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1

EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington 4: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington EIS-0424: Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts from DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to assist with funding the construction, operation, and maintenance of modifications to the Klickitat Hatchery and the Yakama Nation's Hatchery Complex Program that intend to aid populations of anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams. The proposed action could include support for modifications to the existing hatchery, a new hatchery/acclimation facility in Wahkiacus, Washington, and an acclimation facility at McCreedy Creek in Yakima County, Washington. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

2

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0384 May 2007 Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Title of Proposed Project: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Cooperating Tribe: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation State Involved: Washington Abstract: The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) describes a Chinook salmon hatchery production program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). BPA proposes to fund the construction, operation and maintenance of the program to help mitigate for anadromous fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Colville Tribes want to produce adequate

3

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joseph Hatchery Program Joseph Hatchery Program Draft EIS S-1 SUMMARY Purpose and Need The Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC, www.nwcouncil.org) recommended that the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) study and consider funding a Chinook salmon production program and hatchery proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Tribes). The proposal intends to increase returns of adult summer/fall Chinook by raising and releasing juvenile fish in the waters of the Okanogan River, and in the Columbia River below Chief Joseph Dam and above its confluence with the Okanogan River. The proposed program would construct, operate and maintain a hatchery below the Chief Joseph Dam on the Columbia River and several fish acclimation and release ponds on the Okanogan River and Omak

4

EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

5

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde … Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration July 2004 Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program -- Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Project i Table of Contents Page Chapter 1: Updated Summary and Project Description 1.1 Introduction..............................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Purpose and Need for the Proposed Action .............................................................1-2 1.3 Decisions to be Made and Responsible Officials ....................................................1-3 1.4 Summary of Public Involvement, Consultation, and Coordination.........................1-3

6

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental...

7

EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham 13: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho EA-1913: Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) to modify existing facilities at the Springfield Hatchery, located in Bingham County, Idaho. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Mitigation Action Plan Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Project, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Finding of No Significant Impact Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho May 3, 2012 EA-1913: Final Environmental Assessment

8

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; 495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin. Additional information is available at the project website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/WallaWallaHatchery/. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILALE FOR DOWNLOAD March 28, 2013 EIS-0495: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

9

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.  

SciTech Connect

This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin.

17

EIS-0500: Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer, and Lemhi Counties, Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOEs Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EIS that will assess potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho to construct and operate a hatchery for spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Salmon River subbasin and Yellowstone cutthroat trout in the Upper Snake River subbasin on Fort Hall Reservation.

18

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

20

Final Environmental Impact Statement Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program (DOE/EIS-0213)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Naturally-reproducing salmon are adult fish that spawn in a stream or river. Wild salmon are defined in this document as fish that have not spent any part of their life history in an artificial environment, and are the progeny of naturally- reproducing salmon regardless of parentage. For example, the progeny of hatchery fish that have been raised in the wild are considered wild. This distinction is made so that spring chinook in the Clearwater can be defined as wild. Ü For Your Information * The Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Comparison of Alternatives and Impacts This summary gives the major points of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1901: Kootenai River White Sturgeon and Burbot Hatcheries Project, Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to support the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho's construction of a new hatchery on property owned by the Tribe at the confluence of the Moyie and Kootenai Rivers, approximately eight miles upstream from Bonners Ferry, Idaho. The proposed location of the new hatchery facility is currently the site of the Twin Rivers Canyon Resort. Website for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Native Fish Aquaculture Program: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Kootenai_Aquaculture_Program/

25

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Umatilla Hatchery Final Predesign Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the preliminary design of Umatilla Fish Hatchery near Irrigon, Oregon. The fish hatchery will be capable of rearing steelhead and chinook with an initial capacity of 290,000 pounds. Future expansion will allow for a total capacity of 500,000 pounds if the initial production goals are met. The hatchery will consist of both Oregon and Michigan style ponds. The Oregon ponds are similar to those at Irrigon. The Michigan ponds are more narrow and shallow, are self cleaning, and use oxygen supplementation to obtain higher rearing densities as is currently being done in the state of Michigan. The Oregon ponds are a two-pass system with the capability to convert to Michigan style ponds, if this mode of operation proves to be an effective method in the west. The Michigan ponds are three-pass with the capability to expand to four-pass.

Unknown Author

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

DOE/EIS-0340; Grand Ronde … Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 NORTHEAST OREGON HATCHERY PROGRAM GRANDE RONDE - IMNAHA SPRING CHINOOK HATCHERY PROJECT DOE/EIS-0340 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0340) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Federal Agencies: U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Cooperating Tribes: Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Cooperating State Agencies: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)

29

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

31

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

REPORT A: UMATILLA HATCHERY MONITORING AND EVALUATION--This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for 1 November, 1999 to 31 October, 2002. Studies at UFH are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated along with the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring at UFH are mandatory. An experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. An evaluation of survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared at three densities will be completed with final returns in 2005. Two new evaluations were started during this reporting period. The first is an evaluation of spring chinook survival of groups transferred to Imeques acclimation facility in the fall, overwinter-acclimated and released with the standard acclimated production groups in March. The second is an evaluation of subyearling fall chinook survival and straying of a direct-stream released group in the lower Umatilla River and the standard group acclimated at Thornhollow acclimation facility in the upper Umatilla River. An important aspect of the project is evaluation of the spring chinook and summer steelhead fisheries in the upper and lower Umatilla River. REPORT B: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000 Fiscal Year--The results presented in this report are from the ninth year of Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Broodstock monitoring for hatchery production was conducted on adult returns to the Umatilla River at Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla adult facilities for salmon; steelhead adults were monitored at Minthorn adult facility. A new addition to this year's report is the effort to bring together an overview of fish health monitoring results including historical and year to date pathogen information. This information is in table form (Appendix Tables A-28, A-29 and A-30). A summary of juvenile disease outbreaks at Umatilla Hatchery is also included (Appendix Table A-31). REPORT C: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Fiscal Year--Results from the 2001 annual report cover the 10th year of Fish Health Monitoring in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Efforts were again made to provide up to date fish health and juvenile disease outbreak loss summary tables from the beginning of the Umatilla Hatchery program (Appendix Tables A-27, A-28, A-29 and A-30). Outmigrant Fish Health Monitoring results were included in this report since this was part of the fish health work statement for this report period. The discussion section for the 2001 and 2002 annual reports are combined in the 2002 report due to time constraints and consolidation efforts to complete this report by the end of May 2003.

Chess, Dale W.; Cameron, William A.; Stonecypher, Jr., R. Wes (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for the period November 1, 1997 to October 31, 1998. Studies at Umatilla Hatchery are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated as part of the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring are mandatory and have become the responsibility of the fish health staff conducting studies at UFH. Additional studies include evaluations of sport fisheries in the Umatilla River and mass marking and straying of fall chinook salmon. Except for adult recovery data, an experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. We are currently in the second year of rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon at three densities. Experimental rearing of subyearling, fall release, and yearling spring chinook salmon, and steelhead has also been conducted. Although preliminary adult return data has been recovered, data on smolt-to-adult survival for all groups is incomplete. Conclusions in this report should be viewed as preliminary and used in conjunction with additional data as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Brown, Kassandra A.; Waln, Karen (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wenatchee Subbasin Plan Hatchery Information for Subbasin Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifications and reform. Some of the principal processes are: Federal: Hatchery and Genetic Management Plans hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. Much of the initial work on the HGMP process was coordinated) The APRE process seeks to document progress toward hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. The NPCC used

35

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

SciTech Connect

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Link to BPA Home Page Agency Topics Finance & Rates Jobs Public Involvement Contact Link to BPA Home Page EFW - Salmon Swimming Upriver EFW - Forest, Evening Sky EFW - Deer in...

38

Savings Program | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings Program Savings Program Savings Program The Savings Program offers a convenient, tax-effective way to save and invest for the future. At retirement, Savings Program benefits are designed to work together with the Pension Plan and Social Security benefits to provide retirement income. More information is available in the Book of Benefits. Employees can also find current information on the internal Benefits web site (restricted access) or log on to the Schwab Retirement Plan Services Company website. The Internal Revenue Service has announced the new changes in amounts and limits as they relate to our Savings Program and Pension Plan. Employees & Retirees Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Retiree Book of Benefits Health Plans Savings Program Savings Program and Pension Plan Changes

39

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery-and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In the Yakima Spring Chinook supplementation program, wild fish are brought into the Cle Elum Hatchery, artificially crossed, reared, transferred to acclimation sites, and released into the upper Yakima River as smolts. When these fish mature and return to the Yakima River most of them will be allowed to spawn naturally; a few, however, will be brought back to the hatchery and used for research purposes. In order for this supplementation approach to be successful, hatchery-origin fish must be able to spawn and produce offspring under natural conditions. Recent investigations on salmonid fishes have indicated that exposure to hatchery environments during juvenile life may cause significant behavioral, physiological, and morphological changes in adult fish. These changes appear to reduce the reproductive competence of hatchery fish. In general, males are more affected than females; species with prolonged freshwater rearing periods are more strongly impacted than those with shorter rearing periods; and stocks that have been exposed to artificial culture for multiple generations are more impaired than those with a relatively short exposure history to hatchery conditions.

Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Rau, J.A. (Cle Elum Supplementation Research, Cle Elum, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Jackson National Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Jackson, Wyoming Coordinates 43.4799291°, -110.7624282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

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41

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Roaring Judy Fish Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Gunnison, Colorado Coordinates 38.5458246°, -106.9253207° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

42

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Creek Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Creek Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mammoth Lakes, California Coordinates 37.648546°, -118.972079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

43

Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Belmont Springs Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Belmont Springs Hatchery Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Fielding, Utah Coordinates 41.8146489°, -112.1160644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

44

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

45

ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

basis for judging and proposing reforms in fish husbandry practices. To analyze and understand reform. Assessing the effects of hatchery produced fish on wild and other hatchery fish outside

46

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde-Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (03/23/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2006 3, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for NEOH Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project (DOE/EIS-0340-SA-01) Ken Kirkman - KEWU-4 Project Manager Proposed Action: Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Modifications Resulting from Final Design Project No.: 1988-053-01 Location: Wallowa County, Oregon Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Nez Perce Tribe Introduction: BPA, in its March 11, 2005 Record of Decision (ROD) on the Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project, decided to fund value engineering, land acquisition and final design of fish production facilities to support an ongoing program of Snake River spring chinook propagation for conservation and recovery of the species. BPA analyzed the

48

EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

340: Oregon Hatchery Project 340: Oregon Hatchery Project EIS-0340: Oregon Hatchery Project Summary This EIS analyzes the environmental impacts of developing additional facilities and modifications to existing facilities built for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan in order to mitigate impacts to natural populations of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins caused by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration's operation of four federal dams on the lower Snake River. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, are cooperating agencies. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 23, 2006 EIS-0340-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

49

The Design Complexity of Program Undo Support in a General Purpose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Complexity of Program Undo Hardware overhead 12 Avg. 4.5% overhead 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000;Radu Teodorescu - University of Illinois Design Complexity of Program Undo Lines of code 14 0 500 1000The Design Complexity of Program Undo Support in a General Purpose Processor Radu Teodorescu

Torrellas, Josep

50

Formal verification of complex properties on PLC programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formal verification has become a recommended practice in the safety-critical application areas. However, due to the complexity of practical control and safety systems, the state space explosion often prevents the use of formal analysis. In this paper we extend our former verification methodology with effective property preserving reduction techniques. For this purpose we developed general rule-based reductions and a customized version of the Cone of Influence (COI) reduction. Using these methods, the verification of complex requirements formalised with temporal logics (e.g. CTL, LTL) can be orders of magnitude faster. We use the NuSMV model checker on a real-life PLC program from CERN to demonstrate the performance of our reduction techniques.

Darvas, D; Voros, A; Bartha, T; Blanco Vinuela, E; Gonzalez Suarez, V M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Bonneville Power Administration Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 17 Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 203 / Tuesday, October 21, 1997 / Notices all comments received within 60 days of the date of publication of this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on this proposed information collection or to obtain a copy of the proposal and associated collection instruments, please write the above address, or call Department of the Army Reports clearance officer at (703) 614-0454. Title: Research to Develop a Profile of Army National Guard Members. Needs and Uses: This research will be a mail survey among Army National Guard members. The research will assist the Army National Guard (ARNG) in making the most effective use of its public relations, advertising and marketing budget for recruiting efforts. The research will help the ARNG and its

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous salmonid hatcheries Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distribution and Plants 2 Review of Artificial Production of Anadromous and Resident Fish Summary: performance might be among the anadromous salmonid hatchery fish. These...

54

Design, construction and operation of an inland red drum hatchery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The surface area of the filter cloth was sufficient so that water could be puinped through the incubator and out the standpipe without sigtuficant water velocity that would impinge planktonic eggs or larvae. Lab and F d pre ara' n Area The remote location... 15 16 19 Critique of Internship LIST OF FIGURES 1 Hatchery Floor Plan 23 2 Water Flow Diagram 3 Spawn Tank Elevation and Plan View 25 4 Incubation Platform 5 Maturation Regime 27 ABSTRACT My Master of Agriculture internship was served...

Turner, John M

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the DOE Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the Department of Energy Complex OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................ 3 2.0 STATUS OF DOE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS ...................................................... 5 Overall Assessment .......................................................................... 5 Improvements to Emergency Management Programs at DOE Sites Since 1998 .................................................................. 5 Continuing Weaknesses ................................................................... 7 Underlying Causes ...........................................................................

57

Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

Doulas, Speros

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Termination and complexity bounds for SAFE programs Salvador Lucas Ricardo Pe~na  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Termination and complexity bounds for SAFE programs Salvador Lucas Ricardo Pe~na Dep. de Sistemas partially supported by the EU (FEDER) and the Spanish MEC, under grant TIN 2004-7943- C04. Salvador Lucas

Lucas, Salvador

59

DOEs Worker-Focused Safety Program Honors Contractors Across EM Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Several contractors across the EM complex received honors in recent months in an important DOE safety program that turns to workers to assess, prevent, and control potential health and safety hazards.

60

Voluntary Protection Program | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voluntary Protection Voluntary Protection Program Voluntary Protection Program Posted: February 14, 2013 - 9:53am Raising the VPP flag at New Hope Center Protection against preventable illness and injury is not new to Y-12. Excellent tools already function toward keeping us healthy and safe on the job, and in June, Y-12 received the U.S. Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Star status. We proudly fly the flag at the New Hope Center. This flag of distinction shows Y-12 employees are serious about safety. Senior Vice President and Deputy General Manager of Operations Bill Klemm said, "The objective isn't the star. The objective is everybody's safety. I give credit to everyone at the plant for us receiving the VPP Star level status. Continue to keep safety your focus as we continue our

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61

Mode Estimation of Modelbased Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An example of a complex device is DS­1, which flies by an asteroid and comet using ion propulsion. DS­1's, and stores each picture on disk. The three images are then read, processed and a course correction. The camera generates a faulty image, which is stored on disk. At some later time the image is read, processed

Williams, Brian C.

62

Marginal metabolic scope and growth of hatchery-produced, juvenile red drum by progeny group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nine broodstock groups of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (each consisting of two males and three females) at a State of Texas fish hatchery spawned 13 concurrent progeny groups for which two performance factors, marginal metabolic scope (MMS...

Clark, Kevin Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Emigration of Natural and Hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (Steelhead; Oncorhynchus mykiss) Smolts from the Imnaha River, Oregon from 5 October 2006 to 21 June 2007, Annual Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) Department of Fisheries Resources Management (DFRM) results for the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Hatchery Evaluation studies and the Imnaha River Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) for the 2007 smolt migration from the Imnaha River, Oregon. These studies are closely coordinated and provide information about juvenile natural and hatchery spring/summer Naco x (Chinook Salmon; Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Heeyey (steelhead; O. mykiss) biological characteristics, emigrant timing, survival, arrival timing and travel time to the Snake River dams and McNary Dam (MCD) on the Columbia River. These studies provide information on listed Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) for the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (NMFS 2000). The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program's goal is to maintain a hatchery production program of 490,000 Naco x (Chinook salmon) and 330,000 Heeyey (steelhead) for annual release in the Imnaha River (Carmichael et al. 1998, Whitesel et al. 1998). These hatchery releases occur to compensate for fish losses due to the construction and operation of the four lower Snake River hydroelectric facilities. One of the aspects of the LSRCP hatchery evaluation studies in the Imnaha River is to determine natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolt performance, emigration characteristics and survival (Kucera and Blenden 1998). A long term monitoring effort was established to document smolt emigrant timing and post release survival within the Imnaha River, estimate smolt survival downstream to McNary Dam, compare natural and hatchery smolt performance, and collect smolt-to-adult return information. This project collects information for, and is part of, a larger effort entitled Smolt Monitoring by Federal and Non-Federal Agencies (BPA Project No. 198712700). This larger project provides data on movement of smolts out of major drainages and past dams on the Snake River and Columbia River. In season indices of migration strength and migration timing are provided for the run-at large at key monitoring sites. Marked smolts are utilized to measure travel time and estimate survival through key index reaches. Fish quality and descaling measures are recorded at each monitoring site and provide indicators of the health of the run. Co-managers in the Imnaha River subbasin (Ecovista 2004) have identified the need to collect information on life history, migration patterns, juvenile emigrant abundance, reach specific smolt survivals, and Smolt-to-Adult Return rates (SAR's) for both Heeyey (steelhead) and Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts. The current study provides information related to the majority of the high priority data needs. Current funding does not allow for determination of a total (annual) juvenile emigrant abundance and lack of adult passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag detectors at the mouth of the Imnaha River results in the inability to calculate tributary specific SAR's. Information is shared with the Fish Passage Center (FPC) on a real time basis during the spring emigration period. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted the NPT to monitor emigration timing and tag up to 19,000 emigrating natural and hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) and Heeyey (steelhead) smolts from the Imnaha River with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. The completion of trapping in the spring of 2007 marked the 16th year of emigration studies on the Imnaha River, and the 14th year of participating in the FPC smolt monitoring program. Monitoring and evaluation objectives were to: (1) Evaluate effects of flow, temperature and other environmental factors on juvenile migration timing. (2) Determine emigration timing, travel time, and in-river survival of PIT tagged hatchery Naco x (Chinook salmon) smolts released at the Imnaha River acclimation facility to the Imnaha River juvenile migration trap. (3) Monitor the daily catch and biological cha

Michaels, Brian; Espinosa, Neal (Nez Perce Tribe)

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

67

CNC programming system for complex components based on KBE within integrated environment of CAD/CAPP/CAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To promote the research and development of modern digital and intelligent manufacturing technology and overcome shortcomings of computerized numerical control(CNC) programming for complex components, an innovativ...

