensional supergravity solutions based on both hyper-Kaehler base spaces that can be put into a Gibbons-Hawking form and hyper-Kaehler base spaces that cannot be put into a Gibbons-Hawking form. We find a new solution which is over triaxial Bianchi type IX Einstein-hyper-Kaehler base space with no triholomorphic U(1) symmetry. One special case of this solution corresponds to a five-dimensional solution based on Eguchi-Hanson type II geometry.

  15. Microsoft Word - moody_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSI Colloquium on Monday, August 27 at 3:45 pm in Hawking Auditorium--Mitchel Institute Refreshments will be served at 3:30 pm FORENSIC RADIOCHEMISTRY Dr. Ken Moody Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Abstract: Signatures inherent in a sample containing radionuclides give clues about the origin of the material. This information can be quite important when dealing with smuggled nuclear materials interdicted by law enforcement personnel, or potential debris samples

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. Sankaran, E. Hawkes, Jackie Chen T. Lu, C. K. Law premixed Friday: Combustion instabilities (growl) and extinction 1 Outline for the week Mon: Physical concepts faster mixing, faster propagation, optimize liftoff, flame surface density, reaction rate, PDF Tues: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements of flame structure - to assess models Wed: Non-Premixed and Premixed flames - measurements, models gas turbine example Thurs: Partially premixed flames - and some examples Fri: Future challenges:

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNS PROCI 31, 1299 R. Sankaran, E. Hawkes, Jackie Chen T. Lu, C. K. Law Premixed DNS PROCI 31, 1291 1 Outline for the week Mon: Physical concepts faster mixing, faster propagation, optimize liftoff, flame surface density, reaction rate, PDF Tues: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements of flame structure - to assess models Wed: Non-Premixed and Premixed flames - measurements, models gas turbine example Thurs: Partially premixed flames - and some examples Fri: Future challenges: Combustion Instabilities

  18. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corregated" premixed R. Sankaran, E. Hawkes, Jackie Chen T. Lu, C. K. Law premixed Thursday: Partially-premixed flames 1 Outline for the week Mon: Physical concepts faster mixing, faster propagation, optimize liftoff, flame surface density, reaction rate, PDF Tues: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements of flame structure - to assess models Wed: Non-Premixed and Premixed flames - measurements, models gas turbine example Thurs: Partially premixed flames - and some examples Fri: Future challenges:

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corrugated" premixed R. Sankaran, E. Hawkes, Jackie Chen, T. Lu, C. K. Law premixed Tuesday: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements 1 Outline for the week Mon: Physical concepts faster mixing, faster propagation, optimize liftoff, flame surface density, reaction rate, PDF Tues: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements of flame structure - to assess models Wed: Non-Premixed and Premixed flames - measurements, models gas turbine example Thurs: Partially premixed flames - and some examples Fri: Future

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corregated" premixed R. Sankaran, E. Hawkes, Jackie Chen T. Lu, C. K. Law premixed Wednesday: Non-premixed and Premixed Flames 1 Outline for the week Mon: Physical concepts faster mixing, faster propagation, optimize liftoff, flame surface density, reaction rate, PDF Tues: Kilohertz PLIF, PIV measurements of flame structure - to assess models Wed: Non-Premixed and Premixed flames - measurements, models gas turbine example Thurs: Partially premixed flames - and some examples Fri: Future

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawson New Technologies for In Situ Measurements of Microphysical and Optical Cloud Properties SBIR Program: NASA, NSF, DOE, DoD NSF HIAPER Aircraft Development Program NASA Radiation Sciences Program NSF Physical Meteorology Program DOE AVP Program ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  Improvements in Existing Cloud Particle Instruments  New Cloud Particle Instruments  Applications on Large (Global Hawk) and Small (Aerosonde, Manta) UAS  In situ Measurements with Very Large Sample Volumes  E-field

  2. Dynamics of Competing Reaction Pathways during Catalytic CO Hydrogenation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Ruthenium | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Dynamics of Competing Reaction Pathways during Catalytic CO Hydrogenation on Ruthenium Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Jerry LaRue, Chapman University Program Description Optical femtosecond laser pulses can be used to initiate catalytically important reactions on metal surfaces, such as CO hydrogenation on ruthenium. Using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we selectively probed

  3. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carol Hawk Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems July 20, 2010 2 Roadmap Vision In 10 years, control systems for critical applications will be designed, installed, operated, and maintained to survive an intentional cyber assault with no loss of critical function. * Published in January 2006 * Energy Sector's synthesis of critical control system security challenges, R&D needs, and implementation milestones * Provides strategic framework to - align

  4. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  5. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons You Need To Learn 1 1 "Legal Landmines for Small Contractors" United States Department of Energy 12th Annual Small Business Conference & Expo 11 May 2011 Kansas City, Missouri Mark R. "Hawk" Thomas, Esq. Reid Law PC Legal Lessons You Need To Learn 2 2 Federal Contracts - IP - Business Ventures ____________________________________________ SBA Certifications Teaming & Joint Ventures Subcontracts & Suppliers Solicitations & Bids Cost & Labor Standards

  6. Battery intercalation strategy: in-situ electrochemical liquid cell TEM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study and high quality single layer nanosheets preparation | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Battery intercalation strategy: in-situ electrochemical liquid cell TEM study and high quality single layer nanosheets preparation Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Zhiyuan Zeng, LBL Program Description Battery intercalation is the reversible inclusion or insertion of a molecule (or ion) into compounds with layered structures, which is

  7. Making STEM Personal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupations in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are among the fastest growing fields, offering well-paying opportunities to better explore, understand, and improve the world. To celebrate Women’s History Month, DOE recently introduced an online Women @ Energy series that profiles DOE women involved in STEM., Included in the Women @ Energy series are OE’s Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman and Carol Hawk who manages the Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Program.

  8. The Role of Three-Dimensional Microstructure in Electrochemical Device

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource The Role of Three-Dimensional Microstructure in Electrochemical Device Performance Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Wilson K. S. Chiu, Ph.D. (Professor) Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut Wilson K. S. Chiu earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rutgers University in 1997 and 1999, respectively. His research was supported by the U.S.

  9. Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    visible to x-ray (laser) fields | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Atomic, molecular, and nuclear quantum dynamics and control in (strong) visible to x-ray (laser) fields Wednesday, July 20, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Thomas Pfeifer, MPIK Heidelberg Program Description Electrons bound in atoms and small molecules represent some of the most fundamental quantum systems. These systems are so well known and reliable that they serve as optical

  10. Bimolecular Imaging with femtosecond X-ray pulses | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Bimolecular Imaging with femtosecond X-ray pulses Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Marvin Seibert, Uppsala University Program Description This talk will be part review, part outlook of the potential for imaging biological structures with fs X-ray pulses, from the first experiments at LCLS to the current single particle imaging initiative. Bimolecular Imaging with femtosecond X-ray pulses

  11. Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Contact Information: For More Information:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Contact Information: For More Information: CEDS projects are funded through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) research and development (R&D) program, which aims to enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's energy infrastructure by reducing the risk of energy disruptions due to cyber-attacks. Carol Hawk Program Manager DOE OE R&D Adrian Chavez Principal Investigator Sandia National

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems: Areas of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expertise: Platforms Platforms Sky Spirit Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Sky Spirit Mini Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) TigerShark Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) TigerShark Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) IGNAT Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) IGNAT Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) MQ-8 Fire Scout Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) MQ-8 Fire Scout Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) RQ-4 Global Hawk

  13. Magnetic Correlations: A (Momentum) Space-Time Odyssey | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetic Correlations: A (Momentum) Space-Time Odyssey Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yue Cao, Brookhaven National Laboratory Program Description Magnetic correlations are the fundamental building blocks of magnetism, and are suspected by many to be the driving force behind such exotic phenomenon as high Tc superconductivity. The marriage between the Free Electron Laser (FEL) and inelastic X-ray spectroscopy

  14. Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid (October 2014) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid (October 2014) Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid (October 2014) An article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid reliable and secure. The article also presents insights of four Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) recipients that are advancing state of the art of power grid security by designing cybersecurity into the

