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1

EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation’s Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington.

2

EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington 4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation's Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

3

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0384 May 2007 Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Project: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Cooperating Tribe: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation State Involved: Washington Abstract: The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) describes a Chinook salmon hatchery production program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). BPA proposes to fund the construction, operation and maintenance of the program to help mitigate for anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Colville Tribes want to produce adequate

4

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joseph Hatchery Program Joseph Hatchery Program Draft EIS S-1 SUMMARY Purpose and Need The Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC, www.nwcouncil.org) recommended that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) study and consider funding a Chinook salmon production program and hatchery proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). The proposal intends to increase returns of adult summer/fall Chinook by raising and releasing juvenile fish in the waters of the Okanogan River, and in the Columbia River below Chief Joseph Dam and above its confluence with the Okanogan River. The proposed program would construct, operate and maintain a hatchery below the Chief Joseph Dam on the Columbia River and several fish acclimation and release ponds on the Okanogan River and Omak

5

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde Â… Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2004 Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program -- Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Project i Table of Contents Page Chapter 1: Updated Summary and Project Description 1.1 Introduction..............................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Purpose and Need for the Proposed Action .............................................................1-2 1.3 Decisions to be Made and Responsible Officials ....................................................1-3 1.4 Summary of Public Involvement, Consultation, and Coordination.........................1-3

6

EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham 13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Mitigation Action Plan Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Project, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Finding of No Significant Impact Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Final Environmental Assessment

7

Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; 495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin. Additional information is available at the project website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/WallaWallaHatchery/. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILALE FOR DOWNLOAD March 28, 2013 EIS-0495: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

9

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2001 fishing season has been especially successful with great fishing for both rainbow and kokanee throughout Lake Roosevelt. The results of the Two Rivers Fishing Derby identified 100 percent of the rainbow and 47 percent of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin.

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65,838 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 55.1%. Presmolts (140,410), smolts (38,672), and adults (190) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2002. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and three unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Three of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2002 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

25

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

27

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

28

Survival of Wells Hatchery Steelhead in the Mid-Columbia River, Part I, Smolt Monitoring Program, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Survival of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) from Wells Hatchery (WDG) was studied in 1984 to derive an index of steelhead survival in the mid-Columbia. This index was determined as part of the Smolt Monitoring Program conducted by the fishery agencies and tribes through the Water Budget Center. The program in 1984 was limited because of fish availability. A major goal of the 1984 program was to adapt techniques which have largely been used for specific research purposes, to a management program that is to be repeated annually. Such a program requires that minimum disruption of the existing fishery management program occurs. Sufficient fish were allocated to the program to allow two replicate test releases from Pateros, Washington and two paired control releases below Priest Rapids Dam. These mark groups were recovered at McNary Dam, and survival was calculated as the ratio in proportion recovered for the test and control groups. Data from the second replicate release was judged to not sufficiently meet the experimental criteria and was rejected. The first replicate was judged to be suitable, and survival was calculated. Estimated survival for the first steelhead replicate from Pateros to below Priest Rapids Dam was 0.5181 with a lower 95% confidence interval of 0.4626 and an upper confidence interval of 0.5736.

McConnaha, Willis E.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Complex Systems Program Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Systems Program seeks to understand the fundamental science of these ... Complex Systems Fundamentals Roldan Pozo; Measurement Science for ...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1998 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and NMFS initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 1998, are presented in this report.

Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Hatchery Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dam Height: 96 m Length: 472 m Dam crest elevation: EL.181.0 m Type: concrete gravity dam 3Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South

34

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Si

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho's construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort. Website for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Native Fish Aquaculture Program: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Kootenai_Aquaculture_Program/

39

Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

Steward, C.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The most crucial data for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available. A comprehensive fish health monitoring regimen was incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation study for Umatilla Hatchery. This is a unique feature of the Umatilla Hatchery evaluation project.

Keefe, MaryLouise; Carmichael, Richard W.; French, Rod A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

IEAB Task 56 Hatchery C/E IEABHatcheryReport-Part2 July 22, 20021  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Costs per Release, Adult return, and Fish Caught VI. PRIEST RAPIDS HATCHERY A. Description of Project B of Project B. Location C. Construction Data D. Funding E. Annual Budgets F. Survival Rates to Adult G. Costs FOR EIGHT ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION PROGRAMS I. SPRING CREEK NATIONAL FISH HATCHERY A. Description of Project B

43

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of the Umatilla Hatchery in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan type of rearing using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus nzykiss). The hatchery was completed in the fall of 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to develop considerable knowledge and understanding of new production and supplementation techniques. The use of the Michigan raceways in rearing at Umatilla Hatchery was selected because it could increase smolt production given the limited hatchery well water supply and allow comparison of Michigan raceways with the standard Oregon raceways. Results of testing the Michigan raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia Basin. The Umatilla Hatchery is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council`s goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan . The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. This report covers the first four years of the monitoring of the hatchery.

Hayes, Michael C.; Waln, Karen; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Complexity and expressive power of logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article surveys various complexity and expressiveness results on different forms of logic programming. The main focus is on decidable forms of logic programming, in particular, propositional logic programming and datalog, but we also mention general ... Keywords: Complexity, datalog, expressive power, logic programming, nonmonotonic logic, query languages

Evgeny Dantsin; Thomas Eiter; Georg Gottlob; Andrei Voronkov

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1995-1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Hatchery for the period November 1, 1995 to October 31, 1996. Studies at Umatilla Hatchery are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in Michigan raceways. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at Umatilla Hatchery and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program is intensively monitored and evaluated as part of the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring are mandatory and have become the responsibility of the fish health staff conducting the studies at Umatilla Hatchery. Additional studies include evaluations of sport fisheries in the Umatilla River and mass marking and straying of fall chinook salmon. Juvenile rearing experiments have been completed for subyearling fall chinook salmon reared in Michigan and Oregon raceways. Although preliminary adult return data has been recovered, the most data on post-release survival is incomplete. Conclusions in this report should be viewed as preliminary and used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

Focher, Shannon M.; Carmichael, Richard W.; Hayes, Michael C. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Umatilla Hatchery Final Predesign Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides information on the preliminary design of Umatilla Fish Hatchery near Irrigon, Oregon. The fish hatchery will be capable of rearing steelhead and chinook with an initial capacity of 290,000 pounds. Future expansion will allow for a total capacity of 500,000 pounds if the initial production goals are met. The hatchery will consist of both Oregon and Michigan style ponds. The Oregon ponds are similar to those at Irrigon. The Michigan ponds are more narrow and shallow, are self cleaning, and use oxygen supplementation to obtain higher rearing densities as is currently being done in the state of Michigan. The Oregon ponds are a two-pass system with the capability to convert to Michigan style ponds, if this mode of operation proves to be an effective method in the west. The Michigan ponds are three-pass with the capability to expand to four-pass.

Unknown Author

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Willpinit, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DOE/EIS-0340; Grand Ronde Â… Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 NORTHEAST OREGON HATCHERY PROGRAM GRANDE RONDE - IMNAHA SPRING CHINOOK HATCHERY PROJECT DOE/EIS-0340 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0340) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Federal Agencies: U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Cooperating Tribes: Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Cooperating State Agencies: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)

51

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

54

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first three years of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. Because the hatchery and the evaluation study and the fish health monitoring investigations are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The majority of the data that is crucial for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Onjukka, Sam T.; Focher, Shannon M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

REPORT A: UMATILLA HATCHERY MONITORING AND EVALUATION--This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for 1 November, 1999 to 31 October, 2002. Studies at UFH are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated along with the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring at UFH are mandatory. An experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. An evaluation of survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared at three densities will be completed with final returns in 2005. Two new evaluations were started during this reporting period. The first is an evaluation of spring chinook survival of groups transferred to Imeques acclimation facility in the fall, overwinter-acclimated and released with the standard acclimated production groups in March. The second is an evaluation of subyearling fall chinook survival and straying of a direct-stream released group in the lower Umatilla River and the standard group acclimated at Thornhollow acclimation facility in the upper Umatilla River. An important aspect of the project is evaluation of the spring chinook and summer steelhead fisheries in the upper and lower Umatilla River. REPORT B: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000 Fiscal Year--The results presented in this report are from the ninth year of Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Broodstock monitoring for hatchery production was conducted on adult returns to the Umatilla River at Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla adult facilities for salmon; steelhead adults were monitored at Minthorn adult facility. A new addition to this year's report is the effort to bring together an overview of fish health monitoring results including historical and year to date pathogen information. This information is in table form (Appendix Tables A-28, A-29 and A-30). A summary of juvenile disease outbreaks at Umatilla Hatchery is also included (Appendix Table A-31). REPORT C: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Fiscal Year--Results from the 2001 annual report cover the 10th year of Fish Health Monitoring in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Efforts were again made to provide up to date fish health and juvenile disease outbreak loss summary tables from the beginning of the Umatilla Hatchery program (Appendix Tables A-27, A-28, A-29 and A-30). Outmigrant Fish Health Monitoring results were included in this report since this was part of the fish health work statement for this report period. The discussion section for the 2001 and 2002 annual reports are combined in the 2002 report due to time constraints and consolidation efforts to complete this report by the end of May 2003.

Chess, Dale W.; Cameron, William A.; Stonecypher, Jr., R. Wes (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for the period November 1, 1997 to October 31, 1998. Studies at Umatilla Hatchery are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated as part of the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring are mandatory and have become the responsibility of the fish health staff conducting studies at UFH. Additional studies include evaluations of sport fisheries in the Umatilla River and mass marking and straying of fall chinook salmon. Except for adult recovery data, an experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. We are currently in the second year of rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon at three densities. Experimental rearing of subyearling, fall release, and yearling spring chinook salmon, and steelhead has also been conducted. Although preliminary adult return data has been recovered, data on smolt-to-adult survival for all groups is incomplete. Conclusions in this report should be viewed as preliminary and used in conjunction with additional data as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Brown, Kassandra A.; Waln, Karen (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

Bowles, Edward C.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume I of V; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Individual operational plans for 1993 are provided for the Abernathy Salmon Culture Technology Center, Carson National Fish Hatchery, Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery, Entiat National Fish Hatchery, Hagerman National Fish Hatchery, Kooskia National Fish Hatchery, Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery, Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery, Willard National Fish Hatchery, and the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery.

Shelldrake, Tom

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located along the Columbia River at Underwood, Washington, approximately 30 miles upstream of Bonneville Dam. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Urb Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Upriver bright [URB] Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of at two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Savings Program | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings Program Savings Program Savings Program The Savings Program offers a convenient, tax-effective way to save and invest for the future. At retirement, Savings Program benefits are designed to work together with the Pension Plan and Social Security benefits to provide retirement income. More information is available in the Book of Benefits. Employees can also find current information on the internal Benefits web site (restricted access) or log on to the Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company website. The Internal Revenue Service has announced the new changes in amounts and limits as they relate to our Savings Program and Pension Plan. Employees & Retirees Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Retiree Book of Benefits Health Plans Savings Program Savings Program and Pension Plan Changes

68

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992-1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Hatchery is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing summer steelhead in the Umatilla River and expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council`s goal of doubling salmonid production in the Columbia Basin. This report covers the second year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary.

Keefe, MaryLouise; Hayes, Michael C.; Groberg, Jr., Warren J. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MASTER PLAN ChiefJosephDamHatcheryProgram This Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. demonstrate that plants provide food products by grinding wheat seeds into flour and using the flour to make or bulk food department of the supermarket. (If unavailable, use the amount of whole wheat flour listed in the recipe and explain how wheat is ground into flour.) 2. Other ingredients listed in the recipe on page T-4

70

MASTER PLAN ChiefJosephDamHatcheryProgram This Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towey, John McGlenn, Laura Beauregard, JoeWright, (from left to right, middle row) John McKern, Dan Warren

71

On the complexity of dataflow analysis of logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely held that there is a correlation between complexity and precision in dataflow analysis, in the sense that the more precise an analysis algorithm, the more computationally expensive it must be. The details of this relationship, however, appear ... Keywords: Prolog, complexity, program analysis

Saumya K. Debray

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree analysis, the relative total reproductive success (adult-to-adult production) of hatchery (H{sub old} or H{sub new}) and wild (W) fish for two populations, over multiple brood years. Our analyses of samples from fish that bred in the early to mid 1990's show that fish of 'old' hatchery stocks have much lower total fitness than wild fish (17% to 54% of wild fitness), but that 'new' stocks have fitness that is similar to that of wild fish (ranging from 85% to 108% of wild fitness, depending on parental gender and run year). Therefore, our results show that the decision to phase out the old, out-of-basin stocks and replace them with new, conservation hatchery stocks was well founded. We also conclude that the H{sub new} fish are leaving behind substantial numbers of wild-born offspring. The similar fitnesses of H{sub new} and W fish suggests that wild-born offspring of H{sub new} fish are unlikely to have negative genetic effects on the population when they in turn spawn in the wild. We will test this hypothesis once enough F2 offspring have returned. Another interesting result is that we were unable to match a large fraction of the unclipped, returning fish with parents from their brood year. Furthermore, we were missing more fathers than mothers. Because we sampled almost every possible anadromous parent, these results suggest that nonanadromous trout or precocious parr may be obtaining a substantial number of matings. Substantial reproduction by precocious parr could be one unintended consequence of the hatchery program.

Blouin, Michael

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

On the Complexity of Dataflow Analysis of Logic Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article reports some results on this correlation in the context of logic programs. A formal notion of the "precision" of an analysis algorithm is proposed, and this is used to characterize the worst-case computational complexity of a number of dataflow analyses with different degrees of precision. While this article considers the analysis of logic programs, the technique proposed, namely the use of "exactness sets" to study relationships between complexity and precision of analyses, is not specific to logic programming in any way, and is equally applicable to flow analyses of other language families.

Saumya K. Debray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1987 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimated kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 6.01 million during late summer 1987. This estimate is 40% higher than the 1986 estimate and is the second largest population estimate since 1977. Higher abundance is predominantly a result of enhanced fry survival and recruitment. Hatchery-reared fry contribution was 22% of total fry recruitment in 1987, compared to 8% in 1986, and resulted from a fivefold increase in survival. Much of this improvement can be attributed to the large (52 mm) fry produced at Cabinet Gorge Hatchery in 1987 and represents the first measurable contribution of the new hatchery to the kokanee rehabilitation program. Survival of hatchery-reared fry released into Clark Fork River was nearly one-half that of fry released into Sullivan Springs due to poor flow conditions and potentially high predation during migration from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery to Lake Pend Oreille. Wild fry survival was enhanced by early availability of forage (cladocern zooplankton) during fry emergence in late spring. Cladoceran production began three weeks earlier in 1987 than 1986, which resulted from reduced Mysis abundance and earlier thermal stratification of Lake Pend Oreille, which helped segregate cladocerans from mysid predation. Kokanee dry otolith coding was evaluated to provide a reliable long-term mark. Analysis of daily growth increments on otoliths was used successfully in 1987 to differentiate fry from various release sites. The technique will be refined during 1988 to include coding fry otoliths with water temperature fluctuations during hatchery residence. 23 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Bowles, Edward C.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries. To accomplish this goal. We are tagging missing production groups within hatcheries to assure each production group is identifiable to allow future evaluation upon recovery of tag data.

Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson National Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Jackson, Wyoming Coordinates 43.4799291°, -110.7624282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

79

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Gunnison, Colorado Coordinates 38.5458246°, -106.9253207° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

80

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mammoth Lakes, California Coordinates 37.648546°, -118.972079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

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81

Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Belmont Springs Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Fielding, Utah Coordinates 41.8146489°, -112.1160644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

82

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Measurement of Thyroxin Concentration as an Indicator of the Critical Period for Imprinting in the Kokanee Salmon (Orcorhynchus Nerka) Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Hatcheries; 1991 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous investigations have determined that thyroid hormone surges activate olfactory imprinting in anadromous salmonid smolts. The mechanism of action appears to require binding of thyroid hormones to receptors in brain cell nuclei, which stimulates neuron differentiation and wires a pattern of neuron circuitry that allows for the permanent storage of the imprinted olfactory memory. In this study, thyroxine concentrations [T{sub 4}] were measured in 487 Lake Whatcom stock and 70 Lake Roosevelt stock Kokanee salmon to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Eggs, alevins and fry, reared at the Spokane Indian Kokanee Hatchery, were collected from January through August 1991. Sampled fish were flash frozen on dry ice and stored at {minus}80{degrees}C until T{sub 4} was extracted and concentrations determined by radioimmunassay. Mean concentration {+-} SEM of 10--20 individual fish (assayed in duplicate) were determined for each time period. T{sub 4} concentration peaked on the day of hatch at 16.8 ng/g body weight and again at swim-up at 16.0 {+-} 4.7 ng/g body weight. T{sub 4} concentration was 12.5 to 12.9 ng/g body weight in eggs, 7.1 to 15.2 ng/g body weight in. alevins, 4.5 to 11.4 ng/g body weight in 42 to 105 day old fry and 0.1 to 2.9 ng/g body weight in 112 to 185 day old fry. T{sub 4} concentrations were highest in eggs at 13.3 {+-} 2.8 ng/g body weight, then steadily decreased to 0.1 {+-} 0.1 ng/g body weight in older fry. Fry were released in Lake Roosevelt tributaries in July and August 1991, at about 170--180 days post hatching, in order to imprint them to those sites. The results of this study indicate that the time of release was not appropriate for imprinting. If T{sub 4} levels are an accurate guide for imprinting in kokanee, our results suggest that the critical period for imprinting in kokanee is at hatching or swim-up stages.

Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Koehler, Valerie A. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Natural Reproductive Success and Demographic Effects of Hatchery-Origin Steelhead in Abernathy Creek, Washington : Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many hatchery programs for steelhead pose genetic or ecological risks to natural populations because those programs release or outplant fish from non-native stocks. The goal of many steelhead programs has been to simply provide 'fishing opportunities' with little consideration given to conservation concerns. For example, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has widely propagated and outplanted one stock of winter-run steelhead (Chambers Creek stock) and one stock of summer-run steelhead (Skamania stock) throughout western Washington. Biologists and managers now recognize potential negative effects can occur when non-native hatchery fish interact biologically with native populations. Not only do non-native stocks pose genetic and ecological risks to naturally spawning populations, but non-native fish stray as returning adults at a much higher rate than do native fish (Quinn 1993). Biologists and managers also recognize the need to (a) maintain the genetic resources associated with naturally spawning populations and (b) restore or recover natural populations wherever possible. As a consequence, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the NOAA Fisheries have been recommending a general policy that discourages the use of non-native hatchery stocks and encourages development of native broodstocks. There are two primary motivations for these recommendations: (1) reduce or minimize potential negative biological effects resulting from genetic or ecological interactions between hatchery-origin and native-origin fish and (2) use native broodstocks as genetic repositories to potentially assist with recovery of naturally spawning populations. A major motivation for the captive-rearing work described in this report resulted from NOAA's 1998 Biological Opinion on Artificial Propagation in the Columbia River Basin. In that biological opinion (BO), NOAA concluded that non-native hatchery stocks of steelhead jeopardize the continued existence of U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed, naturally spawning populations in the Columbia River Basin. As a consequence of that BO, NOAA recommended - as a reasonable and prudent alternative (RPA) - that federal and state agencies phase out non-native broodstocks of steelhead and replace them with native broodstocks. However, NOAA provided no guidance on how to achieve that RPA. The development of native broodstocks of hatchery steelhead can potentially pose unacceptable biological risks to naturally spawning populations, particularly those that are already listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA. The traditional method of initiating new hatchery broodstocks of anadromous salmonid fishes is by trapping adults during their upstream, spawning migration. However, removing natural-origin adults from ESA listed populations may not be biologically acceptable because such activities may further depress those populations via 'broodstock mining'. In addition, trapping adult steelhead may be logistically unfeasible in many subbasins due to high water flows in the spring, when steelhead are moving upstream to spawn, that will often 'blow out' temporary weirs. Additional risks associated with trapping adults include genetic founder effects and difficulties meeting minimum, genetic effective number of breeders without 'mining' the wild population to potential extinction. As a result, alternative methods for developing native broodstocks are highly desired. One alternative for developing native broodstocks, particularly when the collection of adults is logistically unfeasible or biologically unacceptable, is captive rearing of natural-origin juveniles to sexual maturity. In this approach, pre-smolt juveniles are collected from the stream or watershed for which a native broodstock is desired, and those juveniles are raised to sexual maturity in a hatchery. Those hatchery-reared adults then become the broodstock source for gametes and initial progeny releases. Such a captive rearing program offers many genetic advantages over traditional adult-trapping programs for developing native

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Abernathy Fish Technology Center

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (03/23/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2006 3, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01) Ken Kirkman - KEWU-4 Project Manager Proposed Action: Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Modifications Resulting from Final Design Project No.: 1988-053-01 Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Nez Perce Tribe Introduction: BPA, in its March 11, 2005 Record of Decision (ROD) on the Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project, decided to fund value engineering, land acquisition and final design of fish production facilities to support an ongoing program of Snake River spring chinook propagation for conservation and recovery of the species. BPA analyzed the

87

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

340: Oregon Hatchery Project 340: Oregon Hatchery Project EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project Summary This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 23, 2006 EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

89

Spring Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon; 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the fourth consecutive year, the Nez Perce Tribe, in conjunction with the Fish Passage Center, participated in the smolt monitoring program in the Imnaha River. A screw trap was used to collect emigrating natural and hatchery chinook salmon (Uncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts from February 25 to June 27, 1997. A total of 270 natural chinook salmon, 10,616 hatchery chinook salmon, 864 natural steelhead trout (and 13 natural steelhead parr), and 7,345 hatchery steelhead trout smolts were captured during emigration studies on the Imnaha River. Mortality associated with trapping, handling and tagging was low: 0.37% for natural chinook, 0.11% for hatchery chinook, 0.11% for natural steelhead, and 0.39% for hatchery steelhead trout smolts. Natural chinook salmon smolts emigrated from the Imnaha River from February 25 to June 10 and had a mean length of 108 mm, average weight of 13 g, and mean condition factor of 1.02. The peak period of natural chinook smolt emigration, based on number of fish collected, occurred between March 25 and April 30. Hatchery reared chinook salmon smolts were collected from April 9 to May 9, with 99% of the smolts being caught within 10 days after release. Hatchery chinook smolts mean length, weight, and condition factor were 131 mm, 25.4 g, and 1.12, respectively. Emigration of natural steelhead smolts in the Imnaha River occurred between March 14 and June 25. Peak emigration occurred from May 1 to May 15. Natural steelhead smolts averaged 175 mm in fork length, 55.8 g in weight and had a mean condition factor of 1 .OO. Hatchery steelhead smolts emigrated from the Imnaha River between April 15 and June 27. Hatchery steelhead smolts averaged 210 mm in fork length, 88 g in weight and had a mean condition factor of 0.93. Spring runoff water conditions in 1997 provided above average flows for emigrating anadromous salmonid smolts. Imnaha River mean daily discharge during spring emigration ranged from 7.4 cms (260 cfs) on March 9 to 96.6 cms (3,410 cfs) on April 20 at USGS gauge 13292000, Imnaha, OR. Snake River discharge measured at the Anatone gauge station, ranged from 61.1 to 152 kcfs from April 15 to May 18. River discharge at LGR ranged from 79.6 kcfs on March 6 to 225.3 kcfs on May 18. Flows at LGR were generally greater than 100 kcfs during most of the spring runoff period, and discharge exceeded 120 kcfs from March 20-31 and April 19 to June 24. The water spill period at LGR occurred continuously from April 10 to June 29 with peak spill of 101.9 kcfs occurring on May 17.

Blenden, Michael L.; Veach, Eric R.; Kucera, Paul A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

Hoelscher, Brian

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bonneville Power Administration Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 17 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 203 / Tuesday, October 21, 1997 / Notices all comments received within 60 days of the date of publication of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on this proposed information collection or to obtain a copy of the proposal and associated collection instruments, please write the above address, or call Department of the Army Reports clearance officer at (703) 614-0454. Title: Research to Develop a Profile of Army National Guard Members. Needs and Uses: This research will be a mail survey among Army National Guard members. The research will assist the Army National Guard (ARNG) in making the most effective use of its public relations, advertising and marketing budget for recruiting efforts. The research will help the ARNG and its

93

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Reducing Parallel Program Simulation Complexity by Static Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel approach, based on the integration of static program analysis and simulation techniques, for the performance prediction of message passing programs. PS, a simulator of PVM applications developed in the last years by our ... Keywords: parallel program analysis, performance analysis, simulation, software reengineering

Rocco Aversa; Beniamino Di Martino; Nicola Mazzocca; Umberto Villano

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Complexity-based program phase analysis and classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling and analysis of program behavior are at the foundation of computer system design and optimization. As computer systems become more adaptive, their efficiency increasingly depends on program dynamic characteristics. Previous studies have revealed ... Keywords: computer architecture, performance modeling, program phase, wavelet

Chang-Burm Cho; Tao Li

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the DOE Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the Department of Energy Complex OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................ 3 2.0 STATUS OF DOE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS ...................................................... 5 Overall Assessment .......................................................................... 5 Improvements to Emergency Management Programs at DOE Sites Since 1998 .................................................................. 5 Continuing Weaknesses ................................................................... 7 Underlying Causes ...........................................................................

97

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of activities/events conducted in response to the Objectives and Tasks described in the 1998 contract Statement Of Work for the Planning and Predesign activities of the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH). The report follows the format of the contract for ease in finding accomplishments. Although specific emphasis will be placed on activities related directly to the NPTH, activities from other artificial production related projects may also be noted because of overlap in staff duties and production facilities. Additionally, the project leader's role has evolved as other Tribal fisheries projects have been developed and assigned to the Production Services Division, Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT). Thus, implementation of the project leader role for the NPTH actually entails specific duties of the Hatchery Supervisor, the Production Coordinator as well as the Production Director. The Production Director, Ed Larson was absent mos t of January and part of February before he began working part time from home while recovering from back surgery.

Johnson, David B.; Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

Doulas, Speros

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Program Plan Reports | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

status of various programs. For more information, select one of the following. Audited financial statements for the benefit plans supported by B&W Y-12, L.L.C. are also...

100

Voluntary Protection Program | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voluntary Protection Voluntary Protection Program Voluntary Protection Program Posted: February 14, 2013 - 9:53am Raising the VPP flag at New Hope Center Protection against preventable illness and injury is not new to Y-12. Excellent tools already function toward keeping us healthy and safe on the job, and in June, Y-12 received the U.S. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Star status. We proudly fly the flag at the New Hope Center. This flag of distinction shows Y-12 employees are serious about safety. Senior Vice President and Deputy General Manager of Operations Bill Klemm said, "The objective isn't the star. The objective is everybody's safety. I give credit to everyone at the plant for us receiving the VPP Star level status. Continue to keep safety your focus as we continue our

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101

1992 annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1992 the Santa Fe Institute hosted more than 100 short- and long-term research visitors who conducted a total of 212 person-months of residential research in complex systems. To date this 1992 work has resulted in more than 50 SFI Working Papers and nearly 150 publications in the scientific literature. The Institute`s book series in the sciences of complexity continues to grow, now numbering more than 20 volumes. The fifth annual complex systems summer school brought nearly 60 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to Santa Fe for an intensive introduction to the field. Research on complex systems-the focus of work at SFI-involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex adaptive behavior range upwards from DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complex behavior include spin glasses, cellular automata, and genetic algorithms. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simple components; (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy); and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

A programming environment for the design of complex high speed ASICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A C++ based programming environment for the design of complex high speed ASICs is presented. The design of a 75 Kgate DECT transceiv er is used as a driv er example. Compact descriptions, combined with efficient sim ulationand syn thesis strategies are ... Keywords: congestion, global routing, quadratic placement, relaxed pins, routing models, supply-demand

Patrick Schaumont; Serge Vernalde; Luc Rijnders; Marc Engels; Ivo Bolsens

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01) TO: Greg Baesler Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project-Modifications to original proposal Project No.: 1985-038-00 Location: Colville Indian Reservation, Okanogan County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a

110

Mechatronics Engineering Program, SabanciUniversity,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................2-16 2.3.2.1 Artificial Propagation Program ......................................................2-18 3.3.2.1 Feather River Hatchery Artificial Propagation Program................3-18 3.3.2.2 Small-18 4.3.2.1 Artificial Propagation Program ......................................................4-18 4

Peles, Yoav

111

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2002 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2003-2004 Biennial Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer Chinook (hereafter, Chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of Chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams Chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River Chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well as comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer Chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer Chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer Chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer Chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2002 and their respective adult returns through 2004.

Berggren, Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Waste management under multiple complexities: Inexact piecewise-linearization-based fuzzy flexible programming  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inexact piecewise-linearization-based fuzzy flexible programming is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It's the first application to waste management under multiple complexities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It tackles nonlinear economies-of-scale effects in interval-parameter constraints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It estimates costs more accurately than the linear-regression-based model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties are decreased and more satisfactory interval solutions are obtained. - Abstract: To tackle nonlinear economies-of-scale (EOS) effects in interval-parameter constraints for a representative waste management problem, an inexact piecewise-linearization-based fuzzy flexible programming (IPFP) model is developed. In IPFP, interval parameters for waste amounts and transportation/operation costs can be quantified; aspiration levels for net system costs, as well as tolerance intervals for both capacities of waste treatment facilities and waste generation rates can be reflected; and the nonlinear EOS effects transformed from objective function to constraints can be approximated. An interactive algorithm is proposed for solving the IPFP model, which in nature is an interval-parameter mixed-integer quadratically constrained programming model. To demonstrate the IPFP's advantages, two alternative models are developed to compare their performances. One is a conventional linear-regression-based inexact fuzzy programming model (IPFP2) and the other is an IPFP model with all right-hand-sides of fussy constraints being the corresponding interval numbers (IPFP3). The comparison results between IPFP and IPFP2 indicate that the optimized waste amounts would have the similar patterns in both models. However, when dealing with EOS effects in constraints, the IPFP2 may underestimate the net system costs while the IPFP can estimate the costs more accurately. The comparison results between IPFP and IPFP3 indicate that their solutions would be significantly different. The decreased system uncertainties in IPFP's solutions demonstrate its effectiveness for providing more satisfactory interval solutions than IPFP3. Following its first application to waste management, the IPFP can be potentially applied to other environmental problems under multiple complexities.