Shengwen Zhang; Guicheng Wang; Liang Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Design Complexity of Program Undo Support in a General-Purpose Processor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hardware overhead, rough develop- ment time, and lines of code; and Section 4 concludes. 2 ImplementationThe Design Complexity of Program Undo Support in a General-Purpose Processor Radu Teodorescu on collision-free syn- chronization [7, 10], speculation on the values of in- validated cache lines [5

Torrellas, Josep

69

Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01) TO: Greg Baesler Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project-Modifications to original proposal Project No.: 1985-038-00 Location: Colville Indian Reservation, Okanogan County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Introduction: The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a

70

EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPAs proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

71

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Notes From the Chair 2 Re-thinking Hatcheries: 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flying Windmills Technology: 3 A Look at Efforts to Capture Wind Energy N.W. Q&A: Dick Whitney 4 awareness of the water, power, fish and wildlife, and related aspects of the transboundary Columbia River and Wildlife Program. The Council invited proposals last November; the deadline for submis- sion was in April

74

Y-12 National Security Complex Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program 2007 Calendar Yeare Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) which became effective May 1, 2006, continued a requirement for a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP). The BMAP was originally developed in 1985 to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protected the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek: EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). The objectives of the current BMAP are similar, specifically to assess stream ecological conditions relative to regulatory limits and criteria, to assess ecological impacts as well as recovery in response to Y-12 operations, and to investigate the causes of continuing impacts. The BMAP consists of three tasks that reflect complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the biotic integrity of EFPC. These tasks include: (1) bioaccumulation monitoring, (2) benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring, and (3) fish community monitoring. As required by the NPDES permit, the BMAP benthic macroinvertebrate community monitoring task includes studies to annually evaluate the receiving stream's biological integrity in comparison to TN Water Quality Criteria. BMAP monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) appropriate habitat distribution, and (5) access. The primary sampling sites include upper EFPC at kilometers (EFKs) 24.4 and 23.4 [upstream and downstream of Lake Reality (LR) respectively]; EFK 18.7 (also EFK 18.2 and 19), located off the ORR and below an area of intensive commercial and light industrial development; EFK 13.8, located upstream from the Oak Ridge Wastewater Treatment Facility (ORWTF); and EFK 6.3 located approximately 1.4 km below the ORR boundary (Fig. 1.1). Actual sampling locations on EFPC may differ slightly by task according to specific requirements of the task. Brushy Fork (BF) at kilometer (BFK) 7.6 and Hinds Creek at kilometer (HCK) 20.6 are the most commonly used reference sites for the Y-12 BMAP. Additional sites off the ORR are also occasionally used for reference, including Beaver Creek, Bull Run, Cox Creek, and Paint Rock Creek (Fig. 1.2). Summaries of the sampling designs for the three primary tasks of the Y-12 Complex BMAP for EFPC are presented in Tables 1.1-1.3. This report covers the 2007 study period, although data collected outside this time period are included as appropriate. To address the biological monitoring requirements for Bear Creek and McCoy Branch, CERCLA-funded data is summarized in Appendix A (for Bear Creek) and Appendix B (for McCoy Branch). Data for these two watersheds is provided herein to address Section IX of the NPDES Permit for Y-12, where 'Results of these CERCLA programs can be used to meet the biological monitoring requirements of this permit'. For potential comparison with instream biological measures, a summary of the toxicity testing results for Y-12 outfalls into upper EFPC is provided in Appendix C (these results have been previously reported).

Peterson, M.J.; Greeley, M. S. Jr.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Ryan, M. G.; Smith, J. G.; Southworth, G. R.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DOCENT TRAINING PROGRAM AGENDA Page 1 of 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.m. History of Research at Lake Tahoe Presentation by Dr. Charles R. Goldman, UC Davis 40 Years of Research.m.) LOCATION: Tahoe City Field Station (Historic Hatchery) 2400 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City, CA 9:00 ­ 11:00 aDOCENT TRAINING PROGRAM AGENDA Page 1 of 4 SESSION 1 Program Overview, Lake Tahoe 101, Geology

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

76

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

none,

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requests, only 58% to 95% of AHUs identified in earlier report were shut off S. F. Austin Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water Consumption Over 600 kW reduction when AHUs and lights turned off L.B. Johnson Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water...LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test Presented to the State Purchasing and General Services Commission By the Monitoring Analysis Task E Dr. W. D...

Turner, W. D.; Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Y-12 National Security Complex- April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Evaluation to determine whether Y-12 National Security Complex is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

79

Fire Protection Program Assessment, Building 9203 & 9203A Complex- Y12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment is intended to evaluate the fire hazards, life safety and fire protection features inherent in the Building 9203 and 9203A complex.

80

Sea Grant Program Impacts http://www.seagrant.noaa.gov/newsevents/impacts2010.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea Grant Program Impacts http://www.seagrant.noaa.gov/newsevents/impacts2010.html Alaska Sea Grant Sea Grant helps rebuild crab stock in Alaska Developing technology for successful king crab hatchery King Crab Research Rehabilitation and Biology Program (AKCRRAB) Alaska Sea Grant and its partners

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project--Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (11/7/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 7, 2000 November 7, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 TO : Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery facilities. Project No.: F3204 Location: Prosser and Toppenish, Yakima County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

82

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NV-21, Pyramid Lake Solar Assisted Fish Hatchery NV-64.Award~ PYRAMID LAKE SOLAR ASSISTED FISH HATCHERY Applicant

Case, C.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mode Estimation of Model-based Programs: Monitoring Systems with Complex Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An example of a complex device is DS-1, which flies by an asteroid and comet using ion propulsion. DS-1's, and stores each picture on disk. The three images are then read, processed and a course correction. The camera generates a faulty image, which is stored on disk. At some later time the image is read, processed

Williams, Brian C.

84

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Patty O'Toole July 20, 2007 Program Implementation Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hatchery Reform Steering Committee From: The Hatchery Scientific Review Group Subject: Preview of Key-established Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG) has provided a foundation for hatchery reform principles maximizing harvest. In order for hatchery actions to effectively address conservation goals, harvest reforms

86

Incorporating daily flood control objectives into a monthly stochastic dynamic programming model for a hydroelectric complex  

SciTech Connect

A monthly stochastic dynamic programing model was recently developed and implemented at British Columbia (B.C.) Hydro to provide decision support for short-term energy exports and, if necessary, for flood control on the Peace River in northern British Columbia. The model established the marginal cost of supplying energy from the B.C. Hydro system, as well as a monthly operating policy for the G.M. Shrum and Peace Canyon hydroelectric plants and the Williston Lake storage reservoir. A simulation model capable of following the operating policy then determines the probability of refilling Williston Lake and possible spill rates and volumes. Reservoir inflows are input to both models in daily and monthly formats. The results indicate that flood control can be accommodated without sacrificing significant export revenue.

Druce, D.J. (British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation; Creston National Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Mitigation Objective 1: Produce Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire eggs and rear up to 100,000 Westslope Cutthroat trout annually for offsite mitigation stocking. Accomplishments: A total of 141,000 westslope cutthroat eggs (M012 strain) was acquired from the State of Montana Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in May 2002 for this objective. We also received an additional 22,000 westslope cutthroat eggs, MO12 strain naturalized, from feral fish at Rogers Lake, Flathead County, Montana. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 95.6%. We achieved a 0.80 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management. Mitigation Objective 2: Produce Rainbow Trout at Creston NFH--Task: Acquire and rear up to 100,000 Rainbow trout annually for offsite mitigation in closed basin waters. Accomplishments: A total of 54,000 rainbow trout eggs (Arlee strain) was acquired from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery in December 2002 for this objective. The fish were reared using approved fish culture techniques as defined in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish Hatchery Management guidelines. Survival from the swim up fry stage to stocking was 99.9%. We achieved a 0.79 feed conversion this year on a new diet, Skretting ''Nutra Plus''. Arlee rainbow trout are being used for this objective because the stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs and habitat conditions and returns to the creel are unsuitable for native cutthroat. Post release survival and angler success is monitored annually by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT). Stocking numbers and locations vary yearly based on results of biological monitoring and adaptive management.

US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff, (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Creston National Fish Hatchery, Kalispell, MT)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Keeping Track of the National Transuranic Program Complex Defense Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

The long-term performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal system in southeastern New Mexico is assessed periodically using transuranic (TRU) waste physical and radiological properties and other information describing the waste. This TRU waste estimate is based on the best knowledge of the TRU waste across the DOE complex at the time repository performance is assessed. TRU waste inventory was collected from each of the Department of Energy (DOE) sites that generated TRU waste for the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) and subsequently for the Compliance Re-certification Application (CRA) in order to support the assessments that ultimately led to certification and re-certification of the WIPP. In each case, information was collected, stored and maintained in the Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Database (TWBID) that was used to generate tables describing the volumetric, physical, and radiological properties of the TRU waste. The tables and other descriptions of the waste were reported in baseline reports for the certification and the re-certification. Information maintained in the TWBID database has now been transferred to a new qualified database that utilizes a more efficient operating configuration. This database known as the Comprehensive Inventory Database (CID) will be the information repository for TRU waste destined to WIPP, and the source for information submitted for annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Update Reports to be used in future repository performance assessments (PAs) and re-certifications. The information that has been collected will support a wider range of data needs including waste management, transportation and strategic planning. (authors)

Crawford, B.; Lott, S.; McInroy, W.; VanSoest, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Patterson, R. [U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Post-Release Performance of Natural and Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Clearwater Rivers.  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, we continued a multi-year study to compare smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) ratios between two groups of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that reached the sea through a combination of either (1) transportation and inriver migration or (2) bypass and inriver migration. We captured natural subyearlings rearing along the Snake and Clearwater rivers and implanted them with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, but knew in advance that sample sizes of natural fish would not be large enough for precise comparisons of SAR ratios. To increase sample sizes, we also cultured Lyons Ferry Hatchery subyearlings under a surrogate rearing strategy, implanted them with PIT tags, and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers to migrate seaward. The surrogate rearing strategy involved slowing growth at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to match natural subyearlings in size at release as closely as possible, while insuring that all of the surrogate subyearlings were large enough for tagging (i.e., 60-mm fork length). Surrogate subyearlings were released from late May to early July 2006 to coincide with the historical period of peak beach seine catch of natural parr in the Snake and Clearwater rivers. We also PIT tagged a large representative sample of hatchery subyearlings reared under a production rearing strategy and released them into the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 2006 as part of new research on dam passage experiences (i.e., transported from a dam, dam passage via bypass, dam passage via turbine intakes or spillways). The production rearing strategy involved accelerating growth at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, sometimes followed by a few weeks of acclimation at sites along the Snake and Clearwater rivers before release from May to June. Releasing production subyearlings has been suggested as a possible alternative for making inferences on the natural population if surrogate fish were not available. Smoltto-adult return rates are not reported here, but will be presented in future reports written after workshops and input by federal, state, and tribal researchers. In this report, we compared the postrelease performance of natural subyearlings to the postrelease performance of surrogate and production subyearlings. We made this comparison to help the fisheries community determine which of the two hatchery rearing strategies produced fish that were more similar to natural subyearlings. We compared the following attributes of postrelease performance (1) detection dates at dams, (2) detections during the implementation of summer spill, (3) travel times, (4) migrant sizes, and (5) the joint probability of migration and survival. Overall, we found that postrelease performance was more similar between natural and surrogate subyearlings than between natural and production subyearlings. Further, the similarity between natural and surrogate subyearlings was greater in 2006 than in 2005, partly as the result of changes in incubation and early rearing practices we recommended based on 2005 results.

Connor, William P.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Compliation of Bioassay Issues Reported During the 120-Day Suspension of PAAA Enforcement Actions Related to Internal Dose Evaluation Programs by Contractors in the Department of Energy Complex  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Compilation of Bioassay Issues Reported During the 120- Day Suspension of PAAA Enforcement Actions Related to Internal Dose Evaluation Programs by Contractors in the Department of Energy Complex BACKGROUND - The DOE Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) invoked a 120-day suspension of PAAA enforcement actions for issues associated with contractor Internal Dose Evaluation Programs (IDEP). Prior to initiation of the suspension, EH Enforcement had identified deficiencies in DOE- contractor implemented bioassay programs at numerous sites within the DOE complex. The commonality of the IDEP deficiencies at the various sites, as well as

93

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Programming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provided on the Cray systems at NERSC. The Programming Environment is managed by a meta-module named similar to "PrgEnv-gnu4.6". The "gnu" indicates that it is providing the GNU...

95

Survival of Hatchery Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-Flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1998-2001 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect

We report results from four years (1998-2001) of an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. We report analyses of associations among river conditions and survival and travel time estimates, which include data from 1995 through 1997. At weekly intervals from early June to early July each year (mid-May to late June in 2001), hatchery-reared subyearling fall chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released above Lower Granite Dam at Pittsburgh Landing and Billy Creek on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Each year, a small proportion of fish released were not detected until the following spring. However, the number that overwintered in the river and migrated seaward as yearlings the following spring was small and had minimal effect on survival estimates. Concurrent with our studies, a number of subyearling fall chinook salmon that reared naturally in the Snake River were caught by beach seine, PIT tagged, and released. We compared a number of characteristics of hatchery and wild fish. Hatchery and wild fish were similar in 2001, and from 1995 through 1997. Results for 1998 through 2000 showed some relatively large differences between hatchery and wild fish. However, recent information suggests that a considerable proportion of wild subyearling chinook salmon migrating in a given year may actually be stream-type (spring/summer), rather than ocean-type (fall) fish, which may account for some of the differences we have observed.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Activation of Hydrogen with Bi-Functional Ambiphillic Catalyst Complexes - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Tom Autrey (Primary Contact), Greg Schenter, Don Camaioni, Abhi Karkamkar, Herman Cho, Bojana Ginovska-Pangovska Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 MS#K2-57 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: (509) 375-3792 Email: tom.autrey@pnnl.gov DOE Program Officer: Raul Miranda Objectives The objective of our research is to develop fundamental insight into small molecule activation in molecular complexes that will provide the basis for developing rational approaches

97

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program (8/2/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 147 / Tuesday, August 2, 2005 / Notices ORDERS GRANTING IMPORT/EXPORT AUTHORIZATIONS DOE/FE AUTHORITY-Continued Order No. Date issued Importer/exporter FE docket No. Import volume Export volume Comments 289-C ...... 6-24-05 Duke Energy LNG Sales, Inc., 89-77-LNG. .................. .................. Vacate long-term import authority. 2106 ......... 6-24-05 Apache Corporation, 05-43- NG. 55 Bcf Import and export a combined total of natural gas from and to Canada, beginning on July 8, 2005, and extend- ing through July 7, 2007. 334-A ...... 6-24-05 Ocean State Power and Ocean State Power II. .................. .................. Vacate long-term import authority. 335-A ...... 6-24-05 Ocean State Power and Ocean State Power II. ..................

98

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-117): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Ross Complex) 1/16/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2003 16, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-117- (Ross Complex) Paul Martin TFHV/CSB2 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the non-electric portions of the Bonneville Power Administration's Ross Complex Location: The Ross Complex is located at 5411 NE Highway 99, Vancouver, Clark County, Washington in the BPA Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage and maintain grounds and landscaping in the non-electrical portions of the Ross Facility. Vegetation management at the Facility shall include: 1) bare ground management of graveled storage areas, perimeter roads and parking

99

Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect

Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Extremophiles 2004 Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles SEPTEMBER 19 -23, 2004 CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND Extremophiles 2004 5th International Conference on Extremophiles © 2004, American Society for Microbiology 1752 N Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036-2904 Phone: 202-737-3600 World Wide Web: www.asm.org All Rights Reserved Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 1-55581 324-0 TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information Scientific Program Abstracts for Oral Sessions Abstracts for Poster Sessions Index 4 10 18 42 144 4 ASM Conferences EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Frank Robb, Chair University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute Michael W. Adams University of Georgia Koki Horikoshi Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Robert M. Kelly North Carolina State University Jennifer Littlechild

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101

Theory of Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Christopher Wolverton Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Northwestern University 2220 Campus Drive, Room 2036 Evanston, IL 60208-3108 Phone: (734) 678-6319 Email: c-wolverton@northwestern.edu Vidvuds Ozolins Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles DOE Program Officer: James Davenport Program Manager Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Office of Basic Energy Sciences Email: James.Davenport@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-0035 Objectives Using first-principles methods, determine the atomic- level processes that are rate limiting in hydrogen storage

102

Product and program management : battling the strangler trees of system and social complexity in the software market jungle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of Software Product and Program Management as recently emergent roles in the information technology sector is presented. The exploration is presented in six sections divided into two major parts. The first ...