  15. Project: 1.8 MW Wind Turbine on Tribal Common Lands Near Lake Erie

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anthony J. Giacobbe Seneca Nation of Indians and James F. Yockey URS Inc. May 4, 2015 BACKGROUND Membership and Territories Total Enrolled Membership: 8,057 members Members Residing On Territory: 4,006 members Territories:  Allegany Territory  Cattaraugus Territory  Oil Spring Territory  Niagara Falls Territory  Buffalo Creek Territory BACKGROUND Clans Clans:  Deer  Hawk  Heron  Snipe Clans:  Turtle  Beaver  Wolf  Bear BACKGROUND Elected Government Elected

  16. Cybersecurity Related News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News Cybersecurity Related News October 6, 2014 New Article on Cybersecurity Discusses DOE's Partnership with the Energy Sector to Keep the Grid Reliable and Secure An article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid reliable and secure. April 28, 2014 Energy Department Releases New Guidance for Strengthening Cybersecurity of the Grid's Supply Chain

  17. Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid Reliability remains a fundamental principle of grid modernization efforts, but in today's world, reliability requires cybersecurity. This article discusses energy sector partnerships that are designing cybersecurity into the smart grid with the vision of surviving a cyber-incident while sustaining critical energy delivery functions. Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva I. The Power Grid: Beyond Smart The power grid is already smart, if ''smart'' can describe an

  18. Cybersnooping: Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the Smarter Grid (October 2014) Cybersecurity and the Smarter Grid (October 2014) An article by OE's Carol Hawk and Akhlesh Kaushiva in The Electricity Journal discusses cybersecurity for the power grid and how DOE and the energy sector are partnering to keep the smart grid reliable and secure. The article also presents insights of four Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) recipients that are advancing state of the art of power grid security by designing cybersecurity into the foundation of

  19. Site selection report: characterization of subsidence over longwall mining panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-20

    We have completed our evaluation of candidate longwall mines available for study in the Rocky Mountain Coal Province. This report summarizes our views and evaluation of two candidate mines, the Allen Mine in Weston, Colorado, and the Hawk's Nest Mine in Somerset, Colorado. WCC visited the Allen and the Hawk's Nest Mines, and rated them in order of preference for subsidence monitoring according to criteria given in this report. Based on these evaluations and related discussions with the Technical Project Officer, the Hawk's Nest Mine appears to be the preferred mine for subsidence monitoring, because it is the only candidate mine offering two adjacent longwall panels for monitoring wherein a full subsidence profile may be obtained for at least one of the panels. Selection of this mine requires that provisions be made for monitoring 2000 ft of overburden, whereas our proposal addressed a mine with 600 ft of overburden. Changes in instrumentation which may permit the project to remain within the current budget were investigated and are discussed.

  20. NSTX-U Control System Upgrades

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, K. G.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lawson, J. E.; Mozulay, R.; Sichta, P.; Tchilinguirian, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    The National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) is undergoing a wealth of upgrades (NSTX-U). These upgrades, especially including an elongated pulse length, require broad changes to the control system that has served NSTX well. A new fiber serial Front Panel Data Port input and output (I/O) stream will supersede the aging copper parallel version. Driver support for the new I/O and cyber security concerns require updating the operating system from Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) v4 to RedHawk (based on RHEL) v6. While the basic control system continues to use the General Atomics Plasma Control System (GA PCS), the effort to forwardmore » port the entire software package to run under 64-bit Linux instead of 32-bit Linux included PCS modifications subsequently shared with GA and other PCS users. Software updates focused on three key areas: (1) code modernization through coding standards (C99/C11), (2) code portability and maintainability through use of the GA PCS code generator, and (3) support of 64-bit platforms. Central to the control system upgrade is the use of a complete real time (RT) Linux platform provided by Concurrent Computer Corporation, consisting of a computer (iHawk), an operating system and drivers (RedHawk), and RT tools (NightStar). Strong vendor support coupled with an extensive RT toolset influenced this decision. The new real-time Linux platform, I/O, and software engineering will foster enhanced capability and performance for NSTX-U plasma control.« less

  1. Probing Fullerenes from Within using LCLS | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Probing Fullerenes from Within using LCLS Wednesday, June 15, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Nora Berrah, University of Connecticut Program Description Short x-ray pulses from free electron lasers (FEL) open a new regime for all scientific research. The first x-ray FEL, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Laboratory on the Stanford campus, provides intense short pulses that allow the investigation of ultrafast non-linear and

  2. Universal Charge Order in the High-Tc Superconductors | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Universal Charge Order in the High-Tc Superconductors Wednesday, May 4, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Eduardo H. da Silva Neto - UBC Eduardo H. da Silva Neto was born in Recife, Brazil. He obtained his B.A. in Physics and Mathematics (2008) from Amherst College, and his Ph. D. (2013) in Physics from Princeton University. Since 2013 he has been a Max-Planck-UBC postdoctoral research fellow at the Quantum Matter Institute at

  3. Gas Dynamics in an X-ray FEL Gas Attenuator under High Repetition Rate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Gas Dynamics in an X-ray FEL Gas Attenuator under High Repetition Rate Operation Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Bo Yang, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington Program Description The LCLS-II project seeks to increase the repetition rate of the LCLS X-ray Free-Electron Laser by many orders, up to 1 MHz from the current 120 Hz maximum. It calls into

  4. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-04-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Soviet Union to build Iran nuclear plant; Dension announces cuts in Elliot Lake production; Soviet environmental study delays Rostov startup; Cogema closes two mines; Namibian sanctions lifted by USA and Canada; US Energy and Kennecott restructors joint venture; Australians reelect Hawke; China to buy Soviet nuclear plant; Olympic Dam`s first sale of concentrates to USA; Uranevz buys one-third of Cogema`s Rabbit Lake operations; East and West Germany forming joint nuclear law; and Nova Scotia extends uranium exploration plan.

  5. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  6. Black hole temperature: Minimal coupling vs conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazel, Mohamadreza; Mirza, Behrouz; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2014-05-15

    In this article, we discuss the propagation of scalar fields in conformally transformed spacetimes with either minimal or conformal coupling. The conformally coupled equation of motion is transformed into a one-dimensional Schrödinger-like equation with an invariant potential under conformal transformation. In a second stage, we argue that calculations based on conformal coupling yield the same Hawking temperature as those based on minimal coupling. Finally, it is conjectured that the quasi normal modes of black holes are invariant under conformal transformation.

  7. National Nuclear Security Administration Babcock & Wilcox Technical

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) Fiscal Year 2014 Performance Evaluation Report (PER) NNSA Production Office B&W Y-12 Performance Period: October 2013 - June 2014 September 8, 2014 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This document has been approved for release to the public by: Scott A. Hawks / NPO Y-12 Classification Officer 09/09/14 NPO Y-12 September 8, 2014 B&W Y-12 PER 2 | P a g e Executive Summary This Performance Evaluation Report (PER) provides the

  8. National Nuclear Security Administration Babcock & Wilcox Technical

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC (B&W Pantex) Fiscal Year 2014 Performance Evaluation Report (PER) NNSA Production Office B&W Pantex Performance Period: October 2013 - June 2014 September 8, 2014 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This document has been approved for release to the public by: Scott A. Hawks / NPO Y-12 Classification Officer 09/09/14 NPO Pantex September 8, 2014 B&W Pantex PER 2 | P a g e This Performance Evaluation

  9. Greybody factors for Myers–Perry black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-11-15

    The Myers–Perry black holes are higher-dimensional generalizations of the usual (3+1)-dimensional rotating Kerr black hole. They are of considerable interest in Kaluza–Klein models, specifically within the context of brane-world versions thereof. In the present article, we shall consider the greybody factors associated with scalar field excitations of the Myers–Perry spacetimes, and develop some rigorous bounds on these greybody factors. These bounds are of relevance for characterizing both the higher-dimensional Hawking radiation, and the super-radiance, that is expected for these spacetimes.

