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Sample records for hawaiian electric industries

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) PROJECT PROFILE: Hawaiian Electric Company (SHINES) Title: Integrating System to Edge-of-Network Architecture and Management for SHINES (SEAMS) Technologies on High Penetration Grids Funding Opportunity: Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV SunShot Subprogram: Systems Integration Location: Honolulu, Hawaii Partners: Siemens, Alstom, DNV GL , AWS Truepower, Referentia Systems, Apparent, and Stem Amount Awarded: $2,437,500 Awardee

  2. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - SolarCity and the Hawaiian Electric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Companies SolarCity and the Hawaiian Electric Companies NREL is collaborating with solar energy company SolarCity at the ESIF to address the safety, reliability, and stability challenges of interconnecting high penetrations of distributed photovoltaics (PV) with the electric power system. The work includes collaboration with the Hawaiian Electric Companies to analyze high-penetration solar scenarios using advanced modeling and inverter testing at the ESIF. Download the project fact sheet and

  3. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  4. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + SolarCity and the Hawaiian Electric Companies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the collaboration between NREL, SolarCity, and the Hawaiian Electric Companies at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) to address the safety, reliability, and stability challenges of interconnecting high penetrations of distributed photovoltaics with the electric power system.

  5. Energy Systems Integration: NREL + SolarCity and the Hawaiian Electric Companies (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLARCITY AND THE HAWAIIAN ELECTRIC COMPANIES NREL is collaborating with solar energy company SolarCity at the ESIF to address the safety, reliability, and stability challenges of interconnecting high penetrations of distributed photovoltaics (PV) with the electric power system. The work includes collaboration with the Hawaiian Electric Companies to analyze high-penetration solar scenarios using advanced modeling and inverter testing at the ESIF. R&D STRATEGY The ESIF's unique megawatt-scale

  6. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  7. Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Place: Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region,...

  8. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  9. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  10. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  11. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 6,243,013 862,269 28,017 8 ...

  12. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Customers" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",6243013,8...

  13. A Brief History of the Electricity Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data and evaluating electricity restructuring James Bushnell University of California Energy Inst. www.ucei.berkeley.edu Outline * Shameless flattery - Why EIA data are so important * Why are people so unhappy? - With electricity restructuring * What EIA data have helped us learn - Production efficiencies - Market efficiency - Market competition - Environmental compliance Why EIA is so important * Important industries undergoing historic changes - Restructuring/deregulation - Environmental

  14. Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Place: Xixiang Town,Shenzhen, Guangdong...

  15. Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III ...

  16. Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the stability and resiliency of the electric grid PDF icon Electric Power Industry ... Stationary Electrical Energy Storage Applications Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update ...

  17. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  18. Environmental assessment for the granting of US Navy easements near Pearl Harbor and Waikele Gulch Oahu, Hawaii to Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luersen, P.; Wiley, M.; Hart, J.; Kanehiro, C.; Soloway, M.

    1994-09-23

    This document was prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA: and Navy regulations (OPNAVINST 5090.1B)). The document addresses environmental impacts from the proposed granting of three easements to the Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc. (HECO) for the use of Navy property near Waikele Gulch, Pearl City and the Waiau Power Plant. HECO`s proposed Waiau-CIP, Part 2, Project requires installation, operation, and maintenance of steel transmission line poles and associated equipment on three Navy parcels crossed by the 7.8 mile project. Health risks from exposure to the electric and magnetic fields of 138-kV transmission lines are discussed.

  19. Electric and Gas Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric and Gas Industries Association Place: Sacramento, CA Zip: 95821 Website: www.egia.org Coordinates:...

  20. Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry.

  1. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  2. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were ...

  3. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. PDF icon Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility

  4. Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, ...

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, ...

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, ...

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, ...

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, ...

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, ...

  11. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives to their commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are...

  12. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

  13. ConEd (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate and Custom Efficiency Programs offer incentives to directly metered electric customers in good standing who contribute to the system benefits charge ...

  14. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives for commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are provided on...

  15. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers July 22, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Kristen Honey Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Wollman Deputy Director of the Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program at the National

  16. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D.; Busch, J.; Starrs, T.

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  17. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  18. Public-policy responsibilities in a restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hirst, E.; Bauer, D.

    1995-06-01

    In this report, we identify and define the key public-policy values, objectives, and actions that the US electricity industry currently meets. We also discuss the opportunities for meeting these objectives in a restructured industry that relies primarily on market forces rather than on government mandates. And we discuss those functions that governments might undertake, presumably because they will not be fully met by a restructured industry on its own. These discussions are based on a variety of inputs. The most important inputs came from participants in an April 1995 workshop on Public-Policy Responsibilities and Electric Industry Restructuring: Shaping the Research Agenda. Other sources of information and insights include the reviews of a draft of this report by workshop participants and others and the rapidly growing literature on electric-industry restructuring and its implications. One of the major concerns about the future of the electricity industry is the fate of numerous social and environmental programs supported by today`s electric utilities. Many people worry that a market-driven industry may not meet the public-policy objectives that electric utilities have met in the past. Examples of potentially at-risk programs include demand-side management (DSM), renewable energy, low-income weatherization, and fuel diversity. Workshop participants represented electric utilities, public utility commissions (PUCs), state energy offices, public-interest groups, other energy providers, and the research community.

  19. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Sales (Megawatthours

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",47211525,53107038,19107433,557463,119983459 "Connecticut",12777579,12893531,351479...

  20. Dakota Electric Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Lighting Chillers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Compressed air Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls Motors Motor VFDs...

  1. (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Connecticut Utilities implement electric and gas efficiency rebate programs funded by Connecticut's public benefits charge through the Energy Efficiency Fund. The Connecticut Light and Power...

  2. Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles Working With Industry and Utilities to Promote Electric Vehicles June 10, 2015 - 10:45am Addthis Tom Kuhn, President of EEI and Secretary Moniz at the MOU signing on Monday, June 8, at Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Annual Convention in New Orleans, LA. | Photo courtesy of EEI Tom Kuhn, President of EEI and Secretary Moniz at the MOU signing on Monday, June 8, at Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Annual

  3. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",8414175.4,7806276.7,2262752.4,57837.4,18541041.8 "Connecticut",2523348.7,2004629.1...

  4. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Revenue (Thousands Dollars) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 8,414,175 ...

  5. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" ...

  6. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  7. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 54,487 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  8. Missouri Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 8 * Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 92,313 100.0 Total Renewable

  9. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 29,791 100.0 Total

  10. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  11. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 6,760 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  12. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 159 1.9 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  13. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 8 0.2 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 5,628

  14. West Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 80,789 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  15. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  16. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  17. Lodi Electric Utility- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility provides an on-bill financing program for the commercial and industrial customers. To participate, the customer must receive a rebate through the utility's rebate program, and...

  18. Empire District Electric- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers a Commercial/Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program to its non-residential customers in Arkansas who purchase certain high-efficiency equipment for...

  19. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  20. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 359 0.9 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 136,962 100.0 Total

  1. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 27 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 128,678 100.0 Total

  2. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 34,740 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 6,150

  3. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1 Other Biomass 2 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 143,598 100.0 Total Renewable

  4. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,251 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  5. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 31 0.2 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 55,127 100.0

  6. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 424 0.9 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 229,752 100.0

  7. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  8. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1 MSW/Landfill Gas 29 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 104,153 100.0 Total

  9. Louisiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 14 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 102,885 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  10. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 57 1.3 Other Biomass 35 0.8 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 17,019 100.0 Total

  11. Maryland Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas 135 1.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 43,607 100.0 Total Renewable

  12. Massachusetts Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 26 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 255 1.9 Other Biomass 9 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation

  13. Michigan Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas 176 0.6 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 111,551 100.0 Total

  14. Minnesota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other Biomass 75 0.5 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 53,670 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  15. Nebraska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6 0.1 Other Biomass 5 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 36,630 100.0 Total Renewable

  16. Nevada Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 35,146 100.0 Total

  17. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Hampshire Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1 MSW/Landfill Gas 29 0.7 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 22,196 100.0 Total

  18. New Jersey Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 171 0.9 Other Biomass 20 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation

  19. New Mexico Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 36,252 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 2,072 5.7

