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Sample records for hatchery program grande

  1. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with

  2. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho Summary DOE's ...

  3. EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation’s Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington.

  4. EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation's Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. ...

  5. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  6. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download...

  7. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho SUMMARY DOE's Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of...

  8. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery .

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  9. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  10. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  11. EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho.

  12. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Combs, Mitch

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee

  13. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  14. Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks

  15. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Mitch

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the

  16. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2005-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the

  17. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2004-05-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to

  18. Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, 1995-2002 Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffnagle, Timothy; Carmichael, Richard; Noll, William

    2003-12-01

    areas in 1995 from as high as 1,205 redds in the same area in 1969 (Table 1). All streams reached low points (0-6 redds in the index areas) in the 1990's, except those in which no redds were found for several years and surveys were discontinued, such as Spring, Sheep and Indian creeks which had a total of 109 redds in 1969. The Minam and Wenaha rivers are tributaries of the Grande Ronde River located primarily in wilderness areas. Chinook salmon numbers in these two streams (based on redd counts) also decreased dramatically beginning in the early 1970's (Table 1). Since then there have been a few years of increasing numbers of redds but counts have generally been 25-40% of the number seen in the 1960's. No hatchery fish have been released into either of these streams and we monitor them during spawning ground surveys for the presence of hatchery strays. These populations will be used as a type of control for evaluating our supplementation efforts in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River. In this way, we can attempt to filter out the effects of downstream variables, over which we have no control, when we interpret the results of the captive broodstock program as the F1 and F2 generations spawn and complete their life cycles in the wild. The Grande Ronde Basin Captive Broodstock Program was initiated because these chinook salmon populations had reached critical levels where dramatic and unprecedented efforts were needed to prevent extinction and preserve any future options for use of endemic fish for artificial propagation programs for recovery and mitigation. This program was designed to quickly increase numbers of returning adults, while maintaining the genetic integrity of each endemic population.

  19. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  20. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  1. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in

  2. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  3. EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

  4. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Umatilla County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

  5. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D.

    2009-11-14

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement

  6. Grande

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    breaks ground on key sediment control project November 5, 2009 Structures will limit flow of sediments toward Rio Grande Los Alamos, New Mexico, November 5, 2009- Crews broke...

  7. Grande

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    breaks ground on key sediment control project November 5, 2009 Structures will limit flow of sediments toward Rio Grande Los Alamos, New Mexico, November 5, 2009- Crews broke ground this week on one of two engineered structures in a Los Alamos National Laboratory environmental project to reduce the flow of sediments down two canyons toward the Rio Grande. Called "grade-control" structures, the approximately $2 million features are up to eight feet high and made of rocks packed tightly

  8. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  9. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.

    1995-02-01

    At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

  10. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish

  11. Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

  12. EA-1037: Uranium Lease Management Program, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office's proposal to maintain and preserve the nation's immediately accessible supply of...

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  15. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-08-18

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium

  16. "Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically

  17. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T.

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  18. High performance computing and communications grand challenges program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, J.E.; Barr, A.; Chandy, K.M.; Goddard, W.A., III; Kesselman, C.

    1994-10-01

    The so-called protein folding problem has numerous aspects, however it is principally concerned with the {ital de novo} prediction of three-dimensional (3D) structure from the protein primary amino acid sequence, and with the kinetics of the protein folding process. Our current project focuses on the 3D structure prediction problem which has proved to be an elusive goal of molecular biology and biochemistry. The number of local energy minima is exponential in the number of amino acids in the protein. All current methods of 3D structure prediction attempt to alleviate this problem by imposing various constraints that effectively limit the volume of conformational space which must be searched. Our Grand Challenge project consists of two elements: (1) a hierarchical methodology for 3D protein structure prediction; and (2) development of a parallel computing environment, the Protein Folding Workbench, for carrying out a variety of protein structure prediction/modeling computations. During the first three years of this project, we are focusing on the use of two proteins selected from the Brookhaven Protein Data Base (PDB) of known structure to provide validation of our prediction algorithms and their software implementation, both serial and parallel. Both proteins, protein L from {ital peptostreptococcus magnus}, and {ital streptococcal} protein G, are known to bind to IgG, and both have an {alpha} {plus} {beta} sandwich conformation. Although both proteins bind to IgG, they do so at different sites on the immunoglobin and it is of considerable biological interest to understand structurally why this is so. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  19. SUNSHOT GRAND CHALLENGE SUMMIT AND PEER REVIEW EVENT PROGRAM

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EVENT PROGRAM MAY 19-22 2014 ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA Hilton Anaheim 3 Welcome to the SunShot ... Green Room San Simeon El Capitan Avila Laguna California Promenade Promenade BALLROOM ...

  20. Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.

    2003-03-01

    Endangered Species Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorizes ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and Grande Ronde River (GR) for research and enhancement purposes. Modification 2 of this permit authorizes ODFW to take adults for spawning and the production and release of smolts for the Captive and Conventional broodstock programs. This report satisfies the requirement that an annual report be submitted. Herein we report on activities conducted and provide cursory data analyses for the Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon Captive and Conventional broodstock projects from 1 January-31 December 2000.

  1. Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  2. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan

    2009-04-16

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for

  3. Rio Grande Erosion Potential Demonstration - Report for the National Border Technology Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEPSEN, RICHARD A.; ROBERTS, JESSE D.; LANGFORD, RICHARD; GAILANI, JOSEPH

    2001-11-01

    This demonstration project is a collaboration among DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC), and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Sandia deployed and demonstrated a field measurement technology that enables the determination of erosion and transport potential of sediments in the Rio Grande. The technology deployed was the Mobile High Shear Stress Flume. This unique device was developed by Sandia's Carlsbad Programs for the USACE and has been used extensively in collaborative efforts on near shore and river systems throughout the United States. Since surface water quantity and quality along with human health is an important part of the National Border Technology Program, technologies that aid in characterizing, managing, and protecting this valuable resource from possible contamination sources is imperative.