  10. The Creation of the Universe

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  11. Leon Lopez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leon Lopez August 11, 2015 Split-second decisions As the final 2014 New Mexico Basketball Championship game for the Class 5A high school girls is about to begin in the University of New Mexico's "Pit" arena, the "Hawks" from Albuquerque's Volcano Vista High School and the "Trojans" from Las Cruces' Mayfield High School nervously shuffle about, while the Service Innovation Division's Leon Lopez gets ready to referee, just as he has for 37 years during his spare time.

  12. The Creation of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-09

    Gravity and quantum theory cause the Universe to be spontaneously created out of nothing. Most of these universes are quite unlike our own but we select out a subset that are compatible with what we observe. Please note that Professor Hawking's talk will be broadcasted in the following rooms : TH auditorium (4-3-006) TE auditorium (30-7-018) 40-S2-A01 40-S2-C01 BE Meyrin (6-2-024) BE Prévessin (864-1-D02)

  13. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UAV-based lidar sensor for next-generation suborbital platforms -- and -- Development of a new airborne lidar instrument for aerosol transport studies Presented by Matthew McGill with Stan Scott, Shane Wake, Dennis Hlavka, William Hart, and Paul Newman Presentation overview 1. CPL: what it is, what it does 1. CPL, CLASIC, and that NASA A-Train 1. UAV-CPL on Global Hawk next-generation airborne science 4. Where to next? cloud-aerosol transport, a new instrument development The NASA Cloud Physics

  14. Microsoft Word - Agenda 071910.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review July 20-22, 2010 Westin Alexandria ● Alexandria, VA Tuesday, July 20 - Day 1 Time Activity Host/Presenter 7:30 - 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30 - 8:45 am Welcome from Program Manager Carol Hawk 8:45 - 9:00 am Introductions and Instructions Katie Jereza Best Practices/Standards Development 9:00 - 9:30 am Advanced Security Acceleration Project for the Smart Grid (ASAP-SG) Oak Ridge National Laboratory 9:30 - 10:00 am

  15. Entropic principle and asymptotic freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gukov, Sergei; Saraikin, Kirill; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-03-15

    Motivated by the recent developments about the Hartle-Hawking wave function associated to black holes, we formulate an entropy functional on the moduli space of Calabi-Yau compactifications. We find that the maximization of the entropy is correlated with the appearance of asymptotic freedom in the effective field theory. The points where the entropy is maximized correspond to points on the moduli which are maximal intersection points of walls of marginal stability for Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield states. We also find an intriguing link between extremizing the entropy functional and the points on the moduli space of Calabi-Yau three folds which admit a ''quantum deformed'' complex multiplication.

  16. April 7 Webinar on OE’s Resilient Electricity Delivery Infrastructure Initiative FOA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On April 7, Dan Ton, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, Dr. Imre Gyuk, Manager of the Energy Storage Program, and Dr. Carol Hawk, Manger of the Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Program, will be featured speakers during a webinar on OE’s Resilient Electricity Delivery Infrastructure Initiative (REDI) Funding Opportunity Announcement. The Resilient Electricity Delivery Infrastructure Initiative FOA is focused on local and tribal governments that experienced a Presidentially Declared Major Disaster over the past 30 years. The awards will help communities deploy smart grid tools and technologies that will help decision makers and resource managers improve recovery of electricity delivery services in their communities.

  17. Generalized uncertainty principle in f(R) gravity for a charged black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2011-02-15

    Using f(R) gravity in the Palatini formularism, the metric for a charged spherically symmetric black hole is derived, taking the Ricci scalar curvature to be constant. The generalized uncertainty principle is then used to calculate the temperature of the resulting black hole; through this the entropy is found correcting the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy in this case. Using the entropy the tunneling probability and heat capacity are calculated up to the order of the Planck length, which produces an extra factor that becomes important as black holes become small, such as in the case of mini-black holes.

  18. Assessment of the Impacts of Green Mountain Power Corporation's Wind Power Facility on Breeding and Migrating Birds in Searsburg, Vermont: July 1996--July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, P.

    2002-03-01

    A 6-megawatt, 11 turbine wind power development was constructed by Green Mountain Power Corporation in Searsburg, southern Vermont, in 1996. To determine whether birds were impacted, a series of modified BA (Before, After) studies was conducted before construction (1993-1996), during (1996), and after (1997) construction on the project site. The studies were designed to monitor changes in breeding bird community (species composition and abundance) on the site, examine the behavior and numbers of songbirds migrating at night over the site and hawks migrating over the site in daylight, and search for carcasses of birds that might have collided with the turbines.

  19. CONFIRMATION OF ONE OF THE COLDEST KNOWN BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luhman, K. L.; Bochanski, J. J.; Burgasser, A. J.; Labbe, I.; Monson, A. J.; Persson, S. E.; Saumon, D.; Marley, M. S.

    2012-01-10

    Using two epochs of 4.5 {mu}m images from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we recently identified a common proper motion companion to the white dwarf WD 0806-661 that is a candidate for the coldest known brown dwarf. To verify its cool nature, we have obtained images of this object at 3.6 {mu}m with IRAC, at J with the High Acuity Wide-field K-band Imager (HAWK-I) on the Very Large Telescope, and in a filter covering the red half of J with FourStar on Magellan. WD 0806-661 B is detected by IRAC but not HAWK-I or FourStar. From these data we measure colors of [3.6] - [4.5] = 2.77 {+-} 0.16 and J - [4.5] > 7.0 (S/N < 3). Based on these colors and its absolute magnitudes, WD 0806-661 B is the coldest companion directly imaged outside of the solar system and is a contender for the coldest known brown dwarf with the Y dwarf WISEP J1828+2650. It is unclear which of these two objects is colder given the available data. A comparison of its absolute magnitude at 4.5 {mu}m to the predictions of theoretical spectra and evolutionary models suggests that WD 0806-661 B has T{sub eff} = 300-345 K.

  20. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introducedmore » by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.« less

  1. Cold black holes in the Harlow–Hayden approach to firewalls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, Yen Chin; McInnes, Brett; Chen, Pisin

    2014-12-31

    Firewalls are controversial principally because they seem to imply departures from general relativistic expectations in regions of spacetime where the curvature need not be particularly large. One of the virtues of the Harlow–Hayden approach to the firewall paradox, concerning the time available for decoding of Hawking radiation emanating from charged AdS black holes, is precisely that it operates in the context of cold black holes, which are not strongly curved outside the event horizon. Here we clarify this point. The approach is based on ideas borrowed from applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to the quark–gluon plasma. Firewalls aside, our work presents a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics and evolution of evaporating charged AdS black holes with flat event horizons. We show that, in one way or another, these black holes are always eventually destroyed in a time which, while long by normal standards, is short relative to the decoding time of Hawking radiation.

  2. Cold black holes in the Harlow–Hayden approach to firewalls

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ong, Yen Chin; McInnes, Brett; Chen, Pisin

    2014-12-31

    Firewalls are controversial principally because they seem to imply departures from general relativistic expectations in regions of spacetime where the curvature need not be particularly large. One of the virtues of the Harlow–Hayden approach to the firewall paradox, concerning the time available for decoding of Hawking radiation emanating from charged AdS black holes, is precisely that it operates in the context of cold black holes, which are not strongly curved outside the event horizon. Here we clarify this point. The approach is based on ideas borrowed from applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence to the quark–gluon plasma. Firewalls aside, our workmore » presents a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics and evolution of evaporating charged AdS black holes with flat event horizons. We show that, in one way or another, these black holes are always eventually destroyed in a time which, while long by normal standards, is short relative to the decoding time of Hawking radiation.« less

  3. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introduced by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.

  4. Entropy localization and extensivity in the semiclassical black hole evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casini, H.

