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  1. Hartford Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hartford Electric Place: Wisconsin Phone Number: (262) 670-3700 Website: hartfordelectric.org Outage Hotline: (262) 670-3710 or (262)...

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The Hartford | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In 2011, The Hartford installed 6 charging stations at its three main campuses in Hartford, Simsbury and Windsor, Connecticut, for a total of 12 electric vehicle supply equipment ...

  3. Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7637111, -72.6850932 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility Facility Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization...

  5. West Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map West Hartford is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau...

  6. Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hartford Steam Co Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 860-725-7005 Website: www.hartfordsteam.com Outage Hotline: 860-725-7005 References: EIA...

  7. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RI Hartford: Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Phoenix ... written comments regarding the Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing ...

  8. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study- Hartford Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On July 9, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Hartford, CT to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The agenda, full...

  9. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Constraints | Department of Energy Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Meeting Date and Location: April 21, 2014 9:00A.M.. to 1:00 P.M. EST (Providence, RI) - 1:00 P.M. EST to 5:00 P.M. EST (Hartford, CT) Providence: Rhode Island Convention Center, 1 Sabin St., Ballroom B, Providence, RI Hartford: Connecticut Department of

  10. National incinerator testing and evaluation program: The environmental characterization of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) Combustion Technology, Mid-Connecticut Facility, Hartford, Connecticut. Final report, June 1987-March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finklestein, A.; Klicius, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of an environmental characterization of refuse-derived (RDF) semi-suspension burning technology at a facility in Hartford, Connecticut, that represents state-of-the-art technology, including a spray dryer/fabric filter flue-gas cleaning (FGC) system for each unit. Results were obtained for a variety of steam production rates, combustion conditions, flue gas temperatures, and acid gas removal efficiencies. All incoming wastes and residue streams were weighed, sampled, and analyzed. Key combustor and FGC system operating variables were monitored on a real time basis. A wide range of analyses for acid gases, trace organics, and heavy metals was carried out on gas emissions and all ash residue discharges.

  11. Hartford County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Connecticut Light and Power DBS Energy Inc Energy Recovery Associates Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen National Energy Resource Corporation Pioneer Valley Photovoltaics...

  12. East Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  13. Microsoft Word - Statement Rick Terven.Plumbers Pipefitters.Hartford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    across the United States are out of sight - and out of mind - until something goes wrong. ... and replacement to provide additional tools to states and utilities to address old, ...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Glenn Poole Verso Maine Energy.QER Hartford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verso's Energy Conversions * Both Maine mills have converted to Combined Cycle with Cogeneration - Gas Turbine-HRSG-Steam turbine - cogeneration - Over 250 million invested - ...

  15. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: QM Power, Inc. – Lee’s Summit, MOPartners: United Technologies Research Center – East Hartford, CT

  16. Department of Energy Announces Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting in Rhode Island, Connecticut

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advisory of a two-part Quadrennial Energy Review public meeting in Providence, R.I. and Hartford, Conn.

  17. Sebastian County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Arkansas Barling, Arkansas Bonanza, Arkansas Central City, Arkansas Fort Smith, Arkansas Greenwood, Arkansas Hackett, Arkansas Hartford, Arkansas Huntington,...

  18. Public health assessment for public health implications of radiation contamination at former clock factories located in Bristo (Hartford County), New Haven, (New Haven County), Thomaston (Litchfield County), and Waterbury (New Haven County), Connecticut, Region 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-29

    This public health assessment was developed (1) to evaluate the radiation data collected by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP) at structures that once housed clock factories in four Connecticut municipalities, and (2) to determine whether a public health hazard exists at any of these sites from the contamination. Contamination was detected at levels that may pose a health risk to current occupants at the former Waterbury Clock Factory, the former Lux Clock Factory, and the former Benrus Clock Company buildings in Waterbury; the former Sessions Clock Company in Bristol; and the former Seth Thomas Clock Company in Thomaston. However, none of the radiation levels detected pose an immediate health problem. The Connecticut Department of Public Health recommends that individuals be disassociated from areas with radiation at levels exceeding 15 mRem/year.

  19. Butler County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iowa Clarksville, Iowa Dumont, Iowa Greene, Iowa New Hartford, Iowa Parkersburg, Iowa Shell Rock, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleButlerCounty,Iowa&...

  20. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  1. Energy Media Advisories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    initiative. February 3, 2011 U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow,...

  2. Department of Energy Announces First Quadrennial Energy Review...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... in New England, to be held in Hartford, CT; infrastructure constraints related to Bakken, to be held in North Dakota; electricity transmission storage and distribution in the ...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Mid-Program Review: Employees Plug...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... SolarWorld * Spirae * Sprint * Straus Family Creamery * Telefonix * Territo Electric Tesla The Coca-Cola Company * The Hartford * The Venetian and The Palazzo Tube Art Group UL ...

  4. Licking County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Licking County, Ohio Alexandria, Ohio Beechwood Trails, Ohio Buckeye Lake, Ohio Granville South, Ohio Granville, Ohio Gratiot, Ohio Hanover, Ohio Harbor Hills, Ohio Hartford,...

  5. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benjamin Peterson Mortenson C onstruction Rue Phillips True S outh R enewables Richard Pizzella Hartford Steam Boiler Larry Pratt CFV S olar T est L aboratory Angelo Purpura ...

  6. Spin-orbit coupling, electron transport and pairing instabilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut 06106, USA AlbaNova University Center Nordita, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden Publication Date: 2016-04-28 OSTI Identifier: 1249828 Grant...

  7. Avon, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Avon is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in Avon,...

  8. United Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Technologies Corp Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06101 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: UTC is a global technology corporation with activities in aerospace,...

  9. Lyon County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype A. Places in Lyon County, Kansas Admire, Kansas Allen, Kansas Americus, Kansas Bushong, Kansas Emporia, Kansas Hartford, Kansas Neosho Rapids, Kansas Olpe, Kansas Reading,...

  10. Geneva County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geneva, Alabama Hartford, Alabama Malvern, Alabama Samson, Alabama Slocomb, Alabama Taylor, Alabama Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGenevaCounty,Alabama...

  11. Connecticut Light and Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Connecticut Light and Power Address: P.O. Box 270 Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: 06141 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer...

  12. CX-005347: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Incentive ProgramCX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1Date: 03/02/2011Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. Disability Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through The Hartford. These income protection plans will pay a percentage of your salary when you are unable to work due to illness or injury. Resources STD highlight sheet ...

  14. QER- Comment of Elaine Mroz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elaine Mroz Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meetings ‘‘Infrastructure Restraints- New England” held April 21, 2014, in Providence, RI and Hartford, CT. Please see attached file.

  15. Blue Hills, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Hills is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References ...

  16. West Simsbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Simsbury is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References...

  17. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshops...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 11, 2008 San Francisco, CA June 18, 2008 Oklahoma City, OK July 9, 2008 Hartford, CT July 29, 2008 Atlanta, GA August 6, 2008 Las Vegas, NV September 17, 2008 Chicago, IL DOE ...

  18. PV-MOD_PVPMC_Workshop_2014_Attendees_Website.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... C onstruction Rue Phillips True S outh R enewables Richard Pizzella Hartford Steam Boiler Andrew Ponec Dragonfly S ystems Larry Pratt CFV S olar T est L aboratory Heather ...

  19. CX-007525: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Connecticut-City-Hartford CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 01/06/2012 Location(s): Connecticut Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  20. CX-004915: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    United Technologies Research Center - Water-Based Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/16/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy

  1. word2pdf43408.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YOUR BENEFIT PLAN LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC Retiree Voluntary Accidental Death and Dismemberment Plan (ADD) Questions about Your Coverage In the event You have questions regarding any aspect of Your coverage, You should contact Your Employee Benefits Manager or You may write to us at: The Hartford Group Benefits Division, Customer Service P.O. Box 2999 Hartford, CT 06104-2999 Or call Us at: 1-800-523-2233 When calling, please give Us the following information: 1) the policy number; and

  2. CX-002716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Advanced Low Temperature Heat Recovery Absorption Chiller Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) ModuleCX(s) Applied: A1, A9Date: 06/11/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  5. CX-004690: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Natural Refrigerant Very-High Efficiency Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning SystemCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  6. CX-002111: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Optimization of Hybrid-Water/Air-Cooled Condenser In an Enhanced Turbine Geothermal Organic Rankine Cycle SystemCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9Date: 05/05/2010Location(s): East Hartford, CTOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. CX-004641: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Whole Building Energy DiagnosticsCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 12/09/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-005443: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plug and Play Distributed Power Systems for Smart-Grid Connected BuildingsCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 03/17/2011Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-000698: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut - State Building Energy Improvements: 79 Elm StreetCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.4, B1.24, B1.31, B2.5, B5.1Date: 01/05/2010Location(s): Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. Niche Application Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Niche Application Opportunities Bart A. van Hassel United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, Connecticut, USA DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit Defining pathways for onboard automotive applications Golden, CO, USA January 27-28, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 1 10 100 1000 10000 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Useful Specific Power [W/kg] Useful Specific Energy [Wh/kg] Automotive 80

  11. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Results | Department of Energy Preliminary Evaluation Results Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results This report provides preliminary results from the evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment, early results and agency experience are also provided. 43847.pdf (1.59 MB) More Documents & Publications

  12. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report and Appendices | Department of Energy Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. 45670-2.pdf (1.25 MB) More Documents & Publications Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third

  13. Radial Flow Bearing Heat Exchanger | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radial Flow Bearing Heat Exchanger Radial Flow Bearing Heat Exchanger Sandia's Radial Flow Heat Exchanger Sandia's Radial Flow Heat Exchanger Lead Performer: Sandia National Laboratories - Albuquerque, NM Partners: -- Tribologix - Golden, CO -- United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT -- University of Maryland - College Park, MD -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN -- Whirlpool - Benton Harbor, MI -- Optimized Thermal Systems - College Park, MD DOE Funding: $5,472,285

  14. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shirley Ann Jackson About Us Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D. - President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Former Chairman, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Shirley Ann Jackson The Honorable Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D., is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. She was elected to the Brookings Board of Trustees in 2000. Described by Time Magazine as "perhaps the

  15. High Efficiency Solid-State Heat Pump Module | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Solid-State Heat Pump Module High Efficiency Solid-State Heat Pump Module Electrocaloric Calorimeter. Image courtesy of United Technologies Research Center and BTO Peer Review. Electrocaloric Calorimeter. Image courtesy of United Technologies Research Center and BTO Peer Review. Lead Performer: United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT DOE Total Funding: $1,090,000 Cost Share: $365,000 Project Term: August 2015 - September 2017 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy

  16. High-efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor High-efficiency Low Global-Warming Potential (GWP) Compressor Image courtesy of United Technologies Research Center and BTO Peer Review. Image courtesy of United Technologies Research Center and BTO Peer Review. Lead Performer: United Technologies Research Center - East Hartford, CT DOE Total Funding: $974,000 Cost Share: $417,000 Project Term: Sep 2015 - Aug 2017 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and

  17. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report and Appendices | Department of Energy Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. 45670-1.pdf (836.62 KB) More Documents & Publications SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit

  18. Northeast Hydrogen Station Network Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World leader in gases, technologies and services for Industry and Health June 10, 2016 NE Hydrogen Station Network Summary DOE AMR 2016 2 World leader in gases, technologies and services for Industry and Health East Coast Planned Fueling network- Stations 12 Stations for the North East  NYC and Long Island- (4)  Boston Area - (4)  Connecter Stations - (1) Hartford, CT & (1) Providence, RI  Northern New Jersey- (2) 6/18/2016 3 World leader in gases, technologies and services for

  19. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  20. EVG USAIX, Svergreen chalk River Liaison Office Ontario, Canada

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Special Nuc.lear ?kk?rials kcc+ntabilitg EVG USAIX, Svergreen chalk River Liaison Office Ontario, Canada iulff USAEC, Washington Office See Div. of Rak Materials c~!:KRGO O?ER.i~TIONS ---.-- :ri:i!k USAZC, Ctricago Opnrations Office AGT General Electric Company AN? Project A.J,I Argonne Nat'1 Lab. AYL Al-tonne Nat'1 Lab. B XI Battelle Xfemorial Inst. CKX Vi.l;ro Carp, of America Em USAEC, East Hartford Area a TSC Ioxa State College ITS General Electric Company ANP Jk!pt, -%IAO IJSAK;,

  1. QER- Comment of Rachel Branch

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    April 20, 2014 I hereby respectfully request that the Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force on the Infrastructure Constraints in New England oppose any new development or building of any more fossil fuel infrastructure and only allow the repair of existing infrastructure that is absolutely necessary as we transition to sustainable, renewable sources. Further, I respectfully request that any and all subsidies, tax incentives and/or tax exemptions hereinafter be appropriated and/or directed only to sustainable, renewable sources, i. e., solar, wind, and hydro energy, and development of electrical storage capacities for those sustainable and renewable sources. I further request that any funds spent to push for fossil fuel infrastructure be transparent to the general public. As you are holding meetings in Providence and Hartford, when will your meeting in Massachusetts be scheduled so that Commonwealth of Massachusetts residents can participate? Respectfully submitted, Rachel I. Branch

  2. Thermal performance of a scramjet combustor operating at Mach 5.6 flight conditions. Final report, May 1996--May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stouffer, S.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Emmer, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the experimental data and the procedures used in acquiring and reducing the thermal loads data during tests of a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). This research effort is part of the UTRC effort to develop dual-mode scramjet combustor technology to support the development of Mach S missile technology. The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct-connect scramjet tests. The tests were conducted at the UTRC Ramject/Scramjet direct-connect combustor test facility in East Hartford, CT.

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, V.P.; Bradley, M.T.; Nagy, P.A.

    1982-08-01

    Uranium resources of the Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using available surface and subsurface geological information. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, as interpreted from the aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey and from the hydrochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance survey reports, were also investigated. A general reconnaissance of the geologic environments exposed in surface outcrops was carried out; and over 400 rock, sediment, and water geochemical analyses were made from the samples taken. Additionally, 119 rock samples were petrographically studied. A total of 21 occurrences were located, sampled, and described in detail. Six uranium occurrences, previously unreported in the literature, were located during hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey followup, or general outcrop reconnaissance. Nine areas of uranium favorability were delineated within the Lovelock Quadrangle. One area, which contains the basal units of the Hartford Hill Rhyolite, is favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits. Eight areas are favorable for uranium deposits in playa sediments. These playas are considered favorable for nonmarine carbonaceous sediment deposits and evaporative deposits. The total volume of rock in favorable areas of the Lovelock Quadrangle is estimated to be 190 km/sup 3/. The remaining geologic units are considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits. These include upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic volcanic, plutonic, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Also unfavorable are Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic flows and intrusive phases, tuffs, and sediments.

  4. Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

  5. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R.

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  6. Educating the public about America`s fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, J.H. [C.E.E.D., Northfield, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Today we would like to take a few moments of your time to talk about America`s fuel-coal, and a new organization created to educate decision makers, the public and educators. The Center for Energy & Economics Development (CEED) began as a concept in late 1992, and began operations with the creation of the Southern Region in March of 1993. Discussions began among several railroad CEO`s who were concerned that their major revenue commodity - coal - was experiencing serious problems due to public opposition and governmental restrictions. Conversations with their counterparts in the coal industry resulted in an agreement to forget parochial and often conflicting interests in Washington, and pursue the development of an overall grassroots joint-effort to protect the coal option. Those of you familiar with the history of conflict between these two industries recognize that this was a major step, and one that has led to an exciting new initiative. The coal/rail discussions examined a variety of approaches that the coalition might follow. Rather than jumping off into unchartered waters, or retraveling old roads, the group decided to first find out what was known and unknown about coal and energy. A Washington public relations firm, and a well known polling organization began the process in December of 1992 with a comprehensive opinion research program that would allow us to understand attitudes and opinions about energy and economic development, specifically coal and related issues. We reviewed the public-opinion history of coal beginning with the first national survey conducted in 1944, and then held a series of qualitative focus discussions in Tampa, Hartford, Denver and Indianapolis. In each city there was a discussion between business leaders and environmental activists, and one with the general public. In January of 1993, the focus groups were followed by a quantitative assessment of national opinion measuring trends, collecting demographic and geographic differences.

  7. QER- Comment of Stephen Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I attended the meeting yesterday in Hartford, Conn. I thank you for the opportunity to speak during the public comment period. I thanked the moderator, Fred Hanson, for bringing up the option of Conservation and Energy Efficiency to the last panel. The following are the comments I presented. I would first like to say that the Northeast does not have an energy supply problem. The problem that we have is a demand/supply issue. If the problem is only referred to as a supply problem then only supply solutions will be looked at. When we talk about meeting our energy needs, the conversation should start with: 1st Conservation 2nd Energy Efficiency …..and if we have a concern about Climate Change 3rd Renewables 4th Polluting technologies such as Fossil Fuels and Nuclear If we do not implement this list in the above order we will leave a very different climate and a planet that is difficult to live on for our children. I would next like to illustrate the power of Conservation, Energy Efficiency and Renewables. Two years ago my wife and I had the good fortune to be chosen to participate in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Program. Thank you to National Grid and the state of Massachusetts. By super insulating and air sealing our house, installing an air-source heat pump and a 2.4kW solar system, along with practicing conservation, our total energy bill for last year was $60, which equals 300 pounds of CO2 equivalent. This includes this past winter with its "polar vortex". Conservation, Efficiency and Renewables have been mentioned by a few of the presenters today. We need to bring Conservation, Efficiency and Renewables to center stage to solve our energy needs. Recommendations: 1. Institute to a greater extent "Peak Load Shaving". 2. Make it mandatory that all buildings that are built are Zero Net Energy or Zero Plus Energy. 3. Institute a more aggressive "Time of Use" Electric and Gas Metering System that Mr Reilly of the Vermont Electric Power Company

  8. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  9. QER- Comment of Don Ogden

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force and Energy Policy Systems Analysis Staff: We are unable to attend today's public meeting in Hartford, CT. With only four working days advanced notice of this event we find it difficult to believe that any real effort has been made on your part to reach out to the public for their input. Be that as it may, we want to take this opportunity to comment on the very subject of this meeting. The only true energy related "Infrastructure constraints" we are aware of here in New England are those experienced by corporate entities who seek to export our precious resources to other nations for profit. This, of course, is not at all in the public's interest. Certainly you recall all the efforts our goverment put into establishing "Energy Independence"? That phrase has, and continues to be the watchword heard throughout our nation. Why now, when so-called "Energy Independence" has yet to be established, would we choose to enable private corporations to export gas and oil to other countries at our expense? Further, why is it that corporations and their supporters in government are not actively seeking to repair the massive and dangerous leaks in our existing pipelines? How can corporations and government agencies who reportedly oversee energy corporations even consider building new pipelines when the existing ones are in so need of repair? With this in mind, the only "constraints" we are aware of are the lack of constraints on energy corporations run amok, forever seeking more profits at the expense of the public good. Please recall your mission: "The mission of the Energy Department is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions." Such security is only possible if we plan ahead for future generations in the midst of the Climate Crisis. Selling off our energy resources to other nations until they are depleted is not in

  10. QER- Comment of Martha Tirk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    understand all of the science and nuance involved, but it's clear to me that safety and environmental risks, and the financial risks to our entire community, are significant. What's not clear is how any of us would benefit from the presence of this pipeline in our town and in our region. I am opposed to "fracking" in the first place, and concerned that the real problem is continued dependence on fossil fuels as opposed to renewable and clean energy. Apart from my concerns about "fracked" gas, I do not believe we need more fossil fuel infrastructure. What we do need is a public-private partnership that promotes sustainable, renewable energy sources and the development of storage capacity for electricity generated by those sources. I cannot attend either of your meetings tomorrow in Hartford or Providence but wanted to express my concerns. Thank you.

  11. Effect of Component Failures on Economics of Distributed Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, Barry T.

    2012-02-02

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for

  12. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We

  13. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    , making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

  14. QER- Comment of Janice Kurkoski

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposal for Conservation Reward Rate for Electricity First of all, thank you for the time you are taking to hear from the public along with the industry and government officials in this critical matter. I attended the public hearing in Hartford CT two days ago and was able to comment on parts of what we are proposing here. We are writing to open a conversation with you about a proposal that we have been discussing in our past meetings. We would like to see you initiate legislation that would mandate a "stepped rate" for electricity, under which consumers who used less would pay a lower rate per kilowatt hour than those who used more. Background North Quabbin Energy is a community group from the nine North Quabbin towns in north central Massachusetts that focuses on education and local action relating to ways to conserve energy and support local and regional enterprises that reduce our dependence on imported resources. The towns are Athol, Orange, Petersham, Royalston, Warwick, Wendell, New Salem, Erving and Phillipston. Our members include representatives from the appointed Energy Committees of these towns. For the past six years, we have participated in many different types of events and activities, always with an emphasis on the idea that the single best way to address the high financial, social, and environmental costs of our current energy use patterns is to consume less energy in the first place. What we have discovered in our community work is that most people seem aware of the reasons for conserving energy (lowering greenhouse gas emissions, saving money, reducing dependence on oil and other imported resources, etc.). Many are also knowledgeable about the basic weatherization and conservation strategies that utilities, municipalities, and community groups like ours try to promote (for example, adding insulation to homes, turning thermostats down, or using fluorescent or LED lighting rather than incandescent bulbs). Yet except when energy prices are