  4. EIS-0213: Nez-Perce Tribal Hatchery Project (NPTH).

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Nez Perce Tribe propose to supplement their existing program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. This EIS evaluates the Proposed Action that the Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities.

  5. Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Fact Sheet, July 2001

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed at the Climax millsite at Grand Junction, Colorado, between 1951 and 1970. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike material containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The tailings were an ideal and inexpensive construction material suitable for concrete, mortar, and fill. Accordingly, the tailings were widely used in the Grand Junction area for these purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy

  6. Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  7. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  8. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M.

    2001-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving

  9. Rio Grande

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rio Grande Rio Grande In New Mexico, the Rio Grande flows from one sediment-filled basin to another, cutting canyons between the basins and supporting a fragile ecosystem on its...

  10. CTUIR Grande Ronde River Watershed Restoration Program McCoy Creek/McIntyre Creek Road Crossing, 1995-1999 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2000-08-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into a contract agreement beginning in 1996 to fund watershed restoration and enhancement actions and contribute to recovery of fish and wildlife resources and water quality in the Grande Ronde River Basin. The CTUIR's habitat program is closely coordinated with the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program and multiple agencies and organizations within the basin. The CTUIR has focused during the past 4 years in the upper portions of the Grande Ronde Subbasin (upstream of LaGrande, Oregon) on several major project areas in the Meadow, McCoy, and McIntyre Creek watersheds and along the mainstem Grande Ronde River. This Annual Report provides an overview of individual projects and accomplishments.

  11. Grand Challenges

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Challenges Grand Challenges Our goals to live a sustainable future LANL stakeholders TA-21 cleanup activities water on LANL land Collaborate with our stakeholders and tribal...

  12. Grande Ronde Basin Chinook Salmon Captive Brood and Conventional Supplementation Programs, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, Richard W.

    2003-03-01

    Permit Number 1011 (formerly Permit No. 973) authorized ODFW to take listed spring chinook salmon juveniles from Catherine Creek and the Lostine and Grande Ronde rivers for scientific research and enhancement purposes. Special condition 2a specified the need for an annual report prior to initiation of next year's work.

  13. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  14. Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-10-02

    The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Since the hatchery was constructed, ongoing Operation and Maintenance (O&M) and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been funded by BPA. The O&M and M&E activities examined in the EA were very general in nature due to the fact the project was in the conceptual stage. Since that time the hatchery has refined the need for specific O&M and M&E activities, proposed for fiscal year 2004, (funding for projects runs from October 2003 to September 2004). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze the environmental impacts that would result from the specific O&M and M&E activities proposed for fiscal year 2004.

  15. Rio Grande

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rio Grande Rio Grande In New Mexico, the Rio Grande flows from one sediment-filled basin to another, cutting canyons between the basins and supporting a fragile ecosystem on its flood plain. August 1, 2013 river bank Banks of the Rio Grande Groundwater at LANL discharges to springs along the Rio Grande. Stream flow resulting from heavy storms and snowmelt also has the potential to reach the Rio Grande. RELATED IMAGES http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2818/9628464665_3a972e1387_t.jpg Enlarge

  16. Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program Administration and Habitat Projects, Annual Progress Report, Project Period: Program Administration: January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997 Habitat Projects: January 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, Cecilia; Kuchenbecker, Lyle; Perry, Patty

    1998-10-28

    This agreement provided funding for operation and administration of the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program including staffing of an Executive Director, Program Planner, and clerical personnel. The contract covers maintaining program services, project planning, subwatershed plans (CRMP's), public involvement and education, interagency coordination/clearing house, monitoring, and technical support activities that have taken place in the Grande Ronde basin. Cost-share has been received from the Bureau of Reclamation and the Governor's Watershed Enhancement Board.

  17. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1989-02-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies.

  19. EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery...

  20. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1991-09-01

    As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the

  1. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  2. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  3. Rio Grande

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In New Mexico, the Rio Grande flows from one sediment-filled basin to another, cutting canyons between the basins and supporting a fragile ecosystem on its flood plain. August 1, ...

  4. Grand Challenges

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Challenges Grand Challenges Our goals to live a sustainable future LANL stakeholders TA-21 cleanup activities water on LANL land Collaborate with our stakeholders and tribal governments to ensure that LANL's impact on the environment is as low as reasonably achievable Remove or stabilize pollutants from the Manhattan Project and Cold War eras Protect water resource quality and reduce water use Stormwater drainage at LANL LANL land waste workers at LANL Eliminate industrial emissions,

  5. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington Contact Dave Goodman jdgoodman@bpa.gov (503) 230-4764 More Information http:efw.bpa.gov...

  6. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  7. Sediment erosion and transport at the Rio Grande mouth : report for the National Border Technology Program and International Boundary and Water Commission.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapin, D. Michael, Jr.; Langford, Richard; Neu, Roene; Buhalts, Randy A.; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2003-11-01

    The mouth of the Rio Grande has become silted up, obstructing its flow into the Gulf of Mexico. This is problematic in that it has created extensive flooding. The purpose of this study was to determine the erosion and transport potential of the sediments obstructing the flow of the Rio Grande by employing a unique Mobile High Shear Stress flume developed by Sandia's Carlsbad Programs Group for the US Army Corps of Engineers. The flume measures in-situ sediment erosion properties at shear stresses ranging from normal flow to flood conditions for a variable depth sediment core. The flume is in a self-contained trailer that can be placed on site in the field. Erosion rates and sediment grain size distributions were determined from sediment samples collected in and around the obstruction and were subsequently used to characterize the erosion potential of the sediments under investigation.