Sun Wei [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang, Guo H., E-mail: huang@iseis.org [Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainability Research, UR-NCEPU, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Institute for Energy, Environment and Sustainable Communities, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Lv Ying; Li Gongchen [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1990 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka in Lake Pend Oreille met with some success in 1990, but unexpected results have raised new questions. Estimated kokanee abundance during late August of 1990 was about 6.9 million fish. This is a decline of 19% from 1989, a continued decrease since 1988. The decreased population was attributed to low stocking of hatchery fry (7.3 million), lower wild fry survival in 1990 (1.5%), and exceptionally poor survival of fish ages 3+ and 4+. Average survival of the older fish was only 11% in 1990 compared to 72% in prior years. Compensatory survival was noted for kokanee ages 1+ and 2+, with an average of 81% in 1990 compared to 44% in 1989. Hatchery fry comprised 47% of the total kokanee fry recruitment in 1990 (80% of fry biomass). This contribution ranked third behind 1988 and 1989 since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. Survival of hatchery fry was 20%, the second highest since this investigation began. Findings of 1990 indicate a more comprehensive approach to managing kokanee must take into account predator stockings and predator/prey interaction. An unexpected low adult escapement was responsible for an egg-take of only 5.6 million eggs in 1990, 58% of the previous year, which will limit experimental stocking in 1991. Modification of the fish ladder at the Cabinet Gorge Fish Hatchery to improve adult escapement is strongly recommended to increase egg-take. 27 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

Paragamian, Vaughn L.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Need for a Strong Science and Technology Program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex for the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper I argue for the need for a strong Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons Complex as the basis for maintaining a credible deterrence capability. The current Nuclear Posture Review establishes a New Triad as the basis for the United States deterrence strategy in a changing security environment. A predictive science capability is at the core of a credible National Nuclear Weapons program in the 21st Century. In absence of nuclear testing, the certification of our current Nuclear Weapons relies on predictive simulations and quantification of the associated simulation uncertainties. In addition, a robust nuclear infrastructure needs an active research and development program that considers all the required nuclear scenarios, including new configurations for which there is no nuclear test data. This paper also considers alternative positions to the need for a Science and Technology program in the Nuclear Weapons complex.

Garaizar, X

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1995 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservoir (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and coho salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla river releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Pend Oreille once provided the most popular kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka fishery in northern Idaho. A dramatic decline in the population occurred from the mid-1960s to 1970s. Restoration efforts included construction of the Cabinet Gorge Fish Hatchery to supplement the wild population and restore the fishery. In this study, hatchery-reared age 0 kokanee were stocked into Lake Pend Oreille from 1986 through 1992. Seven experimental stocking strategies for kokanee were tested using five locations and two time periods (early May through early June or late July). In 1985, the age 3 and older kokanee totaled about 0.35 million, but rose to 0.78 million in 1986, was stable, was then followed by a decline in 1990 to 0.53 million, then improved to 1.75 million in 1992. Much of the annual variation in total numbers of kokanee, ranging from 4.5 million to 10.2 million, was due to hatchery stockings of age 0 fish. Standing stocks of kokanee remained stable and ranged from 8 to 10 kg/hectare de spite dramatic changes in density due to age 0 fish. Prior to this study (1985), standing stocks were substantially higher (mean = 13.6 kg/hectare), indicating that the population may be operating below carrying capacity. The authors found survival of age 0 hatchery kokanee by each release season to range from 3% in 1986 to 39% in 1992, while the mean from 1987 through 1992 was 23%. They found significant (P=0.05) differences in survival between years, but they could not detect differences between stocking locations (P>0.71). Their analysis of survival between time (early vs late) and location was weak and inconclusive because after 1989 they had fewer fish to stock and could not repeat testing of some release strategies. They believe some of the variation in survival between release groups each year was due to the length of time between release in the lake and trawling.

Paragamian, Vaugh L.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project : Combined-Planning & Design and Operations & Maintenance Reports, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2000 Combined Maintenance and Operations (O&M) and Planning and Design (P&D) contract is hereby completed based on this annual report patterned after the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration. Primary project activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 process that: (1) Accepted final design, (2) Authorized a capital construction amount of $16,050,000, and (3) Authorized contractor selection, and (4) Provided construction site dedication, and (5) Implemented construction activities over an anticipated 2-year period of July 2000 through October 2002.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Use of the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to Simulate Complex Waste Treatment Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Simulation Program is a process simulator designed for aqueous based chemical processes. ESP, which is produced by OLI Systems, Inc., utilizes sophisticated activity coefficient models and predictive equations that result in the ability to simulate very complex electrolyte systems (OLI, 2002). The software comes with databanks of regressed parameters for a large number of aqueous, vapor, and solid species covering most of the elements. ESP has been used extensively at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to predict nuclear waste slurry vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium. It has and is being used to model leaching and washing of nuclear waste sludges, evaporation of nuclear waste solutions, crystallization of salts, precipitation of plutonium and other metals from waste solutions, and other processing of dilute and concentrated aqueous solutions, sludges, and slurries. The software is also used extensively to rationalize the characterization of nuclear wastes using limited data from analyses of waste samples. The OLI provided databanks suffer from a legacy interaction model that limits the accuracy when neutral solutes are important. Also, the nitrate-nitrite systems typically found in nuclear wastes are not properly parameterized in ESP databases because of the existence of sodium nitrate and nitrite ion pairs. Properties databanks for ESP have been developed at Flour Federal Services that eliminate the legacy model and provide more accurate simulation results than the OLI supplied databases for such concentrated solutions and slurries.

MacLean, G. T.; Ho, Q. T.; Berger, S. R. K.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

122

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Featured Programs Big Data: Making Complex Things Simpler NEW (pg. 5)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; customer relationship managers; business intelligence professionals; government security professionals and the broader world at large." Derik Mantel Project Manager Faegre & Benson, LLP United States program details Wagner Manager, Technology Commercialization Hewlett-Packard United States program details Faculty

Seager, Sara

124

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY2012 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspections completed by the GWPP on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2010 through 2012. In addition, this report also documents well inspections performed under the Y-12 Water Resources Restoration Program, which is administered by URS|CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). This report documents well maintenance activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2009); and provides summary tables of well inspections and well maintenance activities during the reference time period.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems, and (4) design, situational awareness and control of complex networks. The program elements consist of a group of Complex Networked Systems Research Institutes (CNSRI), tightly coupled to an associated individual-investigator-based Complex Networked Systems Basic Research (CNSBR) program. The CNSRI's will be principally located at the DOE National Laboratories and are responsible for identifying research priorities, developing and maintaining a networked systems modeling and simulation software infrastructure, operating summer schools, workshops and conferences and coordinating with the CNSBR individual investigators. The CNSBR individual investigator projects will focus on specific challenges for networked systems. Relevancy of CNSBR research to DOE needs will be assured through the strong coupling provided between the CNSBR grants and the CNSRI's.

Brown, D L

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Complexes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; /Kansas U.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC,

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Complexity of Large-scale Convex Programming under a Linear ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observe that while the lower complexity bound in (2.6) is in the same order of magnitude as the one established in [25,27] for the general first-order methods to

129

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project--Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (11/7/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 7, 2000 November 7, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 TO : Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery facilities. Project No.: F3204 Location: Prosser and Toppenish, Yakima County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

130

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

132

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programming for Exascale Computers William Gropp and Marc Snir April 15, 2013 Abstract Exascale systems will present programmers with many challenges. We review the...

134

Keeping Track of the National Transuranic Program Complex Defense Transuranic Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal system in southeastern New Mexico is assessed periodically using transuranic (TRU) waste physical and radiological properties and other information describing the waste. This TRU waste estimate is based on the best knowledge of the TRU waste across the DOE complex at the time repository performance is assessed. TRU waste inventory was collected from each of the Department of Energy (DOE) sites that generated TRU waste for the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) and subsequently for the Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) in order to support the assessments that ultimately led to certification and re-certification of the WIPP. In each case, information was collected, stored and maintained in the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID) that was used to generate tables describing the volumetric, physical, and radiological properties of the TRU waste. The tables and other descriptions of the waste were reported in baseline reports for the certification and the re-certification. Information maintained in the TWBID database has now been transferred to a new qualified database that utilizes a more efficient operating configuration. This database known as the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID) will be the information repository for TRU waste destined to WIPP, and the source for information submitted for annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Update Reports to be used in future repository performance assessments (PAs) and re-certifications. The information that has been collected will support a wider range of data needs including waste management, transportation and strategic planning. (authors)

Crawford, B.; Lott, S.; McInroy, W.; VanSoest, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Programmed improvements of the alternating gradient synchrotron complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and need for DOE to undertake the actions described in this document are to improve the efficiency of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) complex. Benefits would include optimization of the AGS scientific program, increased high-energy and nuclear physics experimentation, improved health and safety conditions for workers and users, reduced impact on the environment and the general public, energy conservation, decreased generation of hazardous and radioactive wastes, and completion of actions required to permit the AGS to be the injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)., Improved efficiency is defined as increasing the AGS`s capabilities to capture and accelerate the proton intensity transferred to the AGS from the AGS booster. Improved capture of beam intensity would reduce the beam losses which equate to lost scientific opportunity for study and increased potential for radiation doses to workers and the general public. The action would also refurbish magnets used in the transfer tunnel which connects the AGS complex to RHIC to permit smooth injection of beam into the RHIC accelerator. These magnets were previously used to direct beam to fixed targets for high energy physics studies but have hot received proper maintenance to be reliable as injectors to RHIC. The document describes alternative actions, the affected environment, and environmental impacts.

NONE

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Annual Coded-Wire Tag Program : Washington : Missing Production Groups Annual Report for 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the 'Annual Coded-wire Tag Program - Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries' project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time and to meet various measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries. Objective 1 for FY-00 was met with few modifications to the original FY-00 proposal. Under Objective 2, snouts containing coded-wire tags that were recovered during FY-00 were decoded. Under Objective 3, this report summarizes available recovery information through 2000 and includes detailed information for brood years 1989 to 1994 for chinook and 1995 to 1997 for coho.

Mills, Robin D.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1986 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimated kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) abundance in Lake Pend Oreille was 4.3 million during September 1986. This estimate was similar to 1985 and indicates continued suppression of the kokanee population since initial decline in the late 1960s. Atypically high survival of wild fry resulted in similar fry recruitment in 1986 as 1985, whereas hatchery-reared fry contributed only 8% to total fry recruitment as a result of low post-release survival (3%). Fry released into the Clark Fork River from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery had very low survival during emigration to Lake Pend Oreille, resulting from poor flow conditions and potentially high predation. Fry survival during emigration was twice as high during nighttime flows of 16,000 cfs than 7,800 cfs. Emigration also was faster during higher flows. Several marks were tested to differentially mark fry release groups to help determine impacts of flow and other factors on fry survival. Survival of fry marked with tetracycline and fluorescent dye was high (>99%) during the 10-week study. In contrast, survival of fry marked with fluorescent grit marks ranged from 5 to 93%, depending on application pressure and distance from the fry. Retention was high (>96%) for tetracycline and grit marks during the study, whereas dye marks were discernible (100%) for only one week. 23 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

Bowles, Edward C.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Energy Programs | Complex Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at room temperature. The key, of course, is to understand how they do it. Intriguing Stripes and Other Clues The basic idea behind superconductivity is that electrons, which...

142

Annual Coded Wire Program Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the ``Missing Production Groups``. Production fish released by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980`s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. The objectives of the ``Missing Production Groups`` program are: to estimate the total survival of each production group, to estimate the contribution of each production group to various fisheries, and to prepare an annual report for all USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern.

Pastor, S.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Vancouver, WA (United States). Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Compliation of Bioassay Issues Reported During the 120-Day Suspension of PAAA Enforcement Actions Related to Internal Dose Evaluation Programs by Contractors in the Department of Energy Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Compilation of Bioassay Issues Reported During the 120- Day Suspension of PAAA Enforcement Actions Related to Internal Dose Evaluation Programs by Contractors in the Department of Energy Complex BACKGROUND - The DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) invoked a 120-day suspension of PAAA enforcement actions for issues associated with contractor Internal Dose Evaluation Programs (IDEP). Prior to initiation of the suspension, EH Enforcement had identified deficiencies in DOE- contractor implemented bioassay programs at numerous sites within the DOE complex. The commonality of the IDEP deficiencies at the various sites, as well as

144

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

146

Activation of Hydrogen with Bi-Functional Ambiphillic Catalyst Complexes - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Tom Autrey (Primary Contact), Greg Schenter, Don Camaioni, Abhi Karkamkar, Herman Cho, Bojana Ginovska-Pangovska Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 MS#K2-57 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 375-3792 Email: tom.autrey@pnnl.gov DOE Program Officer: Raul Miranda Objectives The objective of our research is to develop fundamental insight into small molecule activation in molecular complexes that will provide the basis for developing rational approaches

147

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program (8/2/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 147 / Tuesday, August 2, 2005 / Notices ORDERS GRANTING IMPORT/EXPORT AUTHORIZATIONS DOE/FE AUTHORITY-Continued Order No. Date issued Importer/exporter FE docket No. Import volume Export volume Comments 289-C ...... 6-24-05 Duke Energy LNG Sales, Inc., 89-77-LNG. .................. .................. Vacate long-term import authority. 2106 ......... 6-24-05 Apache Corporation, 05-43- NG. 55 Bcf Import and export a combined total of natural gas from and to Canada, beginning on July 8, 2005, and extend- ing through July 7, 2007. 334-A ...... 6-24-05 Ocean State Power and Ocean State Power II. .................. .................. Vacate long-term import authority. 335-A ...... 6-24-05 Ocean State Power and Ocean State Power II. ..................

148

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Ross Complex) 1/16/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2003 16, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-117- (Ross Complex) Paul Martin TFHV/CSB2 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex Location: The Ross Complex is located at 5411 NE Highway 99, Vancouver, Clark County, Washington in the BPA Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking

149

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume I, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Seelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. This is the second year of the annual systemwide program conducted by the Fish Passage Center (formerly Water Budget Center). Index reaches have been established. Travel time indices are calculated for year to year comparison. Marked groups of steelhead, spring chinook, fall chinook, and summer chinook are monitored at sampling points throughout the system. Because this program is intended to be representative of the juvenile migration, marked groups represent major hatchery production stocks. Arrival time and duration of marked groups are reported. Annual travel time indices are reported from Rock Island Dam to McNary Dam, and from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam. Hatchery and brand release information is reported.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Monitoring the Reproductive Success of Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Natural Spring Chinook Salmon in the Wenatchee River, 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated differences in the statistical power to assign parentage between an artificially propagated and wild salmon population. The propagated fish were derived from the wild population, and are used to supplement its abundance. Levels of genetic variation were similar between the propagated and wild groups at 11 microsatellite loci, and exclusion probabilities were >0.999999 for both groups. The ability to unambiguously identify a pair of parents for each sampled progeny was much lower than expected, however. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of cases the most likely pair of parents were the true parents was lower for propagated parents than for wild parents. There was a clear relationship between parentage assignment ability and the degree of linkage disequilibrium, the estimated effective number of breeders that produced the parents, and the size of the largest family within the potential parents. If a stringent threshold for parentage assignment was used, estimates of relative fitness were biased downward for the propagated fish. The bias appeared to be largely eliminated by either fractionally assigning progeny among parents in proportion to their likelihood of parentage, or by assigning progeny to the most likely set of parents without using a statistical threshold. We used a DNA-based parentage analysis to measure the relative reproductive success of hatchery- and natural-origin spring Chinook salmon in the natural environment. Both male and female hatchery-origin fish produced far fewer juvenile progeny per parent when spawning naturally than did natural origin fish. Differences in age structure, spawning location, weight and run timing were responsible for some of the difference in fitness. Male size and age had a large influence on fitness, with larger and older males producing more offspring than smaller or younger individuals. Female size had a significant effect on fitness, but the effect was much smaller than the effect of size on male fitness. For both sexes, run time had a smaller but still significant effect on fitness, with earlier returning fish favored. Spawning location within the river had a significant effect on fitness for both males and females, and for females explained most of the reduced fitness observed for hatchery fish in this population. While differences have been reported in the relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced salmonids Oncorhynchus spp., factors explaining the differences are often confounded. We examined the spawning site habitat and redd structure variables of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha of known size that spawned in two tributaries of the Wenatchee River. We controlled for variability in spawning habitat by limiting our analysis to redds found within four selected reaches. No difference in the instantaneous spawner density or location of the redd in the stream channel was detected between reaches. Within each reach, no difference in the fork length or weight of hatchery and naturally produced fish was detected. While most variables differed between reaches, we found no difference in redd characteristics within a reach between hatchery and naturally produced females. Correlation analysis of fish size and redd characteristics found several weak but significant relationships suggesting larger fish contract larger redds in deeper water. Spawner density was inversely related to several redd structure variables suggesting redd size may decrease as spawner density increases. Results should be considered preliminary until samples size and statistical power goals are reached in future years. Trends in relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Wenatchee Basins suggest females that spawn in the upper reaches of the tributaries produced a great number of offspring compared to females that spawn in the lower reaches of the tributaries. To better understand this trend, redd microhabitat data was collected from spring Chinook sa

Ford, Michael J.; Williamson, Kevin S. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Theory of Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Christopher Wolverton Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University 2220 Campus Drive, Room 2036 Evanston, IL 60208-3108 Phone: (734) 678-6319 Email: c-wolverton@northwestern.edu Vidvuds Ozolins Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles DOE Program Officer: James Davenport Program Manager Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Office of Basic Energy Sciences Email: James.Davenport@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-0035 Objectives Using first-principles methods, determine the atomic- level processes that are rate limiting in hydrogen storage

152

Product and program management : battling the strangler trees of system and social complexity in the software market jungle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of Software Product and Program Management as recently emergent roles in the information technology sector is presented. The exploration is presented in six sections divided into two major parts. The first ...