  20. Arizona Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.3 Solar 20 0.1 Wind 128 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 29 0.1 MSW/Landfill Gas 4 * Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 111,751 100.0 Total

  1. Arkansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,981 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,667 10.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,341 8.4 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 312 2.0 MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1 Other Biomass 6 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 61,000 100.0 Total

  2. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood Waste 639 0.9 MSW/Landfill Gas 292 0.4 Other Biomass 97 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  3. Colorado Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 50,721 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  4. Florida Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 491 0.8 Other Biomass 171 0.3 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation

  5. Georgia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 17 * Other Biomass 4 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 137,577 100.0 Total

  6. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass 162 6.4 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,836 100.0 Total Renewable Net

  7. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 12,025 100.0 Total

  8. Illinois Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 201,352 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 5,257

  9. Indiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 125,181 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 3,699 3.0

  10. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 57,509 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 10,309

  11. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 47,924 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 3,473 7.2

  12. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 20,453 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 893 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 824 4.0 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 52 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 17 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 98,218 100.0 Total Renewable

  13. Utah Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,497 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 528 7.0 Geothermal 42 0.6 Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 42,249 100.0 Total Renewable

  14. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3 0.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 6,620 100.0 Total Renewable

  15. Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas 290 1.2 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,966 100.0 Total

  16. Washington Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 39 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 103,473

  17. Wisconsin Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 76 0.4 Other Biomass 12 0.1 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 64,314 100.0 Total

  18. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 48,119 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 4,271 8.9

  19. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  20. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  1. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  2. Assistance to States on Electric Industry Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Andersen

    2010-10-25

    This project seeks to educate state policymakers through a coordinated approach involving state legislatures, regulators, energy officials, and governors’ staffs. NCSL’s activities in this project focus on educating state legislators. Major components of this proposal include technical assistance to state legislatures, briefing papers, coordination with the National Council on Electricity Policy, information assistance, coordination and outreach, meetings, and a set of transmission-related activities.

  3. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",39357,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",6033,15.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",4314,11 "

  4. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27674,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2499,9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1956,7.1 "

  5. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",6188,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1941,31.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",508,8.2 "

  6. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",33071,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",231,0.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",101,0.3 "

  7. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21022,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2412,11.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",858,4.1 " Solar","-","-"

  8. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14261,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10684,74.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",8425,59.1 "

  9. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",45575,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1984,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",747,1.6 "

  10. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  11. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",23982,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1623,6.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1340,5.6 "

  12. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3623,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2223,61.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1594,44 "

  13. Louisiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",26744,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",517,1.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",192,0.7 "

  14. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",4430,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1692,38.2 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",738,16.6 "

  15. Maryland Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",12516,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",799,6.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",590,4.7 "

  16. Massachusetts Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",13697,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",566,4.1 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",262,1.9

  17. Michigan Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",29831,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",807,2.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",237,0.8 "

  18. Minnesota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14715,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2588,17.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",193,1.3 " Solar","-","-"

  19. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",15691,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",235,1.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional","-","-"

  20. Missouri Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21739,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1030,4.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",564,2.6 "

  1. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",5866,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3085,52.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",2705,46.1 "

  2. Nebraska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",7857,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",443,5.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",278,3.5 "

  3. Nevada Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",11421,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1507,13.2 " Geothermal",319,2.8 " Hydro Conventional",1051,9.2 " Solar",137,1.2 "

  4. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",4180,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",671,16.1 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",489,11.7 "

  5. New Jersey Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",18424,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",230,1.2 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  6. New Mexico Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",8130,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",818,10.1 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",82,1 " Solar",30,0.4 " Wind",700,8.6

  7. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",32417,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3855,11.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3272,10.1 "

  8. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",2067,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",422,20.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",414,20.1 "

  9. Arizona Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",26392,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2901,11 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",2720,10.3 "

  10. Arkansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",15981,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1667,10.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1341,8.4 "

  11. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",67328,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",16460,24.4 " Geothermal",2004,3 " Hydro Conventional",10141,15.1 " Solar",475,0.7 "

  12. Colorado Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",13777,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2010,14.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",662,4.8 " Solar",41,0.3 "

  13. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",8284,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",281,3.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  14. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3389,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10,0.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  15. Florida Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wood/Wood Waste" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",59222,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1182,2 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",55,0.1 "

  16. Georgia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",36636,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2689,7.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",2052,5.6 "

  17. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Other Biomass" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",2536,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",340,13.4 " Geothermal",31,1.2 " Hydro Conventional",24,0.9 " Solar",2,0.1 " Wind",62,2.4 "

  18. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3990,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3140,78.7 " Geothermal",10,0.3 " Hydro Conventional",2704,67.8 "

  19. Illinois Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",44127,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2112,4.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",34,0.1 " Solar",9,"*" "

  20. Indiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27638,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1452,5.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",60,0.2 " Solar","-","-"

  1. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14592,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3728,25.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",144,1 " Solar","-","-" "

  2. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",12543,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1082,8.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3,"*" "

  3. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",20453,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",893,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",824,4 "

  4. Utah Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",7497,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",528,7 " Geothermal",42,0.6 " Hydro Conventional",255,3.4 " Solar","-","-"

  5. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1128,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",408,36.2 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",324,28.7 "

  6. Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",24109,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1487,6.2 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",866,3.6 "

  7. Washington Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",30478,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",23884,78.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",21181,69.5 "

  8. West Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",16495,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",715,4.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",285,1.7 "

  9. Wisconsin Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",17836,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1267,7.1 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",492,2.8 "

  10. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",7986,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1722,21.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",307,3.8 " Solar","-","-"

  11. Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GridEx III | Department of Energy Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III Securing the Electricity Grid: Government and Industry Exercise Together at GridEx III November 24, 2015 - 10:00am Addthis Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall Deputy Secretary of Energy I had the opportunity this past week to represent the Department of Energy at a critically important exercise here in our Nation's Capital - an exercise, just like

  12. Institutional contexts of market power in the electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foer, A.A.

    1999-05-01

    Market power is widely recognized as one of the principal issues that must be dealt with if the electricity industry is to make the transition from regulation to competition. In this article, the author provides a legal and economic introduction to what the antitrust community means by market power and offers a primer on why market power is so central an issue in the electricity industry. Finally and most importantly, he offers comments on the institutional contexts of market power, exploring a process which he calls Shermanization that helps explain the institutional aspect of moving from regulation to competition and holds implications for where oversight should reside during this complex transition.

  13. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  14. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: 1970-1991

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the U.S. electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  15. Informatics requirements for a restructured competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickle, S.; Marnay, C.; Olken, F.

    1996-08-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing a slow but nonetheless dramatic transformation. It is a transformation driven by technology, economics, and politics; one that will move the industry from its traditional mode of centralized system operations and regulated rates guaranteeing long-run cost recovery, to decentralized investment and operational decisionmaking and to customer access to true spot market prices. This transformation will revolutionize the technical, procedural, and informational requirements of the industry. A major milestone in this process occurred on December 20, 1995, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved its long-awaited electric utility industry restructuring decision. The decision directed the three major California investor-owned utilities to reorganize themselves by the beginning of 1998 into a supply pool, at the same time selling up to a half of their thermal generating plants. Generation will be bid into this pool and will be dispatched by an independent system operator. The dispatch could potentially involve bidders not only from California but from throughout western North America and include every conceivable generating technology and scale of operation. At the same time, large customers and aggregated customer groups will be able to contract independently for their supply and the utilities will be required to offer a real-time pricing tariff based on the pool price to all their customers, including residential. In related proceedings concerning competitive wholesale power markets, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recognized that real-time information flows between buyers and sellers are essential to efficient equitable market operation. The purpose of this meeting was to hold discussions on the information technologies that will be needed in the new, deregulated electric power industry.

  16. Local government: The sleeping giant in electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, S.

    1997-11-01

    Public power has long been a cornerstone of consumer leverage in the electric industry. But its foundation consists of a much broader and deeper consumer authority. Understanding that authority - and present threats to it - is critical to restructuring of the electric industry as well as to the future of public power. The country has largely forgotten the role that local governments have played and continue to play in the development of the electric industry. Moreover, we risk losing sight of the options local governments may offer to protect consumers, to advance competition in the marketplace, and to enhance opportunities for technology and economic development. The future role of local government is one of the most important issues in the restructuring discussion. The basic authority of consumers rests at the local level. The resulting options consumers have to act as more than just respondents to private brokers and telemarketing calls are at the local level. And the ability for consumers to shape the marketplace and standards for what it will offer exists at the local level as well.