Hempe, John A. (John Alan)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Complex Hydrides - A New Frontier for Future Energy Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Vitalij K. Pecharsky, 1 Marek Pruski, 2 L. Scott Chumbley, 3 Duane D. Johnson, 4 Takeshi Kobayashi 5 1 FWP Leader: Ames Laboratory, 253 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: vitkp@ameslab.gov, Phone: (515) 294-8220 2 PI: Ames Laboratory, 230 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: mpruski@iastate.edu, Phone: (515) 294-2017 3 PI: Ames Laboratory, 214 Wilhelm Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: chumbley@iastate.edu, Tel.: 515-2947903; 4 PI: Ames Laboratory, 311 TASF, Ames, IA 50011, Email: ddj@ameslab.gov, Phone: (515) 2949649 5 Ames Laboratory, 229 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011, Email: takeshi@iastate.edu, Phone: (515)-294-6823 DOE Program Officer: Dr. Refik Kortan

104

Fungal Genomics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strains Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of xyloseFungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev 1 * (complex communities Fungal Genomics Program Igor Grigoriev

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microsoft Word - 2011_07_05_KHP Draft EIS.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement July 2011 DOE/EA-0424 Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0424 Bonneville Power Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation July 2011 Abstract - Klickitat Hatchery Complex Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agencies: Lead federal agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); cooperating federal agencies: National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs; Lead state agency: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW); cooperating tribe: Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

106

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1998 (1991 through 1995 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Results from evaluation of photonic marking as a tool to mass mark juvenile salmonids were mixed (Appendix B). Logistical and safety concerns were documented. The mark was not retained through to adult return as no photonic marks were detected in any of the Sandy hatchery jack or adult coho recoveries. Data from coded-wire tag recoveries indicated there should have been approximately 6 jack and 318 adult coho recovered with photonic marks. Photonic marks were retained for the 5 months from marking to release. Photonic marking did not appear to effect in-hatchery survival or hatchery return rate. Because of the above results evaluation of photonic marking was discontinued in favor of evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer tagging. Results in 1998 with Sandy hatchery coho demonstrated a marking rate of 17,000 fish per day for VIE tagging (Appendix C). Mark retention at releases was 98% for VIE tags. Although, this included re-marking 22% of the fish during the coded-wire tagging process (4 months after the VIE marks were applied).

Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refiners Switch to Reformulated Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 , (Adobe

108

U1A Complex  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

U1A Complex  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2003, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using three strategies: eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit and Alturas lakes in November and December, age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2003. Age-0 through age-4 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 81,727 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 46,234 fish. Age-0 through age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 11,961 fish. Angler surveys were conducted from May 25 through August 7, 2003 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 179 anglers and estimated that 424 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.09 fish/hour. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 15 to May 29, 2003. We estimated that 4,637 wild/natural and 12,226 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component included an estimated 5,352 out-migrants produced from a summer direct-release made to Redfish Lake in 2002 and 6,874 out-migrants produced from a fall direct-release made in 2002. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 23 to June 5, 2003 and April 25 to June 4, 2003, respectively. The SBT enumerated 28 wild/natural and 13,329 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts that outmigrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 286 wild/natural and 553 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2003. The hatchery-produced component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from presmolt releases made directly to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2002. Median travel times for passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagged smolts from the Redfish Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for wild/natural smolts and hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Redfish Lake Creek trap were 10.6 d for wild/natural smolts, 6.2 d for summer direct-released smolts, and 7.1 d for fall direct-released smolts. Median travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from the Pettit Lake Creek trap site to Lower Granite Dam were estimated for hatchery-produced smolts. Median travel times for smolts originating from the Pettit Lake Creek trap were 14.1 d for fall direct released smolts and 13.6 d for fall direct released smolts. Cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams were utilized to estimate detection rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Detection rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Pettit Lake fall direct released smolts recorded the highest detection rate of 37.14%. In 2003, 312 hatchery-produced adult socke

Willard, Catherine; Plaster, Kurtis; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999 when six jacks and one jill were captured at IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2002, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in August and to Pettit and Redfish lakes in October, age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek in May, eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in December, and hatchery-produced and anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2002. Age-0, age-1, and age-2 O. nerka were captured in Redfish Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 50,204 fish. Age-0, age-1, age-2, and age-3 kokanee were captured in Alturas Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 24,374 fish. Age-2 and age-3 O. nerka were captured in Pettit Lake, and population abundance was estimated at 18,328 fish. The ultimate goal of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) captive broodstock development and evaluation efforts is to recover sockeye salmon runs in Idaho waters. Recovery is defined as reestablishing sockeye salmon runs and providing for utilization of sockeye salmon and kokanee resources by anglers. The immediate project goal is to maintain this unique sockeye salmon population through captive broodstock technology and avoid species extinction. The project objectives are: (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye salmon. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program supplementation efforts. (4) Refine our ability to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, providing written activity reports and participation in essential program management and planning activities.

Willard, Catherine; Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RETRAN-02: a program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow systems. Volume 1. Theory and numerics (Revision 2). [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect

RETRAN-02 represents a significant achievement in the development of a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of LWR systems. The RETRAN-02 computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-01 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for: (1) BWR and PWR transients; (2) small-break loss-of-coolant accidents; (3) balance of plant modeling; and (4) anticipated transients without scram, while maintaining the analysis capabilities of the predecessor code. This report (the first of a four-volume computer code manual) describes the theory and numerical algorithms of the RETRAN-02 code. The three companion volumes describe the programming aspects, the programming details, and the verification and qualification performed with RETRAN.

McFadden, J.H.; Narum, R.E.; Peterson, C.E.; Noble, C.; Farman, R.F.; McClure, J.A.; Paulsen, M.P.; Richert, K.D.; Hughes, E.D.; Gose, G.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Research Elements : 2007 Annual Project Progess Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) and Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focused on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced adults occurred in 1993. The first release of juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. In 1999, the first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded when six jacks and one jill were captured at the IDFG Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2007, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: (1) eyed-eggs were planted in Pettit Lake in November; (2) age-0 presmolts were released to Alturas, Pettit, and Redfish lakes in October; (3) age-1 smolts were released into Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River in May; and (4) hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September. Oncorhynchus nerka population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September 2007. Population abundances were estimated at 73,702 fish for Redfish Lake, 124,073 fish for Alturas Lake, and 14,746 fish for Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted from May 26 through August 7, 2007 on Redfish Lake to estimate kokanee harvest. On Redfish Lake, we interviewed 102 anglers and estimated that 56 kokanee were harvested. The calculated kokanee catch rate was 0.03 fish/hour for each kokanee kept. The juvenile out-migrant trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 14 to June 13, 2007. We estimated that 5,280 natural origin and 14,256 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component originated from a 2006 fall presmolt direct-release. The juvenile out-migrant traps on Alturas Lake Creek and Pettit Lake Creek were operated by the SBT from April 19 to May 23, 2007 and April 18 to May 29, 2007, respectively. The SBT estimated 1,749 natural origin and 4,695 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Pettit Lake and estimated 8,994 natural origin and 6,897 hatchery origin sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Alturas Lake in 2007. The hatchery origin component of sockeye salmon out-migrants originated from fall presmolt direct-releases made to Pettit and Alturas lakes in 2006. In 2007, the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC) chose to have all Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles (tagged and untagged) transported due to potential enhanced survival. Therefore, mainstem survival evaluations were only conducted to Lower Granite Dam. Unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth Valley juvenile out-migrant traps to Lower Granite Dam were utilized to estimate survival rates for out-migrating sockeye salmon smolts. Survival rate comparisons were made between smolts originating from Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes and the various release strategies. Alturas Lake hatchery origin smolts tagged at the out-migrant trap recorded the highest survival rate of 78.0%. In 2007, 494 hatchery origin adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 195 areas of excavation in the lake from spawning events. This was the highest number of redds observed in Redfish Lake since the program was initiated. Suspected redds were approximately 3 m x 3 m in size and were constructed by multiple pairs of adults. To monitor the predator population found within the lakes, we monitored bull trout spawning in Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake; and in Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the tenth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts (41 adults) and redd counts (22 redds

Peterson, Mike; Plaster, Kurtis; Redfield, Laura; Heindel, Jeff; Kline, Paul

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted ''active'' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted ''inactive'' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). This plan does not apply to temporary piezometers or other specialized groundwater monitoring/sampling devices that have been or may be installed for research purposes, hydrologic tests, pilot studies, or short-term investigations. This plan will be reviewed and updated every three years, as specified in the ''Y-12 GWPP Management Plan'' (BWXT 2004). Between scheduled updates of this plan, addenda issued by the GWPP Manager (or authorized designee) will document any substantial changes or modifications to the plan, including changes in the GWPP status designation for each monitoring well identified in the plan. The addenda, numbered in consecutive ascending order, will be forwarded to all personnel included on the distribution list for this plan. The addenda are inserted in Appendix C pending the next scheduled update of the plan, which will incorporate the information included in the addenda.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

RETRAN-02: A program for transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of complex fluid flow systems: Volume 1, Theory and numerics (Revision 4)  

SciTech Connect

RETRAN-02 represents a significant achievement in the development of a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of light water reactor systems. The RETRAN-02 computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-01 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for (1) BWR and PWR transients, (2) small break loss of coolant accidents, (3) balance of plant modeling, and (4) anticipated transients without scram, while maintaining the analysis capabilities of the predecessor code. The RETRAN-02 computer code is constructed in a semimodular and dynamic dimensioned form where additions to the code can be easily carried out as new and improved models are developed. The NRC, at the request of a group of utilities, had Argonne National Laboratory perform a technical review of RETRAN-01 MOD003 and RETRAN-02 MOD002. This review was completed in May 1983, and the NRC issued a Safety Evaluation Report on RETRAN in September 1984. Revision 4 of the RETRAN-02 computer code manuals describes the MOD005 version of the code. This report (the first of a four-volume computer code manual) describes the theory and numerical algorithms of the RETRAN-02 code. The three companion volumes describe the programming details, the user input requirements and sample problem input and output files, and the verification and qualification performed with RETRAN. 186 refs., 75 figs., 30 tabs.

McFadden, J.H.; Narum, R.E.; Peterson, C.E.; Noble, C.; Farman, R.F.; McClure, J.A.; Paulsen, M.P.; Richert, K.D.; Hughes, E.D.; Gose, G.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex SCC: The Strategic Computing Complex The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. The 300,000-square-foot, vault-type building features an unobstructed 43,500-square-foot computer room, which is an open room about three-fourths the size of a football field. The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a secured supercomputing facility that supports the calculation, modeling, simulation, and visualization of complex nuclear weapons data in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program. National Security

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121

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outlines a comprehensive program of habitat improvements, hatchery reforms and hydrosystem operations

122

Complex Queries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Complex Queries Complex Queries < User:Jweers Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Using Nested Queries 1.1 Programs 2 Using Inverse Property Ask Query 3 Using Wildcards Plus Array Print with Count 3.1 States start with A (4) Using Nested Queries Complex Help:Inline queries are queries which involve multiple subjects, properties, or nested queries. The following is an example of a nested query which will return only Programs (Category:Programs) in the Energy Sector (Property:ProgramSector = Energy) within the subsector of Wind (Property:Sector = Wind) which have been developed by National Labs (Category:United States Department of Energy National Laboratories). The last piece mentioned is where the nested query comes into play. To find Programs which have been developed by National Labs, we must search the

123

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin non-gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer (VIE) tagging showed an improvement in tagging rate and pre-release tag retention from the first (1998) to second (1999) year of tagging. For fish tagged in 1999 pre-release VIE tag retention was 99.4%. The first adult hatchery returns of VIE tagged coho for this study will be in 2000. Of 17 jacks recovered at Sandy hatchery in 1999 12 (70.6%) had retained there VIE tag.

Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM Sorghums are important nongrain lignocellulosic feedstocks Biomass Switch Grass Forage Sorghum Bioenergy Sorghum Biomass per acre per year that can be converted (DT

125

Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program helps to prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends by sharing performance information, lessons learned and good practices across the DOE complex.

126

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

128

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

129

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

DOCENT TRAINING PROGRAM AGENDA Page 1 of 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Lake Tahoe Presentation by Dr. Charles R. Goldman, UC Davis 40 Years of Research at Lake Tahoe and Ecology of Lake Tahoe Saturday, June 11, 2011 LOCATION: Tahoe City Field Station (Historic Hatchery) 2400 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City, CA 10:00-10:20 a.m. Historic Hatchery Background of the Building

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

131

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife project 'Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW)'. Results for the 2001 contract period: Objective 1--Over 1 million juvenile salmon were coded-wire by this program (Table 1); Objective 2--ODFW recovered and processed over 40,000 snout collected from coded-wire tagged fish (Table 2); Objective 3--Survival data is summarized below; Objective 4--The last group of VIE tagged coho was released in 2001 and returning coho were samples at Sandy Hatchery. This sampling showed only 1 of 1,160 returning coho VIE marked as juveniles retained the VIE mark as adults.

Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The NNSA Albuquerque Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Albuquerque Complex Transition Site Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger Viewing Options-Click to increase or decrease page font size. NNSA Home Page Office of Public Affairs Employee Concerns Program Whistleblower Home Page Office of Civil Rights Federal Asian Pacific American Council - New Mexico Chapter Current Management and Operating Contracts Freedom of Information Privacy Act NEPA Contractor Human Resources Office of Field Financial Management The NNSA Albuquerque Complex Transition Site We are incorporating the web pages on this site into the NNSA HQ site, located at http://www.nnsa.energy.gov. We now provide links to the current locations of all our previous pages and hosted Field Office sites.

133

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Pantex Plant - February...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Security Complex - April 2012 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 VPP Program Document...

134

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2009 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, July-September 2009 More Documents & Publications Program Update: 2nd...

135

SYMMETRY IN SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMS A (complex ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 28, 2007 ... products of Hahn and Krawtchouk polynomials occur. 2. BACKGROUND AND ... where cr = ?C, Br?, and air = ?Ai,Br?. The following obvious...

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW) Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags showed tagging rate and pre-release tag retention improved from the first to second years of tagging. Tagging rate remained identical from 1999 to 2000 while pre-release tag retention dropped to 95%. Returning jack and adult salmon were sampled for CWT and VIE tags in the fall of 2000. Of 606 adults recovered at Sandy Fish Hatchery in 2000, only 1 or 0.2%, retained their VIE tag. Of 36 jacks recovered in 2000, 13 or 36.1% retained their VIE tag.

Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Research Element, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Idaho Department of Fish and Game initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Restoration efforts are focusing on Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes within the Sawtooth Valley. The first release of hatchery-produced juvenile sockeye salmon from the captive broodstock program occurred in 1994. The first anadromous adult returns from the captive broodstock program were recorded in 1999, when six jacks and one jill were captured at Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. In 2001, progeny from the captive broodstock program were released using four strategies: age-0 presmolts were released to all three lakes in October and to Pettit and Alturas lakes in July; age-1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek, and hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for volitional spawning in September along with anadromous adult sockeye salmon that returned to the Sawtooth basin and were not incorporated into the captive broodstock program. Kokanee population monitoring was conducted on Redfish, Alturas, and Pettit lakes using a midwater trawl in September. Only age-0 and age-1 kokanee were captured on Redfish Lake, resulting in a population estimate of 12,980 kokanee. This was the second lowest kokanee abundance estimated since 1990. On Alturas Lake age-0, age-1, and age-2 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population was estimated at 70,159. This is a mid range kokanee population estimate for Alturas Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1990. On Pettit Lake only age-1 kokanee were captured, and the kokanee population estimate was 16,931. This estimate is in the midrange of estimates of the kokanee population in Pettit Lake, which has been sampled yearly since 1992. We continue to have difficulty capturing age-0 kokanee in the midwater trawl on Pettit Lake. Angler surveys were conducted on Redfish and Alturas lakes to estimate kokanee harvest and to estimate return to creel for hatchery rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We failed to encounter any kokanee that had been harvested in 88 angler interviews conducted between May 26 and August 7, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. On Alturas Lake, we again failed to encounter any harvested kokanee in 116 angler interviews, resulting in an estimated kokanee harvest of zero. We estimated that anglers harvested 9.5% of the 6,598 rainbow trout planted in Alturas Lake. We estimated that 110 wild/natural and 9,616 hatchery-produced sockeye salmon smolts out-migrated from Redfish Lake in 2001. This was the lowest estimate of unmarked smolt out-migration since monitoring began in 1991. The trap on Redfish Lake Creek was operated from April 22 to June 6, 2001 to estimate out-migration. Mean travel times for PIT-tagged smolts from Redfish Lake Creek Trap to Lower Granite Dam was 10.3 days for wild/natural smolts and 10.6 days for hatchery-produced smolts. Based on cumulative unique PIT tag interrogations from Sawtooth basin traps to mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams, the Redfish Lake wild/natural smolts, Redfish fall direct presmolts group, and Alturas Lake fall direct presmolts recorded the highest detection rates. In 2001, 65 hatchery-raised and 14 anadromous adult sockeye salmon were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. We observed 12 to 15 areas of excavation in the lake that were possible redds. We monitored bull trout spawning on Fishhook Creek, a tributary to Redfish Lake, and on Alpine Creek, a tributary to Alturas Lake. This represented the fourth consecutive year that the index reaches have been surveyed on these two streams. Adult counts on Fishhook Creek were similar to previous years as were redd counts. On Alpine Creek, bull trout numbers were also similar to previous years, but the number of redds observed increased over prev

Hebdon, J. Lance; Castillo, Jason; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Methow Subbasin I. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dictated hatchery program modifications and reform. Some of the principal processes are: Federal: Hatchery). The HGMP process also seeks to document and implement hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. Much hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. The NPCC used consultants and representatives of the Columbia Basin

139

Okanogan Subbasin I. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dictated hatchery program modifications and reform. Some of the principal processes are: Federal: Hatchery). The HGMP process also seeks to document and implement hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. Much hatchery reform in the Columbia Basin. The NPCC used consultants and representatives of the Columbia Basin

140

Community Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Navigate Section Community Richmond Bay Campus Planning Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Community Education Programs...