Hempe, John A. (John Alan)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Annual Coded Wire Program: Oregon Missing Production Groups: 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries.

Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.; Murry, William M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries.

Garrison, Robert L.; Lewis, Mark A.; Murray, William M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

GRPANL: a program for fitting complex peak groupings for gamma and x-ray energies and intensities  

SciTech Connect

GRPANL is a general-purpose peak-fitting program that calculates gamma-ray and x-ray energies and intensities from a given spectral region. The program requires that the user supply input information such as the first and last channels of the region, the channels to be used as pre- and post-region background, the system gain and zero-intercept, and a list of approximate energy values at which peaks occur in the region. Because the peak position and peak-shape parameters enter nonlinearly into the peak-fitting algorithm, an iterative least-square procedure is used in the fitting process. The program iterates until either all convergence criteria are met or ten iterations have elapsed. The code described here allows for twenty free parameters and a region as large as 240 data channels. This code runs on an LSI-11 computer with 32K memory and disk-storage capability.

Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Complex Hydrides - A New Frontier for Future Energy Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Vitalij K. Pecharsky, 1 Marek Pruski, 2 L. Scott Chumbley, 3 Duane D. Johnson, 4 Takeshi Kobayashi 5 1 FWP Leader: Ames Laboratory, 253 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: vitkp@ameslab.gov, Phone: (515) 294-8220 2 PI: Ames Laboratory, 230 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: mpruski@iastate.edu, Phone: (515) 294-2017 3 PI: Ames Laboratory, 214 Wilhelm Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: chumbley@iastate.edu, Tel.: 515-2947903; 4 PI: Ames Laboratory, 311 TASF, Ames, IA 50011, Email: ddj@ameslab.gov, Phone: (515) 2949649 5 Ames Laboratory, 229 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: takeshi@iastate.edu, Phone: (515)-294-6823 DOE Program Officer: Dr. Refik Kortan

158

Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complex Y-12 National Security Complexs primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly...

159

Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We PIT-tagged juvenile spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery in October 2002 as part of the Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) for migratory year (MY) 2003. We tagged 20,950 Imnaha stock spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,904 fish to leave the acclimation pond at our Imnaha River satellite facility beginning 1 April 2003 to begin their seaward migration. The fish remaining in the pond were forced out on 15 April 2003. We tagged 20,820 Catherine Creek stock captive and conventional brood progeny spring chinook salmon, and after mortality and tag loss, we allowed the remaining 20,628 fish to leave the acclimation ponds at our Catherine Creek satellite facility beginning during two acclimation periods. The volitional release for the early acclimation group began 12 March 2003, and all remaining fish were forced out of the ponds on 23 March 2003. The volitional release for the late acclimation group began 31 March 2003, and all remaining fish were forced out of the ponds on 14 April 2003. We estimated survival rates, from release to Lower Granite Dam in MY 2003, for three stocks of hatchery spring chinook salmon tagged at Lookingglass Hatchery to determine their relative migration performance. Survival rates for the Imnaha River, Lostine River, and Catherine Creek stocks were 0.714, 0.557, and 0.350, respectively. We PIT-tagged 20,944 BY 2002 Imnaha River stock and 20,980 BY 2002 Catherine Creek stock captive and conventional brood progeny in October and November 2003 as part of the CSS for MY 2004. From tagging to January 28, 2004, the rates of mortality and tag loss for Imnaha River stock were 0.16% and 0.04%, respectively. Catherine Creek stock, during the same period, had rates of mortality and tag loss of 0.19% and 0.06%, respectively.

Jonasson, Brian

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Microsoft Word - 2011_07_05_KHP Draft EIS.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement July 2011 DOE/EA-0424 Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0424 Bonneville Power Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation July 2011 Abstract - Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agencies: Lead federal agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); cooperating federal agencies: National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Lead state agency: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); cooperating tribe: Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part I, Estimation of Survival, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual Smolt Monitoring Program is the result of implementation of Section 304(d)(2) of the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Survival was monitored for specific marked groups of steelhead and spring chinook. Survival through the mid-Columbia from Winthrop Hatchery and the Methow River to below Priest Rapids Dam was estimated. Estimation of survival of marked groups of steelhead from Little Goose Dam to below Ice Harbor Dam was attempted. Serious problems were evident in the Snake River survival data. A release strategy which avoids holding of control groups was tested with satisfactory results.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan For The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 LLC (hereafter referenced as B&W Y-12), the Y-12 management and operations (M&O) contractor for DOE. B&W Y-12 is a new corporate name, assumed in January 2007, for the company formerly known as BWXT Y-12, L.L.C., hereafter referenced as BWXT. This GWPP management plan addresses the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A Environmental Protection Program (hereafter referenced as DOE O 450.1A), which emphasize a site-wide approach for groundwater protection at each DOE facility through implementation of groundwater surveillance monitoring. Additionally, this plan addresses the relevant and applicable GWPP elements and goals described in the DOE O 450.1A technical guidance documents issued in June 2004 (DOE 2004) and May 2005 (DOE 2005). This GWPP management plan is a 'living' document that is reviewed annually, revised and reissued every three years, and is formatted to provide for updating individual sections independent of the rest of the document. Section 2 includes a short description of the groundwater system at Y-12, the history of groundwater monitoring at Y-12 and the corresponding evolution of the GWPP, and an overview of ongoing Y-12 groundwater monitoring activities. Section 3 describes the key elements of the GWPP management strategy. Organizational roles and responsibilities of GWPP personnel are outlined in Section 4. Section 5 presents an overview of the GWPP project plans for applicable programmatic elements. Section 6 lists the reports, plans, and documents that are referenced for technical and administrative details.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

User manual for geothermal energy assisted dairy complex computer programs: PREBLD, MODEL0, MODEL1, MODEL2, FRMAT2, PREPI2, NET2, DAIRY and DAIRY1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation of the programs on a computer is described. The programs are divided into two parts: the simulation of the buildings and the simulation of the pipe network. (MHR)

Not Available

165

Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (hereafter referenced as BWXT), the Y-12 management and operations (M&O) contractor for DOE. This GWPP management plan addresses the requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (BWXT Y12 S/RID) regarding the implementation of a site-wide approach for groundwater protection at each DOE facility. Additionally, this plan is a ''living'' document that is reviewed annually, revised and reissued every three years, and is formatted to provide for updating individual sections independent of the rest of the document. Section 2 includes a short description of the groundwater system at Y-12, the history of groundwater monitoring at Y-12 and the corresponding evolution of the GWPP, and an overview of ongoing Y-12 groundwater monitoring activities. Section 3 describes the key elements of the GWPP management strategy. Organizational roles and responsibilities of GWPP personnel are outlined in Section 4. Section 5 presents an overview of the GWPP project plans for applicable programmatic elements. Section 6 lists the reports, plans, and documents that are referenced for technical and administrative details.

Elvado Environmental LLC; Environmental Compliance Department Environment, Safety, and Health Division Y-12 National Security Complex

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2003, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using three strategies: eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit and Alturas lakes in November and December, age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2003. Age-0 through age-4 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 81,727 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 46,234 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 11,961 fish. Angler surveys were conducted from May 25 through August 7, 2003 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 179 anglers and estimated that 424 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.09 fish/hour. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 15 to May 29, 2003. We estimated that 4,637 wild/natural and 12,226 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component included an estimated 5,352 out-migrants produced from a summer direct-release made to Redfish Lake in 2002 and 6,874 out-migrants produced from a fall direct-release made in 2002. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 23 to June 5, 2003 and April 25 to June 4, 2003, respectively. The SBT enumerated 28 wild/natural and 13,329 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts that outmigrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 286 wild/natural and 553 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from presmolt releases made directly to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2002. Median travel times for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged smolts from the Redfish Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for wild/natural smolts and hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Redfish Lake Creek trap were 10.6 d for wild/natural smolts, 6.2 d for summer direct-released smolts, and 7.1 d for fall direct-released smolts. Median travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from the Pettit Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Pettit Lake Creek trap were 14.1 d for fall direct released smolts and 13.6 d for fall direct released smolts. Cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams were utilized to estimate detection rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Detection rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Pettit Lake fall direct released smolts recorded the highest detection rate of 37.14%. In 2003, 312 hatchery-produced adult socke

Willard, Catherine; Plaster, Kurtis; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999 when six jacks and one jill were captured at IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2002, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in August and to Pettit and Redfish lakes in October, age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek in May, eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in December, and hatchery-produced and anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2002. Age-0, age-1, and age-2 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 50,204 fish. Age-0, age-1, age-2, and age-3 kokanee were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 24,374 fish. Age-2 and age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 18,328 fish. The ultimate goal of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) captive broodstock development and evaluation efforts is to recover sockeye salmon runs in Idaho waters. Recovery is defined as reestablishing sockeye salmon runs and providing for utilization of sockeye salmon and kokanee resources by anglers. The immediate project goal is to maintain this unique sockeye salmon population through captive broodstock technology and avoid species extinction. The project objectives are: (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye salmon. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program supplementation efforts. (4) Refine our ability to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, providing written activity reports and participation in essential program management and planning activities.

Willard, Catherine; Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Program Handbook for  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For new, complex, or advanced testing tasks, a ... any decision about the acceptability of the ... Toxicology Program (NTP), the International Agency for ...

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

RETRAN-3D—A Program for Transient Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Complex Fluid Flow Systems: Volume 1: Theory and Numerics (Rev ision 3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RETRAN-02 has proven to be a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of light water reactor systems. The RETRAN-3D computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-02 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for (1) boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients, (2) small break loss-of-coolant accidents, (3) anticipated transients without scram, (4) long-term transients, (5) transients with thermodynamic non...

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component originated from a 2006 fall presmolt direct-release. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 19 to May 23, 2007 and April 18 to May 29, 2007, respectively. The SBT estimated 1,749 natural origin and 4,695 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 8,994 natural origin and 6,897 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from fall presmolt direct-releases made to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2006. In 2007, the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC) chose to have all Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles (tagged and untagged) transported due to potential enhanced survival. Therefore, mainstem survival evaluations were only conducted to Lower Granite Dam. Unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to Lower Granite Dam were utilized to estimate survival rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Survival rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Alturas Lake hatchery origin smolts tagged at the out-migrant trap recorded the highest survival rate of 78.0%. In 2007, 494 hatchery origin adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 195 areas of excavation in the lake from spawning events. This was the highest number of redds observed in Redfish Lake since the program was initiated. Suspected redds were approximately 3 m x 3 m in size and were constructed by multiple pairs of adults. To monitor the predator population found within the lakes, we monitored bull trout spawning in Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake; and in Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the tenth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts (41 adults) and redd counts (22 redds

Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

174

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 which provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater sampling (Section 3.0), whereas well granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also determines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 4.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 5.0). This plan applies to groundwater monitoring wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure 1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime is directly south of Y-12 and encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge that is bound to the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and by Scarboro Road to the east. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated in accordance with the schedule required in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT 2001). Between scheduled updates of this plan, any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan, will be described in addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee). Information included in the addenda will be incorporated into the plan during the next scheduled update.

None

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated every three years, as specified in the ''Y-12 GWPP Management Plan'' (BWXT 2004). Between scheduled updates of this plan, addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee) will document any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan. The addenda, numbered in consecutive ascending order, will be forwarded to all personnel included on the distribution list for this plan. The addenda are inserted in Appendix C pending the next scheduled update of the plan, which will incorporate the information included in the addenda.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

178

SSO Program Improvement Report, July 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that SSO programs could be improved complex-wide through clearer program requirements in DOE directives, better support for coordination and sharing of best practices among DOE...

179

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ``Annual Coded Wire Tag Program -- Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries`` project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) [formerly the Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) and the Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW)], Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time. Data generated by this project contributes to WDFW`s obligations for representative tagging under the Endangered. Species Act (ESA) permit for operating Columbia Basin facilities. WDFW facilities operating outside the Snake River basin are required to have a Section 10, ``Incidental Take`` permit. Consistent with special conditions within this permit, WDFW has now reached it`s objective to tag representative groups from all WDFW Columbia Basin releases.

Fuss, Howard J.; Ashbrook, Charmane; Doty, Daniel (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tectogenesis of the rocks surrounding the Winnsboro intrusive complex and reconnaissance and petrography of the Pageland pluton; South Carolina Geothermal Program Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Major post-tectonic plutons of the easternmost Piedmont in the southern Appalachians have been of primary interest because of their high radiogenic heat production. Such heat production comes from a linear map trend including the Winnsboro, Liberty Hill, Pageland, and Lilesville plutons which parallel the proposed eastern Piedmont Fault system of Hatcher and others (1977). This study, in examining regional versus contact metamorphism and crosscutting relationships between the Winnsboro and Pageland complexes and the major folds and mylonitic zones of this area, provides a relative time framework for the tectonic and plutonic events.

Bourland, W.C.; Farrar, S.S.