  17. Cyber Security Challenges in Using Cloud Computing in the Electric Utility Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Bora A.

    2012-09-01

    This document contains introductory material that discusses cyber security challenges in using cloud computing in the electric utility industry.

  18. Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together in National Effort to Tackle Important New Electricity Area PDF icon Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders More Documents & Publications SEAD-Fact-Sheet.pdf The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 2011

  19. Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6781665,1611149,2270495,2900021,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1132056,381979,373947,376130,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  1. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Custom Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dakota Electric will conduct an inspection of the project site prior to approval, and grant applications must earn pre-approval from Dakota Electric before any work begins. To qualify for rebates...

  2. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... including San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, ComEd, and Pepco in the United States, and London Hydro and Hydro One in Canada. ...

  3. National Grid (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Grid offers various rebate programs for industrial and commercial customers to install energy efficiency measures. 

  4. Salem Electric- Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salem Electric provides incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. Available rebates include:

  5. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... sulfur, tire-derived fuels, waste heat and miscellaneous technologies. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" ...

  7. Oncor Electric Delivery - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contact Oncor Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Oncor Electric Delivery Website http:www.takealoadofftexas.comindex.aspx?idcommercial-standard-offer...

  8. DTE Energy (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Program for Business offers prescriptive incentives for both electric and natural gas energy efficient improvements in areas of lighting, HVAC, processes, compressed air,...

  9. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  10. RG&E (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  11. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are limited to 50% of the project cost up to a maximum of $100,000. Customers who wish to participate in this rebate program should call Dakota Electric Association before the new equipme...

  12. District of Columbia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 200 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation - - Geothermal - - Hydro

  13. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 1999: Mergers and Other Corporate Combinations, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Presents data about corporate combinations involving investor-owned utilities in the United States, discusses corporate objectives for entering into such combinations, and assesses their cumulative effects on the structure of the electric power industry.

  14. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 2000: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  15. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to commercial and industrial electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment and measures in eligible facilities. Incentives are...

  16. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  17. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objectives of the Market Assessment were to: Develop a detailed profile of the stock of motor-driven equipment in U.S. industrial facilities; Characterize and estimate the magnitude of opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of industrial motor systems; Develop a profile of motor system purchase and maintenance practices; Develop and implement a procedure to update the detailed motor profile on a regular basis using readily available market information; and, Develop methods to estimate the energy savings and market effects attributable to the Motor Challenge Program.

  18. Performance Issues for a Changing Electric Power Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the factors affecting reliability within the electric bulk power system. Historical and projected data related to reliability issues are discussed on a national and regional basis. Current research on economic considerations associated with reliability levels is also reviewed.

  19. Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1997-07-01

    This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

  20. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  1. District of Columbia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","-" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","-" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",790,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity","-","-" " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional","-","-"

  2. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  3. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corneli, Steve; Kihm, Steve; Schwartz, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  4. Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands ...

  5. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  6. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  7. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  8. U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, B.C.B.; Wang Yingshi

    1997-11-01

    Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

  9. SO{sub 2} trading program as a metaphor for a competitive electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    This very brief presentation focuses on the competitive market impacts of sulfur dioxide SO{sub 2} emissions trading. Key points of the presentation are highlighted in four tables. The main principles and results of the emissions trading program are outlined, and the implications of SO{sub 2} trading for the electric industry are listed. Parallels between SO{sub 2} trading and electric utility restructing identified include no market distortion by avoiding serious disadvantages to competitors, and avoidance of stranded costs through compliance flexibility. 4 tabs.

  10. Hawaiian Electric Co Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    183,153.015 260,373 61,190.495 220,118.05 33,668 66,873.03 263,036.362 351 184,698.251 666,307.427 294,392 2008-06 50,956.441 171,624.468 259,968 56,718.638 212,158.651 33,628...

  11. Hawaiian Electric Co Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8262 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 19547 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location HI Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity...

  12. The revenue requirement approach to analysis of alternative technologies in the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The advancement of coal-based power generation technology is of primary interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The interests are well-founded due to increasing costs for premium fuels and, more importantly, the establishment of energy independence to promote national security. One of DOE's current goals is to promote the development of coal-fired technology for the electric utility industry. This paper is concerned with the economic comparison of two alternative technologies: the coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) and the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-combined cycle. The revenue requirement analysis was used for the economic evaluation of engineering alternatives in the electric utility industry. The results were compared based on year-by-year revenue requirement analysis. A computer program was written in Fortran to perform the calculations.

  13. Visioning the 21st Century Electricity Industry: Outcomes and Strategies for America

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lauren Azar Senior Advisor to the Secretary U. S. Department of Energy 8 February 2012 Visioning the 21 st Century Electricity Industry: Strategies and Outcomes for America http://teeic.anl.gov/er/transmission/restech/dist/index.cfm We all have "visions," in one form or another: * Corporations call them strategic plans * RTOs ... transmission expansion plans or Order 1000 plans * State PUCs ... integrated resource plans * Employees ... career goals Artist: Paolo Frattesi Artist: Paolo

  14. Antitrust Enforcement in the Electricity and Gas Industries: Problems and Solutions for the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Francois

    2006-06-15

    Antitrust enforcement in the electricity and gas industries raises specific problems that call for specific solutions. Among the issues: How can the anticompetitive effects of mergers be assessed in a changing regulatory environment? Should long-term agreements in energy purchasing be prohibited? What are the benefits of preventive action such as competition advocacy and market surveillance committees? Should Article 82 (a) of the EC Treaty be used to curb excessive pricing?. (author)

  15. Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

  16. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  17. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  18. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",14568,14637,14840,15009,15219 "Hydro Conventional",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 "Wind",26589,34450,55363,73886,94652 "Wood/Wood Waste",38762,39014,37300,36050,37172 "MSW Biogenic/Landfill

  19. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  20. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2885295,2992238,2926731,2726452,2883361 " Coal",1990511,2016456,1985801,1755904,1847290 " Petroleum",64166,65739,46243,38937,37061 " Natural Gas",816441,896590,882981,920979,987697 " Other Gases",14177,13453,11707,10632,11313

  1. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",761603,763994,770221,774279,782176 " Coal",312956,312738,313322,314294,316800 " Petroleum",58097,56068,57445,56781,55647 " Natural Gas",388294,392876,397460,401272,407028 " Other Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700

  2. DOE National Power Grid recommendations: unreliable guides for the future organization of the bulk electric-power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk electric power supply industry needs leadership to meet its problems effectively, economically, and with the least injury to the environment during the rest of the century. The industry's pluralistic character, which is one of its strengths, and the range of the federal antitrust laws have blunted industry response to the challenge of supplying adequate bulk power. DOE failed to recognize the leadership vacuum and to use the opportunity provided by its Final Report on the National Power Grid Study to adopt a more effective role. DOE can still recover and urge Congress to pass the necessary enabling legislation to establish a regional bulk power supply corporation that would generate and transmit electric power for sale to federally chartered, privately owned electric utilities having no corporate links to their wholesale customers. 87 references.

  3. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  4. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition.

  5. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings. ...

  6. Ultra-Efficient and Power Dense Electric Motors for U. S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Schiferl, Richard F.; Umans, Stephen D.