  8. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge -- Battery Workshop Thursday, July 26, 2012 - ... Technologies Program 9:25-9:50 AM EV BATTERY TECHNOLOGY-CURRENT STATUS & COST ...

  9. Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blouin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree

  10. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries. To accomplish this goal. We are tagging missing production groups within hatcheries to assure each production group is identifiable to allow future evaluation upon recovery of tag data.

  11. Willamette Hatchery Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Annual Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, R.D.; Ewing, S.K.; Sheahan, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Hydropower development and operations in the Columbia River basin have caused the loss of 5 million to 11 million salmonids. An interim goal of the Northwest Power Planning Council is to reestablish these historical numbers by doubling the present adult runs from 2.5 million to 5.0 million fish. This increase in production will be accomplished through comprehensive management of both wild and hatchery fish, but artificial propagation will play a major role in the augmentation process. The current husbandry techniques in existing hatcheries require improvements that may include changes in rearing densities, addition of oxygen, removal of excess nitrogen, and improvement in raceway design. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to increase the number of fish released from hatcheries that survive to return as adults.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Grand Junction Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction Sites Grand Junction Sites gjmap Grand Junction Disposal Site Grand Junction Processing Site Grand Junction Site Contact Us

  13. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT

  14. Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

    2008-12-01

    Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U

  15. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  16. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

  17. EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    an Environmental Impact Statement Click the image to view the EIS. Contact Donald Rose dlrose@bpa.gov (503) 323-3796 More Information http:efw.bpa.govenvironmentalservice...

  18. SOFT COST GRAND CHALLENGE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energycenter.org California Center for Sustainable Energy Soft Cost Grand Challenge May 22, 2014 Accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy 2...

  19. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  20. Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

    2014-12-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after

  1. GRAND CHALLENGE PROBLEMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GRAND CHALLENGE PROBLEMS Time is the biggest issue. Materials typically become critical in a matter of months, but solutions take years or decades to develop and implement. Our first two grand challenges address this discrepancy. Anticipating Which Materials May Go Critical In an ideal world, users of materials would anticipate supply-chain disruptions before they occur. They would undertake activities to manage the risks of disruption, including R&D to diversify and increase supplies or to

  2. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  3. EIS-0522: Melvin R. Sampson Hatchery, Yakima Basin Coho Project; Kittitas County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating a proposed hatchery for coho salmon. BPA’s proposed action is to fund the Confederated Tribes of the Yakama Nation construction of a hatchery on 50 acres of land owned by the Yakama Nation in Kittitas County, Washington. Hatchery operations would include collection of adult coho for broodstock at the existing Roza and Sunnyside dams, incubation and rearing of up to 200,000 juvenile coho salmon, and release of smolts into the Yakima and Naches Rivers.

  4. Mountain View Grand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain View Grand Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Grand Facility Mountain View Grand Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  5. EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho’s construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort.

  6. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams

  7. Grand Junction/New Brunswick Laboratory interlaboratory measurement program. Part I. Evaluation. Part II. Methods manual. [National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trahey, N.M.; Voeks, A.M.; Soriano, M.D.

    1982-09-01

    This interlaboratory measurement program was conducted to provide a reference data base for comparison of measurements performed using various measurement methods under the National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE) Program. The design of the program also included an evaluation of the accuracies of the measurement methods used by the participating laboratories in measuring New Brunswick Laboratory Reference Materials (RMs) 101-A through 110-A, the low level uranium and thorium samples distributed in the program. Finally, consensus values for these RMs, based on participants measurement data, were calculated.

  8. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick; Petrosky, Charlie; Schaller, Howard

    2002-02-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to

  9. EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA’s proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

  10. 2015 Race to Zero Competition Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist Team

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Submissions | Department of Energy Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist Team Submissions 2015 Race to Zero Competition Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist Team Submissions Read the team submissions for the Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist teams from the 2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition below. Learn more about the results of the 2015 competition. Grand Winner: Opti-MN, University of Minnesota (38.54 MB) Grand Winner Finalist: Team App, Appalachian State University (4.78

  11. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January ...

  12. Rio Grande North | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name Rio Grande North Facility Rio Grande North Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Baryonyx Corporation Developer Baryonyx...

  13. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Grand Junction Office Founder Honored...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the Philip C. Leahy Memorial Park Dedication and Open House The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offce of Legacy Management (LM) held an ...

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2006-03-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see

  17. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S.

    1988-02-02

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

  18. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Featured Content ASCR Discovery ASCR Program Documents ASCR Workshops and Conferences Workshops & Conferences Archive DOE Simulations Summit Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series SciDAC Conferences HPC Operations Review

  20. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2005-04-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D

  1. SU(6) grand unified model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, J.X.

    1986-03-14

    A model of grand unified theory based on SU(6) gauge group is proposed. It can accommodate two generations of ordinary fermions with V-A weak coupling and two generations of weird fermions with V+A weak coupling. In this model, a new discrete symmetry is introduced that insures existence of fermions with lower masses when SU(6) gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. Simple Higgs fields with appropriate vacuum expectation values are chosen, so that the masses of weird fermions are heavier than those of ordinary fermions. This model also gives the same value of Weinberg angle, sin sq of Theta/sub w/ = 3/8, as in the usual SU(5) grand unified model at the grand unified scale.

  2. Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal

    2009-02-18

    This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages

  3. Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 Annual Inspection - Grand Junction, Colorado, Office Site April 2016 Page 1 Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site 1.1 Inspection Summary The Grand Junction, ...