    2009-01-15

    I aim to quantify the distribution of information in the Hawking radiation and inside the black hole in the semiclassical evaporation process. The structure of relativistic quantum field theory does not allow one to define a localized entropy unambiguously, but rather forces one to consider the shared information (mutual information) between two different regions of space-time. Using this tool, I first show that the entropy of a thermal gas at the Unruh temperature underestimates the actual amount of (shared) information present in a region of the Rindler space. Then, I analyze the mutual information between the black hole and the late time radiation region. A well-known property of the entropy implies that this is monotonically increasing with time. This means that in the semiclassical picture it is not possible to recover the eventual purity of the initial state in the final Hawking radiation through subtle correlations established during the whole evaporation period, no matter the interactions present in the theory. I find extensivity of the entropy as a consequence of a reduction to a two dimensional conformal problem in a simple approximation. However, the extensivity of information in the radiation region in a full four dimensional calculation seems not to be guaranteed on general grounds. I also analyze the localization of shared information inside the black hole finding that a large amount of it is contained in a small, approximately flat region of space-time near the point where the horizon begins. This gives place to large violations of the entropy bounds. I show that this problem is not eased by backscattering effects and argue that a breaking of conformal invariance is necessary to delocalize the entropy. Finally, I indicate that the mutual information could lead to a way to understand the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy which does not require a drastic reduction in degrees of freedom in order to regulate the entanglement entropy. On the contrary

  5. Microscopic entropy of nondilatonic branes: A 2D approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Serra, Nicola

    2004-12-15

    We investigate nondilatonic p-branes in the near-extremal, near-horizon regime. A two-dimensional gravity model, obtained from dimensional reduction, gives an effective description of the brane. We show that the AdS{sub p+2}/CFT{sub p+1} correspondence at finite temperature admits an effective description in terms of a AdS{sub 2}/CFT{sub 1} duality endowed with a scalar field, which breaks the conformal symmetry and generates a nonvanishing central charge. The entropy of the CFT{sub 1} is computed using Cardy formula. Fixing in a natural way a free, dimensionless, parameter introduced in the model by a renormalization procedure, we find exact agreement between the CFT{sub 1} entropy and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the brane.

  6. Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

  7. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  8. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  9. Global arms proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, D.

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the United States delivered some US $11 billion of military hardware to Iran between 1969 and 1979, in the hopes of helping stabilize a volatile situation in the Middle East. That did not work. When Iran used the weapons against Iraq, the USSR, France, and a number of developing countries helped arm Iraq. It was this vast arsenal that Iraq deployed in its Kuwait-Persian Gulf War venture. Granted, those weapons were augmented by some U.S.-made equipment like TOW antitank missiles and Hawk antiaircraft missiles that were captured in the Iraqi attack on Kuwait. A report issued by the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in June cited that chain of events to demonstrate that the U.S. and other major exporters are gradually losing control of the weapons transferred (to other countries) as well as the technology and industry necessary to produce and support them.

  10. Constructed wetlands for municipal solid waste landfill leachate treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peverly, J.; Sanford, W.E.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    1993-11-01

    In 1989, the US Geological Survey and Cornell University, in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Tompkins County Solid Waste Department, began a three-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, New York, to test the effectiveness of leachate treatment with constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. A parallel study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Fenton, New York was conducted by researchers at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hawk Engineering (Trautmann and others, 1989). Results are described.

  11. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (3/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  12. Quantum gravity effects in the Kerr spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.; Tuiran, E.

    2011-02-15

    We analyze the impact of the leading quantum gravity effects on the properties of black holes with nonzero angular momentum by performing a suitable renormalization group improvement of the classical Kerr metric within quantum Einstein gravity. In particular, we explore the structure of the horizons, the ergosphere, and the static limit surfaces as well as the phase space available for the Penrose process. The positivity properties of the effective vacuum energy-momentum tensor are also discussed and the 'dressing' of the black hole's mass and angular momentum are investigated by computing the corresponding Komar integrals. The pertinent Smarr formula turns out to retain its classical form. As for their thermodynamical properties, a modified first law of black-hole thermodynamics is found to be satisfied by the improved black holes (to second order in the angular momentum); the corresponding Bekenstein-Hawking temperature is not proportional to the surface gravity.

  13. Generic features of Einstein-Aether black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamaki, Takashi; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2008-01-15

    We reconsider spherically symmetric black hole solutions in Einstein-Aether theory with the condition that this theory has identical parametrized post-Newtonian parameters as those for general relativity, which is the main difference from the previous research. In contrast with previous study, we allow superluminal propagation of a spin-0 Aether-gravity wave mode. As a result, we obtain black holes having a spin-0 'horizon' inside an event horizon. We allow a singularity at a spin-0 horizon since it is concealed by the event horizon. If we allow such a configuration, the kinetic term of the Aether field can be large enough for black holes to be significantly different from Schwarzschild black holes with respect to Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass, innermost stable circular orbit, Hawking temperature, and so on. We also discuss whether or not the above features can be seen in more generic vector-tensor theories.

  14. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  15. Primordial black holes with mass 10{sup 16}?10{sup 17} g and reionization of the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotsky, K.M.; Kirillov, A.A. E-mail: kirillov-aa@yandex.ru

    2015-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) with mass 10{sup 16}?10{sup 17} g almost escape constraints from observations so could essentially contribute to dark matter density. Hawking evaporation of such PBHs produces with a steady rate ?- and e{sup }-radiations in MeV energy range, which can be absorbed by ordinary matter. Simplified estimates show that a small fraction of evaporated energy had to be absorbed by baryonic matter what can turn out to be enough to heat the matter so it is fully ionized at the redshift z?5...10. The result is found to be close to a borderline case where the effect appears, what makes it sensitive to the approximation used. In our approximation, degree of gas ionization reaches 50-100% by z?5 for PBH mass (3...7)נ10{sup 16} g with their abundance corresponding to the upper limit.

  16. Brane World States from a Generalized Chaplygin Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Vargas Moniz, Paulo

    2004-11-17

    We consider the hypothesis that the transition to an accelerated period in the current universe involves a quantum mechanical process. We identify a minisuperspace configuration with two Lorentzian sectors, separated by a classically forbidden region. The Hartle-Hawking and Vilenkin wave functions are computed, together with the transition amplitudes towards the accelerating epoch. Furthermore, it is found that for specific initial conditions, the parameters characterizing the generalized Chaplygin gas become related through an expression involving an integer n. We also introduce a phenomenological association between some brane world scenarios and a FRW minisuperspace cosmology with a generalized Chaplygin gas. Results suggest that the brane tension would become related to generalized Chaplygin gas parameters through another expression involving an integer.

  17. Black Holes in the Cosmos, the Lab, and in Fundamental Physics (2/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Black holes present the extreme limits of physics. They are ubiquitous in the cosmos, and in some extra-dimensional scenarios they could be produced at colliders. They have also yielded a puzzle that challenges the foundations of physics. These talks will begin with an overview of the basics of black hole physics, and then briefly summarize some of the exciting developments with cosmic black holes. They will then turn to properties of quantum black holes, and the question of black hole production in high energy collisions, perhaps beginning with the LHC. I will then overview the apparent paradox emerging from Hawking's discovery of black hole evaporation, and what it could be teaching us about the foundations of quantum mechanics and gravity.

  18. Microsoft Word - FG2_scoping transcript_Jacksonville06092011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 FUTUREGEN 2.0 PROGRAM 10 PUBLIC SCOPING MEETING 11 12 13 JACKSONVILLE, ILLINOIS 14 15 16 JUNE 9, 2011 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Page 2 1 I N D E X 2 MAIN SPEAKERS: PAGE 3 Cliff Whyte 5 4 Jeff Hoffmann 11 5 Mike Long 16 6 Ken Humphreys 20 7 Cliff Whyte 31 8 PUBLIC: 9 Brad Zeller 37 10 Kelly Hall 39 11 Andy Davenport 40/98 12 David Davenport 49 13 Jeffrey Niemann 56 14 Elizabeth Niemann 62 15 Richard Johnson 68 16 William Hawks 69 17 Catherine Edmiston 72 18 Patty Rykhus 77/101 19

  19. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-01-30

    stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

  20. Semiclassical instability of dynamical warp drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finazzi, Stefano; Liberati, Stefano; Barcelo, Carlos

    2009-06-15

    Warp drives are very interesting configurations in general relativity: At least theoretically, they provide a way to travel at superluminal speeds, albeit at the cost of requiring exotic matter to exist as solutions of Einstein's equations. However, even if one succeeded in providing the necessary exotic matter to build them, it would still be necessary to check whether they would survive to the switching on of quantum effects. Semiclassical corrections to warp-drive geometries have been analyzed only for eternal warp-drive bubbles traveling at fixed superluminal speeds. Here, we investigate the more realistic case in which a superluminal warp drive is created out of an initially flat spacetime. First of all we analyze the causal structure of eternal and dynamical warp-drive spacetimes. Then we pass to the analysis of the renormalized stress-energy tensor (RSET) of a quantum field in these geometries. While the behavior of the RSET in these geometries has close similarities to that in the geometries associated with gravitational collapse, it shows dramatic differences too. On one side, an observer located at the center of a superluminal warp-drive bubble would generically experience a thermal flux of Hawking particles. On the other side, such Hawking flux will be generically extremely high if the exotic matter supporting the warp drive has its origin in a quantum field satisfying some form of quantum inequalities. Most of all, we find that the RSET will exponentially grow in time close to, and on, the front wall of the superluminal bubble. Consequently, one is led to conclude that the warp-drive geometries are unstable against semiclassical backreaction.