    2013-03-12

    The primary purpose of this project was to combine the ease-of-installation and ease-of-use attributes of industrial induction motors with the low-loss and small size and weight advantages of PM motors to create an ultra-efficient, high power density industrial motor that can be started across-the-line or operated from a standard, Volts/Hertz drive without the need for a rotor position feedback device. PM motor products that are currently available are largely variable speed motors that require a special adjustable speed drive with rotor position feedback. The reduced size and weight helps to offset the magnet cost in order make these motors commercially viable. The scope of this project covers horsepower ratings from 20 ? 500. Prototypes were built and tested at ratings ranging from 30 to 250 HP. Since fans, pumps and compressors make up a large portion of industrial motor applications, the motor characteristics are tailored to those applications. Also, since there is extensive use of adjustable frequency inverters in these applications, there is the opportunity to design for an optimal pole number and operate at other than 60 Hz frequency when inverters are utilized. Designs with four and eight pole configurations were prototyped as part of this work. Four pole motors are the most commonly used configuration in induction motors today. The results of the prototype design, fabrication, and testing were quite successful. The 50 HP rating met all of the design goals including efficiency and power density. Tested values of motor losses at 50 HP were 30% lower than energy efficient induction motors and the motor weight is 35% lower than the energy efficient induction motor of the same rating. Further, when tested at the 30 HP rating that is normally built in this 286T frame size, the efficiency far exceeds the project design goals with 30 HP efficiency levels indicating a 55% reduction in loss compared to energy efficient motors with a motor weight that is a few percentage points lower than the energy efficient motor. This 30 HP rating full load efficiency corresponds to a 46% reduction in loss compared to a 30 HP NEMA Premium? efficient motor. The cost goals were to provide a two year or shorter efficiency-based payback of a price premium associated with the magnet cost in these motors. That goal is based on 24/7 operation with a cost of electricity of 10 cents per kW-hr. Similarly, the 250 HP prototype efficiency testing was quite successful. In this case, the efficiency was maximized with a slightly less aggressive reduction in active material. The measured full load efficiency of 97.6% represents in excess of a 50% loss reduction compared to the equivalent NEMA Premium Efficiency induction motor. The active material weight reduction was a respectable 14.5% figure. This larger rating demonstrated both the scalability of this technology and also the ability to flexibly trade off power density and efficiency. In terms of starting performance, the 30 ? 50 HP prototypes were very extensively tested. The demonstrated capability included the ability to successfully start a load with an inertia of 25 times the motor?s own inertia while accelerating against a load torque following a fan profile at the motor?s full nameplate power rating. This capability will provide very wide applicability of this motor technology. The 250 HP prototype was also tested for starting characteristics, though without a coupled inertia and load torque. As a result it was not definitively proven that the same 25 times the motor?s own inertia could be started and synchronized successfully at 250 HP. Finite element modeling implies that this load could be successfully started, but it has not yet been confirmed by a test.

  7. Solar-electric power: The U.S. photovoltaic industry roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-01-01

    To meet this challenge, we — the U.S.-based PV industry — have developed this roadmap as a guide for building our domestic industry, ensuring U.S. technology ownership, and implementing a sound commercialization strategy that will yield significant benefits at minimal cost. Putting the roadmap into action will call for reasonable and consistent co-investment by our industry and government in research and technology development.

  8. This document is to provide input for a probable future state of the electric system and electric industry in 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Renz - Renz Consulting State of the Electric System in 2030 The Issue Last month's SGN article by Joe Miller discussed how the transition to a Smart Grid might take place. Joe's article was part of a series that has discussed the seven Principal Characteristics of a Smart Grid. While those seven characteristics promise a future in which the power grid supports and enables the needs of 21 st century society, such a grid does not exist today. And it will not exist tomorrow unless there is a

  9. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price Correction/Update Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  10. Electric industry restructuring and environmental issues: A comparative analysis of the experience in California, New York, and Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Since the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) issued its April 20, 1994, Blue Book proposal to restructure the regulation of electric utilities in California to allow more competition, over 40 states have initiated similar activities. The question of how major public policy objectives such as environmental protection, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and assistance to low-income customers can be sustained in the new competitive environment is also an important element being considered. Because many other states will undergo restructuring in the future, the experience of the {open_quotes}early adopter{close_quotes} states in addressing public policy objectives in their electric service industry restructuring processes can provide useful information to other states. The Competitive Resource Strategies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Utility Technologies, is interested in documenting and disseminating the experience of the pioneering states. The Center for Energy Analysis and Applications of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory assisted the Office of Utility Technologies in this effort with a project on the treatment of environmental issues in electric industry restructuring.

  11. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",17.822291,14.699138,11.842263,10.37511,15.452998 "Connecticut",19.748254,15.547557...

  12. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Release Date: October 21, 2015 Final 2014 data Next Release date: October 15, 2016 Annual data for 2014 re-released: January 13, 2016 (Revision\Correction) The Form EIA-861 and Form EIA-861S (Short Form) data files include information such as peak load, generation, electric purchases, sales, revenues, customer counts and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and

  13. Electricity and technical progress: The bituminous coal mining industry, mechanization to automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devine, W.D. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    Development and use of electric mobile machinery facilitated the mechanization of underground bituminous coal mining and has played a lesser but important role in the growth of surface mining. Electricity has been central to the rise of mechanically integrated mining, both underground (after 1950) and on the surface (recently). Increasing labor productivity in coal mining and decreasing total energy use per ton of coal mined are associated with penetration of new electric technology through at least 1967. Productivity declined and energy intensity increased during the 1970s due in part to government regulations. Recent productivity gains stem partly from new technology that permits automation of certain mining operations. On most big electric excavating machines, a pair of large alternating current (ac) motors operate continuously at full speed. These drive direct current (dc) generators that energize dc motors, each matched to the desired power and speed range of a particular machine function. Direct-current motors provide high torque at low speeds, thus reducing the amount of gearing required; each crawler is independently propelled forward or backward by its own variable-speed dc motors. The principal advantages of electric power are that mechanical power-transmission systems - shafts, gears, etc. - are eliminated or greatly simplified. Reliability is higher, lifetime is longer, and maintenance is much simpler with electric power than with diesel power, and the spare parts inventory is considerably smaller. 100 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  15. A premium price electricity market for the emerging biomass industry in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) is the means by which the UK Government creates an initial market for renewable sources of electricity. For the first time the third round of the competition for NFFO contracts included a band for {open_quote}energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes{close_quote}. The NFFO Order which obliges the Regional Electricity Companies (RECs) in England and Wales to contract for a specified electricity generating capacity from renewable resources was made in December 1994. It required 19.06 MW of wood gasification capacity and 103.81 MW from other energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes. The purpose of these Orders is to create an initial market so that in the not too distant future the most promising renewables can compete without financial support. This paper describes how these projects are expected to contribute to this policy. It also considers how the policy objective of convergence under successive Orders between the price paid under the NFFO and the market price for electricity might be accomplished.

  16. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 DETAILED DATA Revisions \ Corrections for electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system.

  17. 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",10,6,59.1,52.9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Planned Year","State Code","Producer Type","Fuel Source","Generators","Facilities","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)" 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",10,6,59.1,52.9 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","Hydroelectric",2,1,4.8,4.8 2014,"AK","Total Electric Power

  18. SunShot-funded Advanced Inverter Testing Enables 2,500 Solar Energy Systems to Connect to Hawaiis Electric Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to a SunShot collaboration at the Energy Departments National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 2,500 Hawaiian Electric customers will connect solar power to the electrical grid...

  19. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  20. An overview of market power issues in today`s electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, L.A.

    1998-07-01

    With the tendency for vertical disintegration of control and/or ownership of assets within the industry, however, properly defining the relevant product in horizontal competition at each stage of production, transmission, distribution, and marketing assumes increasing importance. There is every reason to expect that market power issues and antitrust concerns will arise in each of the five dimensions outlined above. In each case, the author believes the framework will continue to be properly measuring market shares and concentration for carefully defined product and geographic markets as a basis for making informed judgments about market power concerns. The modeling of industry demand, supply, and competitive interactions certainly helps to inform this process by testing the proper scopes of product and geographic markets and of the economic significance of productive assets in the market defined. Modeling should also help the screening process where the issue is possible market power in markets being restructured for retail competition.

  1. Identification, definition and evaluation of potential impacts facing the US electric utility industry over the next decade. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grainger, J.J.; Lee, S.S.H.