1978-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program is designed to rapidly increase numbers of Chinook salmon in stocks that are in imminent danger of extirpation in Catherine Creek (CC), Lostine River (LR) and upper Grande Ronde River (GR). Natural parr are captured and reared to adulthood in captivity, spawned (within stocks) and their progeny reared to smoltification before being released into the natal stream of their parents. This program is co-managed by ODFW, National Marine Fisheries Service, Nez Perce Tribe and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Presmolt rearing was initially conducted at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery (LFH) but parr collected in 2003 and later were reared at Wallowa Fish Hatchery (WFH). Post-smolt rearing is conducted at Bonneville Fish Hatchery (BOH - freshwater) and at Manchester Research Station (MRS - saltwater). The CC and LR programs are being terminated, as these populations have achieved the goal of a consistent return of 150 naturally spawning adults, so the 2005 brood year was the last brood year collected for theses populations. The Grande Ronde River program continued with 300 fish collected each year. Currently, we are attempting to collect 150 natural parr and incorporate 150 parr collected as eggs from females with low ELISA levels from the upper Grande Ronde River Conventional Hatchery Program. This is part of a comparison of two methods of obtaining fish for a captive broodstock program: natural fish vs. those spawned in captivity. In August 2007, we collected 152 parr (BY 2006) from the upper Grande Ronde River and also have 155 Grande Ronde River parr (BY 2006) that were hatched from eyed eggs at LFH. During 2008, we were unable to collect natural parr from the upper Grande Ronde River. Therefore, we obtained 300 fish from low ELISA females from the upper Grande Ronde River Conventional Program. In October 2008 we obtained 170 eyed eggs from the upper Grande Ronde river Conventional Hatchery Program. We will attempt to collect natural parr in August 2009. This year 752 fish were removed from the captive population: 629 fish survived to gamete production and 123 fish died from various causes prior to spawning. Growth of the Captive Broodstock fish was similar to previous years. The saltwater fish have grown more slowly than those reared in freshwater. A total of 720 fish were sorted as maturing and 629 (87.4%) of them survived to spawn. We collected gametes from 273 females and 350 males from the 2002-2006 brood years in 2008, using 111 spawning matrices and collected 474,187 green eggs (1,737 eggs/female). All ripe males were spawned and no semen was collected for cryo-preservation. Of the 474,187 eggs collected for the BY 2008 F1 generation, 448,373 (94.6%) survived to the eyed stage. 68,612 (15.3%) were culled from females with high ELISA OD values for BKD prevention. For BY 2007, we collected a total of 477,048 eggs from all three populations and 407,369 (85.4%) reached the eyed stage, while 95,024 eyed eggs (23.3%) were culled for BKD prevention. Eyed eggs were hatched at Lookingglass Fish Hatchery, producing 267,131 fry. As parr, 153,371 fish were coded-wire tagged (CWT). For the 2006 F1 brood year, we collected 177,890 eggs and 149,073 (83.8%) reached the eyed stage. 83,826 eyed eggs (56.2%) were culled at the eyed stage for BKD prevention. 61,044 fry were produced (93.6%), 53,688 (88 %) survived to smolt. There were 54 bacterial kidney disease (BKD) mortalities at BOH and MRS, combined in this reporting period. Overall, there were fewer BKD mortalities in 2008 due to a reduced number of fish coming into the Captive Broodstock Program and a shift away from collecting wild parr to using eyed eggs from low ELISA females from the Conventional Hatchery Program. Unknown causes of death accounted for 32 deaths at MRS and BOH, combined in 2008. We continually examine and modify the operations of the Captive Broodstock Program to make improvements wherever possible. We continue to have difficulty with prevention and treatment of BKD outbreak

Hoffnagle, Timothy L.; Hair, Donald; Gee, Sally

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The 300,000-square-foot, vault-type building features an unobstructed 43,500-square-foot computer room, which is an open room about three-fourths the size of a football field. The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. National Security

183

Adaptive genetic programming for option pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic Programming (GP) is an automated computational programming methodology, inspired by the workings of natural evolution techniques. It has been applied to solve complex problems in multiple domains including finance. This paper illustrates the ... Keywords: enetic programming, options pricing

Zheng Yin; Anthony Brabazon; Conall O'Sullivan

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Complex Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Complex Queries Complex Queries < User:Jweers Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Using Nested Queries 1.1 Programs 2 Using Inverse Property Ask Query 3 Using Wildcards Plus Array Print with Count 3.1 States start with A (4) Using Nested Queries Complex Help:Inline queries are queries which involve multiple subjects, properties, or nested queries. The following is an example of a nested query which will return only Programs (Category:Programs) in the Energy Sector (Property:ProgramSector = Energy) within the subsector of Wind (Property:Sector = Wind) which have been developed by National Labs (Category:United States Department of Energy National Laboratories). The last piece mentioned is where the nested query comes into play. To find Programs which have been developed by National Labs, we must search the

185

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

186

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies.

187

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife project 'Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW)'. Results for the 2001 contract period: Objective 1--Over 1 million juvenile salmon were coded-wire by this program (Table 1); Objective 2--ODFW recovered and processed over 40,000 snout collected from coded-wire tagged fish (Table 2); Objective 3--Survival data is summarized below; Objective 4--The last group of VIE tagged coho was released in 2001 and returning coho were samples at Sandy Hatchery. This sampling showed only 1 of 1,160 returning coho VIE marked as juveniles retained the VIE mark as adults.

Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I- September 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Summary Report

189

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

190

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

191

Complex Quadratic Optimization and Semidefinite Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In D.Z. Du and P.M. Pardalos, editors, Handbook of Combinatorial Optimization, volume 3, pages 1 – 19. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1998. [4] A. Frieze and M.

192

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

193

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

194

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

195

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW) Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags showed tagging rate and pre-release tag retention improved from the first to second years of tagging. Tagging rate remained identical from 1999 to 2000 while pre-release tag retention dropped to 95%. Returning jack and adult salmon were sampled for CWT and VIE tags in the fall of 2000. Of 606 adults recovered at Sandy Fish Hatchery in 2000, only 1 or 0.2%, retained their VIE tag. Of 36 jacks recovered in 2000, 13 or 36.1% retained their VIE tag.

Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The NNSA Albuquerque Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Albuquerque Complex Transition Site Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger Viewing Options-Click to increase or decrease page font size. NNSA Home Page Office of Public Affairs Employee Concerns Program Whistleblower Home Page Office of Civil Rights Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Current Management and Operating Contracts Freedom of Information Privacy Act NEPA Contractor Human Resources Office of Field Financial Management The NNSA Albuquerque Complex Transition Site We are incorporating the web pages on this site into the NNSA HQ site, located at http://www.nnsa.energy.gov. We now provide links to the current locations of all our previous pages and hosted Field Office sites.

197

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999, when six jacks and one jill were captured at Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2001, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to all three lakes in October and to Pettit and Alturas lakes in July; age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September along with anadromous adult sockeye salmon that returned to the Sawtooth basin and were not incorporated into the captive broodstock program. Kokanee population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September. Only age-0 and age-1 kokanee were captured on Redfish Lake, resulting in a population estimate of 12,980 kokanee. This was the second lowest kokanee abundance estimated since 1990. On Alturas Lake age-0, age-1, and age-2 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population was estimated at 70,159. This is a mid range kokanee population estimate for Alturas Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1990. On Pettit Lake only age-1 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population estimate was 16,931. This estimate is in the midrange of estimates of the kokanee population in Pettit Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1992. We continue to have difficulty capturing age-0 kokanee in the midwater trawl on Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted on Redfish and Alturas lakes to estimate kokanee harvest and to estimate return to creel for hatchery rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We failed to encounter any kokanee that had been harvested in 88 angler interviews conducted between May 26 and August 7, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. On Alturas Lake, we again failed to encounter any harvested kokanee in 116 angler interviews, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. We estimated that anglers harvested 9.5% of the 6,598 rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We estimated that 110 wild/natural and 9,616 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2001. This was the lowest estimate of unmarked smolt out-migration since monitoring began in 1991. The trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 22 to June 6, 2001 to estimate out-migration. Mean travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from Redfish Lake Creek Trap to Lower Granite Dam was 10.3 days for wild/natural smolts and 10.6 days for hatchery-produced smolts. Based on cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth basin traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams, the Redfish Lake wild/natural smolts, Redfish fall direct presmolts group, and Alturas Lake fall direct presmolts recorded the highest detection rates. In 2001, 65 hatchery-raised and 14 anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 12 to 15 areas of excavation in the lake that were possible redds. We monitored bull trout spawning on Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake, and on Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the fourth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts on Fishhook Creek were similar to previous years as were redd counts. On Alpine Creek, bull trout numbers were also similar to previous years, but the number of redds observed increased over prev

Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 1998: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 1998-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon collection and spawning began in 1998. A total of 114 fish were collected from Johnson Creek and 54 fish (20 males and 34 females) were retained for Broodstock. All broodstock were transported to Lower Snake River Compensation Plan's South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility, operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The remaining 60 fish were released to spawn naturally. An estimated 155,870 eggs from Johnson Creek chinook spawned at the South Fork Salmon River facility were transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for rearing. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,871. Approximately 20,500 eggs from females with high levels of Bacterial Kidney Disease were culled. This, combined with green-egg to eyed-egg survival of 62%, resulted in about 84,000 eyed eggs produced in 1998. Resulting juveniles were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery in 1999. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags and 8,043 were also PIT tagged. A total of 78,950 smolts were transported from the McCall Fish Hatchery and released directly into Johnson Creek on March 27, 28, 29, and 30, 2000.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Workshops Highlights of our Programs Named Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Faculty opportunities Learning Lab...

200

EEO and Diversity Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity: Collaborating for Mission Success Solutions to Workplace Conflict: What Mediation Can Do for You! FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MEDIATION On October 27, 2006, the EEO and Diversity Program sponsored a panel presentation on the mediation program for all Service Center complex employees. Also, a session was held for the Service Center Leadership Team on November 15, 2006. At the end of the panel presentations, audience members were able to ask questions about the mediation program. If you would like to review the DVD of the presentation, contact the EEO and Diversity Program Office at (505) 845-5517 or by email at EEODiversityOffice@doeal.gov * What kinds of issues can be mediated? * How does one prepare for mediation?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Sustainability Outreach Program Brochure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health, Safety and Security (HSS) is Health, Safety and Security (HSS) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) central organization responsible for health, safety, environment, and security; providing corporate-level leadership and strategic vision to coordinate and integrate these vital programs. HSS is responsible for policy development and technical assistance; safety analysis; corporate safety and security programs; education and training; complex-wide independent oversight; and enforcement. The Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer advises the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary on all matters related to health, safety and security across the complex. Our Stakeholders Labor Unions/Workers Local Communities/General Public Contractors Universities/Academic Institutions Professional Associations

202

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

203

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

204

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

205

Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

206

Graduate Fellowship Programs | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to students pursuing doctoral degrees in fields of study that use high performance computing to solve complex science and engineering problems. The program fosters a...

207

Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to students pursuing doctoral degrees in fields of study that use high performance computing to solve complex science and engineering problems. The program fosters a...

208

Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

209

Generating Parallel Programs from the Wavefront Design Pattern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Object-oriented programming, design patterns, and frameworks are common techniques that have been used to reduce the complexity of sequential programming. We have applied these techniques to the more difficult domain of parallel programming. This paper ...

John Anvik; Steve MacDonald; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer; Steven Bromling; Kai Tan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

211

Program Accomplishments  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Progress and accomplishments in hydrogen and fuel cells. A Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet that outlines current progress in key program goals.

212

Banquet Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Annual Banquet Program 5:30 pm Social Hour (Cash Bar) 6:30 pm Dinner 7:15 pm Program • Remarks & Introduction of Current Officers John ...

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program . If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

214

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program. If you need assistance with the DOE application, please e-mail SC.WDTS@science.doe.gov. For the Argonne Student Research Participation Program, apply only...

215

Complexity Science for Simpletons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we shall describe some of the most interesting topics in the subject of Complexity Science for a general audience. Anyone with a solid foundation in high school mathematics (with some calculus) and an elementary understanding of computer programming will be able to follow this article. First, we shall explain the significance of the P versus NP problem and solve it. Next, we shall describe two other famous mathematics problems, the Collatz 3n+1 Conjecture and the Riemann Hypothesis, and show how both Chaitin's incompleteness theorem and Wolfram's notion of "computational irreducibility" are important for understanding why no one has, as of yet, solved these two problems.

Craig Alan Feinstein

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 June 2008 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National...

217

Computational Energy Sciences Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Description Led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Research (AR) Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Program provides high-performance computational modeling and simulation resources to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and other programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These resources are dedicated to speeding development and reducing costs associated with advanced power system design and performance modeling. CES research is focused on developing a set of complex but flexible computational tools that allow more rapid and efficient scale-up of new subsystems, devices, and components, thereby reducing the need for large and expensive demonstration-scale testing of integrated energy systems,

218

ARM - Data Quality Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality Program Quality Program DQ Resources Data Quality Assessment and Control Report (PDF, 747KB) Data Quality Office Data Quality Problem Reporting (DQPR) Contact Us Submit Data Quality Findings Randy Peppler, Data Quality Manager Ken Kehoe, Data Quality Specialist Justin Monroe, Data Quality Specialist Adam Theisen, Data Quality Specialist Sean Moore, Data Quality Consultant Instrument and Site Contacts Instrument Mentors AAF Contacts AMF Contacts NSA Site Contacts SGP Site Contacts TWP Site Contacts Data Quality Program Introduction One of the goals of the ARM Climate Research Facility is to provide datastreams of quality suitable for scientific research. Maintaining data quality for an organization program of the size and complexity of the ARM Facility is a significant challenge; efforts toward this end have matured

219

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities Postdoctoral Programs Alumni Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Newcomers Assistance Office Postdoctoral Resources Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Contact Us Schedule of Career Development Seminars Organized by the Postdoctoral Office for 2011 Here is a schedule of all of our Career Development Seminars and Workshops! Normally, the events happen at lunchtime and food is provided. The topics of these events include: Journal Clubs Career Development Networking We welcome all of our Postdocs and colleagues to and join us! Wednesday January 19 Postdoc Journal Club and pizza lunch. Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory

220

The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVII : Effects of Ocean Covariates and Release Timing on First Ocean-Year Survival of Fall Chinook Salmon from Oregon and Washington Coastal Hatcheries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of oceanographic conditions, as well as effects of release-timing and release-size, on first ocean-year survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon were investigated by analyzing CWT release and recovery data from Oregon and Washington coastal hatcheries. Age-class strength was estimated using a multinomial probability likelihood which estimated first-year survival as a proportional hazards regression against ocean and release covariates. Weight-at-release and release-month were found to significantly effect first year survival (p < 0.05) and ocean effects were therefore estimated after adjusting for weight-at-release. Negative survival trend was modeled for sea surface temperature (SST) during 11 months of the year over the study period (1970-1992). Statistically significant negative survival trends (p < 0.05) were found for SST during April, June, November and December. Strong pairwise correlations (r > 0.6) between SST in April/June, April/November and April/December suggest the significant relationships were due to one underlying process. At higher latitudes (45{sup o} and 48{sup o}N), summer upwelling (June-August) showed positive survival trend with survival and fall (September-November) downwelling showed positive trend with survival, indicating early fall transition improved survival. At 45{sup o} and 48{sup o}, during spring, alternating survival trends with upwelling were observed between March and May, with negative trend occurring in March and May, and positive trend with survival occurring in April. In January, two distinct scenarios of improved survival were linked to upwelling conditions, indicated by (1) a significant linear model effect (p < 0.05) showing improved survival with increasing upwelling, and (2) significant bowl-shaped curvature (p < 0.05) of survival with upwelling. The interpretation of the effects is that there was (1) significantly improved survival when downwelling conditions shifted to upwelling conditions in January (i.e., early spring transition occurred, p < 0.05), (2) improved survival during strong downwelling conditions (Bakun units < -250). Survival decreased during weak downwelling conditions (Bakun units between -180 and -100). Strong to moderately strong correlations between January upwelling and April SST (r = 0.5), June SST (r = 0.6), and the North Pacific Index (NPI) of Aleutian Low strength (r > 0.7) suggest January is a period when important effects originate and play out over ensuing months. Significant inverse trend with survival (p < 0.05) was found for Bakun indices in December, indicating strong downwelling improved survival. Higher-than-average adult return rates were observed for cohorts from brood-years 1982-1983, strong El Nino years. Individual hatcheries were found to have unique age-class strength and age-at-return characteristics.

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers three of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME) and was completed by Oncorh Consulting as a contract deliverable to the Yakama Nation and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The YKFPME (Project Number 1995-063-25) is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation (Contract No. 00022449) and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract No. 22370). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME.

Knedsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pre-College Research Participation Program Summer 2013 Program Dates June 10, 2013 to August 2, 2013 precollege research student Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S....

223

Special Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... enrolled in our Kindergarten program, as well as students enrolled at Diamond Elementary School. Montgomery County Public Schools provide pick ...

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Program EHS 0243 Soldering Awareness Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: General Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 30 Minutes Medical...

225

From patterns to frameworks to parallel programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Object-oriented programming, design patterns, and frameworks are abstraction techniques that have been used to reduce the complexity of sequential programming. This paper describes our approach of applying these three techniques to the more difficult ... Keywords: design patterns, object-oriented frameworks, parallel programming systems

S. MacDonald; J. Anvik; S. Bromling; J. Schaeffer; D. Szafron; K. Tan

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Program structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A program is usually represented as a word chain. It is exactly a word chain that appears as the lexical analyzer output and is parsed. The work shows that a program can be syntactically represented as an oriented word tree, that is a syntactic program tree, program words being located both in tree nodes and on tree arrows. The basic property of a tree is that arrows starting from each node are marked by different words (including an empty word). Semantics can then be directly specified on such tree using either requirements or additional links, and adding instructions to some tree nodes enables program execution specification.

Shkotin, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

228

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

229

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and...

230

Facility Representative Program: Program Mission Statement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Program Information Program Mission Statement Program Directives and Guidance Facility Representative of the Year Award Program Facility Representative of the Year Award FR...

231

Metric Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST metric program encourages the use of the SI in all facets of education, including honing of worker skills. All Levels of Government. ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

233

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

234

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxycombustion Technology Research And The National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Sequestration Program Prof. Jost O.L. Wendt Honorary Session - Oxycombustion Of Coal III Salt...

235

Program Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Amounts reported to nearest $0.1M. 2. FEMA planned NEHRP budget includes program activities, excluding employee salaries & expenses (S&E). ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Postdoc Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for growth. Contact Postdoc Program Office Email New Initiative Los Alamos National Laboratory is pleased to announce our recent partnership with the University of California (UC)...

237

Training Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Program EHS 680 Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Training & Underground Storage Tank (UST) Facility Employee Training Course Syllabus Subject Category:...

238

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife project 'Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW)'. Results for the 2002 contract period: Objective 1 - Over 1 million juvenile salmon were coded-wire by this program (Table 1). This accounted for about 20% of the fish ODFW coded-wire tagged in 2002 for release in the Columbia Basin; Objective 2 - ODFW recovered and processed over 50,000 snouts collected from coded-wire tagged fish (Table 2); Objective 3 - The survival data summarized below includes results for coded-wire groups funded by this program as well as coded-wire groups funded from other sources; Objective 4 - The last returns of experimental groups of coho marked with VIE tags occurred in 2002 at Sandy Hatchery. This sampling showed that 26 of 67 jack coho and 1 of 2,223 adult coho VIE marked as juveniles retained the VIE mark as adults.

Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program

240

INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC REVIEW PANEL INDEPENDENT SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · identifying potential impacts on coded wire tag programs from regulations requiring mass marking of hatchery of the impacts of hatchery straying on natural populations. 4.2 Some large gaps in capacity to collect

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Programs in Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to the cleanup of sites that were once part of the Nation's nuclear weapons complex. Several of these sites are located close or adjacent to sovereign Tribal nations and impact Indian lands and/or resources. Consistent with the Department's American

242

Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the Department of Energy Complex OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ......

243

Conservation Program Update New conservation program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Program Update New conservation program > Conservation Stewardship Program (CSTP) The new Conservation Stewardship Program is available for all landowners. CSTP rules are still being developed. However, the program could pay farmers who are improving conservation treatment on their working

Netoff, Theoden

244

Programming network components using NetPebbles: an early report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network-centric application developer faces a number of challenges, including distributed program design, efficient remote object access, software reuse, and program deployment issues. This level of complexity hinders the developer's ability to focus ...

Ajay Mohindra; Apratim Purakayastha; Deborra Zukowski; Murthy Devarakonda

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effectively reasoning about infinite sets in answer set programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In answer set programming (ASP), one does not allow the use of function symbols. Disallowing function symbols avoids the problem of having logic programs which have stable models of excessively high complexity. For example, Marek, Nerode, and Remmel ...

Victor Marek; Jeffrey B. Remmel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hybrid programming model for implicit PDE simulations on multicore architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of programming modern multicore processor based clusters is rapidly rising, with GPUs adding further demand for fine-grained parallelism. This paper analyzes the performance of the hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) programming model in the context of ...

Dinesh Kaushik; David Keyes; Satish Balay; Barry Smith

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Program Understanding as Constraint Satisfaction: Representation and Reasoning Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of understanding a source code in a high-level programming language involves complex computation. Given a piece of legacy code and a library of program plan templates, understanding the code corresponds to building mappings from parts ...

Steven Woods; Qiang Yang

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC/EPRI weld residual stress (WRS) program currently consists of four phases, with each phase increasing in complexity from lab size specimens to ...

249

EERE Program Management Guide - About the Program Management Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Managers and their teams need to know what to do, how to do it, and why it needs to be done. User instructions help make EERE's program management processes and tools easier. The DOE and EERE Strategic Management System (SMS) provides a needed standard approach. Need for a Program Management "Operator's Guide" Program management is complex and difficult. It requires knowledge and discipline as well as a broad range of concepts, processes, and tools to be carried out effectively and efficiently. In the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) environment, many Program Managers and their teams bring to the job educational backgrounds and work experiences that are focused on science and technology. To complement that background they

250

Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and project activities. The DOE will be recognized as a...

251

CHRG Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Work Force Information Systems (WFIS): Acquisition Letter 2009-10, Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program - Friday, July 10, 2009 Acquisition Letter 2009-10, which provides informaiton and guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Contracting Officers pertaining to the DOE's Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program (DWMBP) and similar benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. read more ... Computer Account Registration Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 All computer users must complete this form whenever a change in multi-user system access is necessary. read more ... Computer Security Awareness Acknowledgement Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 Computer Security Rules of Behavior Office of Legacy Management read more ... Remote Access Procedures for Systems at Grand Junction - Monday, January 23, 2006

252

PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& DEVELOPMENT: & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Catalyst Layer Bipolar Plate Electrode Backing Layers INTEGRATED SYSTEMS Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Stack

253

Program Summaries  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Summaries Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Program Summaries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Bes Summaries 2012 thumbnail JPG .jpg file (469KB) Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for

254

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sponsor of terrorism' (as defined by the U.S. Department of State). These are currently Iran, Syria, Sudan, & Cuba. What is the acceptance rate for applicants? The program is...

255

SR Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Operations Office Art Programs banner SRS Strategic Plan 2011 - 2015 2010 Draft enterprise SRS Vision DOE-SR Workforce Restructuring Plan Fiscal Year 2013 DOE-SR...

256

Technical Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 11, 2008 ... program (High Amperage and Low Energy) was a successful assets ...... structures, fusion reactors, and heat management systems due to their ...... intensity, which have migrated from process innovation research to enterprise.

257

Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

258

Understanding LISP Programs: Towards a Programmer's Apprentice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several attempts have been made to produce tools which will help the programmer of complex computer systems. A new approach is proposed which integrates the programmer's intentions, the program code, and the comments, by ...

Rich, Charles

259

Complexity in Big History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spier, Fred. “How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

Spier, Fred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Object-oriented pattern-based parallel programming with automatically generated frameworks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CO2P3S parallel programming system uses design patterns and object-oriented programming to reduce the complexities of parallel programming. The system generates correct frameworks from pattern template specifications and provides ...

Steve MacDonald; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Outlier detection by logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of effective knowledge discovery techniques has become a very active research area in recent years due to the important impact it has had in several relevant application domains. One interesting task therein is that of singling out anomalous ... Keywords: Outlier detection, computational complexity, logic programming, nonmonotonic reasoning

Fabrizio Angiulli; Gianluigi Greco; Luigi Palopoli

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

264

NREL: Education Programs - Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Programs Teacher Programs Photo of a man and woman working together in a laboratory. They are both wearing safety glasses as they look at a small white box the man is holding. NREL promotes excellence in teaching and learning and contributes to improving critical elements of the science, mathematics, and technology education system. Teachers are offered research and development opportunities to enhance their content knowledge, instructional strategies, and leadership abilities. Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department

265

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

266

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

267

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program The program of the school focuses on the following areas: The fundamentals of the interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter X-ray and neutron production and experimental instrumentation Theory and practical application of various X-ray and neutron experimental techniques Hands on experience gained through experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Lectures are given by prominent scientists drawn from universities, several national laboratories, and industry. Subjects for lectures include: Interactions of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Neutron Generation and Detection Neutron Instrumentation X-ray Generation and Detection X-ray Instrumentation Single-Crystal and Surface Diffraction

268

Federal Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local government agencies are often the first places where homeowners seek financial assistance for mortgage relief. These requests come at a time when municipalities are facing increasing budgetary demands and diminishing revenues. With unemployment at an all time high and worsening economic conditions, the foreclosure crisis is not likely to abate in the near future. Due to the deep and spreading nationwide foreclosure crisis, Congress has enacted legislation that authorizes agencies in the federal government and national organizations to develop or expand programs to intervene and to assist borrowers by revising and guaranteeing loan agreements. Additionally, large financial institutions and banks are absorbing assets of failed entities and creating programs for homeowners to work out new loan terms. This document provides summaries of the major program offerings to borrowers by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development ( HUD), Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, NeighborWorks, large banks, and financial institutions that have clients nation-wide.

Hope For Homeowners Program

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Adding parallelism to visual data flow programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming in parallel is an error-prone and complex task compounded by the lack of tool support for both programming and debugging. Recent advances in compiler-directed shared memory APIs, such as OpenMP, have made shared-memory parallelism more widely ... Keywords: data flow, parallel, visual language

Philip Cox; Simon Gauvin; Andrew Rau-Chaplin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) Workbook II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and versatile EMTP computer program can help utilities analyze electromagnetic transients, which affect the design and operation of power systems. A workbook published in 1986 introduced basic EMTP concepts.To guide advanced users, EPRI and the EMTP Development Coordination Group cosponsored the preparation of three workbooks on complicated program applications.BackgroundStudies of electromagnetic transients were traditionally performed with special ...

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) Workbook IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and versatile EMTP computer program can help utilities analyze electromagnetic transients, which affect the design and operation of power systems. A workbook published in 1986 introduced basic EMTP concepts. To guide advanced users, EPRI and the EMTP Development Coordination Group cosponsored the preparation of three workbooks on complicated program applications.BackgroundStudies of electromagnetic transients were traditionally performed with special ...

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) Workbook III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex and versatile EMTP computer program can help utilities analyze electromagnetic transients, which affect the design and operation of power systems. A workbook published in 1986 introduced basic EMTP concepts.To guide advanced users, EPRI and the EMTP Development Coordination Group cosponsored the preparation of three workbooks on complicated program applications.BackgroundStudies of electromagnetic transients were traditionally performed with special ...

1989-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

273

Programming models for sensor networks: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensor networks have a significant potential in diverse applications some of which are already beginning to be deployed in areas such as environmental monitoring. As the application logic becomes more complex, programming difficulties are becoming a ... Keywords: Programming models and languages, survey, taxonomy

Ryo Sugihara; Rajesh K. Gupta

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Incentive Energy Incentive Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Energy Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs.

275

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

276

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and math principles that may include robots, reverse engineering, casting, crystal structures, forensic science, the effects of liquid nitrogen, slide rule, sound waves, electrostatics, mechanics, materials properties and materials

277

Property:ToolComplexity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ToolComplexity ToolComplexity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ToolComplexity Property Type Text Description Complexity, or ease of use, of tool/application Allows Values Simple;Moderate;Advanced;Not Available This is a property of type Text. Pages using the property "ToolComplexity" Showing 14 pages using this property. A Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool + Moderate Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + Advanced E Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model + Advanced Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) + Simple Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook + Advanced G Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database + Not Available

278

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plan for the Crystal Springs Fish hatchery and Programs for Snake River Chinook Salmon and Yellowstone for the proposed Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery (Project #2008-906-00, Crystal Springs Planning and Operations sponsor of the final costs associated with the entire Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery and associated support

279

NIST Performance Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Performance Management Program. Performance ... appraisal. APMS and FWS Performance Management Programs: ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Presidential Management Fellows Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presidential Management Fellows Program. Summary: About the Program: The Presidential Management Fellows (PMF ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An Observational and Prognostic Numerical Investigation of Complex Terrain Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain Program conducted a field experiment at the interface of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains in the winter of 1991. Extensive meteorological observations were taken in northeastern Colorado near ...

Gregory S. Poulos; James E. Bossert

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A probabilistic total system approach to the simulation of complex environmental systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GoldSim is a powerful and flexible Windows-based computer program for carrying out probabilistic simulations of complex systems to support management and decision-making in engineering, science and business. The program is highly graphical, highly extensible, ...

Rick Kossik; Ian Miller

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 June 2008 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 Site Office (YSO) and Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during March through May 2008. The ES&H inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Many aspects of the Y-12 ISM program are effective. For example, most work observed was performed using well written and technically accurate

285

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 September 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Summary Report The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during August and September 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. YSO and BWXT have established ISM systems that are conceptually sound. BWXT also has appropriate programs in place to ensure the functionality of the

286

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Complexity: A Guided Tour  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexity: A Guided Tour. Purpose: As science probes the nature of life, society, and technology ever more closely, what ...

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Deterministic Complexity and Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lempel and Ziv (1976) proposed a computable string production-complexity. In this paper, our emphasis is on providing the rigorous development, where possible, for the theoretical aspects of a more recent and contrasting measure of string complexity. ... Keywords: Formal languages, T-codes, complexity measures, entropy, generative systems, information, prefix codes

Mark R. Titchener; Radu Nicolescu; Ludwig Staiger; Aaron Gulliver; Ulrich Speidel

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Complex values in Smalltalk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distinguishing between stateful objects and Values has long been recognized as fruitful. Values are universal context free abstractions that prevent side-effects and allow for a functional programming style. Though object-oriented programming languages ... Keywords: Smalltalk, functional programming, refactoring, serialization, testability, value objects

Thomas J. Schrader; Christian Haider

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Academic Program: Undergraduate Studies General Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the skills necessary to do work at the university level. General #12;Academic Program: Undergraduate StudiesAcademic Program: Undergraduate Studies General Education Program Page 1 of 12 Governance & Policies Effective: June 2008 Academic Program: Undergraduate Studies GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Approved

Hardy, Christopher R.

291

Finite Neutrosophic Complex Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this book for the first time the authors introduce the notion of real neutrosophic complex numbers. Further the new notion of finite complex modulo integers is defined. For every $C(Z_n)$ the complex modulo integer $i_F$ is such that $2F_i = n - 1$. Several algebraic structures on $C(Z_n)$ are introduced and studied. Further the notion of complex neutrosophic modulo integers is introduced. Vector spaces and linear algebras are constructed using these neutrosophic complex modulo integers.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cognitive architectures: a way forward for the psychology of programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming language and library designers often debate the usability of particular design choices. These choices may impact many developers, yet scientific evidence for them is rarely provided. Cognitive models of program comprehension have existed ... Keywords: cognitive architectures, cognitive complexity, psychology of programming

Michael E. Hansen; Andrew Lumsdaine; Robert L. Goldstone

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Joint Degree Program in Social Work and Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Degree Program in Social Work and Law MSW and JD The complexity of current national debates and programs, and social work advocacy activities, including clinical practice, and the law. It is therefore work to remain in good standing and for graduation, the MSW Program follows the Graduate School

Peterson, Blake R.

294

Integrated demonstrations, integrated programs, and special programs within DOE`s Office of Technology Development  

SciTech Connect

This poster session presents information on integrated demonstrations, integrated programs, and special programs within the EM Office of Technology Development that will accelerate cleanup of sites within the Nuclear Weapons Complex. Presented topics include: Volatile organic compounds in soils and ground water, uranium in soils, underground storage tanks, mixed waste landfills, decontamination and decommissioning, in situ remediation, and separations technology.

Peterson, M.E.; Frank, C.; Stein, S.; Steele, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geospatial Science Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program June 21, 2011 - 3:50pm Addthis The overarching mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) is to discover solutions to power and secure America's future. DOE's Geospatial Science Program was established to optimize geospatial investments across our complex and to enable prudent stewardship of the resources provided by the American taxpayer. The term 'geospatial science' encompasses both the concepts of geographic information science and geographic information systems. Geographic information science is the study of spatially-referenced data, including geographic theory, technological design, and analytical algorithms. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are specialized software and hardware used to manage, manipulate, query, and

297

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Program Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy...

298

Facility Representative Program: Program Directives and Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative of the Year Award FR Program Assessment Guide (Appendix B, DOE STD 1063-2011) Program Directives and Guidance FR Program Standard, DOE STD 1063-2011,...

299

Fermilab Education - Graduate Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PhD Program Doctoral Fellowships The DOE Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE CSGF) program FermilabURA Thesis Awards Program The National GEM Consortium Fermilab...

300

STEM Education Program Inventory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issue for STEM Education Program Inventory Title of Program* Requestor Contact Information First Name* Last Name* Phone Number* E-mail* Fax Number Institution Name Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Education Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graduate Opportunities Education and Outreach Programs For Academia Home | Connect with ORNL | For Academia | Education and Outreach Programs SHARE Education Programs Visiting...

302

Federal Energy Management Program: Program Areas  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

program areas of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) focus on specific energy management actions to help Federal agencies deploy the available technologies appropriate...

303

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Federal Energy Management Program Search...

304

Remarks on complex bundles of complex structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider some classical fibre bundles furnished with almost complex structures of twistor type, deduce their integrability in some cases and study self-holomorphic sections of a symplectic twistor space, trying to approach the moduli space of $\\omega$-compatible complex structures. We recall the theory of flag manifolds in order to study the Siegel domain and other domains alike, which is the fibre of the referred twistor space. Finally the coordinates for the twistor of a Riemann surface with the canonical symplectic and metric connection are deduced, this time based on a given conformal coordinate on the surface.

Albuquerque, Rui

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Quantum Computational Complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article surveys quantum computational complexity, with a focus on three fundamental notions: polynomial-time quantum computations, the efficient verification of quantum proofs, and quantum interactive proof systems. Properties of quantum complexity classes based on these notions, such as BQP, QMA, and QIP, are presented. Other topics in quantum complexity, including quantum advice, space-bounded quantum computation, and bounded-depth quantum circuits, are also discussed.

John Watrous

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Program 050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental and Water Environmental and Water Resources MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM Background Mercury exists in trace amounts in fossil fuels (e.g., natural gas, coal), vegetation, crustal material, and waste products. Through combustion or natural processes, mercury vapor can be released to the atmosphere, where it can drift for a year or more, spreading with air currents over vast regions of the globe. Current estimates approximate that 5000 tons of mercury is released annually into the atmosphere from anthropogenic (man-made) and natural sources combined. Anthropogenic sources in the United States account for about 3 percent of the total annual global mercury releases, with U.S. power plants contributing about 1 percent of the world total. Mercury emissions have fallen in

307

HEET Program Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Studies Material Studies (Supported by DOE-NETL) Ceramic Insulation Top Coat provides: thermal insulation Superalloy Substrate (Carries the load) TBC System Cooling Air Gas Path C o o l i n g H o l e Metallic Bond Coat provides: - oxidation/corrosion protection - surface for ceramic to adhere to Contents * Introduction * NETL Programs * Materials Development Issues * Required important research tasks * TBC Architecture * Industry Views * TBC Monitoring * TBC Performance Introduction Improved gas turbines demand materials that operate in high hostile environment. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide solution for meeting such a demand. The TBCs have the most complex structure with a minimum of four layers made of different materials with specific properties and functions. They are the substrate, the bond-

308

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect

Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 During the early days of World War II, fear that Germany would create and use an atomic bomb led the U.S. to secretly launch the Manhattan Project to build one first....

310

Physics of Complex Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Physics of complex plasmas is a wide and varied field. In the context of this PhD thesis I present the major results from my research… (more)

Sütterlin, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Complexity in Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We will review some of the theoretical progresses that have been in the study of complex systems in physics and of their applications to biology.

Giorgio Parisi

1994-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral...

313

Recent Graduate Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have recently graduated from qualifying educational institutions or programs. ... 40 hours of formal, interactive training each year of the program. ...

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Three-dimensional visualization of reactive flows in complex geometries  

SciTech Connect

The visualization of fluid flows has become more challenging, as recent advancements in computational methods have increased the complexity and size of simulations. Our objective is to develop a flexible flow visualization tool for fluid simulations that include the full physics and geometrical complexities found in modeling practical combustion systems, such as internal combustion engines. The challenges to flow visualization come from: (1) the large simulation output, especially when using massively parallel computers; (2) the increasingly complex geometries that include moving surfaces such as pistons and valves; (3) the complex physical phenomena in realistic problems of fuel injection, combustion fronts, boundary flows, and large scale turbulence; and (4) the numerical complexity of indirect addressing of computational elements, variable mesh connectivity, distorted elements, and moving meshes. We have developed a visualization program that addresses these complexities. The program was developed as a post-processor to the KIVA family of codes for reactive flow simulations. Because of the complexity of the KIVA codes, the visualization program is very versatile and applicable to any code with meshes of arbitrary hexahedrons. No comparable commercial visualization package could be found. To visualize the fluid flow, we use mass-less tracer particles that follow the movement of the fluid as determined from output files from the simulation. The movement of the tracer particles is based on a second-order spatial and temporal interpolation of the fluid velocities from successive simulation output files. The visualization program runs on a Silicon Graphics IRIS GTX workstation.

Fairfield, M.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

316

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 February 2008 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight inspected the emergency management program at DOE's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October-November 2007. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63). Independent Oversight reports to the Chief, Office of Health, Safety and Security, who reports directly to the Secretary of Energy. This 2007 inspection found that YSO and B&W Y-12 have established an emergency management program that generally protects site workers and the

317

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title OK-TRIBE-ABSENTEE-SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- ABSENTEE- SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma proposes to retrofit systems and facilities in their complex to

318

Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

Kass, J

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Summer Internship Programs | Office of Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Summer Internship Programs BNL Summer Internship Programs Please note: All DOE programs have strict deadlines. Please contact the Office of Educational Programs for this information. Mentor Orientation Please review the following documents that are part of the Mentor Orientation: Mentor Manual New Appointment Checklist SULI Syllabus CCI Syllabus VFP Syllabus DOE Internship Programs DOE Program Forms & Information DOE summer programs include Community College Institute (CCI), Science Undergraduate Summer Internship (SULI) and Visiting Faculty Program (VFP). DOE Summer Internship Programs Important Dates January 31st - 1st round of student applications available for viewing February 23rd - 2nd round of student applications available for viewing March 12th - Last day for accepting DOE student request

320

Intergovernmental Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intergovernmental Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs The Office of Environmental Management supports, by means of grants and cooperative agreements, a number of institutionalized activities and relationships with various national intergovernmental organizations. These organizations include the Energy Communities Alliance, the Environmental Council of States, the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Governors Association, and the National Conference of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oak Ridge callibration recall program  

SciTech Connect

A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pritchard, E.W. [Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology, TN (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Office of Educational Programs | Student Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Contests for Students and Contests for Students Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program (OEP) InSynC (OEP) New York State Collegiate Science & Technology Entry Program Mini-Course (CSTEP) (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program (Postdoc) AGEP-T FRAME (Research - HSRP) High School Research Program

323

Office of Educational Programs | Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specifically Geared for Teachers Specifically Geared for Teachers Displaying all programs and contests suitable for teachers and faculty. [ Update Search Criteria ] (OEP) InSynC (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program Other Educational Programs Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program

324

A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect

Applied mathematics has an important role to play in developing the tools needed for the analysis, simulation, and optimization of complex problems. These efforts require the development of the mathematical foundations for scientific discovery, engineering design, and risk analysis based on a sound integrated approach for the understanding of complex systems. However, maximizing the impact of applied mathematics on these challenges requires a novel perspective on approaching the mathematical enterprise. Previous reports that have surveyed the DOE's research needs in applied mathematics have played a key role in defining research directions with the community. Although these reports have had significant impact, accurately assessing current research needs requires an evaluation of today's challenges against the backdrop of recent advances in applied mathematics and computing. To address these needs, the DOE Applied Mathematics Program sponsored a Workshop for Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems on September 13-14, 2011. The workshop had approximately 50 participants from both the national labs and academia. The goal of the workshop was to identify new research areas in applied mathematics that will complement and enhance the existing DOE ASCR Applied Mathematics Program efforts that are needed to address problems associated with complex systems. This report describes recommendations from the workshop and subsequent analysis of the workshop findings by the organizing committee.

Alexander, F.; Anitescu, M.; Bell, J.; Brown, D.; Ferris, M.; Luskin, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Moser, B.; Pinar, A.; Tartakovsky, A.; Willcox, K.; Wright, S.; Zavala, V.

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Multifaceted Mathematical Approach for Complex Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied mathematics has an important role to play in developing the tools needed for the analysis, simulation, and optimization of complex problems. These efforts require the development of the mathematical foundations for scientific discovery, engineering design, and risk analysis based on a sound integrated approach for the understanding of complex systems. However, maximizing the impact of applied mathematics on these challenges requires a novel perspective on approaching the mathematical enterprise. Previous reports that have surveyed the DOE?s research needs in applied mathematics have played a key role in defining research directions with the community. Although these reports have had significant impact, accurately assessing current research needs requires an evaluation of today?s challenges against the backdrop of recent advances in applied mathematics and computing. To address these needs, the DOE Applied Mathematics Program sponsored a Workshop for Mathematics for the Analysis, Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems on September 13?14, 2011. The workshop had approximately 50 participants from both the national labs and academia. The goal of the workshop was to identify new research areas in applied mathematics that will complement and enhance the existing DOE ASCR Applied Mathematics Program efforts that are needed to address problems associated with complex systems. This report describes recommendations from the workshop and subsequent analysis of the workshop findings by the organizing committee.

Alexander, F.; Anitescu, M.; Bell, J.; Brown, D.; Ferris, M.; Luskin, M.; Mehrotra, S.; Moser, B.; Pinar, A.; Tartakovsky, A.; Willcox, K.; Wright, S.; Zavala, V.

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Microsoft Word - ROD_031610.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Record of Decision March 2010 Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund the Proposed Action of the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program (hatchery program) as described in the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0384, November 2009). The Proposed Action, which was recommended for BPA funding by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), is in the Columbia Cascade ecological province of Washington State. BPA prepared the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program EIS and this Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the process specified in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA, P.L. 91-190), regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (40 CFR Part 1505), and Implementing

327

Program Development Tools and Infrastructures  

SciTech Connect

Exascale class machines will exhibit a new level of complexity: they will feature an unprecedented number of cores and threads, will most likely be heterogeneous and deeply hierarchical, and offer a range of new hardware techniques (such as speculative threading, transactional memory, programmable prefetching, and programmable accelerators), which all have to be utilized for an application to realize the full potential of the machine. Additionally, users will be faced with less memory per core, fixed total power budgets, and sharply reduced MTBFs. At the same time, it is expected that the complexity of applications will rise sharply for exascale systems, both to implement new science possible at exascale and to exploit the new hardware features necessary to achieve exascale performance. This is particularly true for many of the NNSA codes, which are large and often highly complex integrated simulation codes that push the limits of everything in the system including language features. To overcome these limitations and to enable users to reach exascale performance, users will expect a new generation of tools that address the bottlenecks of exascale machines, that work seamlessly with the (set of) programming models on the target machines, that scale with the machine, that provide automatic analysis capabilities, and that are flexible and modular enough to overcome the complexities and changing demands of the exascale architectures. Further, any tool must be robust enough to handle the complexity of large integrated codes while keeping the user's learning curve low. With the ASC program, in particular the CSSE (Computational Systems and Software Engineering) and CCE (Common Compute Environment) projects, we are working towards a new generation of tools that fulfill these requirements and that provide our users as well as the larger HPC community with the necessary tools, techniques, and methodologies required to make exascale performance a reality.

Schulz, M

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, 1995-2002 Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde Basin once supported large runs of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and estimated peak escapements in excess of 10,000 occurred as recently as the late 1950's (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 1975). Natural escapement declines in the Grande Ronde Basin have been severe and parallel those of other Snake River populations. Reduced productivity has primarily been attributed to increased mortality associated with downstream and upstream migration past eight dams and reservoirs in the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reduced spawner numbers, combined with human manipulation of previously important spawning and rearing habitat in the Grande Ronde Basin, have resulted in decreased spawning distribution and population fragmentation of chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde Basin (Figure 1; Table 1). Escapement of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin included 1,799 adults in 1995, less than half of the previous record low of 3,913 adults in 1994. Catherine Creek, Grande Ronde River and Lostine River were historically three of the most productive populations in the Grande Ronde Basin (Carmichael and Boyce 1986). However, productivity of these populations has been poor for recent brood years. Escapement (based on total redd counts) in Catherine Creek and Grande Ronde and Lostine rivers dropped to alarmingly low levels in 1994 and 1995. A total of 11, 3 and 16 redds were observed in 1994 in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River, respectively, and 14, 6 and 11 redds were observed in those same streams in 1995. In contrast, the maximum number of redds observed in the past was 505 in Catherine Creek (1971), 304 in the Grande Ronde River (1968) and 261 in 1956 in the Lostine River (Tranquilli et al 2003). Redd counts for index count areas (a standardized portion of the total stream) have also decreased dramatically for most Grande Ronde Basin streams from 1964-2002, dropping to as low as 37 redds in the 119.5 km in the index survey areas in 1995 from as high as 1,205 redds in the same area in 1969 (Table 1). All streams reached low points (0-6 redds in the index areas) in the 1990's, except those in which no redds were found for several years and surveys were discontinued, such as Spring, Sheep and Indian creeks which had a total of 109 redds in 1969. The Minam and Wenaha rivers are tributaries of the Grande Ronde River located primarily in wilderness areas. Chinook salmon numbers in these two streams (based on redd counts) also decreased dramatically beginning in the early 1970's (Table 1). Since then there have been a few years of increasing numbers of redds but counts have generally been 25-40% of the number seen in the 1960's. No hatchery fish have been released into either of these streams and we monitor them during spawning ground surveys for the presence of hatchery strays. These populations will be used as a type of control for evaluating our supplementation efforts in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River. In this way, we can attempt to filter out the effects of downstream variables, over which we have no control, when we interpret the results of the captive broodstock program as the F1 and F2 generations spawn and complete their life cycles in the wild. The Grande Ronde Basin Captive Broodstock Program was initiated because these chinook salmon populations had reached critical levels where dramatic and unprecedented efforts were needed to prevent extinction and preserve any future options for use of endemic fish for artificial propagation programs for recovery and mitigation. This program was designed to quickly increase numbers of returning adults, while maintaining the genetic integrity of each endemic population.

Hoffnagle, Timothy; Carmichael, Richard; Noll, William

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Undergraduate Student Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Student Program The Undergraduate Student (UGS) program is a year-round educational program that provides students with relevant research experience while they are pursuing an undergraduate degree. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 663-5621 Email Program Coordinator Brenda Montoya Student Programs (505) 663-5116 Email Deadline for continuing and returning students: you are required to submit updated transcripts to the program office by 2/28 each year. Get relevant experience while pursuing undergraduate degree The Undergraduate Student (UGS) Program offers summer, part-time, and full-time appointments for undergraduate students. The program is a year-round educational program that provides students with

330

6.001 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of complexity in large programming systems. Building abstractions: computational processes; higher-order procedures; compound data; and data abstractions. Controlling interactions: generic operations; self-describing ...

Grimson, Eric

331

Managing Complexity: Disease Control as a Complex Adaptive System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in computer and communications technologies are enabling increased globalization and integration of enterprises, and corresponding increases of enterprise complexity.ï¾ ï¾ This article addresses management of this complexity using a complex adaptive ... Keywords: complex adaptive systems, disease control, strategic management, complexity, system models

William B. Rouse

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Computational complexity since 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field of computational complexity is reaching what could be termed middle age, with over forty years having passed since the first papers defining the discipline. With this metaphor in mind, the early nineteeneighties represented the end of adolescence ...

Russell Impagliazzo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Repairing structurally complex data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel algorithm for repairing structurally complex data. Given an assertion that represents desired structural integrity constraints and a structure that violates them, the algorithm performs repair actions that mutate the given structure ...

Sarfraz Khurshid; Iván García; Yuk Lai Suen

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Complex System Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

Magee, Christopher

2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 Federal Register 67 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2013 / Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b) the USAF Heritage Program the means with which to select respondents pursuant to the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. The primary use of the information collection includes the evaluation and placement of respondents within the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. Affected Public: Business or other for profit; Not-for-profit Institutions. Annual Burden Hours: 49.5. Number of Respondents: 198. Responses per Respondent: 1. Average Burden per Response: 15 minutes. Frequency: On occasion. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Summary of Information Collection Respondents are individuals expressing an interest in participating in the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer

336

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

337

University Research Consortium annual review meeting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Robotics crosscutting program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for cleaning up the legacy of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste at contaminated sites and facilities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex, preventing further environmental contamination, and instituting responsible environmental management. Initial efforts to achieve this mission resulted in the establishment of environmental restoration and waste management programs. However, as EM began to execute its responsibilities, decision makers became aware that the complexity and magnitude of this mission could not be achieved efficiently, affordably, safely, or reasonably with existing technology. Once the need for advanced cleanup technologies became evident, EM established an aggressive, innovative program of applied research and technology development. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established in November 1989 to advance new and improved environmental restoration and waste management technologies that would reduce risks to workers, the public, and the environment; reduce cleanup costs; and devise methods to correct cleanup problems that currently have no solutions. In 1996, OTD added two new responsibilities - management of a Congressionally mandated environmental science program and development of risk policy, requirements, and guidance. OTD was renamed the Office of Science and Technology (OST). This documents presents information concerning robotics tank waste retrieval overview, robotic chemical analysis automation, robotics decontamination and dismantlement, and robotics crosscutting and advanced technology.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A CMOS Current-Mode Dynamic Programming Circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic programming (DP) is a fundamental algorithm for complex optimization and decision-making in many engineering and biomedical systems. However, conventional DP computation based on digital implementation of the ...

Mak, Terrence

340

Using Evolutionary Programming to Generate Skillful Extreme Value Probabilistic Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for producing large member ensemble forecasts, using a variation of Evolutionary Programming (EP), is presented. A series of increasingly complex datasets are used to demonstrate the method and its potential utility. First, EP ...

Paul J. Roebber

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Using Evolutionary Programming to Generate Skillful Extreme Value Probabilistic Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for producing large member ensemble forecasts, using a variation of evolutionary programming (EP), is presented. A series of increasingly complex datasets are used to demonstrate the method and its potential utility. First, EP ...

Paul J. Roebber

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy Technology Programs: program summaries for 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Technology Programs in the BNL Department of Energy and Environment cover a broad range of activities, namely: electrochemical research, chemical energy storage, chemical heat pumps, solar technology, fossil technology, catalytic systems development, space-conditioning technology, and technical support/program management. Summaries of the individual tasks associated with these activities along with publications, significant accomplishments, and program funding levels are presented.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Invariant based programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Program verification is usually done by adding specifications and invariants to the program and then proving that the verification conditions are all true. This makes program verification an alternative to or a complement to testing. We study here an ...

Ralph-Johan Back

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Y-12 Apprentice Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apprentice Program Over the years Y-12 has produced numerous training programs. Many of them have been developed at Y-12 to meet special needs. The training programs have ranged...

345

Verifying Interactive Web Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web programs are important, increasingly representing the primary public interfaces of commercial organizations. Unfortunately, Web programs also exhibit numerous flaws. In addition to the usual correctness problems faced by software, Web programs must ...

Daniel R. Licata; Shriram Krishnamurthi

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Condensate Filter Demineralizer Performance Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upgrading condensate filter demineralizer (CFD) performance poses a complex, challenging utility task. This report summarizes the major factors that impact CFD performance and defines a comprehensive improvement program. In specific, the report discusses hardware, filter media, and operating practices, describing each area in terms of the underlying technology, approach to optimization, and utility experience.

1997-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 November 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an emergency management program review at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October 2001. The purpose of this inspection was to assess Y-12's readiness to protect site personnel and the public from the consequences of onsite events that could result in the release of hazardous materials from site facilities and activities. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume

348

Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex's primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons components, secure storage of special nuclear material (SNM), and various other nuclear weapons-related activities. Other activities include various aspects of testing and development, nonproliferation, and technology transfer. Enforcement June 13, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Babcock & Wilcox Teclmical Services Y -12, LLC - NEA-2008-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC, related to a Uranium Chip Fire at the Y-12 National

349

Hydrogen Program Overview  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: “Why Hydrogen?”

350

NREL: Education Programs - About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Programs Photo graphic representation of NREL Education Programs. NREL believes renewable energy and energy efficiency R&D is only part of the new energy future equation....

351

Hydropower Program Technology Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM - Energy  

75 vehicle technologies program ed wall, program manager ed.wall@ee.doe.gov (202) 586-8055 venture capital technology showcase aug 21 and 22, 2007

353

NREL: Education Programs - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education Programs News Below are news stories involving NREL Education Programs. August 26, 2013 Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies This case study look at the project...

354

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program: Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. AS GU MP PR VI State: Select one... Alaska Alabama Arkansas American Samoa Arizona California Colorado...

355

Intern Programs | PARTI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics of Accelerators and Related Technology for International Students (PARTI) About Apply Visa Info For Current Interns Program Description Fermilab's PARTI program offers...

356

Graduate Research Assistant Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students Graduate Program Graduate Research Assistant Program Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in...

357

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

View Supports functional genomics, user data deposition andJGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 DOE Jointof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: Igor

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

JGI Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JGI Fungal Genomics Program Igor V. Grigoriev 1 Lawrenceof California. JGI Fungal Genomics Program Contact: IgorJGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi,

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Renewable Energy Loan Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Loan Programs Title Renewable Energy Loan Programs Publication Type Case Study Year of Publication 2002 Authors Bolinger, Mark, and Kevin Porter Secondary Title...

360

Early Career Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Early Career Research Program Early Career Research Program Overview Divisional Points of Contact Office of Science Early Career Website Important Dates Links and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydridomethyl iridium complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Program Areas | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Initiatives Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program...

363

EIS-0340: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0340: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement NE Oregon Hatchery Program:...

364

Program Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management Program Management Safety The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) top priority is to ensure proper implementation and continuous improvement of Integrated Safety Management Systems (ISMS) in the EM complex and to serve as a focal point for EM safety standards and policy development and interpretation and interfaces with internal/external oversight organizations Read more Acquisition The Office of Environmental Management strives to assure effective project, acquisition, and contract management, by working closely with senior level officials in Headquarters and Field Managers; external stakeholders; and major contractors for the purpose of achieving acquisition and project management objectives of the Office of Environmental Management (EM)

365

Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Office of Corporate Safety Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Corporate Safety Program (CSP) CSP Home Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) DOE Analytical Services Program (ASP) DOE Laboratory...

367

The Lillehammer Submarine Fan Complex.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The Lillehammer Submarine Fan Complex is a mixed mud/sand rich turbidite fan system. The fan complex was deposited in the Neoproterozoic Hedmark rift basin… (more)

Skaten, Maren Kristin Møllerup

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

Raymond, Kenneth N. (Berkeley, CA); Corneillie, Todd M. (Campbell, CA); Xu, Jide (Berkeley, CA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Alternative Loan Program (Missouri) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Program Information Missouri Program Type Loan Program The Missouri...

370

Usable live programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programming today involves code editing mixed with bouts of debugging to get feedback on code execution. For programming to be more fluid, editing and debugging should occur concurrently as live programming. This paper describes how live execution ... Keywords: debugging, live programming

Sean McDirmid

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

FMOC Standards Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer Facilities Management and Operations Center (FMOC) Standards Program (removed) Sandia Home...

372

OSHWPP model programs guide  

SciTech Connect

Descriptions of model occupational health and safety programs implemented at DOE facilities are presented.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

4SIGHT Computer Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The 4SIGHT computer program was written to facilitate concrete performance prediction under various exposure conditions. ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Typing constraint logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a prescriptive type system with parametric polymorphism and subtyping for constraint logic programs. The aim of this type system is to detect programming errors statically. It introduces a type discipline for constraint logic programs and ... Keywords: Constraint logic programming, Metaprogramming, Prolog, subtyping, type systems

François Fages; Emmanuel Coquery

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Complex Structures in Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we show that the basic external (i.e. not determined by the equations) object in Classical electrodynamics equations is a complex structure. In the 3-dimensional standard form of Maxwell equations this complex structure $\\mathcal{I}$ participates implicitly in the equations and its presence is responsible for the so called duality invariance. We give a new form of the equations showing explicitly the participation of $\\mathcal{I}$. In the 4-dimensional formulation the complex structure is extracted directly from the equations, it appears as a linear map $\\Phi$ in the space of 2-forms on $\\mathbb{R}^4$. It is shown also that $\\Phi$ may appear through the equivariance properties of the new formulation of the theory. Further we show how this complex structure $\\Phi$ combines with the Poincare isomorphism $\\mathfrak{P}$ between the 2-forms and 2-tensors to generate all well known and used in the theory (pseudo)metric constructions on $\\mathbb{R}^4$, and to define the conformal symmetry properties. The equations of Extended Electrodynamics (EED) do not also need these pseudometrics as beforehand necessary structures. A new formulation of the EED equations in terms of a generalized Lie derivative is given.

Stoil Donev

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Harnessing complexity in CSCW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We argue that socio-technical systems can be understood as complex adaptive systems, that is, systems containing component sub-systems interacting such that they co-evolve This viewpoint may allow us to understand more clearly the factors that underlie ...

Simon Kaplan; Lesley Seebeck

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

514 514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y DOE/FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Offi

378

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

379

Program Change Management During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project, which involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As plants meet certain project Milestones, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This report provides information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Facility Representative Program: Program Performance Indicators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Performance Indicators DOE Corporate Reporting Data (ORPS, CAIRS, Others) Facility Representative Performance Indicator Guidance -- Appendix A in DOE-STD-1063-2011,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Postdoctoral Program Program Description The Postdoctoral (Postdoc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program offers the opportunity for appointees to perform research in a robust scientific R&D environment, present and publish research, advance knowledge in basic and applied...

382

External > Programs > Supporting Activities > Diversity Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORO Diversity Programs & Employee Concerns Office Welcome The Oak Ridge Office is a recognized leader in developing and sustaining a high performing, diverse workforce. Reasonable...

383

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of a teepee and a wind turbine. Turbine installed at the Rosebud Sioux Reservation in South Dakota Credit: Intertribal Council on Utility Policy Corporation The program...

384

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Quantum Complexity and Fundamental Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum Complexity and Fundamental Physics. Scott Aaronson Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Define 2: Define Finance Program Objectives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives

387

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Offers Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

388

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Design : Design the Financing Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives Identify & Engage Financial Partners

389

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

390

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

Lee, S

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Staff Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division Melissa Jones Executive Director The California

395

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Final Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION RENEWABLES COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Vice Chair Presiding Member Robert B. Weisenmiller, Ph.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy

396

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK Committee Draft Guidebook Third Edition COMMISSION RENEWABLES COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Vice Chair Presiding Member Robert B. Weisenmiller, Ph.D. Commissioner Associate Member Kate Zocchetti Project Manager Tony Gonçalves Office Manager Renewable Energy

397

Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Policy Fellowship Program About the Program This two-year fellowship at the IDA Science recipients to gain science and technology policy experience. Policy research will focus on areas research for leaders in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office

Sibille, Etienne

398

TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TF Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. The general logic and strategy of the program to achieve its objectives is shown on Fig. 1-1. Five prior programs form the basis for the TFE Verification Program: (1) AEC/NASA program of the 1960s and early 1970; (2) SP-100 concept development program;(3) SP-100 thermionic technology program; (4) Thermionic irradiations program in TRIGA in FY-86; (5) and Thermionic Technology Program in 1986 and 1987. 18 refs., 64 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Complex fission phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined.

D. N. Poenaru; R. A. Gherghescu; W. Greiner

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

400

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first three years of this study were used to collect pre-hatchery baseline data on the fishery. The Spokane Tribal Hatchery began stocking kokanee and rainbow trout in 1991 and Sherman Creek Hatchery began stocking by 1992. The estimated number of kokanee (13,986) harvested in 1993 was similar to harvest numbers in the previous years, but the number of rainbow trout (403,277) and walleye (337,413) harvested doubled from estimates made in past years. The stocking of yearling kokanee began in1992, totaling approximately 140,000 yearlings. The yearlings were not expected to begin entering the creel until 1993 with the main harvest in 1994. As a result, it was too early to speculate on the effect of stocking yearlings instead of fry on the creel. The 1993 rainbow trout harvest escalated. The increased number of walleye harvested was believed to be from the increased angler pressure. Kokanee salmon and rainbow trout growth appeared to be similar to previous years. The growth of walleye was less than in year past, but the average size of walleye in the creel increased. The feeding habits of kokanee, rainbow trout and walleye in 1993 were similar to previous years.

Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

402

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentive Programs Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs. FEMP's Energy Incentive Program helps Federal agencies take advantage of these incentives by providing information about the funding-program opportunities available in each state. Find Funding Click on a state or choose a one from the menu to see a summary of available energy incentives. Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

403

PNNL EERE Program: Building Technologies Program (Overview)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Home Program Areas Contacts Related Sites Energy Directorate PNNL Home Security & Privacy PNNL Buildings Program Overview PNNL Buildings Portfolio Science Foundation EE & Demand Response High-Performance Sustainable Design Codes and Standards Overcoming Market Barriers Analysis and Planning Key Buildings Projects Contacts Publications & Presentations PNNL Buildings Program Buildings account for about 40 percent of our nation's energy use. That's 72 percent of U.S. electricity and 55 percent of natural gas, resulting in 39 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions and a range of other negative environmental impacts. The buildings sciences team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is committed to dramatically improving the

404

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in March-April 2003. The inspection was performed by OA's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Overall, YSO and BWXT have established a generally effective ISM program. YSO and BWXT management have demonstrated their commitment to continuous improvement and have effective tools and process enhancements to address

405

A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nuclear family "A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex" is a four episode

406

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex July 1, 2010 - 10:11am Addthis What does this project do? This nonprofit weatherized a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. The weatherization program of the Rural Nevada Development Corporation (RNDC) reached a recent success in its eleven counties-wide territory. In June, the nonprofit finished weatherizing a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. "That is one big savings and is why I am proud of this project," says Dru Simerson, RNDC Weatherization Manager. RNDC's crew replaced all windows and 17 furnaces and installed floor

407

Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - June Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 June 2011 Site Lead Orientation Visit to the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex [HIAR-Y-12-2011-06-23] The purposes of the visit were to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, initiate the site lead program, increase operational awareness of the site's activities, and discuss methods the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) uses to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Oak Ridge Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public

408

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule brood fall chinook were caught primarily in the British Columbia, Washington and northern Oregon ocean commercial fisheries. The up-river bright fall chinook contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Contribution of Rogue fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River system occurred primarily in the Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries Willamette spring chinook salmon contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Restricted ocean sport and commercial fisheries limited contribution of the Columbia coho released in the Umatilla River that survived at an average rate of 1.05% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. The 1987 to 1991 brood years of coho released in the Yakima River survived at an average rate of 0.64% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery, disease, density, diet and size and time of release, but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are controlled by large scale weather patterns such as El Nino over which man has no influence. Man could have some influence over river flow conditions, but political and economic pressures generally out weigh the biological needs of the fish.

Garrison, Robert L.; Mallette, Christine; Lewis, Mark A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

410

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Structure to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements

411

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

412

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

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