  4. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R.

    2003-11-01

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D

  5. Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D D&D Page 1 of 3 Fact Sheet Grand Junction, Colorado, Site This fact sheet provides information about the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. ...

  6. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office Edgemont LTSP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE Grand Junction Projects Office Edgemont LTSP June 1996 Page ii Contents Page 1.0 Introduction ......

  7. Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2005-03-31

    This report describes a study conducted by PNNL for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterized the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL used the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish who are pulled through the pumps and turbines at Grand Coulee Dam's pump generation station and transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the pump generating plant's new 9-bladed turbines was also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The highest pressure experienced by the Sensor Fish was estimated at 157 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of kokanne would be carried through the pump without being struck and most likely without injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish would be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without injury.

  8. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  9. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Blueprint

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    above" energy strategy, President Obama issued the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge to the nation in March 2012 with the bold goal to enable plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the American family as gasoline-powered vehicles by 2022. I am more convinced now than ever that we can capture this opportunity, and I am committed to making the strategic investments necessary to get there. These investments will: 1) improve the competitive position of U.S.

  10. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

  11. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 - pg 9 PDF icon grandchallengesportfoliopg9.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  12. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 - pg 8 PDF icon grandchallengesportfoliopg8.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  13. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 - pg 6 PDF icon grandchallengesportfoliopg6.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  14. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by EERE Assistant Secretary David Danielson at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Kick-Off meeting held on June 21, 2012 at the Hyatt Regency, Dearborn, MI

  15. PP-33 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presidential permit authorizing Grande Electric Cooperative Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexico border.

  16. Destilaria Rio Grande | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Destilaria Rio Grande Place: Fronteira, Minas Gerais, Brazil Zip: 38230-000 Product: Brazil based ethanol producer. References: Destilaria Rio...

  17. Usina Serra Grande | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Usina Serra Grande Place: Maceio, Alagoas, Brazil Product: Ethanol producer Coordinates: -9.666479, -35.734954 Show Map Loading map......

  18. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Framing Workshop - Report Out & Lessons Learned EV Everywhere Framing Workshop Report Out & Lessons Learned EV Everywhere Grand ...

  19. Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Individual Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge individual projects funded for three Centers of Excellence, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory

  20. Grand River Dam Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Dam Authority Place: Oklahoma Phone Number: 918-256-5545 Website: www.grda.com Twitter: @okgrda Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesGrand-River-Dam-Authority...

  1. 2015 Race to Zero Competition Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Learn more about the results of the 2015 competition. PDF icon Grand Winner: Opti-MN, University of Minnesota PDF icon Grand Winner Finalist: Team App, Appalachian State University ...

  2. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

  3. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K.

    2005-12-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  4. EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NE Oregon Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Modifications Resulting from Final Design

  5. EA-33 Rio Grande Electric | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-33 Rio Grande Electric Order authorizing Rio Grande Electric to export electric energy to Mexico PDF icon EA-33 Rio Grande Electric More Documents & Publications EA-33-A and ...

  6. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2_danielson_caci.pdf (299.97 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for Electric Drive Workshop EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview EV Everywhere Battery Workshop: Setting the Stage for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  7. City of Grand Marais, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grand Marais Place: Minnesota Phone Number: (218) 387-3030 or (218)387-1848 Website: www.ci.grand-marais.mn.usinde Facebook: https:www.facebook.comGrandMaraisMN Outage Hotline:...

  8. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grand Winner Teams 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams, from the U.S. Department of ...

  9. Rio Grande Rift Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Rio Grande Rift Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2010) Ground Gravity Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981) Magnetotellurics At...

  10. East Grand St Bridge Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    East Grand St Bridge Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name East Grand St Bridge Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility East...

  11. Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects ... to develop renewable energy projects and implement energy efficiency measures. ...

  12. Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge in Interfacial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge in Interfacial Mechanics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge...

  13. Agropecuaria e Industrial Serra Grande | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    e Industrial Serra Grande Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agropecuaria e Industrial Serra Grande Place: So Raimundo das Mangabeiras, Maranhao, Brazil Product: Privately owned...

  14. EV Everywhere EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop Agenda EV Everywhere EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power ...

  15. Preservationists Tour Historic Log Cabin at the Grand Junction...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Preservationists Tour Historic Log Cabin at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Office Preservationists Tour Historic Log Cabin at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Office April 19, 2016 - ...

  16. Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the Philip C. Leahy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the Philip C. Leahy Memorial Park Dedication and Open House Grand Junction Office Founder Honored at the Philip C. Leahy Memorial Park ...

  17. Students from Grand Junction High School Triumph in Colorado...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Junction High School Triumph in Colorado Science Bowl For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Feb. 12, 2000 - Students from Grand Junction High ...

  18. Environmental monitoring report on the US Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facility, Grand Junction, Colorado, for calendar year 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report presents results of environmental monitoring activities conducted in 1987 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) Facility in Colorado. The site is included under the DOE's Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (Defense D and D) Program.

  19. Wintertime meteorology of the Grand Canyon region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The Grand Canyon region of the American Southwest is an interesting region meteorologically, but because of its isolated location, the lack of major population centers in the region, and the high cost of meteorological field experiments, it has historically received little observational attention. In recent years, however, attention has been directed to episodes of visibility degradation in many of the US National parks, and two recent field studies focused on this visibility problem have greatly increased the meteorological data available for the Grand Canyon region. The most recent and comprehensive of these studies is the Navajo Generating Station Winter Visibility Study of 1989--90. This study investigated the sources of visibility degradation in Grand Canyon National Park and the meteorological mechanisms leading to low visibility episodes. In this paper we present analyses of this rich data set to gain a better understanding of the key wintertime meteorological features of the Grand Canyon region.