  1. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World

  2. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; et al

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 tomore » 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.« less

  3. Milagro limits and HAWC sensitivity for the rate-density of evaporating primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Alfaro, R.; Allen, B. T.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez, J. D.; Arceo, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Aune, T.; H. A. Ayala Solares; Barber, A. S.; Baughman, B. M.; Bautista-Elivar, N.; Gonzalez, J. Becerra; Belmont, E.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Berley, D.; Bonilla Rosales, M.; Braun, J.; Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carraminana, A.; Castillo, M.; Christopher, G. E.; Cotti, U.; Cotzomi, J.; de la Fuente, E.; De León, C.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz Hernandez, R.; Diaz-Cruz, L.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dingus, B. L.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Fiorino, D. W.; Fraija, N.; Galindo, A.; Garfias, F.; González, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Grabski, V.; Gussert, M.; Hampel-Arias, Z.; Harding, J. P.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Hui, C. M.; Hüntemeyer, P.; Imran, A.; Iriarte, A.; Karn, P.; Kieda, D.; Kolterman, B. E.; Kunde, G. J.; Lara, A.; Lauer, R. J.; Lee, W. H.; Lennarz, D.; Vargas, H. Leon; Linares, E. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Longo, M.; Luna-GarcIa, R.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, A.; Marinelli, S. S.; Martinez, H.; Martinez, O.; Martínez-Castro, J.; J. A.J. Matthews; McEnery, J.; Mendoza Torres, E.; Mincer, A. I.; Miranda-Romagnoli, P.; Moreno, E.; Morgan, T.; Mostafa, M.; Nellen, L.; Nemethy, P.; Newbold, M.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Oceguera-Becerra, T.; Patricelli, B.; Pelayo, R.; Perez-Perez, E. G.; Pretz, J.; Riviere, C.; Rosa-Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz-Velasco, E.; Ryan, J.; Salazar, H.; Salesa, F.; Sandoval, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schneider, M.; Silich, S.; Sinnis, G.; Smith, A. J.; Stump, D.; Sparks Woodle, K.; Springer, R. W.; Taboada, I.; Toale, P. A.; Tollefson, K.; Torres, I.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Vasileiou, V.; Villasenor, L.; Weisgarber, T.; Westerhoff, S.; Williams, D. A.; Wisher, I. G.; Wood, J.; Yodh, G. B.; Younk, P. W.; Zaborov, D.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, H.

    2015-04-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) are gravitationally collapsed objects that may have been created by density fluctuations in the early universe and could have arbitrarily small masses down to the Planck scale. Hawking showed that due to quantum effects, a black hole has a temperature inversely proportional to its mass and will emit all species of fundamental particles thermally. PBHs with initial masses of ~ 5.0 × 10¹⁴ g should be expiring in the present epoch with bursts of high-energy particles, including gamma radiation in the GeV – TeV energy range. The Milagro high energy observatory, which operated from 2000 to 2008, is sensitive to the high end of the PBH evaporation gamma-ray spectrum. Due to its large field-of-view, more than 90% duty cycle and sensitivity up to 100 TeV gamma rays, the Milagro observatory is well suited to perform a search for PBH bursts. Based on a search on the Milagro data, we report new PBH burst rate density upper limits over a range of PBH observation times. In addition, we report the sensitivity of the Milagro successor, the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory, to PBH evaporation events.

  4. CANDELS MULTIWAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE IDENTIFICATION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE CANDELS UKIDSS ULTRA-DEEP SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; Castellano, Marco; Ferguson, Henry C.; Dahlen, Tomas; Grogin, Norman; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandy M.; Guo, Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Almaini, Omar; Collaboration: CANDELS team; and others

    2013-06-01

    We present the multiwavelength-ultraviolet to mid-infrared-catalog of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra-Deep Survey field observed as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). Based on publicly available data, the catalog includes the CANDELS data from the Hubble Space Telescope (near-infrared WFC3 F125W and F160W data and visible ACS F606W and F814W data); u-band data from CFHT/Megacam; B, V, R{sub c} , i', and z' band data from Subaru/Suprime-Cam; Y and K{sub s} band data from VLT/HAWK-I; J, H, and K band data from UKIDSS (Data Release 8); and Spitzer/IRAC data (3.6, 4.5 {mu}m from SEDS; 5.8 and 8.0 {mu}m from SpUDS). The present catalog is F160W-selected and contains 35, 932 sources over an area of 201.7 arcmin{sup 2} and includes radio- and X-ray-detected sources and spectroscopic redshifts available for 210 sources.

  5. Bilinear covariants and spinor fields duality in quantum Clifford algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ab?amowicz, Rafa?; Gonalves, Icaro; Rocha, Roldo da

    2014-10-15

    Classification of quantum spinor fields according to quantum bilinear covariants is introduced in a context of quantum Clifford algebras on Minkowski spacetime. Once the bilinear covariants are expressed in terms of algebraic spinor fields, the duality between spinor and quantum spinor fields can be discussed. Thus, by endowing the underlying spacetime with an arbitrary bilinear form with an antisymmetric part in addition to a symmetric spacetime metric, quantum algebraic spinor fields and deformed bilinear covariants can be constructed. They are thus compared to the classical (non quantum) ones. Classes of quantum spinor fields classes are introduced and compared with Lounesto's spinor field classification. A physical interpretation of the deformed parts and the underlying Z-grading is proposed. The existence of an arbitrary bilinear form endowing the spacetime already has been explored in the literature in the context of quantum gravity [S. W. Hawking, The unpredictability of quantum gravity, Commun. Math. Phys. 87, 395 (1982)]. Here, it is shown further to play a prominent role in the structure of Dirac, Weyl, and Majorana spinor fields, besides the most general flagpoles and flag-dipoles. We introduce a new duality between the standard and the quantum spinor fields, by showing that when Clifford algebras over vector spaces endowed with an arbitrary bilinear form are taken into account, a mixture among the classes does occur. Consequently, novel features regarding the spinor fields can be derived.

  6. Semiclassical S-matrix for black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bezrukov, Fedor; Levkov, Dmitry; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we propose a semiclassical method to calculate S-matrix elements for two-stage gravitational transitions involving matter collapse into a black hole and evaporation of the latter. The method consistently incorporates back-reaction of the collapsing and emitted quanta on the metric. We illustrate the method in several toy models describing spherical self-gravitating shells in asymptotically flat and AdS space-times. We find that electrically neutral shells reflect via the above collapse-evaporation process with probability exp(–B), where B is the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the intermediate black hole. This is consistent with interpretation of exp(B) as the number of black hole states.more » The same expression for the probability is obtained in the case of charged shells if one takes into account instability of the Cauchy horizon of the intermediate Reissner-Nordström black hole. As a result, our semiclassical method opens a new systematic approach to the gravitational S-matrix in the non-perturbative regime.« less

  7. Thermodynamical description of stationary, asymptotically flat solutions with conical singularities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Rebelo, Carmen; Radu, Eugen

    2010-05-15

    We examine the thermodynamical properties of a number of asymptotically flat, stationary (but not static) solutions having conical singularities, with both connected and nonconnected event horizons, using the thermodynamical description recently proposed in [C. Herdeiro, B. Kleihaus, J. Kunz, and E. Radu, Phys. Rev. D 81, 064013 (2010).]. The examples considered are the double-Kerr solution, the black ring rotating in either S{sup 2} or S{sup 1}, and the black Saturn, where the balance condition is not imposed for the latter two solutions. We show that not only the Bekenstein-Hawking area law is recovered from the thermodynamical description, but also the thermodynamical angular momentum is the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner angular momentum. We also analyze the thermodynamical stability and show that, for all these solutions, either the isothermal moment of inertia or the specific heat at constant angular momentum is negative, at any point in parameter space. Therefore, all these solutions are thermodynamically unstable in the grand canonical ensemble.