    1993-11-26

    There are numerous conditions of the generation system that may ultimately develop into system states affecting system reliability and security. Such generation system conditions should also be considered when evaluating the potential impacts on system operations. The following five issues have been identified to impact system reliability and security to the greatest extent: transmission access/retail wheeling; non-utility generators and independent power producers; integration of dispersed storage and generation into utility distribution systems; EMF and right-of-way limitations; Clean Air Act Amendments. Strictly speaking, some issues are interrelated and one issue cannot be completely dissociated from the others. However, this report addresses individual issues separately in order to determine all major aspects of bulk power system operations affected by each issue. The impacts of the five issues on power system reliability and security are summarized. This report examines the five critical issues that the US electric utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility industry will be facing over the next decade. The investigation of their impacts on utility system reliability and security is limited to the system operation viewpoint. Those five issues will undoubtedly influence various planning aspects of the bulk transmission system. However, those subjects are beyond the scope of this report. While the issues will also influence the restructure and business of the utility industry politically, sociologically, environmentally, and economically, all discussion included in the report are focused only on technical ramifications.

  2. Energy Innovations from Livermore Lab to Power Hawaiian Nonprofit |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Innovations from Livermore Lab to Power Hawaiian Nonprofit Energy Innovations from Livermore Lab to Power Hawaiian Nonprofit February 28, 2011 - 11:31am Addthis Mike Gleason (second from left), president and CEO of The Arc of Hilo. Also shown, from left: Annemarie Meike, Mark Sueksdorf, Marjorie Gonzalez and Larry Ferderber | Photo Courtesy of LLNL Mike Gleason (second from left), president and CEO of The Arc of Hilo. Also shown, from left: Annemarie Meike, Mark

  3. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  4. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Retail Price (cents/kWh) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 17.82 14.70 11.84 10.38 15.45 Connecticut 19.75 15.55 12.92 13.08 17.05 Maine 15.27 12.70 8.95 0.00 12.65 Massachusetts 17.39 14.68 12.74 8.76 15.35 New Hampshire 17.53 14.34 11.93 0.00 15.22 Rhode Island 17.17 14.56 12.86 14.89 15.41 Vermont 17.47 14.56 10.23 0.00 14.57 Middle Atlantic 16.39 13.65 7.61 12.28 13.41 New Jersey

  5. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  6. A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klara, J.M.; Weinstein, R.E.; Wherley, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

  7. Methods to estimate stranded commitments for a restructuring US electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.; Baxter, L.

    1996-01-01

    Estimates of stranded commitments for US investor-owned electric utilities range widely, from as little as $20 billion to as much as $500 billion (more than double the shareholder equity in US utilities). These potential losses are a consequence of the above-market book values for some utility-owned power plants, long-term power-purchase contracts, deferred income taxes, regulatory assets, and public-policy programs. Because of the wide range of estimates and the potentially large dollar amounts involved, state and federal regulators need a clear understanding of the methods used to calculate these estimates. In addition, they may want simple methods that they can use to check the reasonableness of the estimates that utilities and other parties present in regulatory proceedings. This report explains various top-down and bottom-up methods to calculate stranded commitments. The purpose of this analysis is to help regulators and others understand the implications of different analytical approaches to estimating stranded-commitment amounts. Top-down methods, because they use the utility as the unit of analysis, are simple to apply and to understand. However, their aggregate nature makes it difficult to determine what specific assets and liabilities affect their estimates. Bottom-up methods use the individual asset (e.g., power plant) or liability (e.g., power-purchase contract, fuel-supply contract, and deferred income taxes) as the unit of analysis. These methods have substantial data and computational requirements.

  8. Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9<//td> 1989 258,193 191,487 578,797 – 1,028,477 [–] – 17,942 13,144 166,392 [–] – – 197,478 – 1,225,955 1990

  9. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10<//td> 1989 9,135 6,901 18,424 1,143 35,603 [–] 685 1,781 9,112 [–] – – 11,578 – –

  10. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  11. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  12. Industry Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Partnerships

  13. GLORIA mosaic of the U. S. Hawaiian exclusive economic zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torresan, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    Digital long-range side-scan sonar reconnaissance surveys using GLORIA have imaged about 65% of the nearly 2.4 million km{sup 2} of the Hawaiian EEZ. The images have been processed and compiled into one mosaic that comprises the EEZ area surrounding the principal Hawaiian islands (from Hawaii to Kauai); extending on the south side of the ridge west to Kure Island, and on the north side to St. Rogatien Bank. The GLORIA images depict a variety of features that include enormous slumps and debris avalanches, lava flows, seafloor spreading fabric, fracture zones, seamounts, and unusual sedimentation patterns with more detail than previously had been possible with typical seismic reflection techniques. Some of these features were unknown before the GLORIA surveys. In particular, the GLORIA images show that the major degradational processes that affect the island and ridge areas are massive, likely tsunamogenic, blocky debris avalanches and slumps. These failures mantle the flanks of the ridge; some extending across the trough and up on to the Hawaiian Arch (up to 230 km from their sources). Over 30 failures are identified, ranging in area from 250 to > 6,000 km{sup 2} and having volumes from 500 to > 5,000 km{sup 3}. Such deposits cover > 125,000 km{sup 3} of the Ridge and adjacent seafloor. Also imaged are large Cenozoic submarine volcanic flow fields situated on the Hawaiian Arch. One such field, the North Arch field, is located north of Oahu between the Molokai and Murray fracture zones, and covers about 200,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to the GLORIA imagery only a small portion of this flow field was mapped. In addition, the imagery depicts the finer details of the Molokai and Murray fracture zones, the Cretaceous seafloor spreading fabric, and tensional faults on the Hawaiian Arch.

  14. FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. On October 31, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's Golden Field Office (GFO). Specifically, the Appellant, the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, contested the adequacy of the GFO's search, contending that

  15. Department of Energy Launches Initiative with Industry to Better Protect the Nation’s Electric Grid from Cyber Threats

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration’s efforts to enhance the security and reliability of the nation’s electrical grid, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced an initiative to further protect the electrical grid from cyber attacks.

  16. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  17. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO{sub 2} take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry`s response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  18. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  19. Analysis of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: A forecast of the electric utility industry response to Title IV, Acid Deposition Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molburg, J.C.; Fox, J.A.; Pandola, G.; Cilek, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 incorporate, for the first time, provisions aimed specifically at the control of acid rain. These provisions restrict emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) from electric power generating stations. The restrictions on SO[sub 2] take the form of an overall cap on the aggregate emissions from major generating plants, allowing substantial flexibility in the industry's response to those restrictions. This report discusses one response scenario through the year 2030 that was examined through a simulation of the utility industry based on assumptions consistent with characterizations used in the National Energy Strategy reference case. It also makes projections of emissions that would result from the use of existing and new capacity and of the associated additional costs of meeting demand subject to the emission limitations imposed by the Clean Air Act. Fuel-use effects, including coal-market shifts, consistent with the response scenario are also described. These results, while dependent on specific assumptions for this scenario, provide insight into the general character of the likely utility industry response to Title IV.

  20. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-21

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

  1. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Energy and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Folga, S.; Gillette, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of the total steam electric generating capacity in the United States operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. No evidence exists that Section 316(a) variances have caused any widespread environmental problems. Conversion from once-through cooling to cooling towers would result in a loss of plant output of 14.7-23.7 billion kilowatt-hours. The cost to make up the lost energy is estimated at $12.8-$23.7 billion (in 1992 dollars). Conversion to cooling towers would increase emission of pollutants to the atmosphere and water loss through evaporation. The second report describes alternatives available to plants that currently operate under the variance and estimates the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Little justification has been found for removing the 316(a) variance from the CWA.

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ...

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind ...

  4. NREL Teams with SolarCity to Maximize Solar Power on Electrical Grids -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Teams with SolarCity to Maximize Solar Power on Electrical Grids Both are working together with the Hawaiian Electric Companies to analyze and enable higher penetrations of distributed solar energy systems in Hawaii November 20, 2014 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and SolarCity have entered into a cooperative research agreement to address the operational issues associated with large amounts of distributed solar energy on electrical

  5. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  6. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume II. Impact of geothermal development on the geology and hydrology of the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, C.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The following topics are discussed: the geological setting of the Hawaiian Islands, regional geology of the major islands, geohydrology of the Hawaiian Islands, Hawaiis' geothermal resources, and potential geological/hydrological problems associated with geothermal development. Souces of information on the geology of Hawaii are presented. (MHR)

  7. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  8. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The EIA-861 survey has historically collected retail sales, revenue, and a variety of information related to demand response ...

  9. Hebei Huazheng Industry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hebei Province, China Zip: 53500 Product: Hebei Huazheng Industry manufactures electrical semiconductor devices. References: Hebei Huazheng Industry1 This article is a stub. You...

  10. Everbrite Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Everbrite Industries Inc. Place: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Zip: M1R 2T6 Sector: Solar Product: Everbrite Industries is an electrical contractor...

  11. Industrial Green | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant

  12. March 2012 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Electrical Wiring 08J--OSHA ReportableIndustrial Hygiene - Near Miss (Electrical) 11G--Other - Subcontractor 12C--EH Categories - Electrical Safety 14D--Quality Assurance -...

  13. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  14. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

  15. Hawaiian direct-heat grants encourage geothermal creativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, A.G. )

    1988-12-01

    The Hawaiian Community Geothermal Technology Program is unique. Under its auspices, heat and other by-products of Hawaii's high-temperature HGP-A geothermal well and power plant are not wasted. Instead, they form the backbone of a direct-heat grant program that reaches into the local community and encourages community members to develop creative uses for geothermal energy. A by-product of this approach is a broadened local base of support for geothermal energy development. With the experimental and precommercial work completed, most of the original grantees are looking for ways to continue their projects on a commercial scale by studying the economics of using geothermal heat in a full-scale business and researching potential markets. A geothermal mini-park may be built near the research center. In 1988, a second round of projects was funded under the program. The five new projects are: Geothermal Aquaculture Project - an experiment with low-cost propagation of catfish species in geothermally heated tanks with a biofilter; Media Steam Sterilization and Drying - an application of raw geothermal steam to shredded, locally-available materials such as coconut husks, which would be used as certified nursery growing media; Bottom-Heating System Using Geothermal Power for Propagation - a continuation of Leilani Foliage's project from the first round of grants, focusing on new species of ornamental palms; Silica Bronze - the use of geothermal silica as a refractory material in casting bronze artwork; and Electro-deposition of Minerals in Geothermal Brine - the nature and possible utility of minerals deposited from the hot fluid.

  16. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings.

  17. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (ACHP, 2011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches religious and cultural significance to historic properties that may be affected by the agency's undertakings.

  18. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  19. NIPSCO Prescriptive Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive Natural Gas & Electric Program offers rebates to NIPSCO's large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and institutional customers, who...

  20. American Solar Electric Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Solar Electric Inc Place: Scottsdale, Arizona Zip: 85251 Product: US installer of residential, commercial and industrial PV...

  1. Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

    1993-10-01

    This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

  2. Ultra-Efficient and Power-Dense Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact Sheet Describing How Advanced Electric Motors Offer Large Energy Savings in Industrial Applications

  3. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  4. EERE National Lab Impact Summit Hawaiian Electrics Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MW Year Total DG-PV FIT Utility-scale PV Offshore Wind Onshore Wind Hydro Geothermal WasteBiomass Reverse power flow is the new normal 54% 50% 61% 33% 42% 34% 13% 7% 5% 0% 50% ...

  5. 1,"Kahe","Petroleum","Hawaiian Electric Co Inc",582.1 2,"Waiau...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" ... biomass","Covanta Honolulu Resource Recovery",88 9,"Keahole","Petroleum","Hawaii ...

  6. Lincoln Electric System - Renewable Generation Rate (Nebraska...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Anaerobic Digestion, Small...

  7. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  8. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  9. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  10. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  11. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  12. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  13. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investor-owned electric utility industry members of the Edison Electric Institute pledge to assist Federal agencies in achieving energy-saving goals. These goals are set in the Energy Policy Act of...

  14. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  15. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  16. Sandia Energy - Standards and Industry Outreach/Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Industry OutreachPartnerships Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric...

  17. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... industries, requiring natural gas to melt aluminum and electricity to run equipment. ... Automated Fluidized Bed Heat Treatment System Age Bed Quench Tank Robot Product raised ...

  18. Model Documentation Report: Industrial Sector Demand Module...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. The equation for total industrial electricity consumption is below....

  19. NREL + SolarCity: Maximizing Solar Power on Electrical Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannegan, Bryan; Hanley, Ryan; Symko-Davies, Martha

    2015-06-03

    Learn how NREL is partnering with SolarCity to study how to better integrate rooftop solar onto the grid. The work includes collaboration with the Hawaiian Electric Companies (HECO) to analyze high-penetration solar scenarios using advanced modeling and inverter testing at the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on NREL’s campus. Results to date have been so promising that HECO has more than doubled the amount of rooftop solar it allows on its grid, showing utilities across the country that distributed solar is not a liability for reliability—and can even be an asset.

  20. Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs This presentation discusses national trends in electric utility energy efficiency programs for industrial customers, insights from investor-owned utilities, and national trends/developments among electric cooperatives. PDF icon Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs (October 5, 2010) More Documents & Publications CX-004355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Customer Perspectives on

  1. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-20

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  2. Ultra-Efficient and Power-Dense Electric Motors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Fan and pump industrial motor installations Photos courtesy of Baldor Electric Company. ... the well- established product commercialization channels within Baldor Electric Company. ...

  3. DOE Releases New Video on Electric Vehicles, Highlights Administration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases New Video on Electric Vehicles, Highlights Administration Support for U.S. Auto Industry in Detroit Economic Club Speech DOE Releases New Video on Electric Vehicles, ...

  4. Industrial Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies » Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Marketing Summaries (355) Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories

  5. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  6. Biogas energy for Hawaiian small farms and homesteads, HI-11. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzenhoff, M.H.

    1980-02-01

    This report contains the results of a US Department of Energy, Appropriate Energy Technology grant for the development and demonstration of a simple, easy-to-operate and high energy yielding anaerobic bioconversion system for Hawaiian small scale hog farms. The system included a flexible material ''rubber'' digester, gas storage tank, algae pond, wastewater recycling loop, and gas utilization appliances. Ten cubic feet of biogas per 150 pound hog per day was identified as the sustainable yield of biogas using this system under Hawaiian farm conditions at a 15-day retention period without heating or mixing the anaerobic digester. Cost of the system was compared with the economic value of the gas produced and the investment recovery period was found to be 1.16 years. Biogas was used to fuel numerous farm appliances, including nursery infra-red heaters, gas lamps and an internal combustion powered water pump. Digested pig manure was renovated by recycling through an algae pond, after which it was used in biweekly hog housing sanitation washdowns. Finally, the results of the project have been promulgated through informal seminars, workshops, and the publication-distribution of a farmer oriented manual on digester installation and operation. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  8. Guidance for Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations: What to Ask the Federal Agency in the Section 106 Process (ACHP, 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidance from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is intended to assist tribal and Native Hawaiian organization officials in participating more effectively in the Section 106 review process.

  9. Partnership Helps Alleviate Electric Vehicle Range Anxiety (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    NREL, Clean Cities, and industry leaders join forces to create the first comprehensive online locator for electric vehicle charging stations.

  10. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  11. Bringing electricity reform to the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fe Villamejor-Mendoza, Maria

    2008-12-15

    Electricity reforms will not translate to competition overnight. But reforms are inching their way forward in institutions and stakeholders of the Philippine electricity industry, through regulatory and competition frameworks, processes, and systems promulgated and implemented. (author)

  12. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the principles of industrial energy conservation and energy conservation applications, with emphasis on the energy-intensive industries. Topics covered include energy consumption, alternative energy sources, elements of energy audits, economic investment analysis, management of energy conservation programs, boilers and fired heaters, steam and condensate systems, classification and fouling of heat exchangers, heat transfer augmentation, waste heat sources, heat recovery equipment, properties and characteristics of insulation, energy conservation in industrial buildings, cogeneration, power circuit components and energy conversion devices, electrical energy conservation. A review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, as well as examples, problems, and case studies from specific industries are included.

  13. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapid growth in photovoltaic capacity. Solar electricity output in June is a good indicator of the recent growth of the solar industry, because June has the highest monthly...

  14. Electric Drive Transportation Association EDTA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transportation Association EDTA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA) Product: EDTA is the preeminent U.S. industry association...