  20. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gates Replacement This project is part of the Third Powerplant overhaul at Grand Coulee Dam. The full overhaul effort involves a mechanical overhaul of units G19 - G24. The...

  1. CMI Grand Challenge Problems | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Grand Challenge Problems Time is the biggest issue. Materials typically become critical in a matter of months, but solutions take years or decades to develop and implement. Our first two grand challenges address this discrepancy. Anticipating Which Materials May Go Critical In an ideal world, users of materials would anticipate supply-chain disruptions before they occur. They would undertake activities to manage the risks of disruption, including R&D to diversify and increase supplies or

  2. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooley, Sharon

    2009-03-20

    A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March

  3. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop Agenda | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Agenda EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop Agenda Agenda for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL. agenda_b.pdf (196.97 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charge to the Breakout Groups EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for Electric Drive Workshop EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Kick-Off

  4. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop attendees list |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy attendees list EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop attendees list Attendance list for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree OHare, Chicago, IL. companies_in_attendance_b.pdf (149.45 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

    2002-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in

  6. Biofuels and Sustainable Development: An Executive Session on the Grand Challenges of the Sustainability Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Henry; Clark, William C.; Devereaux, Charan

    2008-05-20

    This report is the result of the second in a series of intense workshops and study sessions on Grand Challenges of the Sustainability Transition, organized by the Sustainability Science Program at Harvard University, hosted by Venice International University, and supported by the Italian Ministry of Environment, Land and Sea.

  7. EIS-0384: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hatchery Program The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund the Proposed Action of the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program (hatchery program) as described in the Chief...

  8. Middle Rio Grande Cooperative Water Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    This is computer simulation model built in a commercial modeling product Called Studio Expert, developed by Powersim, Inc. The simulation model is built in a system dynamics environment, allowing the simulation of the interaction among multiple systems that are all changing over time. The model focuses on hydrology, ecology, demography, and economy of the Middle Rio Grande, with Water as the unifying feature.

  9. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Attend Grand Opening of Recovery Act-Funded A123 Systems Battery Plant ...

  10. DOE/EIS-0485 Final Environmental Impact Statement Grande Prairie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grande Prairie Wind has applied to Western to interconnect the proposed Project to Western's 345-kilovolt (kV) Fort Thompson to Grand Island transmission line at a new switchyard. ...

  11. City of Grand Haven, Michigan (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grand Haven Place: Michigan Phone Number: (616) 846-6250 Website: www.ghblp.org Twitter: @ghblp Facebook: https:www.facebook.comGrandHavenBLP Outage Hotline: (616) 842-2241...

  12. Rio Grande LNG LLC- Dkt. No. 15-190-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed December 23, 2015, by Rio Grande LNG, LLC (Rio Grande), seeking a long-term multi-contract authorization to export...

  13. GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening GreenHunter Biodiesel Refinery Grand Opening June 2, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for (Acting) Deputy Secretary Kupfer ...

  14. SunShot Grand Challenge Summit Breakout Sessions Announced

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit is only six weeks away! SunShot is excited to announce our thought-provoking lineup of Grand Challenge Breakout Sessions.

  15. PP-53 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-53 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. Presidential Permit authorizing Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc.to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Mexico Border. PP-53 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. (1.09 MB) More Documents & Publications PP-55 Roseau Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-42 Roseau Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-67 North Central Electric Cooperative, Inc.

  16. Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site and Disposal Sites Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal and Processing Sites This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal and processing sites at Grand Junction, Colorado. These sites are managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Locations of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Sites Site Description and History The former Grand Junction processing site, historically known as the Climax uranium mill, sits at an elevation of

  17. Winners Announced for the NNSA Grand Challenge Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clark Atlanta University students' rocket tail component for Additive Manufacturing won the NNSA student Grand Challenge Competition.

  18. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charge to the Breakout Groups | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Charge to the Breakout Groups EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charge to the Breakout Groups Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree OHare, Chicago, IL. 7_howell_b.pdf (796.65 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere - Charge to Breakout Sessions EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop Agenda EV Everywhere EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric

  19. Grand Challenges | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Grand Challenges Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Grand Challenges BES Reports Document Archives Contests Contact BES Home History Grand Challenges Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Grand Challenge Report The Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) report, Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination was the culmination of a series of BES-sponsored

  20. Grand Challenges | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Grand Challenges Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Grand Challenges BES Reports Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Research Grand Challenges Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Grand Challenge Report The Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) report, Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination was the culmination of a series of BES-sponsored workshops that began in 2001.

  1. Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Centers of Excellence Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence DOE's Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence and partners, led by NREL, SNL, and LANL grand_challenge_centers.pdf (62.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Individual Projects Final Solar and Wind H2 Report EPAct 812.doc Microsoft Word - H2 National Release 2.doc

  2. 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Grand Winner Teams 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Grand Winner Teams, from the U.S. Department of Energy. rtz_grand_winner_team_rosters.pdf (59.94 KB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Montage Builders Team Submission 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Montage Builders Profile 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Auburn

  3. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project, final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 36 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 36 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  4. EA-0930: Facility Operations at the U.S. DOE Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to expand and upgrade the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Projects Office facilities and operations in Grand Junction, Colorado.

  5. Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, William P.

    2008-04-01

    In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not

  6. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More » Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable. Read More » Process Limits The hard and soft process limits are listed. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:11

  7. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming The genepool system has a diverse set of software development tools and a rich environment for delivering their functionality to users. Genepool has adopted a modular system which has been adapted from the Programming Environments similar to those provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu/4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the GNU environment, principally GCC,

  8. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Read More Programming Tuning Options Tips for tuning performance on the Hopper system ... The ACML library is also supported on Hopper and Franklin. Read More PGAS Language ...