  8. Thermodynamics of rotating charged black branes in third order lovelock gravity and the counterterm method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M.H.; Mann, R.B.

    2006-05-15

    We generalize the quasilocal definition of the stress-energy tensor of Einstein gravity to the case of third order Lovelock gravity, by introducing the surface terms that make the action well-defined. We also introduce the boundary counterterm that removes the divergences of the action and the conserved quantities of the solutions of third order Lovelock gravity with zero curvature boundary at constant t and r. Then, we compute the charged rotating solutions of this theory in n+1 dimensions with a complete set of allowed rotation parameters. These charged rotating solutions present black hole solutions with two inner and outer event horizons, extreme black holes or naked singularities provided the parameters of the solutions are suitably chosen. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, mass and angular momenta of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We find a Smarr-type formula and perform a stability analysis by computing the heat capacity and the determinant of Hessian matrix of mass with respect to its thermodynamic variables in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles, and show that the system is thermally stable. This is commensurate with the fact that there is no Hawking-Page phase transition for black objects with zero curvature horizon.

  9. Black holes in an asymptotically safe gravity theory with higher derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Easson, Damien A. E-mail: easson@asu.edu

    2010-09-01

    We present a class of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to an asymptotically safe theory of gravity containing high-derivative terms. We find quantum corrected Schwarzschild-(anti)-de Sitter solutions with running gravitational coupling parameters. The evolution of the couplings is determined by their corresponding renormalization group flow equations. These black holes exhibit properties of a classical Schwarzschild solution at large length scales. At the center, the metric factor remains smooth but the curvature singularity, while softened by the quantum corrections, persists. The solutions have an outer event horizon and an inner Cauchy horizon which equate when the physical mass decreases to a critical value. Super-extremal solutions with masses below the critical value correspond to naked singularities. The Hawking temperature of the black hole vanishes when the physical mass reaches the critical value. Hence, the black holes in the asymptotically safe gravitational theory never completely evaporate. For appropriate values of the parameters such stable black hole remnants make excellent dark matter candidates.

  10. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in Gauss-Bonnet-Maxwell gravity and the counterterm method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M. H.; Bordbar, G. H.; Shamirzaie, M.

    2006-09-15

    By a suitable transformation, we present the (n+1)-dimensional charged rotating solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a complete set of allowed rotation parameters which are real in the whole spacetime. We show that these charged rotating solutions present black hole solutions with two inner and outer event horizons, extreme black holes, or naked singularities provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. Using the surface terms that make the action well defined for Gauss-Bonnet gravity and the counterterm method for eliminating the divergences in action, we compute finite action of the solutions. We compute the conserved and thermodynamical quantities through the use of free energy and the counterterm method, and find that the two methods give the same results. We also find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Finally, we perform a stability analysis by computing the heat capacity and the determinant of Hessian matrix of mass with respect to its thermodynamic variables in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles, and show that the system is thermally stable. This is commensurate with the fact that there is no Hawking-Page phase transition for black objects with zero curvature horizon.

  11. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) willmore » serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.« less

  12. Bulk scalar emission from a rotating black hole pierced by a tense brane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Nozawa, Masato; Takamizu, Yu-ichi

    2008-02-15

    We study the emission of scalar fields into the bulk from a six-dimensional rotating black hole pierced by a 3-brane. We determine the angular eigenvalues in the presence of finite brane tension by using the continued fraction method. The radial equation is integrated numerically, giving the absorption probability (graybody factor) in a wider frequency range than in the preexisting literature. We then compute the power and angular momentum emission spectra for different values of the rotation parameter and brane tension, and compare their relative behavior in detail. As is expected from the earlier result for a nonrotating black hole, the finite brane tension suppresses the emission rates. As the rotation parameter increases, the power spectra are reduced at low frequencies due to the smaller Hawking temperature and are enhanced at high frequencies due to superradiance. The angular momentum spectra are enhanced over the whole frequency range as the rotation parameter increases. The spectra and the amounts of energy and angular momentum radiated away into the bulk are thus determined by the interplay of these effects.

  13. Origin of the universe from Quantum Chaos: An introduction to current ideas (professor John Dyer Memorial Lecture). Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehler, K.E.

    1989-05-01

    In his recently published book A Brief History of Time, S. Hawking describes his remarkable insights into the problem of the origin of our universe. In this talk a more quantitative description of some of the important principles from this book is presented as a mathematical appendix to it. A brief review of the ideas of the Standard Big Bang Model of the Universe is given in terms of the evolution equation that follows from Einstein's theory. The meaning of the Cosmological Constant, its relation to Vacuum Energy, the model of the empty DeSitter Space and Gravity is derived. By analogy to Schroedinger mechanics one can give the general features of Quantum Cosmology', in which the origin of the universe can be viewed as a quantum tunneling process in imaginary time from a Quantum Chaos state of no space, no time, no matter to an inflationary expanding DeSitter space which eventually transits into the Hot Big Bang Expansion that we see.

  14. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) will serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.

  15. Primordial Black Holes: Observational characteristics of the final evaporation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Stump, D. R.; Linnemann, J. T.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Marinelli, S. S.; Yapici, T.; Tollefson, K.

    2016-07-01

    For many early universe theories predict the creation of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs). PBHs could have masses ranging from the Planck mass to 105 solar masses or higher depending on the size of the universe at formation. A Black Hole (BH) has a Hawking temperature which is inversely proportional to its mass. Hence a sufficiently small BH will quasi-thermally radiate particles at an ever-increasing rate as emission lowers its mass and raises its temperature. Moreover, the final moments of this evaporation phase should be explosive and its description is dependent on the particle physics model. In this work we investigatemore » the final few seconds of BH evaporation, using the Standard Model and incorporating the most recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) results, and provide a new parameterization for the instantaneous emission spectrum. We calculate for the first time energy-dependent PBH burst light curves in the GeV/TeV energy range. Moreover, we explore PBH burst search methods and potential observational PBH burst signatures. We have found a unique signature in the PBH burst light curves that may be detectable by GeV/TeV gamma-ray observatories such as the High Altitude Water Cerenkov (HAWC) observatory. Finally, the implications of beyond the Standard Model theories on the PBH burst observational characteristics are also discussed, including potential sensitivity of the instantaneous photon detection rate to a squark threshold in the 5–10 TeV range.« less

  16. SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 (SEPTEMBER 2001).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORTORY; PROJECT MANAGER BARBARA COX

    2001-09-27

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) strives for excellence in both its science research and its facility operations. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues through its internationally recognized Environmental Management System (EMS) and award-winning community relations program. The Site Environmental Report 2000 (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the Laboratory site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of BNL's mission. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Earth's Mysteries... Protecting its Future,'' describes how the Laboratory approaches its work, with balance between science and the environment. One of the newest initiatives at the Laboratory, the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve, will permanently preserve 530 acres (212 hectares) of the Long Island Central Pine Barrens, a unique ecosystem of forests and wetlands. The Reserve sets aside 10% of BNL property for conservation and ecological research through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Reserve provides habitat for approximately 27 endangered, threatened, or species of special concern, including the state-endangered eastern tiger salamander, state-threatened banded sunfish, and swamp darter, along with a number of other species found onsite, such as the wild turkey and red-tailed hawk.