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141

EEO and Diversity Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity Program EEO and Diversity: Collaborating for Mission Success Solutions to Workplace Conflict: What Mediation Can Do for You! FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MEDIATION On October 27, 2006, the EEO and Diversity Program sponsored a panel presentation on the mediation program for all Service Center complex employees. Also, a session was held for the Service Center Leadership Team on November 15, 2006. At the end of the panel presentations, audience members were able to ask questions about the mediation program. If you would like to review the DVD of the presentation, contact the EEO and Diversity Program Office at (505) 845-5517 or by email at EEODiversityOffice@doeal.gov * What kinds of issues can be mediated? * How does one prepare for mediation?

142

Sustainability Outreach Program Brochure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health, Safety and Security (HSS) is Health, Safety and Security (HSS) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) central organization responsible for health, safety, environment, and security; providing corporate-level leadership and strategic vision to coordinate and integrate these vital programs. HSS is responsible for policy development and technical assistance; safety analysis; corporate safety and security programs; education and training; complex-wide independent oversight; and enforcement. The Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer advises the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary on all matters related to health, safety and security across the complex. Our Stakeholders Labor Unions/Workers Local Communities/General Public Contractors Universities/Academic Institutions Professional Associations

143

Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to students pursuing doctoral degrees in fields of study that use high performance computing to solve complex science and engineering problems. The program fosters a...

144

Program Update: 4th Quarter 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

145

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

146

Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

147

Program Update: 4th Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

148

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time.

149

Student Internship Programs Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Internship Programs Program Description The objective of the Laboratory's student internship programs is to provide students with opportunities for meaningful hands- on...

150

Optimization Online - On the evaluation complexity of composite ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2011 ... On the evaluation complexity of composite function minimization with applications to nonconvex nonlinear programming. C Cartis (coralia.cartis...

C Cartis

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

151

Small-Business Policy | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suppliers Socioeconomic Programs Small-Business Policy Small-Business Policy It is the policy of the Y-12 National Security Complex to provide maximum practicable contracting...

152

Independent Oversight Review, Y-12 National Security Complex...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Complex - March 2014 March 2014 Review of the Uranium Processing Facility Project Design Requirements and Configuration Management Program This report documents the results of...

153

Program Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

154

Program Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

155

Retiree Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Library Services Retiree Program Retiree Program The Research Library offers a 1 year library card to retired LANL employees that allows usage of Library materials. This service...

156

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Programs Educational Programs A collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering...

157

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Gordon G. Wittenberg (Architecture) #12;162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

158

SRS - Programs - Nonproliferation Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 SEARCH GO spacer SRS Home Nonproliferation Programs In the crucial field of nuclear nonproliferation, SRS employee contributions helped to advance all three of the planned plutonium disposition facilities at the Savannah River Site: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF); Waste Solidification Building (WSB); and the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. A $345 million project, the WSB will process liquid waste from the MOX facility. After material is processed at the WSB, transuranic waste will be packaged and sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico, and low-level waste will be packaged and sent to onsite or commercial off-site low-level waste disposal facilities. The mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility will be a major component in the United States' program to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium.

159

Computational Energy Sciences Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Description Led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Research (AR) Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Program provides high-performance computational modeling and simulation resources to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and other programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These resources are dedicated to speeding development and reducing costs associated with advanced power system design and performance modeling. CES research is focused on developing a set of complex but flexible computational tools that allow more rapid and efficient scale-up of new subsystems, devices, and components, thereby reducing the need for large and expensive demonstration-scale testing of integrated energy systems,

160

ARM - Data Quality Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality Program Quality Program DQ Resources Data Quality Assessment and Control Report (PDF, 747KB) Data Quality Office Data Quality Problem Reporting (DQPR) Contact Us Submit Data Quality Findings Randy Peppler, Data Quality Manager Ken Kehoe, Data Quality Specialist Justin Monroe, Data Quality Specialist Adam Theisen, Data Quality Specialist Sean Moore, Data Quality Consultant Instrument and Site Contacts Instrument Mentors AAF Contacts AMF Contacts NSA Site Contacts SGP Site Contacts TWP Site Contacts Data Quality Program Introduction One of the goals of the ARM Climate Research Facility is to provide datastreams of quality suitable for scientific research. Maintaining data quality for an organization program of the size and complexity of the ARM Facility is a significant challenge; efforts toward this end have matured

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161

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 Review of the Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery Program Master Plan;ISRP Review of the Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery Program Master Plan Contents Background..................................................................................................................................... 17 #12;1 ISRP Review of the Crystal Springs Fish Hatchery Program Master Plan Background

162

Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Royalty revenues, which assist funding of programs and attracting/retaining top scientists, have increased

163

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Argonne National Laboratory Educational Programs Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Educational Programs > Welcome Type of Appointments Postdoctoral Newsletters Postdoctoral Office Activities Postdoctoral Programs Alumni Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Newcomers Assistance Office Postdoctoral Resources Postdoctoral Mentoring Program Contact Us Schedule of Career Development Seminars Organized by the Postdoctoral Office for 2011 Here is a schedule of all of our Career Development Seminars and Workshops! Normally, the events happen at lunchtime and food is provided. The topics of these events include: Journal Clubs Career Development Networking We welcome all of our Postdocs and colleagues to and join us! Wednesday January 19 Postdoc Journal Club and pizza lunch. Magnetic Domain-Wall Racetrack Memory

164

international programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en International Programs http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms

165

Complexity in Big History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spier, Fred. How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

Spier, Fred

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Related Federal Programs on AddThis.com... Our History Related Federal Programs Why Energy Efficiency Upgrades Contacts Related Federal Programs Related Links

167

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Guidance Program Guidance Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Program Guidance on AddThis.com... Closeout Guidance Recovery Act Monitoring & Reporting National Environmental Policy Act

168

EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Programs in Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country EM Tribal Programs in Indian Country The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to the cleanup of sites that were once part of the Nation's nuclear weapons complex. Several of these sites are located close or adjacent to sovereign Tribal nations and impact Indian lands and/or resources. Consistent with the Department's American

169

Forest Certification Programs in North and South America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Certification Programs in North and South America: Motivation, Process, and Impacts compliance in Latin America discussion and corporate social responsibility Complex objectives

170

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: Tribal Energy Program on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program

171

SECO Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum of $50,000 per grant ? Funded on a reimbursement basis Renewable Energy Technology Grants ? Fort Worth ISD ? South Sills High School ? 5KW Wind Turbine Alternative Fuel Grants ? Grant program to convert city/county and ISD vehicle... fleets to alternative fuels and hybrid- electric vehicles ? Competitive equipment grant program ? Maximum grant per vehicle - $5,000 ? Maximum total grant per applicant - $50,000 ? Funded on a reimbursement basis The LoanSTAR Revolving Loan Program...

Trevino, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Property:ToolComplexity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ToolComplexity ToolComplexity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ToolComplexity Property Type Text Description Complexity, or ease of use, of tool/application Allows Values Simple;Moderate;Advanced;Not Available This is a property of type Text. Pages using the property "ToolComplexity" Showing 14 pages using this property. A Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool + Moderate Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model + Advanced E Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model + Advanced Energy Forecasting Framework and Emissions Consensus Tool (EFFECT) + Simple Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook + Advanced G Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database + Not Available

173

Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

174

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description SAGE, the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience, is a unique educational program designed to introduce students in geophysics and related fields to "hands on" geophysical exploration and research. The program emphasizes both teaching of field methods and research related to basic science and a variety of applied problems. SAGE is hosted by the National Security Education Center and the Earth and Environmental Sciences Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. * teaches modern geophysical exploration techniques: seismic reflection and refraction, gravity and magnetics, electromagnetics (including magnetotellurics), and electrical resistivity * involves extensive hands-on field experience * integrates geophysical methods to solve real

175

Counterintelligence Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes Counterintelligence Program requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels: DOE 5670.3.

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Program Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In practice, organization is fluid, highly matrixed; scientists work in multiple areas - Ad hoc Task Forces form to address specific problems or issues * Experimental Program...

177

Counterintelligence Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish the policies, procedures, and specific responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Counterintelligence (CI) Program. This directive does not cancel any other directive.

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

178

Programming Stage  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter addresses plans for the acquisition and installation of operating environment hardware and software and design of a training program.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

tentative program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 28, 2014 ... with Jon Brown, Gabriel Nagy, Aidan Sims, and Dana Williams. David Fisher Groups acting on Manifolds: Around the Zimmer Program.

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

LWRS Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New Archive Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Accomplishments Report: 2013 An accomplishments report highlighting progress in the development of the scientific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

182

API Conformance Verification for Java Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software components, services, or modules are used via their application programming interface (API). For any sufficiently complex component, there ... and context in which particular methods of the API can be in...

Xin Li; H. James Hoover; Piotr Rudnicki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Biosludge Incineration - A Program for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste biosludge generated in Shell's Deer Park Manufacturing Complex aqueous effluent treatment facilities is disposed of by on-site incineration. In 1981, an energy conservation program resulted in a 48 percent reduction in natural gas consumption...

Compernolle, R. V.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EERE Program Management Guide - About the Program Management Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Managers and their teams need to know what to do, how to do it, and why it needs to be done. User instructions help make EERE's program management processes and tools easier. The DOE and EERE Strategic Management System (SMS) provides a needed standard approach. Need for a Program Management "Operator's Guide" Program management is complex and difficult. It requires knowledge and discipline as well as a broad range of concepts, processes, and tools to be carried out effectively and efficiently. In the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) environment, many Program Managers and their teams bring to the job educational backgrounds and work experiences that are focused on science and technology. To complement that background they

185

August 1993 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992 DOE/BP-60629-7 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U Report 1992, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1991BI60629, Project No. 199204300 for: U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish and Wildlife P.O. Box

186

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2008 June 2008 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 Site Office (YSO) and Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during March through May 2008. The ES&H inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Many aspects of the Y-12 ISM program are effective. For example, most work observed was performed using well written and technically accurate

187

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume I - September 2005 September 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Summary Report The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) during August and September 2005. The inspection was performed by the OA Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. YSO and BWXT have established ISM systems that are conceptually sound. BWXT also has appropriate programs in place to ensure the functionality of the

188

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Wind Forecasting Improvement Project in Complex Terrain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Wind Program has issued a Notice of Intent for a funding opportunity, tentatively titled Wind Forecasting Improvement Project in Complex Terrain.

189

Complexity, Ecology, Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes  

SciTech Connect

Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

Cai, Jin-Yi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

193

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

194

CHRG Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs Work Force Information Systems (WFIS): Acquisition Letter 2009-10, Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program - Friday, July 10, 2009 Acquisition Letter 2009-10, which provides informaiton and guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Contracting Officers pertaining to the DOE's Displaced Worker Medical Benefit Program (DWMBP) and similar benefits provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. read more ... Computer Account Registration Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 All computer users must complete this form whenever a change in multi-user system access is necessary. read more ... Computer Security Awareness Acknowledgement Form - Tuesday, July 28, 2009 Computer Security Rules of Behavior Office of Legacy Management read more ... Remote Access Procedures for Systems at Grand Junction - Monday, January 23, 2006

195

PROGRAM ABSTRACTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& DEVELOPMENT: & DEVELOPMENT: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Catalyst Layer Bipolar Plate Electrode Backing Layers INTEGRATED SYSTEMS Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Stack

196

Program Summaries  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Program Summaries Program Summaries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Program Summaries Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Bes Summaries 2012 thumbnail JPG .jpg file (469KB) Basic Energy Sciences FY 2012 Research Summaries This report provides a collection of research abstracts and highlights for

197

Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The culture of the DOE community will be based on standards. Technical standards will formally integrate part of all DOE facility, program and project activities. The DOE will be recognized as a...

198

RERTR program  

SciTech Connect

The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program was established in 1978 at the Argonne National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which continues to fund the program and to manage it in coordination with the U.S. Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The primary objective of the program is to develop the technology needed to use low-enrichment uranium (LEU) instead of high-enrichment uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors, without significant penalties in experiment performance, economics, or safety. Eliminating the continuing need of HEU supplies for research and test reactors has long been an integral part of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper reviews the main accomplishments of the program through the years.

Travelli, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Machinist Pipeline/Apprentice Program Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Machinist PipelineApprentice Program Program Description The Machinist Pipeline Program was created by the Prototype Fabrication Division to fill a critical need for skilled...

200

Characteristics of Strong Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Existing financing programs offer a number of important lessons on effective program design. Some characteristics of strong financing programs drawn from past program experience are described below.

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approach, for Determining the Effects of Hatchery Reforms on Extinction Risk and Recovery ................................................................................................................................. 2 Proposal 10: A Tool for Evaluating Risks and Benefits of Reform Actions in Hatchery Programs (WDFW)................................................................................................................................2 Proposal 13: Analytical Approach for Determination of Effects of Hatchery Reform on Extinction

202

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approach, for Determining the Effects of Hatchery Reforms on Extinction Risk and Recovery ................................................................................................................................. 2 Proposal 10: A Tool for Evaluating Risks and Benefits of Reform Actions in Hatchery Programs (WDFW)................................................................................................................................3 Proposal 13: Analytical Approach for Determination of Effects of Hatchery Reform on Extinction

203

Graphical programming at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia has developed an advanced operational control system approach, called Graphical Programming, to design, program, and operate robotic systems. The Graphical Programming approach produces robot systems that are faster to develop and use, safer in operation, and cheaper overall than altemative teleoperation or autonomous robot control systems. Graphical Programming also provides an efficient and easy-to-use interface to traditional robot systems for use in setup and programming tasks. This paper provides an overview of the Graphical Programming approach and lists key features of Graphical Programming systems. Graphical Programming uses 3-D visualization and simulation software with intuitive operator interfaces for the programming and control of complex robotic systems. Graphical Programming Supervisor software modules allow an operator to command and simulate complex tasks in a graphic preview mode and, when acceptable, command the actual robots and monitor their motions with the graphic system. Graphical Programming Supervisors maintain registration with the real world and allow the robot to perform tasks that cannot be accurately represented with models alone by using a combination of model and sensor-based control.

McDonald, M.J.; Palmquist, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Desjarlais, L. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NREL: Education Programs - Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Programs Teacher Programs Photo of a man and woman working together in a laboratory. They are both wearing safety glasses as they look at a small white box the man is holding. NREL promotes excellence in teaching and learning and contributes to improving critical elements of the science, mathematics, and technology education system. Teachers are offered research and development opportunities to enhance their content knowledge, instructional strategies, and leadership abilities. Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions historically underrepresented in the research community in order to expand the workforce vital to the Department

205

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Incentive Energy Incentive Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Energy Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs.

206

ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARRA Program Summary: Energy Smart Jobs Program Statewide Program (Initially targeting urban Description: The Program focuses on both job creation and energy efficiency. Just over one third, utilities and customers to ensure both job creation and energy efficiency opportunities continue

207

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT CANCER PROGRAM 2010 ANNUAL REPORT WITH STATISTICAL DATA FROM 2009 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS MEDICAL CENTER #12;2 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2 #12;3 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 3 UIMC CANCER PROGRAM CHANGING MULTIDISCIPLINARY CARE. FOR GOOD. #12;4 CANCER PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT

Illinois at Chicago, University of

208

SCIENCE Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCIENCE Program SCIENCE Program early science program Early at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility CONTACT  Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | www.alcf.anl.gov | (877) 737-8615 Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI: Venkatramani Balaji Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Award: 150 Million Hours Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage PI: Larry Curtiss Argonne National Laboratory Award: 50 Million Hours Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow PI: Christos Frouzakis Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Award: 150 Million Hours High-Accuracy Predictions of the Bulk Properties of Water PI: Mark Gordon Iowa State University Award: 150 Million Hours Cosmic Structure Probes

209

Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program The program of the school focuses on the following areas: The fundamentals of the interaction of X-rays and neutrons with matter X-ray and neutron production and experimental instrumentation Theory and practical application of various X-ray and neutron experimental techniques Hands on experience gained through experiments at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Lectures are given by prominent scientists drawn from universities, several national laboratories, and industry. Subjects for lectures include: Interactions of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Neutron Generation and Detection Neutron Instrumentation X-ray Generation and Detection X-ray Instrumentation Single-Crystal and Surface Diffraction

210

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Y-12 National Security Complex 4-1 4. The Y-12 National Security Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center and the Nuclear Materials Information Program Library, a premier manufacturing facility operated by B&W Y-12 for NNSA, plays a vital role in DOE's Nuclear Security a safe and reliable US nuclear weapons deterrent. The complex also retrieves and stores nuclear materials

Pennycook, Steve

212

Program Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Description Program Description Discover E (Engineering) is an evening of interesting, interactive and fun engineering, science, math, and technology demonstrations for K-12 students and their parents or guardians. It is held in conjunction with National Engineers Week which is celebrated at the time of George Washington's birthday, our nation's first President, who was a military engineer and land surveyor. Activities include 30-50 interactive demonstrations of basic engineering, science, technology and math principles that may include robots, reverse engineering, casting, crystal structures, forensic science, the effects of liquid nitrogen, slide rule, sound waves, electrostatics, mechanics, materials properties and materials

213

Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's NETL's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program Advances of Multi-pollutant and CO 2 Control Technologies Chicago, IL April 30, 2007 Timothy Fout Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory T. Fout, Apr. 2007 Outline for Presentation * NETL Overview * The Issue * The Solutions * What is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * DOE's Sequestration Program Structure * CO 2 Capture Research Projects T. Fout, Apr. 2007 National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, five locations, one management structure * 1,100 Federal and support-contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations West Virginia

214

Supramolecular chemistry: from complexes to complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1]cryptand (3) is selective for lithium cations (with a diameter of 1.36 A...figure 1i). Spherands bind sodium and lithium cations very strongly (compound 6 forms...calixarene cyt c complex in the presence of excess ascorbate was considerably slower than...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs 6-1 6. Y-12 Environmental Monitoring Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations for radionuclides require continuous emission sam- pling at the Y-12 National Security Complex for air, water, and groundwater environ- mental media. These programs-12 Complex room ventila- tion systems are estimated from radiation control data collected on airborne

Pennycook, Steve

216

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

217

Maryland Efficiency Program Options  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland Efficiency Program Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

218

RESEARCHCONTRIBUTIONS Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCHCONTRIBUTIONS Programming Techniques and Data Structures Min-Max Heaps and Ian Munro Editor Generalized Priority Queues M. D. ATKINSON,J.-R. SACK,N. SANTORO,and T. STROTHOTTE ABSTRACT: ,4 simple implementation of double- endedpriority queues is presented. The proposed structure, called a min-max heap, can

Atkinson, Mike

219

LLNL Microsensors Program  

SciTech Connect

The Microsensors Program was born out the need for enhanced sensor technology in support of the Weapons Program. In the interest of expanded diagnostic capabilities to provide true performance characteristics of weapon assemblies in flight and ground tests, a suite of sensor requirements was proposed. These potential new sensor technologies were envisioned to be completely unobtrusive and allow for the development of test vehicles (mock warheads and bomb assemblies) that were designed to mechanical and electrical specifications as close to the stockpile weapon design configuration as possible. The closeness of a test vehicle design to the respective stockpile weapon design is referred to as ''fidelity,'' with the term ''high-fidelity'' to mean all components are designed to emulate, very closely, the true system design. These efforts were in line with many activities associated with Stockpile Stewardship and were intended to enable better modeling and performance assessment without the need for underground testing. Several weapons are currently undergoing Life Extension Programs (LEP) to lengthen each weapon system's respective service life. The ability to assess the projected life of these complex assemblies is crucial to the success of the LEP activities.

Lavietes, A

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - February 2008 February 2008 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight inspected the emergency management program at DOE's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October-November 2007. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63). Independent Oversight reports to the Chief, Office of Health, Safety and Security, who reports directly to the Secretary of Energy. This 2007 inspection found that YSO and B&W Y-12 have established an emergency management program that generally protects site workers and the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geospatial Science Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program June 21, 2011 - 3:50pm Addthis The overarching mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) is to discover solutions to power and secure America's future. DOE's Geospatial Science Program was established to optimize geospatial investments across our complex and to enable prudent stewardship of the resources provided by the American taxpayer. The term 'geospatial science' encompasses both the concepts of geographic information science and geographic information systems. Geographic information science is the study of spatially-referenced data, including geographic theory, technological design, and analytical algorithms. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are specialized software and hardware used to manage, manipulate, query, and

222

Quantum implicit computational complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a quantum lambda calculus inspired by Lafont's Soft Linear Logic and capturing the polynomial quantum complexity classes EQP, BQP and ZQP. The calculus is based on the ''classical control and quantum data'' paradigm. This is the first example ... Keywords: Implicit computational complexity, Lambda calculus, Quantum computation

Ugo Dal Lago; Andrea Masini; Margherita Zorzi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Brood-Stock Program, 1981-1986 Final Report of Research.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Brood-stock Program was to hatch eggs from upriver stocks, rear the fish to spawning maturity, and use the resulting eggs for stock restoration in the Snake River. Approximately 15,000 eyed Snake River fall chinook salmon eggs were obtained each winter in 1981, 1982, 1983, and 1984 from various Columbia River hatcheries. Fish from these eggs were reared in dechlorinated City of Seattle water at the Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Center or in constant 10.5/degree/C groundwater at the University of Washington's Big Beef Creek Research Station. Seawater tolerance trials of 0+ age (3--5 months) juveniles in all four brood stocks were strongly suggestive of the 1+ age smoltification pattern of spring chinook salmon. Attempts to transfer 0+ age fish to marine net-pens at the Manchester Marine Experimental Station were unsuccessful during the four brood years. The only Snake River fall chinook salmon that demonstrated acceptable survival after 4 months residence in seawater were fish that were transferred as 1+ age smolts. After smolts were successfully transferred to seawater, losses were minimal for several months. However, in all Snake River chinook salmon stocks, mortality due to bacterial kidney disease (BKD) and a previously undescribed ''rosette disease'' resulted in very few maturing fish at 4 or 5 years of age. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Harrell, Lee W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Program Development  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

Atencio, Julian J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge MBA ProgrAM Program Format Program Duration 12 months Program Format Cohort (lockstep) Class Requirements · Application Form and $55 fee. · Resume · Essay outlining why you wish to join the Bridge MBA program, and how you expect the Bridge to aid your future job search (500 words or less) · Official

Carter, John

226

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Selenophene transition metal complexes  

SciTech Connect

This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the {eta}{sup 5}- and the {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The {sup 77}Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of {eta}{sup 1}(S)-bound thiophenes, {eta}{sup 1}(S)-benzothiophene and {eta}{sup 1}(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh{sub 3})Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O{sub 3}SCF{sub 3} was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the {eta}{sup 1}(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

White, C.J.

1994-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Complex-plasma boundaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study deals with the boundary between a normal plasma of ions and electrons, and an adjacent complex plasma of ions, electrons, and microparticles, as found in innumerable examples in nature. Here we show that the matching between the two plasmas involve electrostatic double layers. These double layers explain the sharp boundaries observed in the laboratory and in astrophysics. A modified theory is derived for the double layers that form at the discontinuity between two different complex plasmas and at the point of contact of three complex plasmas. The theory is applied to the first measurements from the Plasma Kristall Experiment (PKE) Nefedov Laboratory in the International Space Station.

B. M. Annaratone; S. A. Khrapak; P. Bryant; G. E. Morfill; H. Rothermel; H. M. Thomas; M. Zuzic; V. E. Fortov; V. I. Molotkov; A. P. Nefedov; S. Krikalev; Yu. P. Semenov

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mobile multiwave lidar complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiwave mobile lidar complexes (MLCs) are designed and developed. A number of vehicle-based MLCs are built. The set of complex lidar probing data obtained with the help of MLCs is synchronised in space and time, covers a large area (the operation range of an MLC is 15 km), and is based on a unified methodological approach. The results of probing contain information on the concentration and physical nature of atmospheric aerosol, chemical composition of the gaseous phase of the atmosphere, wind and turbulence. The obtained data form the basis for a complex analysis of the ecological situation and prognosis of its development.

A S Boreysho; M A Konyaev; A V Morozov; A V Pikulik; A V Savin; A V Trilis; S Ya Chakchir; N I Boiko; Yu N Vlasov; S P Nikitaev; A V Rozhnov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Perennial Grass Breeding Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perennial Grass Breeding Program BIOENERGY PROGRAM One Texas AgriLife Research initiative for bioenergy is the perennial grass breeding program. Results are outlined here. Pearl Millet-Napiergrass P

231

Programs and Initiatives | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Research and Policy Center is helping put Prevention through Design concepts to work. Debbie Reed, UT Liaison Tom Berg, Commercialization and Partnerships director...

232

Immanants, Tensor Network States and the Geometric Complexity Theory Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-symmetric partition is T (GL(E) x GL(F )) ><| Z 2, where T (GL(E) x GL(F )) is the group of pairs of n x n diagonal matrices with the product of determinants equal to 1, delta(Sn) is the diagonal subgroup of Sn x Sn. We also prove that the identity...

Ye, Ke

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Defense Programs: the mission | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the early days of World War II, fear that Germany would create and use an atomic bomb led the U.S. to secretly launch the Manhattan Project to build one first. Enriched uranium...

234

A note on complexity of multistage stochastic programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 20, 2014 ... The (continuous) function F1 : Rn1 ? R, the (nonempty) set X1 and the vector ?1 are deterministic. In (1) we have made it explicit the fact that...

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

DOE Technical Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

government needs 17 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov Market-Focused Programs * Partner with utilities to: - Help promote and supplement EECBG programs - Directly administer programs...

236

Seafood Extension Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafood Extension Program Pamela Tom, Program Manager,of California Sea Grants Seafood Extension Program and thetechnical information to seafood processors, distributors,

Tom, Pamela

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Carney complex (CNC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Carney complex (CNC) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by ... be also observed in some patients without other CNC manifestations or familial history of the disease. ... may be multiple. One of ...

Jrme Bertherat

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Circulating Immune Complexes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antigens, self or foreign, induce an immune response leading to production of specific antibodies that interact with the inciting antigens and may form antigenantibody (immune) complexes. An immune response i...

Dinesh Kumar

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Information hiding in parallel programs  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental principle in program design is to isolate difficult or changeable design decisions. Application of this principle to parallel programs requires identification of decisions that are difficult or subject to change, and the development of techniques for hiding these decisions. We experiment with three complex applications, and identify mapping, communication, and scheduling as areas in which decisions are particularly problematic. We develop computational abstractions that hide such decisions, and show that these abstractions can be used to develop elegant solutions to programming problems. In particular, they allow us to encode common structures, such as transforms, reductions, and meshes, as software cells and templates that can reused in different applications. An important characteristic of these structures is that they do not incorporate mapping, communication, or scheduling decisions: these aspects of the design are specified separately, when composing existing structures to form applications. This separation of concerns allows the same cells and templates to be reused in different contexts.

Foster, I.

1992-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gold Standard Program Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gold Standard Program Model Gold Standard Program Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Gold Standard Program Model Agency/Company /Organization: World Wildlife Fund Sector: Climate, Energy User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.cdmgoldstandard.org/project-certification/rules-and-toolkit Cost: Paid Related Tools Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program (BenMAP) MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model ProForm ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS A bottom-up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects and voluntary programs that result in verifiable co-benefits. Approach It is a bottom up method of certifying Kyoto Protocol Clean Development Mechanism projects as well as voluntary programs that result in verifiable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

HEET Program Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Studies Material Studies (Supported by DOE-NETL) Ceramic Insulation Top Coat provides: thermal insulation Superalloy Substrate (Carries the load) TBC System Cooling Air Gas Path C o o l i n g H o l e Metallic Bond Coat provides: - oxidation/corrosion protection - surface for ceramic to adhere to Contents * Introduction * NETL Programs * Materials Development Issues * Required important research tasks * TBC Architecture * Industry Views * TBC Monitoring * TBC Performance Introduction Improved gas turbines demand materials that operate in high hostile environment. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide solution for meeting such a demand. The TBCs have the most complex structure with a minimum of four layers made of different materials with specific properties and functions. They are the substrate, the bond-

242

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume III - November 2001 November 2001 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an emergency management program review at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in October 2001. The purpose of this inspection was to assess Y-12's readiness to protect site personnel and the public from the consequences of onsite events that could result in the release of hazardous materials from site facilities and activities. Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex, Volume

243

Y-12 National Security Complex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex Aerial View Y-12 National Security Complex's primary mission is to support of the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance program. Activities include assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons components, secure storage of special nuclear material (SNM), and various other nuclear weapons-related activities. Other activities include various aspects of testing and development, nonproliferation, and technology transfer. Enforcement June 13, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Babcock & Wilcox Teclmical Services Y -12, LLC - NEA-2008-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC, related to a Uranium Chip Fire at the Y-12 National

244

Human Reliability Program Overview  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

Bodin, Michael

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

LWR Sustainability Program Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Integrated Program Plan, Revision 2, INL-EXT-11-23452, April 2014. pdf DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program -...

246

DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Administered by the HSS Office of Corporate Safety Programs, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is responsible for implementing performance standards for DOE contractor external dosimetry and radiobioassay programs through periodic performance testing and on-site program assessments.

247

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title OK-TRIBE-ABSENTEE-SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- ABSENTEE- SHAWNEE TRIBE OF INDIANS OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma proposes to retrofit systems and facilities in their complex to

248

ARM - Program Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports Program Fact Sheets Campaign Backgrounders Education and Outreach Posters Brochures Research Highlights Summaries Program Fact Sheets Please contact...

249

Water Power Program: Publications  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Water Power Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE Water Power Program Information Resources Publications...

250

Actuarial Sciences Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Purdue Actuarial Science Program is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly by the Department of Mathematics and Department of Statistics.

251

Microsoft Word - ROD_031610.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Record of Decision March 2010 Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to fund the Proposed Action of the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program (hatchery program) as described in the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0384, November 2009). The Proposed Action, which was recommended for BPA funding by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), is in the Columbia Cascade ecological province of Washington State. BPA prepared the Chief Joseph Hatchery Program EIS and this Record of Decision (ROD) pursuant to the process specified in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA, P.L. 91-190), regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (40 CFR Part 1505), and Implementing

252

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning

253

Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest-2013 data is based on the proposed IPR spending levels as of May 13, 2010. Total $ 155 4 20 34 4 445 116 778 Program Proposed Expense Budget F&W Program Expense Budget IPR FY 2012 FY 2013 Base * 239,634,000 243

254

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual Approved by: (name) Last revised by: (name) Revision/FPS_Program_Manual_Template.docx 1. Introduction The Fire Protection Systems Program is designed to make sure the annual compliance ................................................................................................................. 3 7.1.1 Job Plan: Fire Pump Testing

Pawlowski, Wojtek

255

Program 050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental and Water Environmental and Water Resources MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM Background Mercury exists in trace amounts in fossil fuels (e.g., natural gas, coal), vegetation, crustal material, and waste products. Through combustion or natural processes, mercury vapor can be released to the atmosphere, where it can drift for a year or more, spreading with air currents over vast regions of the globe. Current estimates approximate that 5000 tons of mercury is released annually into the atmosphere from anthropogenic (man-made) and natural sources combined. Anthropogenic sources in the United States account for about 3 percent of the total annual global mercury releases, with U.S. power plants contributing about 1 percent of the world total. Mercury emissions have fallen in

256

Synchronization in complex networks  

SciTech Connect

Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

Identifying enterprise leverage points in Defense Acquisition Program performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large, complex systems development programs in the Department of Defense are finding it more difficult to deliver desired capabilities to the end user on time and on budget than ever before. Evidence exists that almost all ...

Wirthlin, Joseph Robert, 1970-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Systematic Analysis of Defenses against Return-Oriented Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the introduction of return-oriented programming, increasingly complex defenses and subtle attacks that bypass them have been proposed. Unfortunately the lack of a unifying threat model among code reuse security papers ...

Skowyra, Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulation of a hypersonic vehicle with scramjet propulsion system. The papers in this group cover important of the Summer Program: Scramjet Propulsion (A. Auslender); Numerical Methods for Complex Flows (F. Ham

Prinz, Friedrich B.

260

Data Management in the LoanSTAR Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the complexity of managing building energy usage data for many buildings. The history and methodology of data collection at the Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program, a large multimillion dollar project, is given...

Lopez, R. E.; Haberl, J. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oak Ridge callibration recall program  

SciTech Connect

A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pritchard, E.W. [Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology, TN (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Intergovernmental Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intergovernmental Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs Intergovernmental Programs The Office of Environmental Management supports, by means of grants and cooperative agreements, a number of institutionalized activities and relationships with various national intergovernmental organizations. These organizations include the Energy Communities Alliance, the Environmental Council of States, the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Governors Association, and the National Conference of

263

Complexity: Order contra Chaos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complexity: Order contra Chaos James P. Crutchfield Physics Department University of California. Philosophical consequences of deterministic chaos are noted. Appearing in Handbook of Metaphysics and Ontology's behaviour is symbolically specified in its entirety. How does unpredictability arise in such a situation

Crutchfield, Jim

264

Capitalizing on Complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first decade of this new century. In a very short time, we've become aware of global climate change with complexity, the CEO of an industrial products company calls the economic environment of 2009 "a wake-up call and public sector leaders, three widely shared perspectives stand in relief. 1) The world's private

265

Summer Internship Programs | Office of Educational Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Summer Internship Programs BNL Summer Internship Programs Please note: All DOE programs have strict deadlines. Please contact the Office of Educational Programs for this information. Mentor Orientation Please review the following documents that are part of the Mentor Orientation: Mentor Manual New Appointment Checklist SULI Syllabus CCI Syllabus VFP Syllabus DOE Internship Programs DOE Program Forms & Information DOE summer programs include Community College Institute (CCI), Science Undergraduate Summer Internship (SULI) and Visiting Faculty Program (VFP). DOE Summer Internship Programs Important Dates January 31st - 1st round of student applications available for viewing February 23rd - 2nd round of student applications available for viewing March 12th - Last day for accepting DOE student request

266

Complex Systems and Brain Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Charles E. Schmidt College of Science www.ccs.fau.edu #12;Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Our Mission The mission of the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is to understand the principles and mechanisms underlying complex behavior

Fernandez, Eduardo

267

Complexity measures applied to an applications case study  

SciTech Connect

Maintenance of large applications programs has become the most costly function of many Management Information Systems. As a result, recent research has attempted to objectively determine the qualities of low maintenance software. Related research has been directed toward quantifying the complexity, or unmaintainability of existing software. This paper will reference a case study of a large MIS software application and will discuss current maintenance problems and associated costs. A mathematical model will then be presented which correlates quantifiable complexity measures with actual maintenance costs. Finally, a method for projecting cost savings from the reduced complexity of software will be suggested.

Brice, L.; Connell, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program at West Virginia University consists of research and development associated with hazardous waste remediation problems at the Department of Energy complex and elsewhere. This program seeks to facilitate expedited development and implementation of solutions to the nation`s hazardous waste clean-up efforts. By a unique combination of university research and private technology development efforts, new paths toward implementing technology and speeding clean-ups are achievable. Mechanisms include aggressive industrial tie-ins to academic development programs, expedited support of small business technology development efforts, enhanced linkages to existing DOE programs, and facilitated access to hazardous waste sites. The program topically falls into an information component, which includes knowledge acquisition, technology evaluation and outreach activities and an R and D component, which develops and implements new and improved technologies. Projects began in February 1993 due to initiation of a Cooperative Agreement between West Virginia University and the Department of Energy.

Berg, M.; Sack, W.A.; Gabr, M. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

ARTICLE IN PRESS Science of Computer Programming ( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leisure to air traffic control, communications, cars, air planes, etc. Yet, software products today are plagued by defects. The increasing complexity of programs makes it almost impossible to deploy an error, the Windows 2k operating system was shipped with 63,000 defects (discovered to date) [3]. Furthermore, it has

270

Protein complex prediction via improved verification methods using constrained domain-domain matching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identification of protein complexes within protein-protein interaction networks is one of the important objectives in functional genomics. Ozawa et al. proposed a verification method of protein complexes by introducing a structural constraint. In this paper, we propose an improved integer programming-based method based on the idea that a candidate complex should not be divided into many small complexes, and combination methods with maximal components and extreme sets. The results of computational experiments suggest that our methods outperform the method by Ozawa et al. We prove that the verification problems are NP-hard, which justifies the use of integer programming.

Yang Zhao; Morihiro Hayashida; Jose C. Nacher; Hiroshi Nagamochi; Tatsuya Akutsu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Office of Educational Programs | Teacher Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specifically Geared for Teachers Specifically Geared for Teachers Displaying all programs and contests suitable for teachers and faculty. [ Update Search Criteria ] (OEP) InSynC (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program Other Educational Programs Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program

272

Office of Educational Programs | Student Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Contests for Students and Contests for Students Displaying all programs and contests. [ Narrow Search ] (INCREASE) Historically Black Colleges and Universities / National Synchrotron Light Source Consortium (Internship - CCI) Community College Internship (Internship - SULI) Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (Internship - VFP) Visiting Faculty Program (NCSS) Nuclear Chemistry Summer School (NNSS) Nuclear Nonproliferation Safeguards and Security Summer Course (OEP) College Mini-Semester Program (OEP) InSynC (OEP) New York State Collegiate Science & Technology Entry Program Mini-Course (CSTEP) (OEP) Professional Development Workshops for Teachers (OEP) The G.R.E.En. Institute (OSSP) GREEN Institute's Open Space Stewardship Program (Postdoc) AGEP-T FRAME (Research - HSRP) High School Research Program

273

EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

hatchery release evaluation is consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, BPA's Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS and ROD, and the...

274

EIS-0495: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental...

275

EIS-0495: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington Bonneville Power Administration issued a Draft EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of...

276

EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

277

Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Independent Oversight Inspection, Y-12 National Security Complex - April 2003 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Y-12 National Security Complex The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in March-April 2003. The inspection was performed by OA's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Overall, YSO and BWXT have established a generally effective ISM program. YSO and BWXT management have demonstrated their commitment to continuous improvement and have effective tools and process enhancements to address

278

A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nuclear family "A Nuclear Family: Y-12 National Security Complex" is a four episode

279

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex Nevada Weatherizes Large-Scale Complex July 1, 2010 - 10:11am Addthis What does this project do? This nonprofit weatherized a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. The weatherization program of the Rural Nevada Development Corporation (RNDC) reached a recent success in its eleven counties-wide territory. In June, the nonprofit finished weatherizing a 22-unit low-income multifamily complex, reducing the building's duct leakage from 90 percent to just 5 percent. "That is one big savings and is why I am proud of this project," says Dru Simerson, RNDC Weatherization Manager. RNDC's crew replaced all windows and 17 furnaces and installed floor

280

Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex - June Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 June 2011 Site Lead Orientation Visit to the Y-12 Site Office and Y-12 National Security Complex [HIAR-Y-12-2011-06-23] The purposes of the visit were to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, initiate the site lead program, increase operational awareness of the site's activities, and discuss methods the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) uses to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities. Independent Activity Report, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Oak Ridge Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Undergraduate Student Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Program Undergraduate Student Program The Undergraduate Student (UGS) program is a year-round educational program that provides students with relevant research experience while they are pursuing an undergraduate degree. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 663-5621 Email Program Coordinator Brenda Montoya Student Programs (505) 663-5116 Email Deadline for continuing and returning students: you are required to submit updated transcripts to the program office by 2/28 each year. Get relevant experience while pursuing undergraduate degree The Undergraduate Student (UGS) Program offers summer, part-time, and full-time appointments for undergraduate students. The program is a year-round educational program that provides students with

282

Programming languages as tools for describing and modeling anticipatory systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Algorithmizing the control of a complex system needs to know it in details, especially when the control steps are tested at a simulation model of the system. Computing technique enables performing control so that possible consequences to more or less ... Keywords: SIMULA, anticipatory systems, complex systems formalism, object-oriented programming, simulation, sophisticated control

Eugene Kindler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

67 Federal Register 67 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 60 / Thursday, March 28, 2013 / Notices Heritage Program Volunteer Program; (b) the USAF Heritage Program the means with which to select respondents pursuant to the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. The primary use of the information collection includes the evaluation and placement of respondents within the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer Program. Affected Public: Business or other for profit; Not-for-profit Institutions. Annual Burden Hours: 49.5. Number of Respondents: 198. Responses per Respondent: 1. Average Burden per Response: 15 minutes. Frequency: On occasion. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Summary of Information Collection Respondents are individuals expressing an interest in participating in the USAF Heritage Program Volunteer

284

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

285

State Energy Program Competitive Financial Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State Energy Program (SEP) dedicates a portion of its funding each year to provide competitively awarded financial assistance to U.S. states and territories to advance policies, programs, and market strategies.

286

Contract Management Certificate Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract Management Certificate Program Accelerate Your Career BusinessandManagement extension bearing the UC seal signifies a well- known, uncompromising standard of academic excellence. #12;Contract Management Certificate Program UC Irvine Extension's Contract Management Certificate Program focuses on core

Rose, Michael R.

287

Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Assistance Program, State Energy Program, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants...

288

State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007 State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007 This document provides instructions to the states for program year 2007 about...

289

Program Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management Program Management Safety The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) top priority is to ensure proper implementation and continuous improvement of Integrated Safety Management Systems (ISMS) in the EM complex and to serve as a focal point for EM safety standards and policy development and interpretation and interfaces with internal/external oversight organizations Read more Acquisition The Office of Environmental Management strives to assure effective project, acquisition, and contract management, by working closely with senior level officials in Headquarters and Field Managers; external stakeholders; and major contractors for the purpose of achieving acquisition and project management objectives of the Office of Environmental Management (EM)

290

Efficient separations & processing crosscutting program  

SciTech Connect

The Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP) was created in 1991 to identify, develop, and perfect chemical and physical separations technologies and chemical processes which treat wastes and address environmental problems throughout the DOE complex. The ESP funds several multiyear tasks that address high-priority waste remediation problems involving high-level, low-level, transuranic, hazardous, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The ESP supports applied research and development (R & D) leading to the demonstration or use of these separations technologies by other organizations within the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Extracting and Representing Qualitative Behaviors of Complex Systems in Phase Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a qualitative method for understanding and representing phase space structures of complex systems and demonstrate the method with a program, MAPS --- Modeler and Analyzer for Phase Spaces, using deep domain ...

Zhao, Feng

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hydropower Program Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs SHARE Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs image Oak Ridge National Laboratory covers the entire spectrum of nuclear nonproliferation work, from...

294

ORISE: Science Education Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

undergraduate students for paid internships at ORNL for the 2015 spring term of the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program. The program at ORNL is administered by...

295

Energy Smart Grocer Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

296

program | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Carbon Storage Program Carbon Capture Program Crosscutting Research Program Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Lake Nyos and Mammoth Mountain: What Do They Tell Us about...

297

Program Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program Analysis Program Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary...

298

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Transforms, Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX F. TRANSFORMS, COMPLEX ANALYSIS 1 Appendix F Transforms, Complex Analysis This appendix discusses Fourier and Laplace transforms as they are used in plasma physics and this book. Also, key properties of complex variable theory that are needed for understanding and inverting these transforms

Callen, James D.

299

Fungal Genomics Program  

SciTech Connect

The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

Grigoriev, Igor

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

study programs in mathematics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study programs in m mathematics #12;#12;3 CONTENTS 5 Introduction 7 Mathematics at the University of Ljubljana 9 Department of Mathematics information page Academic study program in Mathematics Academic study program in Financial Mathematics Single cycle master's study program in Mathematics education

?umer, Slobodan

302

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

303

SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................10 Lockout/Tag-Out Program: IODP-USIO Policy Modification

304

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

305

Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

Lee, S

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, and W. Kent Ostler

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

310

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

514 514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y DOE/FE-0514 Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2007 Includes Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Projects As of September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 2008 T E C H N O L O G Y This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Offi

311

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Offers Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Program Offers New Spin on Traditional Marketing on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

312

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Design : Design the Financing Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 4: Design the Financing Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives Identify & Engage Financial Partners

313

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Define 2: Define Finance Program Objectives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 2: Define Finance Program Objectives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market Define Finance Program Objectives

314

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

SciTech Connect

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOCENT TRAINING PROGRAM AGENDA Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 p.m. Lake Tahoe and the World Water Crisis Presentation by Dr. Charles Goldman, noted freshwater and Ecology of Lake Tahoe Saturday, June 21, 2014 (9 ­ 11 a.m. / 11 a.m. ­ 2 p.m.) LOCATION: Tahoe City Field Station (Historic Hatchery) 2400 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City, CA 9:00 ­ 11:00 a.m. Research Vessel

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

316

NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear conference showcases complex science, engineering | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering NNSA conference showcases complex science, engineering Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship (SSGF) annual fellows' conference

317

Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex Posted By Office of Public Affairs Acting NNSA Administrator and Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security

318

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Hydropower Technologies Program Technology Review (Deep Dive) for Under Secretaries Johnson and Koonin September 4, 2009 presentation highlighting the Wind and Hydropower...

319

RHIC | Accelerator Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RHIC Accelerators RHIC Accelerators The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider complex is actually composed of a long "chain" of particle accelerators Heavy ions begin their travels in the Electron Beam Ion Source accelerator (1). The ions then travel to the small, circular Booster (3) where, with each pass, they are accelerated to higher energy. From the Booster, ions travel to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (4), which then injects the beams via a beamline (5) into the two rings of RHIC (6). In RHIC, the beams get a final accelerator "kick up" in energy from radio waves. Once accelerated, the ions can "orbit" inside the rings for hours. RHIC can also conduct colliding-beam experiments with polarized protons. These are first accelerated in the Linac (2), and further in the Booster (3), AGS (4), and

320

Complex pendulum biomass sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Complex Glazing Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.2 1.2 This is a Beta version of the Complex Glazing Database (CGDB) for WINDOW 6. The data in the list below was measured by LBNL for this first data set. In the future, LBNL will publish measurement and submittal procedures so that manufacturers can submit their own data to LBNL for review and inclusion in subsequent databases, in a similar fashion to the International Glazing Database (IGDB). The numbering scheme for each manufacturer is a Beta scheme and will be further developed in the next few months. Alkenz USA Inc Shading Material Name BSDF XML File Shading Layer Name ID Type Sunshadow 3000, N901 Charcoal (SA-31) 2011-SA31.XML Sunshadow 3000, N901 Charcoal (WS) 7000 BSDF File Sunshadow 3100, N002 white/bone (SA-30) 2011-SA30.XML Sunshadow 3100, N002 white/bone (WS)

322

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

323

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

324

Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Environmental Biosciences Program Quarterly Report  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risks. These initiatives are consistent with the MUSC role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and with the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable MUSC to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBPs success as a nationally prominent research program is due, in part, to its ability to task-organize scientific expertise from multiple disciplines in addressing these complex problems Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene and low-dose ionizing radiation. Work on the trichloroethylene research projects has been slowed as a result of funding uncertainties. The impact of these funding uncertainties has been discussed with the DOE. Plans for restructuring the performance schedule of the trichloroethylene projects have been submitted to the department. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making. Questions, comments or requests for further information concerning the activities under this cooperative agreement can be forwarded to Dr. Lawrence C. Mohr in the EBP office of the Medical University of South Carolina at (843) 792-1532.

Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total mortality of limnetic fishes, depending on the contribution of littoral zone fishes. Inflow to GCD forebay showed the strongest negative relationship with entrainment whereas reservoir elevation and fish vertical distribution had no direct relationship with entrainment. Our results indicate that kokanee and rainbow trout in Lake Roosevelt were limited by top down impacts including predation and entrainment, whereas bottom up effects and abiotic conditions were not limiting.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement Project Operations and Maintenance Program; Brood Year 2000: Johnson Creek Chinook Salmon Supplementation, Biennial Report 2000-2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe, through funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration, has implemented a small scale chinook salmon supplementation program on Johnson Creek, a tributary in the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project was established to enhance the number of threatened Snake River summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) returning to Johnson Creek through artificial propagation. Adult chinook salmon trapping, broodstock selection, and spawning was first implemented in 1998, did not occur in 1999, and was resumed in 2000. A total of 152 salmon were trapped in Johnson Creek in 2000, of which 73 (25 males, 16 females, and 32 jacks) fish were transported to Idaho Fish and Game=s South Fork Salmon River adult holding and spawning facility for artificial propagation purposes. The remaining 79 (29 males, 16 females, and 24 jacks) fish were released above the weir to spawn naturally. A total of 65,060 green eggs were taken from 16 female salmon and transported to the McCall Fish Hatchery for incubation and rearing. Egg counts indicated an average eye-up rate of 86.0% for 55,971 eyed eggs. Average fecundity for Johnson Creek females was 4,066 eggs per female. Juvenile fish were reared indoors at the McCall Fish Hatchery through November 2001. These fish were transferred to outdoor rearing facilities in December 2001 where they remained until release in March 2002. All of these fish were marked with Coded Wire Tags and Visual Implant Elastomer tags. In addition 9,987 were also PIT tagged. Hand counts provided by marking crews were used to amend the number of juvenile salmon released from the original egg count. A total of 57,392 smolts were released into a temporary acclimation channel in Johnson Creek on March 18, 19, 20, 2002. These fish were held in this facility until a fish screen was removed on March 22, 2002 and the fish were allowed to emigrate.

Daniel, Mitch; Gebhards, John; Hill, Robert

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Enhanced algorithms for stochastic programming  

SciTech Connect

In this dissertation, we present some of the recent advances made in solving two-stage stochastic linear programming problems of large size and complexity. Decomposition and sampling are two fundamental components of techniques to solve stochastic optimization problems. We describe improvements to the current techniques in both these areas. We studied different ways of using importance sampling techniques in the context of Stochastic programming, by varying the choice of approximation functions used in this method. We have concluded that approximating the recourse function by a computationally inexpensive piecewise-linear function is highly efficient. This reduced the problem from finding the mean of a computationally expensive functions to finding that of a computationally inexpensive function. Then we implemented various variance reduction techniques to estimate the mean of a piecewise-linear function. This method achieved similar variance reductions in orders of magnitude less time than, when we directly applied variance-reduction techniques directly on the given problem. In solving a stochastic linear program, the expected value problem is usually solved before a stochastic solution and also to speed-up the algorithm by making use of the information obtained from the solution of the expected value problem. We have devised a new decomposition scheme to improve the convergence of this algorithm.

Krishna, A.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Structure to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Structure on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements

330

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 6: Implement Finance Program Initiatives on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

331

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement to someone by E-mail Measurement to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Measurement on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

332

Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Operations and Maintenance Program Implementation on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

333

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review Radioactive Waste Management Complex Wide Review The main goal of this complex-wide review was to obtain feedback from DOE sites...

334

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the State Capitol Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermal savings expected from turning off air handlers. Details are given in Appendix C. Texas Governor's Energy Office Energy Systems Laboratory LoanSTAR O&M Program Texas A&M University State Capitol Complex O&M Report, p. 8 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The O.... Texas Governor's Energy Office LoanSTAR O&M Program Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University State Capitol Complex O&M Report, p.9 Figure 3: Potential Annual O&M Savings for Eight Buildings in the State Capitol Complex Figure 4 shows the impact...

Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Katipamula, S.; Abbas, M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Civilian Nuclear Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Civilian Nuclear Programs Los Alamos is committed to using its advanced nuclear expertise and unique facilities to meet the civilian nuclear national security demands of the future. CONTACT US Program Director Bruce Robinson (505) 667-1910 Email Los Alamos partners extensively with other laboratories, universities, industry, and the international nuclear community to address real-world technical challenges The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office is the focal point for nuclear energy research and development and next-generation repository science at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Civilian Nuclear Programs Office manages projects funded by the Department of Energy's offices of Nuclear Energy Environmental Management Nuclear Regulatory Commission

337

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Incentive Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentive Programs Incentive Programs Most states offer energy incentive programs to help offset energy costs. FEMP's Energy Incentive Program helps Federal agencies take advantage of these incentives by providing information about the funding-program opportunities available in each state. Find Funding Click on a state or choose a one from the menu to see a summary of available energy incentives. Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma Ohio Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

338

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

339

PNNL EERE Program: Building Technologies Program (Overview)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Home Program Areas Contacts Related Sites Energy Directorate PNNL Home Security & Privacy PNNL Buildings Program Overview PNNL Buildings Portfolio Science Foundation EE & Demand Response High-Performance Sustainable Design Codes and Standards Overcoming Market Barriers Analysis and Planning Key Buildings Projects Contacts Publications & Presentations PNNL Buildings Program Buildings account for about 40 percent of our nation's energy use. That's 72 percent of U.S. electricity and 55 percent of natural gas, resulting in 39 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions and a range of other negative environmental impacts. The buildings sciences team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is committed to dramatically improving the

340

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Department of Energy Complex - May  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Department of Energy Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Department of Energy Complex - May 2000 Independent Oversight Follow-up Review, Department of Energy Complex - May 2000 May 2000 Follow-up Review of Emergency Management Programs in the Department of Energy Complex The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to maintain a comprehensive emergency management system to ensure that DOE is prepared to protect workers, the public, the environment, and national security in the event of an accident or emergency. Following a chemical explosion at DOE's Hanford site in May 1997, an independent oversight evaluation of emergency management programs across the DOE complex was conducted. That evaluation, completed in early 1998, concluded that, despite a series of 1997 Secretarial initiatives on emergency management, the programs at DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermally unstable complexants: Stability of lanthanide/actinide complexes, thermal instability of the ligands, and applications in actinide separations  

SciTech Connect

Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which we call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.

Nash, K.L.; Rickert, P.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Complexity of Ising Spin Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compute the complexity [logarithm of the number of Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) states] associated with minima and index-one saddle points of the TAP free energy. Higher-index saddles have smaller complexities. The two leading complexities are equal, consistent with the Morse theorem on the total number of turning points, and have the value given by Bray and Moore [J. Phys. C 13, L469 (1980)]. In the thermodynamic limit, TAP states of all free energies become marginally stable.

T. Aspelmeier; A. J. Bray; M. A. Moore

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

344

Complex higher order derivative theories  

SciTech Connect

In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico)

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

345

Molecular Modeling of Dirhodium Complexes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Dirhodium complexes such as carboxylates and carboxylamidates are very efficient metal catalysts used in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Recent experimental work has (more)

Debrah, Duke A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A complex systems approach to computational molecular biology  

SciTech Connect

We report on the containing research program at Santa Fe Institute that applies complex systems methodology to computational molecular biology. Two aspects are stressed here are the use of co-evolving adaptive neutral networks for determining predictable protein structure classifications, and the use of information theory to elucidate protein structure and function. A ``snapshot`` of the current state of research in these two topics is presented, representing the present state of two major research thrusts in the program of Genetic Data and Sequence Analysis at the Santa Fe Institute.

Lapedes, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) Facilities Sprinkler System Hydraulic Calculations  

SciTech Connect

The attached calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operational water requirements as determined by hydraulic analysis. Hydraulic calculations for the waste storage buildings of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), T Plant, and Waste Receiving and Packaging (WRAP) facility are based upon flow testing performed by Fire Protection Engineers from the Hanford Fire Marshal's office. The calculations received peer review and approval prior to release. The hydraulic analysis program HASS Computer Program' (under license number 1609051210) is used to perform all analyses contained in this document. Hydraulic calculations demonstrate sprinkler system operability based upon each individual system design and available water supply under the most restrictive conditions.

KERSTEN, J.K.

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Applied Energy Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Applied Energy Programs Los Alamos is using its world-class scientific capabilities to enhance national energy security by developing energy sources with limited environmental impact and by improving the efficiency and reliability of the energy infrastructure. CONTACT US Acting Program Director Melissa Fox (505) 663-5538 Email Applied Energy Program Office serves as the hub connecting the Laboratory's scientific and technical resources to DOE sponsors, DoD programs, and to industry. The Applied Energy Program Office manages Los Alamos National Laboratory programs funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Offices of Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and Fossil Energy. With energy use increasing across the nation and the

349

Generic programming in Scala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generic programming is a programming methodology that aims at producing reusable code, defined independently of the data types on which it is operating. To achieve this goal, that particular code must rely on a set of requirements known as concepts...

N'guessan, Olayinka

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

NASA Defends University Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NASA Defends University Programs ... Predoctoral fellowships, research and facilities grants are essential to the space effort, NASA says ... The Senate Appropriations Committee has questioned the propriety and legality of NASA's academic grant program (C&EN, Nov. 11, page 21). ...

1963-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

Safeguards and Security Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes responsibilities and program planning and management requirements for the Safeguards and Security Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-15-13, cancels DOE O 470.4B.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

353

SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM MATHEMATICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

program, students must: (1) Be entering freshman; (2) Be U.S. citizens, nationals, aliens admitted as refugees, permanent resident aliens; (3) Be enrolled full time in a baccalaureate degree program in one

Croicu, Ana-Maria

354

Programming with human computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amazon's Mechanical Turk provides a programmatically accessible micro-task market, allowing a program to hire human workers. This has opened the door to a rich field of research in human computation where programs orchestrate ...

Little, Greg (Danny Greg)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sandia's Biofuels Program  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Protective Force Program Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 473.2, Protective Force Program, which establishes the requirements and responsibilities for management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Protective Force (PF) Program. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Scientific programming in Fortran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Fortran programming language was designed by John Backus and his colleagues at IBM to reduce the cost of programming scientific applications. IBM delivered the first compiler for its model 704 in 1957. IBM's competitors soon offered incompatible ...

W. Van Snyder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Centralized Procurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centralized Procurement Program What's New Who to Contact Current Products BOAs MOC Integrated Team Program Elements Future Products Welcome to the Carlsbad Field Office’s (CBFO) Centralized Procurement Program (CPP) Web Page. The purpose of the Centralized Procurement Program is to provide a standardized, economical system of acquisition and distribution of common or critical transuranic (TRU) waste products. The program is available for use by DOE contractors. The program is designed to allow user sites to procure products manufactured to standardized quality, procurement, and engineering requirements. The WIPP Management & Operation Contractor (MOC), Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), administers the program. WTS is the design authority for all products currently offered in the program.

360

Monotonic Answer Set Programming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Answer set programming (ASP) does not allow for incrementally constructing...calculi and implementations. In. In: Handbook of Automated Reasoning-Robinson J...Abstract Answer set programming (ASP) does not allow for incrementally constructing......

Martin Gebser; Mona Gharib; Robert Mercer; Torsten Schaub

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

State Energy Program Formula Grant Guidance Program Year 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATE ENERGY PROGRAM FORMULA GRANT GUIDANCE PROGRAM YEAR 2007 STATE ENERGY PROGRAM NOTICE 07-01 EFFECTIVE DATE: April 3, 2007 PURPOSE To establish grant guidance and management...

362

Report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity for the DOE Fusion Energy Sciences Program  

SciTech Connect

This report of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) has been prepared in response to a recommendation by the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board that, ''Given the complex nature of the fusion effort, an integrated program planning process is an absolute necessity.'' We, therefore, undertook this activity in order to integrate the various elements of the program, to improve communication and performance accountability across the program, and to show the inter-connectedness and inter-dependency of the diverse parts of the national fusion energy sciences program. This report is based on the September 1999 Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee's (FESAC) report ''Priorities and Balance within the Fusion Energy Sciences Program''. In its December 5,2000, letter to the Director of the Office of Science, the FESAC has reaffirmed the validity of the September 1999 report and stated that the IPPA presents a framework and process to guide the achievement of the 5-year goals listed in the 1999 report. The National Research Council's (NRC) Fusion Assessment Committee draft final report ''An Assessment of the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Program'', reviewing the quality of the science in the program, was made available after the IPPA report had been completed. The IPPA report is, nevertheless, consistent with the recommendations in the NRC report. In addition to program goals and the related 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year objectives, this report elaborates on the scientific issues associated with each of these objectives. The report also makes clear the relationships among the various program elements, and cites these relationships as the reason why integrated program planning is essential. In particular, while focusing on the science conducted by the program, the report addresses the important balances between the science and energy goals of the program, between the MFE and IFE approaches, and between the domestic and international aspects of the program. The report also outlines a process for establishing a database for the fusion research program that will indicate how each research element fits into the overall program. This database will also include near-term milestones associated with each research element, and will facilitate assessments of the balance within the program at different levels. The Office of Fusion Energy Sciences plans to begin assembling and using the database in the Spring of 2001 as we receive proposals from our laboratories and begin to prepare our budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2003.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geothermal Government Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here you'll find links to federal, state, and local government programs promoting geothermal energy development.

364

Independent Oversight Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order prescribes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Independent Oversight Program. Cancels DOE O 470.2B.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Master Wellness Volunteer Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the program is that you learn new things while helping others lead healthier lives." ­ Cherokee County

366

Weatherization Assistance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energys Weatherization Assistance Program.

367

Sustainable Energy Management Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment... Appoint Energy Manager Analyze Existing Conditions Develop Plan Implement and Monitor Program ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Sustainable Programs Feature District Commitment...

Hanner, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

STEm Minority Graduate Program  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The state of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education in the United States has seen some unfavorable assessments over the past decade. In early February, 2010 the House of Representatives heard testimony on undergraduate and graduate education. The message from the panel, which included experts from academia, STEM-based industries, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) was dire and required an urgent response. The experts along with the committee???¢????????s chairperson, U. S. Representative Daniel Lipinski (D-IL) cited that the complexity of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics applications and coursework and the methodology utilized to teach these subjects are forcing students out of these disciplines. As the National Academies described in its 2007 report Rising Above the Gathering Storm, successful STEM education is not just an academic pursuit???¢????????it???¢????????s a necessity for competing in the knowledge-based economy that the United States had a key role in creating. The potential for action is being made available again as the America COMPETES Act of 2007 is up for reauthorization. Its initial focus was on STEM education at the K-12 levels, but efforts at the undergraduate and graduate levels are needed to retain students to fill the jobs left vacant as baby boomers retire. The Educational Advancement Alliance, Inc. (EAA) has for two decades created programs that have not only addressed the issues of ensuring that students are aptly prepared for college but have focused its efforts over the past decade on increasing the number of students who pursue degrees in STEM disciplines. For the EAA, the introduction of the wonders of science begins at the elementary and middle school level via the Learning Lab, a state-of-the-art mobile science laboratory that visits students in grades 4-6 at the various schools throughout Philadelphia and The Math/Tech Academy which meets on Saturdays for students in grades 5-7. For the past two years the EAA has assisted college graduates in their quest to attain advanced degrees in STEM by providing fellowships. The EAA continued this effort by recruiting and providing fellowships to students who aspired to continue their education at the graduate level. The fellowships provided funding for tuition, fees, books, technology, and stipends to assist with room, board, and living expenses during the academic year and salary, transportation, and living expenses to those students who secured internships with the Department of Energy. Additionally the EAA designed and implemented needed support systems to ensure successful completion of the Masters degree programs, including but not limited to membership in professional associations, attendance at industry and academic conferences, and professional development workshops, and tutorial assistance if needed. This program assisted over 80 students directly and society-at-large by helping to educate and develop future physicists, engineers, biostatisticians, and researchers who will have the necessary skillsets to fill the increasing numbers of positions that require such expertise.

Kaen E. Nicholas

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Safeguards and Security Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish responsibilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security (S&S) Program, and to establish program planning and management requirements for the S&S Program. Cancels DOE O 470.4A, DOE M 470.4-1, Chg. 2, and DOE O 142.1.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

DRAFT: Biological and Implementation Indicators (June 10, 2008) Indicator Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bonneville Dam (1938- present) Abundance of adult fish in the Council's program. Number of salmon, steelhead, lamprey, resident fish, ... ESUs Trends in abundance and productivity for each ESU, especially listed ESUs and for each listed ESU Harvest of hatchery fish in the Council's Program Number by species and by hatchery

371

Tag: partnerships | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partnerships partnerships Tag: partnerships Displaying 1 - 10 of 14... Category: News Grad Assistants Make Their Mark UT students work with the UPF project and Y-12 researchers seeking fresh ideas and extra hands. More... Category: News B&W Y-12 signs two new Mentor-Protégé agreements B&W Y-12 recently signed agreements with two new protégés. The companies join eight other groups currently involved in Y-12's Mentor-Protégé program. More... Category: News Students analyze artificial implants at ASM Materials Camp The leg bone is connected to the hip prosthesis: Students analyze artificial implants at ASM Materials Camp More... Category: News Y-12, UT, and Stanley Healthcare work to advance technology Representatives from the Y-12 National Security Complex; the University of

372

Contact Us | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Contact Us Contact Us Mail and delivery address information: Y-12 National Security Complex P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245* Non-mail deliveries: Bear Creek Road P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 *This mailstop is for general inquiries. For other mail, please contact the intended recipient for the appropriate mailstop. If you don't find what you're looking for on our Home Page or through our Search page, try one of the resources listed below. Media Inquiries Ellen Boatner, 865.241.4937 Public and Governmental Affairs Alice Brandon, 865.576.2963 Benefits One Call, 865.574.1500 New Hope Center Public Use Areas Ray Smith, 865.576.7781 Procurement procurement@y12.doe.gov, 865.576-8500 Socioeconomic Programs Lisa Copeland, 865.576.2090 Employment Staffing, staff@y12.doe.gov, 865.576.1377

373

Y-12 National Security Complex Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y 12 National Security Complex (Y 12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y 12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements that could be applied not only at Y-12 but at other Federal facilities as well. FEMP selected Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to coordinate and manage the water assessment. PNNL contracted Water Savers, LLC to lead the technical aspects of the water assessment. Water Savers provided key technical expertise in water auditing, metering, and cooling systems. This is the report of that effort, which concluded that the Y-12 facility could realize considerable water savings by implementing the recommended water efficiency opportunities.

Elam, Shana E.; Bassett, P.; McMordie Stoughton, Kate

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A global overview of risk management of the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect

No endeavor is risk-fire and as we realize the inherent risks in society, our only viable solution is to manage the risk. Application of an integrated risk management program of a large technological system like the DOE complex is a difficult, task; but it is the only rational means to optimize the risk-benefit equation. An effective risk management culture-within the DOE complex will in the long run, ensure a consistent response to mitigate identified risks. An effective risk management program provides responsible administrative planning and logical application of the best technical analyses. It requires the involvement of all personnel. Our objective in this paper is to point out broad perspectives that raise concerns about future DOE ask management issues and to suggest some possible remedies.

Alesso, H.P.; Majumdar, K.C.

1993-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

375

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

376

The Texas Watershed Steward Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for participation TEXAS WATERSHED STEWARD PROGRAM · Introductory training in the fundamentals of watersheds of Watershed Functions Program Introduction #12;TWS CURRICULUM HANDBOOK PROGRAM INTRODUCTION · About

377

Demand Response Programs for Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response Programs for Oregon Utilities Public Utility Commission May 2003 Public Utility ....................................................................................................................... 1 Types of Demand Response Programs............................................................................ 3 Demand Response Programs in Oregon

378

Geothermal materials program: strategy. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The following topics are discussed: program goal and objectives, program organization, and program status. Current program projects are described. (MHR)

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Utility Program Administrator Market Utility program administrator market...

380

Sun-Climate Complexity Linking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that Earths short-term temperature anomalies share the same complexity index ? as solar flares. We show that this property is not accidental and is a consequence of the phenomenon of information transfer based on the crucial role of non-Poisson renewal events in complex networks.

B. J. West and P. Grigolini

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f), and that Q E (f) # D (f). If f is partial (i.e. Dom (f) #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Computer Science Division University of California . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

382

Reverse Engineering of Biological Complexity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...levels of complexity. For example, a Boeing 777 is fully fly-by-wire with...12, 24). 54 The development of the Boeing 777 alone required...levels of complexity. For example, a Boeing 777-is fully "fly-by-wire" with...

Marie E. Csete; John C. Doyle

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

384

Program Optimization for Faster Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are six operations that map an index (i, j, k) to an index: ... These wavelets have arbitrarily high approximation power even though they ... It is possible that an evolving genetic programming system will choose the ..... In CRC Handbook of.

1998-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

Russian Health Studies Program- Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Russian Health Studies Program assesses worker and public health risks from radiation exposure resulting from nuclear weapons production activities in the former Soviet Union.

386

Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nations energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nations most abundant energy resourcecoal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

None

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

NONE

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Federal Energy Management Program: About the Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Program About the Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) works with key individuals to accomplish energy change within organizations, by bringing expertise from all levels of project and policy implementation, to enable Federal agencies to meet energy-related goals and provide energy leadership to the country. As the nation's largest energy consumer, the Federal Government has a tremendous opportunity and clear responsibility to lead by example. FEMP is central to this responsibility, guiding agencies to use funding more effectively in meeting Federal and agency-specific energy management objectives. Directed by Dr. Timothy Unruh, FEMP helps agencies meet its objectives by providing information through its primary program, technology, and service areas.

389

Master's Fellowship Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Master's Fellowship Program Master's Fellowship Program (MFP): The Master's Fellowship Program (MFP) provides exceptional minority bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Masters of Science degree. The MFP is a minority based program for U.S. under-represented groups in an effort to help enhance the diversity of Sandia's technical workforce. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest.

390

Fire Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

391

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

392

Education Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Academia For Academia University Partners Distinguished Fellowships Postdoctoral Program Graduate Opportunities Education and Outreach Programs For Academia Home | Connect with ORNL | For Academia | Education and Outreach Programs SHARE Education Programs Visiting Faculty ORNL offers a number of opportunities to visiting faculty to do hands-on research during the summer months. Faculty may be accompanied by up to two students. ORNL's commitment to diversity in the science workforce encourages faculty from historically black colleges and minority educational institutions to apply. The Higher Education Research Experience (HERE) program allows visiting faculty to participate in research during the summer or on a semester basis. Historical Black Colleges and Universities/ Minority Education Institutions

393

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

394

SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) DOE F 360.1 (11-03) Executive Development Plan (EDP) Name: Title: Organization: Office: RATIONALE FOR PLAN: APPROVALS: Candidate Signature: Date: Supervisor: Date: Mentor: Date: SES Candidate Development Program Manager: Date: DOE Executive Resources Board: Date: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 360.1 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Executive Development Plan (EDP) NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: DATE: EXECUTIVE CORE QUALIFICATION 1: LEADING CHANGE This core qualification encompasses the ability to develop and implement an organizational vision which integrates key national and program

395

Second Line of Defense Spares Program Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) is part of the Department of Energys (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The SLD Program accomplishes its critical global security mission by forming cooperative relationships with partner countries to install passive radiation detection systems that augment traditional inspection and law enforcement measures by alerting border officials to the presence of special nuclear or other radiological materials in cross-border traffic. An important tenet of the program is to work collaboratively with these countries to establish the necessary processes, procedures, infrastructure and conditions that will enable them to fully assume the financial and technical responsibilities for operating the equipment. As the number of operational deployments grows, the SLD Program faces an increasingly complex logistics process to promote the timely and efficient supply of spare parts.

Henderson, Dale L.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Protocol for Program Reviews: Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Teaching Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an IAS program for fall semester review and a UGIS program for spring semester review for each academic to guide preparation of self-study ("UGIS/IAS Program Director Questionnaire"). · The program review

Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

397

Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint Presentation Energy Efficiency Program Administration Powerpoint...

398

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 2, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SMECC (Substation Maximum Earth Current Computation Program). This program analyzes the electric current distribution among grounded structures inside and outside a substation for different fault conditions. The fault conditions are automatically selected by the program, or they may be specified by the user, or both. The fault condition resulting in maximum substation earth current is identified and reported. Data requirements for this program are: ground impedance, transformer data, transmission line data, transmission line grounding impedances, etc. The program provides four types of standard outputs: (1) a report of voltages and current flow in the unfaulted system, (2) a brief report of the maximum ground potential rise (worst fault condition), (3) a summary report of all fault conditions which have been analyzed by the program, and (4) a detailed report of voltages and current flow for a selected set of fault conditions.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. This report, Volume 3, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program SGSYS (Substation Grounding SYStem Analysis Program). This program analyzes the substation ground field given the total electric current injected into the ground field and the design of the grounding system. Standard outputs of the program are (1) total ground resistance, (2) step voltage, (3) touch voltage, (4) voltages on a grid of points, (5) voltage profile along straight lines, (6) transfer voltages, (7) ground potential rise, (8) body currents, (9) step voltage profile along straight lines, and (10) touch voltage profile along straight lines. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. In the interactive mode, the user defines the grounding system geometry, soil parameters, and output requests interactively, with the use of a user friendly conversational program. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. An appendix provides forms which facilitate data collection procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program SGSYS and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representive Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached covering the period from July to September 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standards , DOE-STD-1063-2000, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definition of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. The percentage of fully qualified Facility Representatives in the DOE complex

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nuclear Energy University Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Status 1 Status Presentation to Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) June 15, 2011 Michael Worley, NEUP Program Manager NEUP Funding is Program Driven Program Directed Funding Program Supported Funding Mission Supported Funding Natl. Labs Universities DOE-NE HQ Peer Review DOE NE Program Drivers 2 3 Summary of Improvements and New Programs for FY 2011 * Expand "Blue Sky" Research and Development (R&D) * Initiate Integrated Research Projects (IRP) * Expand and improve peer review data base * Evaluate adoption of NRC and NNSA Metrics as appropriate to NEUP * Conduct peer review at pre-application stage for R&D 2011 Proposed NEUP Budget - $61.8M * Program Directed Integrated Research Projects (IRP) - $12.0M (NEW)

402

Programming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Programming Programming October 16, 2013 - 5:13pm Addthis Key Actions in Programming Commission a renewable energy screening to assess the options and economics of various technologies. Conduct a planning charrette to bring disciplines together to identify project needs and energy opportunities. Define and prioritize specific energy- related goals and include them in the building program and requirements for the design team. Renewable energy is a key consideration during project programming. As more information about the actual function and needs of the facility becomes available, further decisions can be made about the most appropriate types of renewable energy technologies for the project. The end of this phase results in the creation of the building program,

403

Environmental hazards assessment program. Annual report, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities and reports on progress for the third year of the DOE grant to support the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP). It reports progress against grant objectives and the Program Implementation Plan published at the end of the first year of the grant. As the program has evolved, more projects have been funded and many existing projects have become more complex. Thus, to accomplish better the objectives over the years and retain a solid focus on the total mission, we have reorganized the grant effort from three to five majoe elements: Public and professional outreach; Clinical programs; Science programs; Information systems; and, Program management.

NONE

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2013-2014 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

405

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEAS Safety Program SEAS SAFETY PROGRAM 2012-2103 Program Structure and Responsibilities Dr. Anas Chalah #12;SEAS Safety Program SEAS Safety Program Structure We have developed a great model of collaboration among · EHSEM · SEAS Safety Program · SEAS Facilities which accounts for the regulatory component

406

Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions  

SciTech Connect

Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Competing complexity metrics and adults' production of complex sentences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The adequacy of 11 metrics for measuring linguistic complexity was evaluated by applying each metric to language samples obtained from 30 different adult speakers, aged 60-90 years. The analysis then determined how well ...

Kemper, Susan; Cheng, Hintat

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Providing Utilities with Tools for Industrial Marketing Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROVIDING UTILITIES WITH TOOLS FOR INDUSTRIAL MARKETING PROGRAMS Laura E. Cahi 11 Center "for Metals Fabrication Columbus, Ohio Marketing electrotechnologies to industrial customers can be a complex task unless the right tools are available... to marketing representa tives. The Center for Metals Fabrication is using several tools to tailor marketing programs for 18 electric utilities. CMF provides: o A hotline that customer and utility representatives can use to get advice on implenenting...

Cahill, L. E.

409

Actinide cation-cation complexes  

SciTech Connect

The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

Stoyer, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

411

Substation grounding programs  

SciTech Connect

This document is a users manual and applications guide for the software package SGA. This package comprises four computer programs, namely SOMIP, SMECC, SGSYS, and TGRND. The first three programs are analysis models which are to be used in the design process of substation grounding systems. The fourth program, TGRND, is an analysis program for determining the transient response of a grounding system. It can be used to compute transient ground potential rise due to lightning or switching, and the ground impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) at specified frequencies. This report, Volume 4, is a users manual and an installation and validation manual for the computer program TGRND (Transient GRouNDing System Analysis Program). This program computes transient ground potential rise resulting from lightning, switching, or other transient electric currents injected to a grounding system. The program also computes the impedance (i.e. resistance and reactance) of a grounding system as a function of frequency. This program can be utilized in an interactive or batch mode. The users manual describes data requirements and data preparation procedures. The installation and validation manual describes the computer files which make up the program TGRND and provides a test case for validation purposes.

Meliopoulos, A.P.S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Electric Power Lab.)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Joint Plenary

413

Water-Efficiency Program Prioritization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation outlines water-efficiency program requirements and priorities as presented to Federal agencies by the Federal Energy Management Program.

414

EcoHouse Program Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Provides an overview of the Indianapolis Better Buildings program, the EcoHouse program, and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing partnership (INHP).

415

Departmental Directives Program Policy  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Policy provides formal and organized communication of the Department's expectations for performance of work within the DOE complex. Cancels DOE P 251.1

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Preliminary Environmental Assessment 3: Preliminary Environmental Assessment EA-1913: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Springfield Sockeye Hatchery Program, Springfield, Bingham County, Idaho This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to fund the modification of an existing IDFG trout hatchery near Springfield, Idaho, to provide a facility that would be capable of rearing up to 1 million Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles. Modifications would include demolishing several existing structures, constructing new hatchery facilities in the same footprint, constructing three new residences for hatchery personnel northwest of the hatchery site, and constructing up to six pumps at existing wellheads and a piping system to convey water to hatchery facilities. EA-1913-PEA-2011.pdf

417

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov BTO Program Peer Review Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Danielle Sass Byrnett, DOE Dave Roberts, NREL david.roberts@nrel.gov 303.384.7496 April 3, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United States and are responsible for nearly 40% of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. Several well documented barriers have prevented the development of a self-sustaining building energy upgrade market to reduce this energy use.

418

STEM Education Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs STEM Education Programs Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) views its investment in STEM education as strengthening the Lab's strategic direction and developing its current and future workforce. Contacts Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "We don't have to teach children to ask questions. That comes naturally. We have to not stop them." - LANL Director Charlie McMillan STEM education programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf) Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute (pdf) Discover E (pdf) Engineering Institute Frontiers in Science

419

Acquisition Career Development Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Architecting complex systems for robustness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust design methodologies are frequently utilized by organizations to develop robust and reliable complex systems. The intent of robust design is to create systems that are insensitive to variations from production, the ...

Slagle, Jason C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Renormalization flows in complex networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex networks have acquired a great popularity in recent years, since the graph representation of many natural, social, and technological systems is often very helpful to characterize and model their phenomenology. Additionally, the mathematical tools of statistical physics have proven to be particularly suitable for studying and understanding complex networks. Nevertheless, an important obstacle to this theoretical approach is still represented by the difficulties to draw parallelisms between network science and more traditional aspects of statistical physics. In this paper, we explore the relation between complex networks and a well known topic of statistical physics: renormalization. A general method to analyze renormalization flows of complex networks is introduced. The method can be applied to study any suitable renormalization transformation. Finite-size scaling can be performed on computer-generated networks in order to classify them in universality classes. We also present applications of the method on real networks.

Filippo Radicchi; Alain Barrat; Santo Fortunato; Jos J. Ramasco

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Home Energy Score Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

424

Home Energy Score Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

425

Voluntary Protection Program- Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) promotes safety and health excellence through cooperative efforts among labor, management, and government at the Department of Energy (DOE) contractor sites. DOE has also formed partnerships with other Federal agencies and the private sector for both advancing and sharing its Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) experiences and preparing for program challenges in the next century. The safety and health of contractor and federal employees are a high priority for the Department.

426

Quantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(f) # D (f ), and that Q 0 (f) # R 0 (f). 1 If f is partial (i.e. S #= {0, 1} n ), then Q 2 (f) canQuantum Certificate Complexity Scott Aaronson # Abstract Given a Boolean function f , we study two . Then the deterministic query complexity D (f) is the minimum number of queries to the y i 's needed to evaluate f , if Y

Aaronson, Scott

427

Program Highlights Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Highlights Index Program Highlights Index Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Ecological Risk Assessment of Chemically and Radiologically Contaminated Federal Sites Energy Zone Planning Tool for the Eastern United States Environmental Site Characterization and Remediation at Former Grain Storage Sites Evaluation of Risks of Aquatic Nuisance Species Transfer via the Chicago Area Waterway System Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) Generated by the Petroleum Industry Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India Mobile Climate Observatory on the Pacific

428

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

429

Homeland Security Programs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security Programs Homeland Security Programs SHARE Homeland Security Programs The Homeland Security Programs support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), other federal and state agencies, and commercial partners. Through the integration of a number of key competencies, ORNL is able to provide critical operational, technical, and scientific support to these sponsors. A key focus of this area is to translate the critical research into operational capability for the security, protection, response, and recovery of the nation against natural and man-made events. Research Areas detecting, preventing, and reversing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction deploying integrated systems for incident awareness, detection, and response providing technology for detecting explosives at the

430

Referral Bonus Award Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REFERRAL BONUS AWARD PROGRAM REFERRAL BONUS AWARD PROGRAM The Referral Bonus Award is used to provide an incentive to employees who bring new talent into a Departmental element by referring persons who are subsequently selected and successfully employed for hard-to-fill positions. This award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of DOE O 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. Eligibility All employees who meet the definition of "employee" in 5 U.S.C. 2105 are eligible for referral bonus awards, except: Employees whose regular, recurring, jobs include the recruitment of employees. Employees who refer any individual related by blood or affinity whose close

431

Employee Assistance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Resources AAP/ EEO Working at LBNL Benefits Lab Information International Researchers & Scholars Office Visitors and Affiliates Contact Us forward Berkeley Lab Staff/ Guests Only forward HR Staff Only forward HR A-Z Benefits at Berkeley Lab Search the HR website: Search UC At Your Service My Accounts image (At Your Service Web Site) UPAY 850 Benefits Change form Benefits Forms and Publications Benefits Orientations Benefit Plan Contacts Calendar of Events: July | August COBRA Information Disability Leave of Absence/FMLA Employee Assistance Programs Employee Self Service Family Member Eligibility Verification UC Retirement Savings Program (Fidelity) Health Care Facilitator Program Employee Discounts and Programs Making Benefit Changes Payroll Information Postdoc Benefits

432

Critical Skills Master's Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

433

Emerging Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies Program Emerging Technologies Program Pat Phelan Program Manager patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov (202)287-1906 April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How ET Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers * Solve technical barriers and test innovations to prove effectiveness * Measure and validate energy savings ET Mission: Accelerate the research, development and commercialization of emerging, high impact building technologies that are five years or less to market ready. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

434

Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program is a six-week special training and research summer experience for in-service science and mathematics teachers at Brookhaven National Laboratory....

435

Capital Access Program (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Capital Access Program provides loan guarantees to small businesses seeking access to commercial credit. Premiums paid by the borrower and matched by Vermont Economic Development Authority fund...

436

Agricultural Improvement Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Agricultural Improvement Loan Program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture through the Minnesota Rural Finance Authority (RFA) and provides loans to farmers for...

437

ATF Program Advisory & Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

paths for flexibility & efficiency Old documentation not adequate Old hardware (PLC) no longer programmable ATF Program Advisory & Users Meeting, April 2-3,2009 M.Babzien...

438

Sustainable Agriculture Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Minnesota Sustainable Agriculture Loan program will provide loans to Minnesota residents actively engaged in farming for capital expenditures which enhance the environmental and economic...

439

CEE Winter Program Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

440

EERE Strategic Program Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Strategic Program Review presents the result of recommendations of the National Energy Policy Development Group as stated in the National Energy Policy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Management Control Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

Programs & User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Programs & User Facilities Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

443

Pipeline Operations Program (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pipeline Operations Program regulates the construction, acquisition, abandonment and interconnection of natural gas pipelines, as well as, the transportation and use of natural gas supplies.

444

Program Fact Sheets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page contains links to fact sheets describing solid-state lighting programs, opportunities, and design competitions in place to facilitate the technology's successful introduction into the...

445

California Energy Incentive Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) discusses annual update on key energy issues and financial opportunities for federal sites in California.

446

TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remains available to power a sustainable economy. Program efforts have positioned the United States as the global leader in clean coal technologies. This document serves as a...

447

Nuclear Physics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Data Acquisition Group Detector & Imaging Group Electronics Group User Liaison Nuclear Physics Program HALL A Hall A wide shot of detectors Scientists from across the...

448

EERE Program Management Guide  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Updated in December 2007, this guide is a comprehensive reference manual on EERE program management. The following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs.

449

New Homes Incentive Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Trust's New Homes Program offers builders cash incentives for energy efficient measures included in new homes, where the measures exceed the building code. Lighting upgrades, whole home...

450

Student Internship Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cutting-edge scientific research to further their educational and research goals. The Student Internship Program can provide undergraduate and graduate students research...

451

Stormwater Management Program (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stormwater Management program of the Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Conservation and Restoration administers the rules and regulations for stormwater management for Pennsylvania...

452

Life Extension Programs  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B61-12 Life Extension Program Milestone: First Full-System Mechanical Environment Test Completed Successfully http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesb61lep

453

Fossil Energy Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and...

454

Contract Financing Program (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Contract Financing Program, administered by the Maryland Small Business Development Authority, provides financial assistance to eligible businesses in the form of a direct loan or the guaranty...

455

Wind Program News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eerewindwind-program-news en EERE Leadership Celebrates Offshore Wind in Maine http:energy.goveerearticleseere-leadership-celebrates-offshore-wind-maine

456

Programs of HUD 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This manual briefly explains and updates the status of every program HUD operates, encompassing a host of issues within housing and community development.

457

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Records Management Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

459

Acquisition Career Management Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order defines requirements and responsibilities for training, certification, and career development programs for the DOE acquisition workforce. Cancels DOE O 361.1A.

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Records Management Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hatchery complex program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Weatherization Assistance Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Intergovernmental Program n Decreases electricity generation and resulting pollution-This improves local air quality and reduces adverse health effects, particularly...

462

AMO Program Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This Tuesday Webcast for Industry provides information on the Advanced Manufacturing Office's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program and recent Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency

463

Wind Program: WINDExchange  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Version Bookmark and Share WINDExchange logo WINDExchange is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program's platform for disseminating credible information about wind...

464

RCx Program and UESC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the RCx Program and UESC and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

465

Radiological Assistance Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Weatherization & Intergovernmental Program: Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Program: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Submit Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov...

467

Formal Safety Analysis of the Control Program for a Radiation Therapy Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A central problem in software development is to assure that a complex program actually meets its requirements. This problem is most urgent in applications such as the control of radiation therapy machines, whe...

Jonathan Jacky

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that made it to the Golden Gate Bridge listening station diddetected passing the Golden Gate Bridge over a more thanfish detected at the Golden Gate Bridge were from two groups

Sandstrom, Phil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992 DOE/BP-60629-4 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1991BI60629, Project No. 199204300, 129 electronic pages (BPA documents or other printed media, contact or write to: Bonneville Power Administration Environment, Fish

470

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About to someone by E-mail Share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Facebook Tweet about Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Twitter Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Google Bookmark Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Delicious Rank Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on Digg Find More places to share Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program: About on AddThis.com... Plans, Implementation, & Results Weatherization Assistance Program WAP - Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grants WAP - Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program State Energy Program

473

Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Program Update: 3rd Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: LM Co-Hosts International Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites; LM Communication and Stakeholder Satisfaction Independent Survey; LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood; LM's First Year with the Title X Uranium/Thorium Reimbursement Program; DOE and Colorado Mesa University Education Agreement Expands LM's Site Reuse Portfolio; Completion of the Five-Year Reviews for the Monticello, Utah, Radioactively Contaminated Properties Site (Monticello Vicinity Properties) and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during

474

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operations and Maintenance, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

There were 2 acclimation periods at the Catherine Creek Acclimation Facility (CCAF) in 2004. During the early acclimation period, 92,475 smolts were delivered from Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on 8 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the captive broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.1 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 15 March 2004 and ended 22 March with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 1,475) of 8,785 fish leaving the raceways. This was 9.5% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1200 and 2000 hours which was similar to the hourly temperature profile. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.1 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.5 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 62 (0.07 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the early period was 92,413. During the second acclimation period 70,977 smolts were delivered from LGH on 24 March. This group was comprised entirely of progeny from the conventional broodstock program. The size of the fish at delivery was 23.4 fish/lb. Volitional releases began 30 March 2004 and ended 12 April with an estimated total (based on PIT tag detections of 3,632) of 49,147 fish leaving the raceways. This was 69.2% of the total fish delivered. Fish remaining in the raceways after volitional release were forced out. Hourly detections of PIT-tagged fish showed that most of the fish left between 1200 and 2000 hours which was similar to the hourly temperature profile. The size of the fish just before the volitional release was 23.4 and the size of the fish remaining just before the forced release was 23.9 fish/lb. The total mortality for the acclimation period was 18 (0.03 %). The total number of fish released from the acclimation facility during the late period was 70,959.

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems  

SciTech Connect

Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z