  9. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage & File Systems Application Performance Data & Analytics Job Logs & Statistics ... Each programming environment contains the full set of compatible compilers and libraries. ...

  10. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2008-12-30

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by

  11. SunShot Grand Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SunShot Grand Challenge SunShot Grand Challenge Addthis SunShot Grand Challenge 1 of 28 SunShot Grand Challenge Participants gather for the plenary session at the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by DENNIS SCHROEDER / NREL) Date taken: 2012-06-13 07:10 Arun Majumdar, Founding Director, ARPA-E 2 of 28 Arun Majumdar, Founding Director, ARPA-E Arun Majumdar, Founding Director, ARPA-E gives the welcoming remarks. (Photo by DENNIS SCHROEDER / NREL) Date

  12. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSIM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-08-05

    URGSIM estimates the location of surface water and groundwater resources in the upper Rio Grande Basin between the Colorado-New Mexico state line, and Caballo Reservoir from 1975 - 2045. It is a mass balance hydrology model of the Upper Rio Grande surface water, groundwater, and water demand systems which runs at a monthly timestep from 1975-1999 in calibration mode, 2000 – 2004 in validation mode, and 2005 – 2045 in scenario analysis mode.

  13. Rio Grande pipeline introduces LPG to Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Rio Grande Pipeline, a joint venture between Mid-America Pipeline Co., Amoco Pipeline Co. and Navajo Pipeline Co., has broken new ground in the energy industry as the first LPG pipeline to cross the US-Mexico border. Plans for the project were announced in November 1995 and first deliveries started three months ago on March 21, 1997. The 8-inch, 265-mile pipeline originates near Odessa, TX, where it receives an 85-15 propane-butane mix via a connection to Mid-America Pipeline. From Odessa, product moves west through the Texas desert and crosses the Rio Grande River about 15 miles south of El Paso near Clint, TX and extends 20 miles into Mexico. Capacity of the line is 24,000 bpd and it has been averaging about 22,000 bpd since line-fill. All in all, it sounded like a reasonably feasible, routine project. But perceptions can be deceiving, or at least misleading. In other words, the project can be summarized as follows: one river, two cultures and a world of difference. The official border crossing for pipeline construction took place on Dec. 2, 1996, with a directional drill under the Rio Grande River, but in actuality, the joint venture partners were continually bridging differences in language, laws, customs and norms with Pemex and contracted workers from Mexico.

  14. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponton, David A.

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  15. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using MPI and OpenMP on NERSC systems, the same does not always exist for other supported parallel programming models such as UPC or Chapel. At the same time, we know that these...

  16. MMPA- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following five Members separately administer individual programs: Anoka, Chaska, East Grand Forks, Elk River, and Shakopee. See the web site listed above and select your utility for more prog...

  17. Grand Valley State University Checks Out Energy Savings at New Mary Idema Pew Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-03-01

    Grand Valley State University (GVSU) partnered with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build new, low-energy buildings that are at least 50% below Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Climax Uranium Co Grand Junction Mill

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - CO 0-03 Climax Uranium Co Grand Junction Mill - CO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Climax Uranium Co. (Grand Junction Mill) (CO.0-03) Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management. Designated Name: Grand Junction, Colorado, Processing Site Alternate Name: Climax Uranium Company (Grand Junction Mill) Grand Junction Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site Climax Mill Site Grand Junction Mill 1 Location: Grand Junction, Colorado Evaluation Year:

  19. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

    2009-03-01

    Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total

  20. 2012 Annual Inspection Report for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection - Grand Junction, Colorado, Site March 2012 Page 1 2012 Annual Inspection Report for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Site was inspected on February 23, 2012, and was in excellent condition. Physical and institutional controls enacted at the site continue to be effective in preventing exposure to contamination remaining on the property. A 5-year deficiency-based inspection of all real property assets in compliance with DOE Order 430.1B

  1. 2013 Annual Inspection Report for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Annual Inspection - Grand Junction, Colorado, Site April 2013 Page 1 2013 Annual Inspection Report for the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Site was inspected on March 4, 2013, and was in excellent condition. Physical and institutional controls enacted at the site continue to be effective in preventing exposure to contamination remaining on the property. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. 1.0 Introduction This report presents the results of

  2. Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Office Site March 2014 Page 1 Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site 1.1 Inspection Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Site was inspected on February 19, 2014, and was in excellent condition. Physical and institutional controls enacted at the site continue to be effective in preventing exposure to contamination remaining on the property. No maintenance needs were identified and no cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. The site was

  3. Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grand Junction, Colorado, Office Site March 2015 Page 1 Annual Inspection of the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site 1.1 Inspection Summary The Grand Junction, Colorado, Site was inspected on February 18, 2015, and was in good condition. Physical and institutional controls enacted at the site continue to be effective in preventing exposure to contamination remaining on the property. Two minor maintenance needs were identified; however, no cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. The site was

  4. Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jacksonville | Department of Energy Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening in Jacksonville Saft America Advanced Batteries Plant Celebrates Grand Opening in Jacksonville September 16, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis Department of Energy Investment Helps Support Job Creation, U.S. Economic Competitiveness and Advanced Vehicle Industry WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Secretary Steven Chu joined with Saft America to announce the grand opening of the company's Jacksonville, Florida,

  5. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Signals in the Subsurface | Department of Energy SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface Grand Challenge Workshop -Imaging Subsurface.pdf (434.52 KB) More Documents & Publications AGU SubTER Town Hall Presentation 2015 SubTER Presentation at Town Hall - American Geophysical Union Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic

  6. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy Agenda EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Agenda Agenda for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA agenda_caci.pdf (218.57 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop - Backsplash EV Everywhere Grand Challenge:

  7. DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge May 5, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that 48 research and development projects across the country have been selected as award winners of the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge. The grantees will receive a total of $13 million to fund the development of transformational

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of

  9. Sierra Grande Lodge Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Sierra Grande Lodge Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Truth or Consequences, New Mexico Coordinates 33.1284047,...