  17. The origin of thermal hadron production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satz, H.

    2008-08-29

    The thermal multihadron production observed in different high energy interactions poses two basic problems: (1) why do even elementary interactions with comparatively few secondaries (such as e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation) lead to thermal hadron abundances, and (2) why is there in such interactions a suppression of strange particle production? We show that the recently proposed mechanism of thermal hadron production through Hawking-Unruh radiation can naturally account for both. The event horizon of colour confinement leads to thermal behaviour, but the emission temperature depends on the strange quark content of the produced hadrons, causing a deviation from full equilibrium and hence a suppression of strange particle production. We show that the resulting formalism accounts well for multihadron production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation over a wide energy range, providing a very good description of the observed abundances. It is fully determined in terms of the string tension and the bare strange quark mass, and contains no adjustable parameters.

  18. NSTX-U Advances in Real-Time C++11 on Linux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erickson, Keith G.

    2015-08-14

    Programming languages like C and Ada combined with proprietary embedded operating systems have dominated the real-time application space for decades. The new C++11standard includes native, language-level support for concurrency, a required feature for any nontrivial event-oriented real-time software. Threads, Locks, and Atomics now exist to provide the necessary tools to build the structures that make up the foundation of a complex real-time system. The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is breaking new ground with the language as applied to the needs of fusion devices. A new Digital Coil Protection System (DCPS) willmore »serve as the main protection mechanism for the magnetic coils, and it is written entirely in C++11 running on Concurrent Computer Corporation's real-time operating system, RedHawk Linux. It runs over 600 algorithms in a 5 kHz control loop that determine whether or not to shut down operations before physical damage occurs. To accomplish this, NSTX-U engineers developed software tools that do not currently exist elsewhere, including real-time atomic synchronization, real-time containers, and a real-time logging framework. Together with a recent (and carefully configured) version of the GCC compiler, these tools enable data acquisition, processing, and output using a conventional operating system to meet a hard real-time deadline (that is, missing one periodic is a failure) of 200 microseconds.« less

  19. Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

  20. Leachate treatment system using constructed wetlands, Town of Fenton sanitary landfill, Broome County, New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    Municipal sanitary landfills generate leachate that New York State regulations require to be collected and treated to avoid contaminating surface water and groundwater. One option for treating leachate is to haul it to municipal wastewater treatment facility. This option may be expensive, may require excessive energy for transportation, and may require pretreatment to protect the receiving facility`s processes. An alternative is on-site treatment and discharge. Personnel from the Town of Fenton, New York; Hawk Engineering, P.C.; Cornell University; and Ithaca College designed, built, and operated a pilot constructed wetland for treating leachate at the Town of Fenton`s municipal landfill. The system, consisting of two overland flow beds and two subsurface flow beds has been effective for 18 months in reducing levels of ammonia (averaging 85% removal by volatilization and denitrification) and total iron (averaging 95% removal by precipitation and sedimentation), two key constituents of the Fenton landfill`s leachate. The system effects these reductions with zero chemical and energy inputs and minimal maintenance. A third key constituent of the leachate, manganese, apparently passes through the beds with minimal removal. Details and wetland considerations are described.

  1. Emissions characteristics of Military Helicopter Engines Fueled with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Klingshirn, Christopher D; Striebich, Richard; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in aviation activities and more stringent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations have increased concerns regarding aircraft emissions, due to their harmful health and environmental impacts, especially in the vicinity of airports and military bases. In this study, the gaseous and particulate-matter emissions of two General Electric T701C engines and one T700 engine were evaluated. The T700 series engines power the U.S. Army's Black Hawk and Apache helicopters. The engines were fueled with standard military JP-8 fuel and were tested at three power settings. In addition, one of the T701C engines was operated on a natural-gas-derived Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene jet fuel. Test results show that the T701C engine emits significantly lower particulate-matter emissions than the T700 for all conditions tested. Particulate-matter mass emission indices ranged from 0.2-1.4 g/kg fuel for the T700 and 0.2-0.6 g/kg fuel for the T701C. Slightly higher NOx and lower CO emissions were observed for the T701C compared with the T700. Operation of the T701C with the Fischer-Tropsch fuel rendered dramatic reductions in soot emissions relative to operation on JP-8, due primarily to the lack of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuel. The Fischer-Tropsch fuel also produced smaller particles and slight reductions in CO emissions.

  2. Probability density function treatment of turbulence/chemistry interactions during the ignition of a temperature-stratified mixture for application to HCCI engine modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Chen, J.-Y.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2008-12-15

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine technology promises to reduce NO{sub x} and soot emissions while achieving high thermal efficiency. Temperature and mixture stratification are regarded as effective means of controlling the start of combustion and reducing the abrupt pressure rise at high loads. Probability density function methods are currently being pursued as a viable approach to modeling the effects of turbulent mixing and mixture stratification on HCCI ignition. In this paper we present an assessment of the merits of three widely used mixing models in reproducing the moments of reactive scalars during the ignition of a lean hydrogen/air mixture ({phi}=0.1, p=41atm, and T=1070 K) under increasing temperature stratification and subject to decaying turbulence. The results from the solution of the evolution equation for a spatially homogeneous joint PDF of the reactive scalars are compared with available direct numerical simulation (DNS) data [E.R. Hawkes, R. Sankaran, P.P. Pebay, J.H. Chen, Combust. Flame 145 (1-2) (2006) 145-159]. The mixing models are found able to quantitatively reproduce the time history of the heat release rate, first and second moments of temperature, and hydroxyl radical mass fraction from the DNS results. Most importantly, the dependence of the heat release rate on the extent of the initial temperature stratification in the charge is also well captured. (author)

  3. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavn, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the GibbonsHawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  4. FRW quantum cosmology with a generalized Chaplygin gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam; Moniz, Paulo Vargas

    2005-03-15

    Cosmologies with a Chaplygin gas have recently been explored with the objective of explaining the transition from a dust dominated epoch towards an accelerating expansion stage. In this context, we consider the hypothesis that this transition involves a quantum mechanical process. Our analysis is entirely analytical, with the objective of finding explicit mathematical expressions for the different quantum mechanical states and their cosmological implications. We employ a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) minisuperspace model, characterized by two Lorentzian sectors, separated by a classically forbidden region. This is the configuration associated with the evolution of a generalized Chaplygin gas in a FRW universe. The Hartle-Hawking and Vilenkin wave functions are then computed, together with the transition amplitudes towards the accelerating epoch. Furthermore, for specific initial conditions we found that the generalized Chaplygin gas parameters become related through an expression involving an integer n. We also introduce a phenomenological association between some brane-world scenarios and a FRW minisuperspace cosmology with a generalized Chaplygin gas. The aim is to promote a discussion and subsequent research on the quantum creation of brane cosmologies from such a perspective. Additional results in this paper suggest that the brane tension would become related with the generalized Chaplygin gas parameters through another expression involving an integer.

  5. Thermodynamics of Sultana-Dyer black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2014-05-01

    The thermodynamical entities on the dynamical horizon are not naturally defined like the usual static cases. Here I find the temperature, Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics for the Sultana-Dyer metric which is related to the Schwarzschild spacetime by a time dependent conformal factor. To find the temperature (T), the chiral anomaly expressions for the two dimensional spacetime are used. This shows an application of the anomaly method to study Hawking effect for a dynamical situation. Moreover, the analysis singles out one expression for temperature among two existing expressions in the literature. Interestingly, the present form satisfies the first law of thermodynamics. Also, it relates the Misner-Sharp energy (Ē) and the horizon entropy ( S-bar ) by an algebraic expression Ē = 2 S-bar T which is the general form of the Smarr formula. This fact is similar to the usual static black hole cases in Einstein's gravity where the energy is identified as the Komar conserved quantity.

  6. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.A.