  15. Western Massachusetts Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Massachusetts Electric (WMECO) helps commercial and industrial customers offset the additional costs of purchasing and installing energy efficient equipment. WMECO offers rebates for...

  16. Mass Save (Electric)- Large Commercial Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  17. El Paso Electric Company- Commercial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The El Paso Electric (EPE) Commercial Efficiency Program pays incentives to commercial and industrial customers who install energy efficiency measures in facilities located within EPE's New Mexico...

  18. Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Within the GreenSense program, Denton Municipal Electric's Standard Offer Program provides rebates to large commercial and industrial customers for lighting retrofits, HVAC upgrades and motor...

  19. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  20. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. October 15, 2012 Outfall from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center cooling towers Intermittent flow of discharged water from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center eventually reaches perennial segment of Sandia Canyon during storm events (Outfall 03A199). Contact Environmental Communication & Public

  1. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by cosmic-ray-induced neutrons upon miniature electronic devices, such as chips that help control aircraft or complex integrated circuits in automobiles. Industrial User...

  2. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  3. Small Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    because of equipment age, suboptimal components, or inherently inefficient part-load control. Incentives may be available (check with your electric utility) to help cover the...

  4. Now Available: Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The electric power industry expects a 400% growth in annual sales of plug-in electric vehicles by 2023, which may substantially increase electricity usage and peak demand in high ...

  5. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting, motors, and ASDs, there is a maximum of 50% of the project cost, or 5,000 Agriculture Ventilation: 50% of cost or 100,000 Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator...

  6. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Kansas Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary ... - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  7. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    California Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 ... 63,213 63,813 64,105 65,948 67,328 - No data reported. ...

  8. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Gas 131 0.1 Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  9. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - 0.0 - No data reported. ...

  10. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source ... - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  11. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood... Gas 1,671 1.2 Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  12. Minnesota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Minnesota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood... Gas 340 0.6 Other Biomass 576 1.1 - No data reported. ...

  13. Illinois Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  14. Tennessee Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Tennessee Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  15. Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  16. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source ... Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  17. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Vermont Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas 25 0.4 Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  18. New Jersey Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Jersey Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal ... - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  19. Arkansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 1,341 8.4 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  20. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  1. Missouri Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  2. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 24 0.2 - No data reported. ...

  3. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Iowa Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary ... Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  4. Texas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  5. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 WoodWood ... Gas 237 1.4 Other Biomass 27 0.2 - No data reported. ...

  6. Wisconsin Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wisconsin Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 WoodWood ... Gas 470 0.7 Other Biomass 38 0.1 - No data reported. ...

  7. Nebraska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Nebraska Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  8. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  9. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alaska Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1 - No data reported. ...

  10. Florida Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood... Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  11. Washington Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  12. Nevada Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  13. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  14. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood... Gas - 0.0 Other Biomass 97 0.1 - No data reported. ...

  15. Michigan Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Michigan Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  16. Louisiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Louisiana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source WoodWood ... Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 74 0.1 - No data reported. ...

  17. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  18. Utah Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas 56 0.1 Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  19. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wyoming Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  20. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  1. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - - No data reported. ...

  2. West Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 WoodWood ...Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - 0.0 - No data reported. ...

  3. Maryland Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Maryland Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  4. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source ... - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  5. Georgia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  6. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro ... Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  7. New Mexico Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  8. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood... - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  9. Indiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Indiana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  10. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  11. Massachusetts Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Massachusetts Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  12. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Kentucky Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Hydro Conventional 824 4.0 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  13. Colorado Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Colorado Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind ... Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  14. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro ... Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - WoodWood ... Absolute percentage less than 0.05. - No data reported. ...

  15. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Conventional",122,1.5 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood Waste","-","-" " MSW... Conventional",391,1.2 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood Waste","s","*" " MSW ...

  16. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Conventional","-","-" " Solar","-","-" " Wind",2,0.1 " WoodWood Waste","-","-" " MSW... Conventional","-","-" " Solar","-","-" " Wind",3,"*" " WoodWood Waste","-","-" " MSW ...

  17. Electric Power Industry--Chap6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and carbon dioxide (CO2). Coal-fired generating units produce more SO2 and NOx than other fossil-fuel units for two reasons. First, because coal generally contains more sulfur than...

  18. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of U.S. ...

  19. Texas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",689,0.6 " Solar",14,"*" " ... " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1262,0.3 " Solar",8,"*" " ...

  20. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Per...

  1. Texas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 ... Total Renewable Net Generation 28,967 7.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,262 0.3 ...

  2. Tennessee Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State ...

  3. Tennessee Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent ...

  4. Unitil (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebate New Construction Air Compressors: 45-140 New Construction High Efficiency Dryer: 5-7CFM New Construction Custom: 75% of incremental cost Summary Unitil offers...

  5. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,0.6,0.6,1.3,1.3,0.7,1.2,1.2,1.6,1.2 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",922,172,27,17,512,5,...:",0.7,0.7,1,1.2,0.8,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.1 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",79,19,7,5,42,1,2,0,3...

  6. Antitrust policy in the new electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission should encourage all potential consolidations of transmission assets. It should defer to the position of state Public Utility Commissions with respect to all proposed consolidations of distribution assets. It should take a conservative initial attitude toward all proposed changes in the structure of the wholesale market, both proposed consolidations and potential coerced divestitures. It should eliminate price controls on virtually all wholesales on an experimental basis and use the data made available by that experiment as the basis for a more refined set of policies applicable to the structure of the wholesale market in the dramatically new environment that it is in the process of creating.

  7. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "WoodWood Waste",9,2,2,1,"s" "MSW BiogenicLandfill Gas",755,728,732,758,739 "Other ...

  8. NYSEG (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: As of March 2016, the incentives for program year 2016 are being updated. Please check the program website for updated information. 

  9. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users - Media Publications and Information The Invisible Neutron Threat Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices Nuclear Science Research at the LANSCE-WNR Facility Links About WNR Industrial Users 4FP30L-A/ICE House 4FP30R/ICE II Media

  10. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  11. Docket No. EERE–2010–BT–STD–0027 Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document 77 Fed. Reg. 43015 (July 23, 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum memorializes a communication involving members of the Motor Coalition (industry and energy advocates) in connection with this proceeding.

  12. Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant

  13. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  14. Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

  15. Industry Economist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will report to the Manager of Load Forecasting and Analysis of the Customer Services Organization. He/she serves as an industry economist engaged in load...

  16. Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel cell and biogas industries perspectives. Presented by Mike Hicks, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

  17. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Hewlett Packard Labs Gains Insights with Innovative ALS Research Tools Print Thursday, 05 May 2016 11:21 For the past eight years, Hewlett Packard Labs, the central research organization of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, has been using cutting-edge ALS techniques to advance some of their most promising technological research, including vanadium dioxide phase transitions and atomic movement during memristor operation. Read more... ALS, Molecular Foundry, and aBeam

  18. NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery

  19. Electric power monthly, May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and Stage agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities in Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  20. Electric Power monthly, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  18. Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007:

  19. IT Industry's Renewable Energy Procurement is Significant, Set...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IT Industry's Renewable Energy Procurement is Significant, Set to Climb August 20, 2015 The percentage of renewable electricity purchased by U.S. companies in the information and ...

  20. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid ... to the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery ...

  1. Nanjing Auheng Industrial Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Place: Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip: 210005 Sector: Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product: Manufactures industrial components, including electric vehicle...

  2. Recovery Act: Oxy-Combustion Technology Development for Industrial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Language: English Subject: 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Clean Coal Technology; Coal-Fuels; Industrial and Environmental Processes; Electricity; General, ...

  3. Model Documentation Report: Industrial Demand Module of the National...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    are multiplicative for all fuels that have consumption values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. The equation for total industrial electricity consumption is below....

  4. Microsoft Word Viewer - Industrial Documentation _7-10-06_.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. The equation for total industrial electricity consumption is below....

  5. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industrial Assessment Centers prepare students to excel as young professionals. Here's one story about an electrical engineering student who was able to turn his experience into a job.

  6. NREL Supports Industry to Develop Computer-Aided Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Supports Industry to Develop Computer-Aided Engineering Tools for Car Batteries July ... tools to help produce the next generation of electric drive vehicle (EDV) batteries. ...

  7. Commercial / Industrial Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial & Industrial Lighting Efficiency Program The Commercial & Industrial...

  8. Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    here as electricity generation equipment less than 1 MW) such as microturbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines offers promise to renew growth in the U.S. industrial sector. ...

  9. Rebuilding the American Auto Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Administration made strategic investments to help U.S. auto manufacturers retool to produce the hybrid, electric, and highly fuel efficient advanced vehicles of the future. With the help of these investments -- and the incredible talent and commitment of America's auto workers -- the auto industry is growing again.

  10. PROJECT PROFILE: Electric Power Research Institute | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric Power Research Institute PROJECT PROFILE: Electric Power Research Institute Project Name: Leveraging Industry Research to Educate a Future Electric Grid Workforce in the Western U.S. Funding Opportunity: Solar Training and Education for Professionals (STEP) SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: Knoxville, TN SunShot Award Amount: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $250,000 The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) along with university, utility, and electric industry partners

  11. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  12. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  13. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  14. Electric Vehicle Safety Training for Emergency Responders | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presentation discusses national trends in electric utility energy efficiency programs for industrial customers, insights from investor-owned utilities, and national trends/developments among electric cooperatives. PDF icon Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Programs (October 5, 2010) More Documents & Publications CX-004355: Categorical Exclusion Determination Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators

  15. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  16. Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales.

  17. Industry Profile

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Combined heat and power (CHP)—sometimes referred to as cogeneration—involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

  18. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles Energy 101: Electric Vehicles January 9, 2012 - 4:22pm Addthis A look at how electric vehicles (EVs) work and what current and future models are doing to cut transit costs, reduce emissions, and strengthen our nation's energy security. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs While the North American International Auto Show is slated to kick off today in Detroit, and the industry is already abuzz with the latest innovations in electric

  19. Electric power emergency handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labadie, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Emergency Electric Power Administration's Emergency Operations Handbook is designed to provide guidance to the EEPA organization. It defines responsibilities and describes actions performed by the government and electric utilities in planning for, and in operations during, national emergencies. The EEPA Handbook is reissued periodically to describe organizational changes, to assign new duties and responsibilities, and to clarify the responsibilities of the government to direct and coordinate the operations of the electric utility industry under emergencies declared by the President. This Handbook is consistent with the assumptions, policies, and procedures contained in the National Plan for Emergency Preparedness. Claimancy and restoration, communications and warning, and effects of nuclear weapons are subjects covered in the appendices.

  20. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  1. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  2. National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Revolutionize Electric Power in North America | Department of Energy Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to Revolutionize Electric Power in North America National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap: Transforming the Grid to Revolutionize Electric Power in North America This Roadmap provides a framework for all of the stakeholders that comprise the electric industry to work together to achieve common aims. PDF icon National Electric Delivery Technologies Roadmap:

  3. Annual Public Electric Utility data - EIA-412 data file

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    412 Archive Data (The EIA-412 survey has been terminated.) The EIA-412 "Annual Electric Industry Financial Report" collected information such as income statements, balance sheets, sales and purchases, and transmission line data. Form EIA-412 data Schedules Year 2 Electric Balance Sheet 3 Electric Income Statement 4 Electric Plant 5 Taxes, Tax Equivalents, Contributions, and Services During Year 6 Sales of Electricity for Resale (Account 447) 7 Electric Operation and Maintenance

  4. Early recovery of a Hawaiian lowland rainforest following clearcutting at Kalapana on the Island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The recovery of lowland rainforest vegetation on the Island of Hawaii was evaluated 2 years after clearcutting. Rainforest quality was assessed with regeneration success associated with the environmental changes. Sixty-three percent of the 57 vascular species in the forest were native to the Hawaiian rainforest. Phanerophytes were the most important life form. The presence of Psidium cattleianum and other alien species demonstrated disturbances had occurred in selected areas prior to the clearcutting. Two years after clearcutting (1987), only 24% of the 101 species coming into the clearcut area were native. The shrubs, micro- and nano-phanerophyte, were the dominant life forms, represented by Pipturus albidus, a native rainforest shrub or tree, and four non-native shrub species. Metrosideros polymorpha, the dominant tree in the native forest, was successfully regenerating from seed across the clear-cut area. The forest seedbank analysis also demonstrated that Metrosideros, along with the seeds of important exotic species colonizing the clearcut area were presented in the forest soils. The forest and clearcut species had a high rate of correlation with the elevation gradient. The underlying lava flows strong influenced past and present vegetation associations. In the clearcut area, the degree of compaction and distance from the forest were critical factors determining the composition of recovering vegetation. The microclimate variables of soils, significantly altered due to the effects of clearcutting, and competition from weeds probably lead to poor germination and growth of native rainforest species. This native forest is not pristine, but unique in stature, in complex of cohort stands, and in position on the landscape. It is extremely prone to species composition shift following perturbation, due to the presence of the weed seedbank in the forest seedbank as demonstrated in the dominance of these species across the clearcut area.

  5. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 3. Hawaiian ecosystem and its environmental determinants with particular emphasis on promising areas for geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    A brief geobiological history of the Hawaiian Islands is presented. Climatology, physiography, and environmental degradation are discussed. Soil types and associations, land use patterns and ratings, and vegetation ecology are covered. The fauna discussed include: ancient and recent vertebrate life, land mollusca, marine fauma, and insect fauna. (MHR)

  6. Toughened Graphite Electrode for High Heat Electric Arc Furnaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing SummaryA tougher and more resilient graphite electrode was developed at ORNL to melt steel, titanium, and other scrap metal in industrial electric arc ...

  7. Ames Electric Department- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ames Electric Department provides free energy audits and multiple energy efficiency rebates for commercial and industrial customers. The rebate programs available include: The Appliance Rebate...

  8. DOE Issues Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Electric Motors...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    regarding energy conservation standards for certain commercial and industrial electric motors, under subpart B of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 431, including a...

  9. El Paso Electric Company- Small Business and Large Commercial Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    El Paso Electric (EPE) offers several incentive programs targeting small business owners as well as larger commercial and industrial EPE customers.

  10. Mass Save (Electric)- Small Business Direct Install Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  11. Renewable Resource Electricity in the Changing Regulatory Environment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article surveys in the development of renewable resource electricity recent actions and proposals and summarizes their implications for the renewables industry.

  12. U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

  13. Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Electric and Gas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize CT offers low interest loans for commercial and industrial customers for investments in energy efficiency improvements. Electric customers of Connecticut Light & Power, United...

  14. Electrical Safety

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Electrical Design Criteria ... of High-Voltage and Low-Current ... as a higher level of authority. Per the Integrated Safety Management model, ...

  15. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  16. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  17. Electric power monthly, June 1997 with data for March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. 63 tabs.

  18. Electric power monthly, July 1997 with data for April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. 57 tabs.

  19. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Perspective U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable ... the forest products industry through innovation 2 The U.S. Forest Products Industry's ...

  20. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  1. Electric trade in the United States 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

  2. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  3. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  4. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Industry Commitment Investor-owned electric utility industry members of the Edison Electric Institute pledge to assist Federal agencies in achieving energy-saving goals. These goals are set in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and subsequent executive orders. Federal agencies can contact Federal Utility Partnership Working Group utility partners for more information on assistance.

  5. Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999 Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999 Micropower (defined here as electricity generation equipment less than 1 MW) such as microturbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines offers promise to renew growth in the U.S. industrial sector. Based on the analysis conducted for this 1999 study, these technologies can cost-effectively provide thermal and electric

  6. Antitrust issues and the restructuring of the power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritz, T.F.

    1999-11-01

    Because of extensive federal oversight and state regulation of the utility area, few antitrust cases have been brought concerning the electric power industry. The limited prior case law that exists in this area nonetheless provides valuable guidance regarding how the antitrust laws will protect consumers and, therefore, competition in the electric power industry. This article will discuss the primary antitrust doctrines likely to be utilized to protect competition in this industry.

  7. Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy June 13, 2013 - 1:29pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama

  8. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  9. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,497 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 528 7.0 Geothermal 42 0.6 Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  20. Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.