  10. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon ...

  11. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attnedance list for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon ...

  12. Statement by Energy Secretary Steven Chu on Today's Grand Opening...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on today's grand opening of the Nordex wind turbine manufacturing facility in Jonesboro. ... to assist in the creation of a wind turbine manufacturing facility in Jonesboro, Arkansas. ...

  13. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs: Rio Grande Rift, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity...

  14. Rio Grande County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B. Places in Rio Grande County, Colorado Center, Colorado Del Norte, Colorado Monte Vista, Colorado South Fork, Colorado Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  15. Sandia Energy - SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge: Regional Test Centers Home Videos Renewable Energy Energy Events News SunShot News & Events Photovoltaic Solar SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Previous...

  16. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Kick-Off | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dearborn, MI framingworkshopagenda062112.pdf (85.02 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview Presentation EV Everywhere Framing Workshop - ...

  17. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge- Battery Status and Cost Reduction Prospects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by technology manager David Howell at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL.

  18. Grand Blanc, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Grand Blanc, Michigan 21st century Green Solutions LLC References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  19. Grand Rapids Public Util Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    https:www.facebook.compagesGrand-Rapids-Public-Utilities108782819203449?skwall Outage Hotline: 218-326-4806 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  20. Alpine Extensional Detachment Tectonics In The Grande Kabylie...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extensional Detachment Tectonics In The Grande Kabylie Metamorphic Core Complex Of The Maghrebides (Northern Algeria) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  1. Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    coastal range, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon has a strong connection to the earth and nature and a deep commitment to environmental stewardship. ...

  2. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for Electric Drive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation given by EERE Assistant Secretary David Danielson at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop on July 24, ...

  3. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop List of ...

  4. City of Grand Junction, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grand Junction Municipal Utilities Place: Iowa Phone Number: (515) 738-2285 or (515) 738-2726 Facebook: https:...

  5. Summary of Grand Challenge Products Selected for Award Negotiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-26

    DOE provides $13 million in funding to 48 research and development projects across the country that were selected as award winners of the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge.

  6. Grand Opening of Abengoa's Biorefinery: Nation's Third Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The nation's third commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefinery celebrates its grand ... The plant will produce cellulosic ethanol from non-edible corn stalks, stems, and leaves ...

  7. Grand Junction, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Grand Junction, Colorado Ruby Canyon Engineering Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  8. Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S.

    2009-05-28

    We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on

  9. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. More than 100,000 fish per group are usually marked at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  10. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program : Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    1995-12-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ''Missing Production Groups''. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980's are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ''Missing Production Groups'' program are: (1) to estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and (3) to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. It can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened or endangered stocks. In order to meet these objectives, a minimum of one marked group of fish is necessary for each production release. The level of marking varies according to location, species, and age at release. In general, 50,000 fish are marked with a coded-wire tag (CWT) to represent each production release group at hatcheries below John Day Dam. Between 120,000 and 200,000 fish are marked for groups at hatcheries above John Day Dam. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC.

  11. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  12. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  13. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building.

  14. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  15. Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  16. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  17. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Robert L.; Lewis, Mark A.; Murray, William M.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this project is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries.

  18. Annual Coded Wire Program: Oregon Missing Production Groups: 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.; Murry, William M.

    1992-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries.

  19. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume I, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Seelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01

    The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. This is the second year of the annual systemwide program conducted by the Fish Passage Center (formerly Water Budget Center). Index reaches have been established. Travel time indices are calculated for year to year comparison. Marked groups of steelhead, spring chinook, fall chinook, and summer chinook are monitored at sampling points throughout the system. Because this program is intended to be representative of the juvenile migration, marked groups represent major hatchery production stocks. Arrival time and duration of marked groups are reported. Annual travel time indices are reported from Rock Island Dam to McNary Dam, and from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam. Hatchery and brand release information is reported.

  20. Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound (December 1975) Data Compendium for the Logging Test Pits at the ERDA Grand Junction Compound ...

  1. EIS-0519: Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    19: Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project; Kleberg, Kenedy, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, Texas EIS-0519: Rio Grande LNG Project and Rio Bravo Pipeline Project; ...

  2. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Blueprint | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Blueprint EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Blueprint Recognizing that vehicle electrification is an essential part of our countrys "all-of-the above" energy strategy, President Obama issued the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge to the nation in March 2012 with the bold goal to enable plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the American family as gasoline-powered vehicles by 2022. This "Blueprint" provides an outline

  3. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  4. Arroyo Grande, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Arroyo Grande is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California. It falls under California's 22nd congressional...

  5. Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Rio Grande Rift and Basin and Range Province, New Mexico Abstract A...

  6. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL. 5howellb.pdf (1.24 MB) More Documents & Publications PHEV Battery Cost Assessment ...

  7. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Workshop attendees list...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Attendance list for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Battery Workshop on July 26, 2012 held at the Doubletree OHare, Chicago, IL. companiesinattendanceb.pdf (149.45 KB) More ...

  8. 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit Opening Session Photos |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anaheim Mayor Tom Tait with SunShot Director Minh Le Credit: SunShot Initiative Date ... SunShot Grand Challenge Summit Opening Session SunShot Director Minh Le Credit: SunShot ...

  9. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3_davis_caci.pdf (591.63 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Framing Workshop Report Out & Lessons Learned EV Everywhere Framing Workshop - Report Out & Lessons Learned EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charge to the Breakout Groups

  10. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Grand Challenge Workshop -Imaging Subsurface.pdf More Documents & Publications AGU SubTER Town Hall Presentation 2015 SubTER Fact Sheet SubTER Presentation at Town Hall - ...

  11. City of Grand Rapids- Green Power Purchasing Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, the City of Grand Rapids established a goal of purchasing 20% of its municipal power demand from renewable energy by 2008. In November 2007, the city signed a three-year agreement with a...

  12. Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use Corn Waste as a Feedstock Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use Corn Waste as a Feedstock August 28, 2014 ...

  13. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for Electric Drive Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by EERE Assistant Secretary David Danielson at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop on July 24, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL.

  14. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dakota. Its FIPS County Code is 035. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Grand Forks County, North...

  15. Casa Grande, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Casa Grande is a city in Pinal County, Arizona. It falls under Arizona's 1st congressional...

  16. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock

  17. Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification | Department of Energy Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification Fernald Preserve Visitors Center Grand Opening and LEED Platinum Certification October 16, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Acting Deputy Secretary Kupfer Thank you, Mike, for that introduction and to both you and Jane for hosting this event. You both have been instrumental in the dramatic transformation of this site. We made a commitment more than a decade ago to

  18. SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SubTER Grand Challenge Roundtable: Imaging Geophysical and Geochemical Signals in the Subsurface The Grand Challenge SubTER Panel (Dr. Marcia McNutt, Chair) DOE Leads: Margaret Coleman, Julio Friedmann, Doug Hollett, and Harriet Kung Introduction The future of the world's energy production and deployment is closely tied to our understanding of the subsurface, as well as our capabilities in subsurface or geologic engineering. Developments over the past ten years, including the growth of natural

  19. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EV Design | Department of Energy Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Charging Infrastructure Enabling Flexible EV Design Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA 5_slezak_caci.pdf (2 MB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Framing Workshop - Report Out & Lessons Learned EV Everywhere Framing

  20. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Machines) Workshop | Department of Energy - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop List of companies in attendance at the Electric Drive Workshop held on July 24, 2012 at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL companies_in_attendance_ed.pdf (145.65 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Introduction for Electric Drive Workshop EV

  1. Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes | Department of Energy Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes April 29, 2014 - 2:15pm Addthis To help cut energy waste and improve U.S. energy productivity, the Energy

  2. EA-1338: Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed transfer of real and personal property at the U.S. Department of Energy's Grand Junction Office to non-DOE ownership.

  3. PP-33-1 and EA-33-A Rio Grande Electric Cooperative Inc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy -1 and EA-33-A Rio Grande Electric Cooperative Inc PP-33-1 and EA-33-A Rio Grande Electric Cooperative Inc Rescission of Presidential Permit and Electricity Export Authorization for Rio Grande Electric Cooperative to Export electricity to Mexico. PP-33-1 and EA-33-A Rio Grande Electric Cooperative Inc (52.93 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-33-A and PP-33-1 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-53 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative, Inc. PP-33 Rio Grande Electric Cooperative

  4. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 2, dose assessment supporting data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The second volume of the Grand Junction Office Action Program Technical Basis for Radiological Release of Grand Junction Office Building 2 report includes the data quality objectives (DQO), sampling plan, collected data, and analysis used to model future radiation doses to members of the public occupying Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site. This volume was assembled by extracting relevant components of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 Public Dose Evaluation (DOE 1996) and inserting recent additional data that was gathered and dose pathway modeling that was performed. The intent of this document is to provide all derived guidance decisions, assumptions, measured data, testing results, and pathway modeling software input and output data that supports the discussion and determinations presented in Volume 1 of this report. For constructive employment of this document, the reader is encouraged to closely follow Volume 1 for proper association with the segment of information being examined.

  5. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  6. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 34 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, was also the remedial action contractor. Building 34 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1996. The soil area within the footprint of the building was analyzed and found to be not contaminated. The area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual closeout report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  7. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of the exterior land areas at the Grand Junction Projects Office facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility occupies approximately 56.4 acres (22.8 hectares) along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium-refining activities conducted by the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot-milling experiments conducted for the US Atomic Energy Commission`s (AEC`s) domestic uranium procurement program. The GJPO facility was the collection and assay point for AEC uranium and vanadium oxide purchases until the early 1970s. The DOE Decontamination and Decommissioning Program sponsored the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to remediate the facility lands, site improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor, Rust Geotech, was the Remedial Action Contractor for GJPORAP. The exterior land areas of the facility assessed as contaminated have been remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unrestricted use. Restoration of the aquifer will be accomplished through the natural flushing action of the aquifer during the next 50 to 80 years. The remediation of the DOE-GJPO facility buildings is ongoing and will be described in a separate report.

  8. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) will conduct a feasibility study to determine the cost effectiveness and other economic, environmental, cultural, and social benefits of maximizing the diversity of energy sources used at GTB facilities. This includes an assessment of energy conservation measures as well as renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and biomass.

  9. Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians- 2004 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians, located in northern San Diego County, will conduct a study of the feasibility of reducing air pollution generated on the reservation by an over-reliance on wood-burning stoves, kerosene heaters, and gasoline generators, and to identify the types of renewable energy systems that could be used for residential structures and well-pump systems.

  10. SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Peer Review 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Peer Review brought together more than 800 members of the solar community to review the progress made toward the SunShot goal and discuss the challenges ahead to make solar energy more affordable and widespread across America. Download the Summit conference presentations here.