    2000-12-01

    ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  8. INJECTION PROFILE MODIFICATION IN A HOT, DEEP MINNELUSA WATER INJECTION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

    2001-09-01

    As oil fields in the United States age, production enhancements and modifications will be needed to increase production from deeper and hotter oil reservoirs. New techniques and products must be tested in these areas before industry will adapt them as common practice. The Minnelusa fields of northeastern Wyoming are relatively small, deep, hot fields that have been developed in the past ten to twenty years. As part of the development, operators have established waterfloods early in the life of the fields to maximize cumulative oil production. However, channeling between injectors and producers does occur and can lead to excessive water production and bypassed oil left in the reservoir. The project evaluated the use of a recently developed, high-temperature polymer to modify the injection profiles in a waterflood project in a high-temperature reservoir. The field is the Hawk Point field in Campbell County, Wyoming. The field was discovered in 1986 and initially consisted of eight producing wells with an average depth of 11,500 feet and a temperature of 260 F (127 C). The polymer system was designed to plug the higher permeable channels and fractures to provide better conformance, i.e. sweep efficiency, for the waterflood. The project used a multi-well system to evaluate the treatment. Injection profile logging was used to evaluate the injection wells both before and after the polymer treatment. The treatment program was conducted in January 2000 with a treatment of the four injection wells. The treatment sizes varied between 500 bbl and 3,918 bbl at a maximum allowable pressure of 1,700 psig. Injection in three of the wells was conducted as planned. However, the injection in the fourth well was limited to 574 bbl instead of the planned 3,750 bbl because of a rapid increase in injection pressure, even at lower than planned injection rates. Following completion of polymer placement, the injection system was not started for approximately one week to permit the gel to

  9. A TALE OF DWARFS AND GIANTS: USING A z = 1.62 CLUSTER TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE RED SEQUENCE GREW OVER THE LAST 9.5 BILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudnick, Gregory H.; Tran, Kim-Vy; Papovich, Casey; Momcheva, Ivelina; Willmer, Christopher

    2012-08-10

    We study the red sequence in a cluster of galaxies at z = 1.62 and follow its evolution over the intervening 9.5 Gyr to the present day. Using deep YJK{sub s} imaging with the HAWK-I instrument on the Very Large Telescope, we identify a tight red sequence and construct its rest-frame i-band luminosity function (LF). There is a marked deficit of faint red galaxies in the cluster that causes a turnover in the LF. We compare the red-sequence LF to that for clusters at z < 0.8, correcting the luminosities for passive evolution. The shape of the cluster red-sequence LF does not evolve between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 but at z < 0.6 the faint population builds up significantly. Meanwhile, between z = 1.62 and 0.6 the inferred total light on the red sequence grows by a factor of {approx}2 and the bright end of the LF becomes more populated. We construct a simple model for red-sequence evolution that grows the red sequence in total luminosity and matches the constant LF shape at z > 0.6. In this model the cluster accretes blue galaxies from the field whose star formation is quenched and who are subsequently allowed to merge. We find that three to four mergers among cluster galaxies during the 4 Gyr between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 match the observed LF evolution between the two redshifts. The inferred merger rate is consistent with other studies of this cluster. Our result supports the picture that galaxy merging during the major growth phase of massive clusters is an important process in shaping the red-sequence population at all luminosities.

  10. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  11. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Cregan, Perry B.

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of large scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.

  12. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  13. SNP Assay Development for Linkage Map Construction, Anchoring Whole-Genome Sequence, and Other Genetic and Genomic Applications in Common Bean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Qijian; Jia, Gaofeng; Hyten, David L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Hwang, Eun-Young; Schroeder, Steven G.; Osorno, Juan M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jackson, Scott A.; McClean, Phillip E.; et al

    2015-08-28

    A total of 992,682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was identified as ideal for Illumina Infinium II BeadChip design after sequencing a diverse set of 17 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) varieties with the aid of next-generation sequencing technology. From these, two BeadChips each with >5000 SNPs were designed. The BARCBean6K_1 BeadChip was selected for the purpose of optimizing polymorphism among market classes and, when possible, SNPs were targeted to sequence scaffolds in the Phaseolus vulgaris 14× genome assembly with sequence lengths >10 kb. The BARCBean6K_2 BeadChip was designed with the objective of anchoring additional scaffolds and to facilitate orientation of largemore » scaffolds. Analysis of 267 F2 plants from a cross of varieties Stampede × Red Hawk with the two BeadChips resulted in linkage maps with a total of 7040 markers including 7015 SNPs. With the linkage map, a total of 432.3 Mb of sequence from 2766 scaffolds was anchored to create the Phaseolus vulgaris v1.0 assembly, which accounted for approximately 89% of the 487 Mb of available sequence scaffolds of the Phaseolus vulgaris v0.9 assembly. A core set of 6000 SNPs (BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip) with high genotyping quality and polymorphism was selected based on the genotyping of 365 dry bean and 134 snap bean accessions with the BARCBean6K_1 and BARCBean6K_2 BeadChips. The BARCBean6K_3 BeadChip is a useful tool for genetics and genomics research and it is widely used by breeders and geneticists in the United States and abroad.« less

  14. CANDELS MULTI-WAVELENGTH CATALOGS: SOURCE DETECTION AND PHOTOMETRY IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Koo, David C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Donley, Jennifer L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; and others

    2013-08-15

    We present a UV to mid-infrared multi-wavelength catalog in the CANDELS/GOODS-S field, combining the newly obtained CANDELS HST/WFC3 F105W, F125W, and F160W data with existing public data. The catalog is based on source detection in the WFC3 F160W band. The F160W mosaic includes the data from CANDELS deep and wide observations as well as previous ERS and HUDF09 programs. The mosaic reaches a 5{sigma} limiting depth (within an aperture of radius 0.''17) of 27.4, 28.2, and 29.7 AB for CANDELS wide, deep, and HUDF regions, respectively. The catalog contains 34,930 sources with the representative 50% completeness reaching 25.9, 26.6, and 28.1 AB in the F160W band for the three regions. In addition to WFC3 bands, the catalog also includes data from UV (U band from both CTIO/MOSAIC and VLT/VIMOS), optical (HST/ACS F435W, F606W, F775W, F814W, and F850LP), and infrared (HST/WFC3 F098M, VLT/ISAAC Ks, VLT/HAWK-I Ks, and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0 {mu}m) observations. The catalog is validated via stellar colors, comparison with other published catalogs, zero-point offsets determined from the best-fit templates of the spectral energy distribution of spectroscopically observed objects, and the accuracy of photometric redshifts. The catalog is able to detect unreddened star-forming (passive) galaxies with stellar mass of 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} at a 50% completeness level to z {approx} 3.4 (2.8), 4.6 (3.2), and 7.0 (4.2) in the three regions. As an example of application, the catalog is used to select both star-forming and passive galaxies at z {approx} 2-4 via the Balmer break. It is also used to study the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at 0 < z < 4.

  15. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 10 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45, 90 and 180 with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ?60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90 from beam axis, ?2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2002-12-01

    , burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

  17. Uncertainty Quantification of Calculated Temperatures for the U.S. Capsules in the AGR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lybeck, Nancy; Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Pham, Binh T.; Hawkes, Grant L.

    2015-03-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation experiments are being conducted within the Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The main objectives of the fuel experimental campaign are to provide the necessary data on fuel performance to support fuel process development, qualify a fuel design and fabrication process for normal operation and accident conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes (PLN-3636). The AGR-2 test was inserted in the B-12 position in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in June 2010 and successfully completed irradiation in October 2013, resulting in irradiation of the TRISO fuel for 559.2 effective full power days (EFPDs) during approximately 3.3 calendar years. The AGR-2 data, including the irradiation data and calculated results, were qualified and stored in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) (Pham and Einerson 2014). To support the U.S. TRISO fuel performance assessment and to provide data for validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, the daily as-run thermal analysis has been performed separately on each of four AGR-2 U.S. capsules for the entire irradiation as discussed in (Hawkes 2014). The ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal model predicts the daily average volume-average fuel temperature and peak fuel temperature in each capsule. This thermal model involves complex physical mechanisms (e.g., graphite holder and fuel compact shrinkage) and properties (e.g., conductivity and density). Therefore, the thermal model predictions are affected by uncertainty in input parameters and by incomplete knowledge of the underlying physics leading to modeling assumptions. Therefore, alongside with the deterministic predictions from a set of input thermal conditions, information about prediction uncertainty is instrumental for the ART

  18. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada national Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. A. Wills

    2001-12-01

    total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

  20. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation