Sample records for hartford hartford hartford

  1. The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company Group Numbers Basic Term Life - 677984 Basic by The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company. (Referred to as The Hartford or Hartford.) General from an accident, the benefit will be equal to $140,000 ($70,000 basic group term life PLUS $70

  2. Hartford Steam Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information HanergyHarney Electric Coop,HartHartford

  3. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study- Hartford Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 9, 2008, DOE hosted a regional pre-study workshop in Hartford, CT to receive input and suggestions concerning the 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. The agenda, full...

  4. East Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South,Earlsboro,Canton,Greenville,Connecticut:Hartford,

  5. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: The Hartford | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | DepartmentDepartment of Energy LewisDepartment ofof EnergyThe Hartford

  6. Hartford Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open Energy Information HanergyHarney Electric Coop,Hart

  7. Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio:Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump

  8. Hartford, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio:Connecticut: Energy Resources

  9. Hartford, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio:Connecticut: Energy

  10. Hartford Neighborhood Healthy Homes Project (NeHHP) Checklist Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    @uchc.edu DRAFT 11/13/2009 Combustion Appliance (nonelectric) that is not vented: Some combustion appliances, such as gas ranges and unvented space heaters, and other products (gas logs and charcoal stoves) discharge combustion products directly into the living area. Combustion byproducts can include strong

  11. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Local Affairs - New England Dominion Resources, Inc. Remarks of Joe Rose, President, Propane Gas Association of New England Remarks of Michael Trunzo, President & CEO, New...

  12. Microsoft Word - Statement Rick Terven.Plumbers Pipefitters.Hartford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    systems; reliable, efficient energy production, distribution and transportation. Pollution-control technology across all industries-including refineries, power plants,...

  13. West Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to:Ohio:Wendel,Brooklyn,Covina,285°,Hampton Dunes,

  14. Hartford County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | OpenHalfWind

  15. Hartford Landfill Gas Utilization Proj Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation HandbookOhio:

  16. City of Hartford, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformationHarmony, Minnesota

  17. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE TRIASSIC-JURASSIC MASS EXTINCTION AS SEEN FROM THE HARTFORD BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    cleared ecological space for the rise of dinosaur dominance much as the K-T mass extinction prepared the way for mammalian ecological ascent (Olsen et al., 2003a). In this guidebook, we will examine outcrops--represents an extreme end member of Earth's geography and climate. A "hot house" world, with no evidence of polar ice

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Glenn Poole Verso Maine Energy.QER Hartford...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Conversions * Both Maine mills have converted to Combined Cycle with Cogeneration - Gas Turbine-HRSG-Steam turbine - cogeneration - Over 250 million invested - Typical...

  19. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England Regional

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |ofDepartmentHederman,Department

  20. Essays in Applied Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Jessica Kristin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRAND RAPIDS GREEN BAY HARRISBURG/SCRANT HARTFORD HOUSTONGRAND RAPIDS GREEN BAY HARRISBURG/SCRANT HARTFORD HOUSTON

  1. Benchmarking Best Practices of Demand Responsive Transit Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged; Palmer, Kurt; Abdelmaguid, Tamer

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transit District Greater Attleboro - Taunton RegionalHartford Hamden Bridgeport Attleboro Portland Milford Albany

  2. Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 757-6540 Fax: 860-757-6542 www.cslib.org/publicrecords

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    .cslib.org/publicrecords Connecticut State Library Office of the Public Records Administrator Managing Your Records Before Leaving Your.cslib.org/publicrecords/retstate.htm. Contact your Records Management Liaison Officer (RMLO) for assistance in this process. If you are unsure to the public by properly managing their records. (11/2010) #12;

  3. Connecticut State Library Address: 231 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06106 Phone: (860) 757-6540 Fax: 860-757-6542 Connecticut State Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    . But before you go, you've got one last job to do. You've got to manage your records. And what a job it is with the records. Contact your Records Management Liaison Officer (RMLO) for procedures to identify which records will have fulfilled your responsibility to the public by properly managing their records! 7. That's it

  4. Duke University, Durham, NC Mechanical Engineering Ph.D., 2012 Trinity College, Hartford, CT Mechanical Engineering B.Sc. Hons, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    known as synthetic biology. Intracellular macromolecules will be encapsulated in vitro inside thermal diodes are of interest for more efficient solar energy harvesting and for the thermal regulation

  5. Analysis of farm-to-retail price spreads for whole and two percent milk in seven selected cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Marla Lashea

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of transmission for whole milk was from 0.37 (Hartford) to 2.54 (Dallas) and from 0.39 (Hartford) to 3.66 (Dallas) for two percent milk....

  6. Select Language Powered by Translate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartford, CT Seminar July 2014 07/08/2014 07/10/2014 Livestock and Animal Scales 5286 Harrisburg, PA

  7. Energy Department Accelerates the Deployment of Advanced Vehicle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Biogen Idec, Bloomberg LP, The Coca-Cola Company, the City of Sacramento, Dell, Facebook, The Hartford, The Hertz Corporation, National Grid, New York Power Authority, NRG...

  8. An Overview Welcome to UConn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    ) SBD ($12B) UTC ($81B) NU ($12B) Aetna ($35B) Praxair ($9B) Hartford ($25B) EMCOR ($6B) Goodrich ($16B

  9. QER- Comment of Elaine Mroz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elaine Mroz Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meetings ‘‘Infrastructure Restraints- New England” held April 21, 2014, in Providence, RI and Hartford, CT. Please see attached file.

  10. William T. Yardley

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting Panel on Infrastructure Needs: Electricity and Natural Gas Interdependencies Hartford, CT -- April 21, 2014 Introduction Good afternoon...

  11. Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    contributors to climate change and global warming. According to a US EPA (2006) report, the transportation of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Hartford West Hartford, Connecticut 06117 January 2008 a freight capacity crisis that threatens US eco- nomic productivity. As reported in Jeanneret (2006

  12. Sign inBecome a MarketWatch member todayFront Page News Viewer Commentary Markets Investing Personal Finance Community Quad/Graphics Inc (QUAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Graphics' Hartford, Wis., manufacturing facility achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED certification for a manufacturing site. The 1.6-million-square-foot Hartford plant opened in 1992 also qualified and resource selection; and 5) indoor environmental quality. In addition, the USGBC recognizes innovations

  13. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF NONLINEAR NETWORK DESIGN 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks are employed for transporting energy, material, peo- ... ?United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT 06118. ... The notation associated with problem data is de- ..... are both reliable and computationally efficient. Use of ...

  14. LITERARY DESTINATIONS: MARK TWAIN'S HOUSES AND LITERARY TOURISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Hilary Iris

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Mark Twain has been commemorated for more than eighty-five years at his various houses. His birthplace in Florida, Missouri, his boyhood home in Hannibal, Missouri, his adult home in Hartford, Connecticut, and his summer retreat at Quarry Farm...

  15. An evaluation of the outdoor advertising industry and current proposed legislation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disinger, Thomas Ainsworth

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Cost Pet' No. 100 S~wing Month Cost Per Thousand Daily Effec. Cl. rc. (Dollars Little Falls, Minn. Popular Bluff, Mo. Selma, Ala. Paducah, Kty. Corpus Christi, Tex. Hartford, Conn. Indianapolis, Ind. Atlanta, Ga. New Orleans, La. Dallas...

  16. 2009 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshops...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    study, please select a workshop, below. June 11, 2008 San Francisco, CA June 18, 2008 Oklahoma City, OK July 9, 2008 Hartford, CT July 29, 2008 Atlanta, GA August 6, 2008 Las...

  17. Electric Utility Industrial Conservation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy conducted a study, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, of industrial and commercial electricity conservation opportunities in the service territory of Arkansas Power and Light Company (AP&L). The study determined...

  18. Refrigerants in Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stouppe, D. E.

    .E. Senior Engineer The Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company Hartford,. Connecticut ABSTRACT The massive growth of air conditioning and refrigeration has been a direct result of the development of a class of chemicals called fluorocarbons..., Gordon, "Forty Years Research on Atmospheric Ozone at Oxford: A !Iistory," Applied Optics, March t968, pp. 387-405. 4. Downing, R., "Development of Chloro fluorocarbon Refrigerants," CFCs: Time of Transition, ASHRAE Publication, Atlanta, GA, 1989...

  19. Published: October 12, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 14609 dx.doi.org/10.1021/la203557f |Langmuir 2011, 27, 1460914614

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , dye, and redox shuttle. For instance, coating mesoporous TiO2 networks with various types highly porous aerogels,5 selec- tivelypositioningseveralkindsofdyestoformmulticoloredlayersof porous for Photovoltaic Studies. Samples of FTO-coated glass (10 cmÀ2 , Hartford glass) with dimensions of Received

  20. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/la203557f |Langmuir XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/Langmuir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For instance, coating mesoporous TiO2 networks with various types of insulating metal oxides,1,2 replacing TiO2 by other semiconducting oxides,3,4 fabricating networks from highly porous aerogels,5 selec for Photovoltaic Studies. Samples of FTO-coated glass (10 cmÀ2 , Hartford glass) with dimensions of Received

  1. Junior Example Engineering Robert Garcia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    College (203) 555-1234 Cambridge, MA 02138-6175 Education Harvard University Cambridge, MA S (Mechanics and Relativity, Electricity and Magnetism), Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Engineering.71. Design Project: Aerobic Charge: Converting kinetic energy during exercise to electrical charge. Hartford

  2. W. F. Colban K. A. Thole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 G. Zess Pratt and Whitney, East Hartford, CT 06108 Combustor Turbine Interface Studies--Part 1: Endwall Effectiveness Measurements Improved durability of gas turbine of the first vane. The experiments were performed using large-scale models of a combustor and nozzle guide vane

  3. N. D. Cardwell Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    , University Park, PA 16802 S. W. Burd Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Corporation, East Hartford, CT 06108 Investigation of Sand Blocking Within Impingement and Film-Cooling Holes Gas turbines in the combustor and turbine for combined internal and exter- nal cooling of metal components. Specifically, sand

  4. Camron C. Land Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 Chris Joe Pratt and Whitney, United Technologies Corporation, East Hartford Gas turbine engines use innovative cooling techniques to keep metal temperatures down while pushing-cooling are generally used to reduce metal tempera- tures of the various components in the combustor and turbine

  5. JOURNAL OF PROPULSION AND POWER Vol. 20, No. 6, NovemberDecember 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    Optimization to Reduce Turbine Vane Passage Adiabatic Wall Temperatures Andrew T. Lethander and Karen A. Thole Wagner§ Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Corporation, East Hartford, Connecticut 06108 Secondary flows in airfoil passages have become increasingly important in the design of modern gas turbines

  6. Stephen P. Lynch Narayan Sundaram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    , Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 Atul Kohli Christopher Lehane Pratt & Whitney, 400 Main Street, East Hartford, CT 06108 Heat Transfer for a Turbine Blade With Nonaxisymmetric Endwall Contouring Complex vortical secondary flows that are present near the endwall of an axial gas turbine blade

  7. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  8. J. R. Christophel K. A. Thole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    typically used cooling method whereby coolant is supplied through holes placed along the pressure side Corporation, East Hartford, Connecticut 06108 Cooling the Tip of a Turbine Blade Using Pressure Side Holes engine performance. As a result, cooling methods along the blade tip are crucial. Film-cooling is one

  9. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  10. CX-004690: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natural Refrigerant Very-High Efficiency Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning SystemCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 12/16/2010Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  11. System Name: System Type Room Location E.164 Alias BPB 130 Tandberg C40 Bio Physics Building 130 130

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    Point Marine Science Bldg 4059067 Avery Point Director's office Sony PCS-TL33 Avery Point Campus 4059000 Avery Point Marine Science Sony PCS-TL33 Avery Point Campus 4059152 Bio Physics Tandberg MXP 3000 BPB Director's office Sony PCS-TL33 Greater Hartford Campus 5709214 ITL portable system Sony PCS-TL33 Storrs

  12. CX-005443: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plug and Play Distributed Power Systems for Smart-Grid Connected BuildingsCX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B5.1Date: 03/17/2011Location(s): East Hartford, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. UniversityofConnecticutHealthCenter 263FarmingtonAvenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    PEVAR (percutaneous endovascular aneurysm reconstruction) -- which Michael Dahn, M.D., a vascular in the Hartford region. For Oleski's PEVAR procedure, Dahn and his team used a stent to bypass the aneurysm from. "Since there is no incision, recovery time is very short," says Dahn. "The infection rate is also lower

  14. Driving, Aging & Dementia: On-Line Resources Division of Motor Vehicles & Driver Licensing, Missouri Department of Revenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driving, Aging & Dementia: On-Line Resources Missouri Division of Motor Vehicles & Driver Licensing for Responsible Driving, Inc. http://www.drivingsafe.org/ Alzheimer's Association, St. Louis Chapter (Driving & Driving (The Hartford Insurance Corp.) http://www.thehartford.com/alzheimers/ Family Conversations

  15. The Wizard Behind Oz and Other Stories: A Research Guide for L. Frank Baum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Karla

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Association, and his writings about chickens, including his book The Book of the Hamburgs. It also provides descriptive bibliographical details regarding The Book of the Hamburgs. Keller, Karl. ?L. Frank Baum: The Wizard of Coronado.? Seacoast and Upland... I have not secured a copy of this work for personal consultation. The Book of the Hamburgs: A Brief Treatise Upon the Mating, Rearing and Management of the Different Varieties of Hamburgs. Hartford, CT: Stoddard, 1886. Baum wrote...

  16. The Wizard Behind Oz and Other Stories: A Research Guide for L. Frank Baum By: Karla Lyles October

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Karla

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Association, and his writings about chickens, including his book The Book of the Hamburgs. It also provides descriptive bibliographical details regarding The Book of the Hamburgs. Keller, Karl. ?L. Frank Baum: The Wizard of Coronado.? Seacoast and Upland... I have not secured a copy of this work for personal consultation. The Book of the Hamburgs: A Brief Treatise Upon the Mating, Rearing and Management of the Different Varieties of Hamburgs. Hartford, CT: Stoddard, 1886. Baum wrote...

  17. Mall treats its tenants to energy bonus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warrock, A.M.

    1983-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hartford, Connecticut mall owner returned the first six months' energy savings from a conservation investment to his tenants to make them more aware of the value of conservation and to compensate them for construction disruptions. Besides the new equipment, including an energy-management system, fan modifications, delamping and relamping, and variable-volume systems, contracts for steam and chilled-water supplies were renegotiated. (DCK)

  18. Three essays concerning economic analysis associated with the supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwell Cabello, Pablo

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The Northeast Dairy Compact was established by the Congress as an effort to restore the milk prices and assure its regional supply in six New England states. It operated from July 1997 to September 2001. Boston and Hartford enrich the analysis... 2006) Pablo Sherwell Cabello, B.S., Universidad de las Am?ricas-Puebla; M.A., Texas Tech University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Oral Capps, Jr. Dr...

  19. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  20. Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

  1. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  2. QER- Comment of Don Ogden

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force and Energy Policy Systems Analysis Staff: We are unable to attend today's public meeting in Hartford, CT. With only four working days advanced notice of this event we find it difficult to believe that any real effort has been made on your part to reach out to the public for their input. Be that as it may, we want to take this opportunity to comment on the very subject of this meeting. The only true energy related "Infrastructure constraints" we are aware of here in New England are those experienced by corporate entities who seek to export our precious resources to other nations for profit. This, of course, is not at all in the public's interest. Certainly you recall all the efforts our goverment put into establishing "Energy Independence"? That phrase has, and continues to be the watchword heard throughout our nation. Why now, when so-called "Energy Independence" has yet to be established, would we choose to enable private corporations to export gas and oil to other countries at our expense? Further, why is it that corporations and their supporters in government are not actively seeking to repair the massive and dangerous leaks in our existing pipelines? How can corporations and government agencies who reportedly oversee energy corporations even consider building new pipelines when the existing ones are in so need of repair? With this in mind, the only "constraints" we are aware of are the lack of constraints on energy corporations run amok, forever seeking more profits at the expense of the public good. Please recall your mission: "The mission of the Energy Department is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions." Such security is only possible if we plan ahead for future generations in the midst of the Climate Crisis. Selling off our energy resources to other nations until they are depleted is not in keeping with that mission. Allowing existing energy infrastructure to leak methane and other elements into our compromised atmosphere is not in keeping with that mission. Let's have some of those "transformative solutions", let's put every effort into limiting gas & oil leaks and keeping our energy resources here at home. Don Ogden, producer/co-host The Enviro Show WXOJ-LP & WMCB

  3. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  4. PROGRESS & CHALLENGES IN CLEANUP OF HANFORDS TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEWITT, W.M.; SCHEPENS, R.

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The River Protection Project (RPP), which is managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP), is highly complex from technical, regulatory, legal, political, and logistical perspectives and is the largest ongoing environmental cleanup project in the world. Over the past three years, ORP has made significant advances in its planning and execution of the cleanup of the Hartford tank wastes. The 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs), and 60 miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs) at Hanford contain approximately 200,000 m{sup 3} (53 million gallons) of mixed radioactive wastes, some of which dates back to the first days of the Manhattan Project. The plan for treating and disposing of the waste stored in large underground tanks is to: (1) retrieve the waste, (2) treat the waste to separate it into high-level (sludge) and low-activity (supernatant) fractions, (3) remove key radionuclides (e.g., Cs-137, Sr-90, actinides) from the low-activity fraction to the maximum extent technically and economically practical, (4) immobilize both the high-level and low-activity waste fractions by vitrification, (5) interim store the high-level waste fraction for ultimate disposal off-site at the federal HLW repository, (6) dispose the low-activity fraction on-site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF), and (7) close the waste management areas consisting of tanks, ancillary equipment, soils, and facilities. Design and construction of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the cornerstone of the RPP, has progressed substantially despite challenges arising from new seismic information for the WTP site. We have looked closely at the waste and aligned our treatment and disposal approaches with the waste characteristics. For example, approximately 11,000 m{sup 3} (2-3 million gallons) of metal sludges in twenty tanks were not created during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and have low fission product concentrations. We plan to treat these wastes as transuranic waste (TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which will reduce the WTP system processing time by three years. We are also developing and testing bulk vitrification as a technology to supplement the WTP LAW vitrification facility for immobilizing the massive volume of LAW. We will conduct a full-scale demonstration of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System by immobilizing up to 1,100 m{sup 3} (300,000 gallons) of tank S-109 low-curie soluble waste from which Cs-137 had previously been removed. This past year has been marked by both progress and new challenges. The focus of our tank farm work has been retrieving waste from the old single-shell tanks (SSTs). We have completed waste retrieval from three SSTs and are conducting retrieval operations on an additional three SSTs. While most waste retrievals have gone about as expected, we have faced challenges with some recalcitrant tank heel wastes that required enhanced approaches. Those enhanced approaches ranged from oxalic acid additions to deploying a remote high-pressure water lance. As with all large, long-term projects that employ first of a kind technologies, we continue to be challenged to control costs and maintain schedule. However, it is most important to work safely and to provide facilities that will do the job they are intended to do.

  5. Effect of component failures on economics of distributed photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, B

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for both. Some societal benefits associated with financial benefits to the utility of having a distributed generation capacity that is not fossil-fuel based have been included into the economic models. Also included and quantified in the models are several benefits to society more generally: job creation and some estimates of benefits from avoiding greenhouse emissions. PV system failures result in a lowering of the economic values of a grid-connected system, but this turned out to be a surprisingly small effect on the overall economics. The most significant benefit noted resulted from including the societal benefits accrued to the utility. This provided a marked increase in the valuations of the array and made the overall value proposition a financially attractive one, in that net present values exceeded installation costs. These results indicate that the Department of Energy and state regulatory bodies should consider focusing on societal benefits that create economic value for the utility, confirm these quantitative values, and work to have them accepted by the utilities and reflected in the rate structures for power obtained from grid-connected arrays. Understanding and applying the economic benefits evident in this work can significantly improve the business case for grid-connected PV installations. This work also indicates that the societal benefits to the population are real and defensible, but not nearly as easy to justify in a business case as are the benefits that accrue directly to the utility.

  6. QER- Comment of Martha Tirk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I write as a concerned citizen from Ashfield, one of the rural western Massachusetts towns that would be affected by the proposed installation of a gas pipeline along the existing electrical power grid by Kinder Morgan/TGP. My property abuts easements for these high tension lines. My concerns are threefold: 1. The valuation of my property, and that of others affected by this proposed pipeline, would decrease substantially should this installation become a reality. This will negatively impact the tax basis and in aggregate, reduced tax revenues for our town will have a significant negative effect on schools, public safety, road maintenance and other services. 2. I question the ability to adequately insure my property in the event of this installation becoming a reality. The risks associated with the transport and storage of gas are frightening and real, particularly "fracked' gas with the additives - known and unknown - that become a part of its composition through the shale drilling process and through reactions with the steel pipe in which its carried. My insurance policy, a standard one, will not cover losses that could foreseeably be incurred as a result of leakage, explosion, fire, or other distinctly possible incidents along the pipeline route. 3. The salability of my property will be negatively impacted by this pipeline. In fact, the mere proposal has already had an affect. My immediate neighbor, an older woman who has been living in and maintaining an historic 200+ year old farm house for over 30 years, has recently lost the sale of her home as news of Kinder Morgan's intent has become widespread. We live in a small and rural town. Our quality of life is as precious to us as our natural and community resources - clean water, clean air, rich farmland, and neighbors who take the time to be educated about the impact of proposed large-scale energy generating and transmission projects because we care deeply about preserving all of it. I don't pretend to understand all of the science and nuance involved, but it's clear to me that safety and environmental risks, and the financial risks to our entire community, are significant. What's not clear is how any of us would benefit from the presence of this pipeline in our town and in our region. I am opposed to "fracking" in the first place, and concerned that the real problem is continued dependence on fossil fuels as opposed to renewable and clean energy. Apart from my concerns about "fracked" gas, I do not believe we need more fossil fuel infrastructure. What we do need is a public-private partnership that promotes sustainable, renewable energy sources and the development of storage capacity for electricity generated by those sources. I cannot attend either of your meetings tomorrow in Hartford or Providence but wanted to express my concerns. Thank you.