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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

2

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physicist Sensor Science Division Ultraviolet Radiation Group. ... Ph.D. Optical Sciences and Engineering ... Orlando, FL MS Electrical Engineering, The ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

3

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uwe Arp. Dr. Uwe Arp is a physicist in the Ultraviolet Radiation Group of the Sensor Science Division in the Physical Measurement Laboratory. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

The USDA Ultraviolet Radiation Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation Monitoring Program has been measuring UV radiation since 1994. The initial network of 12 stations employed broadband meters to measure UVB irradiance and included ancillary ...

D. S. Bigelow; J. R. Slusser; A. F. Beaubien; J. H. Gibson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

6

Tropospheric Influence on Solar Ultraviolet Radiation: The Role of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements obtained from several Robertson-Berger (RB) meters over the course of one year define the role of cloud cover in moderating biologically effective ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface. In an annual mean sense, clouds reduce ...

John E. Frederick; Hilary E. Snell

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A CCD Spectroradiometer for Ultraviolet Actinic Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new spectroradiometer for spectral measurements of ultraviolet (UV) atmospheric radiation (290–400 nm) using a charge coupled device (CCD) as a detector is introduced. The instrument development is motivated by the need for measurements with (a)...

Evelyn Jäkel; Manfred Wendisch; Mario Blumthaler; Rainer Schmitt; Ann R. Webb

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Effects of Sunshine, Cloudiness and Haze on Received Ultraviolet Radiation in New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet data from Rochester, Schenectady and Whiteface Mountain, New York, for the period November 1975-December 1977, have been studied to ascertain the importance of extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) radiation, sunshine, cloudiness and haze ...

Anita Baker-Blocker

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Bipolar charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

The photoemission charging of dust particles under ultraviolet radiation from a xenon lamp has been investigated. The velocities of yttrium dust particles with a work function of 3.3 eV and their charges have been determined experimentally; the latter are about 400-500 and about 100 elementary charges per micron of radius for the positively and negatively charged fractions, respectively. The dust particle charging and the dust cloud evolution in a photoemission cell after exposure to an ultraviolet radiation source under the applied voltage have been simulated numerically. The photoemission charging of dust particles has been calculated on the basis of nonlocal and local charging models. Only unipolar particle charging is shown to take place in a system of polydisperse dust particles with the same photoemission efficiency. It has been established that bipolar charging is possible in the case of monodisperse particles with different quantum efficiencies. Polydispersity in this case facilitates the appearance of oppositely charged particles in a photoemission plasma.

Filippov, A. V., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Babichev, V. N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E.; Gavrikov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Pal', A. F. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Petrov, O. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Starostin, A. N.; Sarkarov, N. E. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research, State Research Center of the Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

In vitro models for investigating keratinocyte responses to ultraviolet B radiation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes the use of 2- and 3-dimensional cell-based models for studying how skin cells respond to ultraviolet radiation. These methods were used to… (more)

Fernandez, Tara L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish  

SciTech Connect

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces under extreme ultraviolet radiation: An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces under extreme ultraviolet radiation: An x 2012) Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation-induced carbon contamination and oxidation of Au surfaces modification during EUV exposure. XPS analysis showed that total carbon contamination (C 1s peak

Harilal, S. S.

15

ealth physics is concerned with protecting people from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation while allowing its beneficial use in medicine, science,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, particularly from medical exposures and from the atomic-bomb ex- posures in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. DuringH ealth physics is concerned with protecting people from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation effects such as cancer that had been observed in populations of people receiv- ing high doses

Massey, Thomas N.

16

Influences of atmospheric conditions and air mass on the ratio of ultraviolet to total solar radiation  

SciTech Connect

The technology to detoxify hazardous wastes using ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation is being investigated by the DOE/SERI Solar Thermal Technology Program. One of the elements of the technology evaluation is the assessment and characterization of UV solar radiation resources available for detoxification processes. This report describes the major atmospheric variables that determine the amount of UV solar radiation at the earth's surface, and how the ratio of UV-to-total solar radiation varies with atmospheric conditions. These ratios are calculated from broadband and spectral solar radiation measurements acquired at SERI, and obtained from the literature on modeled and measured UV solar radiation. The following sections discuss the atmospheric effects on UV solar radiation and provide UV-to-total solar radiation ratios from published studies, as well as measured values from SERI's data. A summary and conclusions are also given.

Riordan, C.J.; Hulstrom, R.L.; Myers, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Merida, 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Espaillat, Catherine, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu, E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: jesush@cida.ve, E-mail: briceno@cida.ve, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Simple All Weather Model to Estimate Ultraviolet Solar Radiation (290–385 nm)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new expression to estimate the solar ultraviolet irradiance from parameters usually available in radiometric networks is presented. The authors have analyzed the relation between solar ultraviolet global irradiance (290–385 nm), UV, and ...

I. Foyo-Moreno; J. Vida; L. Alados-Arboledas

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Resonantly enhanced method for generation of tunable, coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon Monoxide vapor is used to generate coherent, tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation by third-harmonic generation using a single tunable dye laser. The presence of a nearby electronic level resonantly enhances the nonlinear susceptibility of this molecule allowing efficient generation of the vuv light at modest pump laser intensities, thereby reducing the importance of a six-photon multiple-photon ionization process which is also resonantly enhanced by the same electronic level but to higher order. By choosing the pump radiation wavelength to be of shorter wavelength than individual vibronic levels used to extend tunability stepwise from 154.4 to 124.6 nm, and the intensity to be low enough, multiple-photon ionization can be eliminated. Excitation spectra of the third-harmonic emission output exhibit shifts to shorter wavelength and broadening with increasing CO pressure due to phase matching effects. Increasing the carbon monoxide pressure, therefore, allows the substantial filling in of gaps arising from the stepwise tuning thereby providing almost continuous tunability over the quoted range of wavelength emitted.

Glownia, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part I: The Sensitivity of Ultraviolet Irradiances to Atmospheric Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model is employed for the prediction of surface UV irradiances. A wide-ranging sensitivity study is undertaken to show how changes to the model input parameters aged UV irradiances at the surface. The ...

Piers M. De F. Forster

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effective photoelectric converters of ultraviolet radiation with graded-gap ZnS-based layers  

SciTech Connect

The use of ultrathin ({approx}10 nm) stable p-Cu{sub 1.8}S films as a transparent component of the p-Cu{sub 1.8}S-n-ZnS heterojunction as well as of the graded-gap layers made it possible to obtain effective photoconverters of ultraviolet radiation. The results of examination of the properties of photoactive Cu{sub 1.8}S-ZnS junctions grown on the CdS or CdSe substrates with intermediate graded-gap layers CdS-Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}S or CdSe-(ZnS){sub x}(CdSe){sub 1-} {sub x}, respectively, are presented. With the correct selection of parameters of the substrates, the graded-gap layers allows one to attain the optimal characteristics of the p-n junction, to realize high electric fields at the Cu{sub 1.8}S-ZnS contact, and to solve the problem of fabrication of the back ohmic contact to ZnS without additional doping of all components of the heterostructure with a foreign impurity. Varying the thickness of a thin ZnS layer, it is possible to control the extension of the space charge in the graded-gap layer and thereby to control the long-wavelength edge of photoconverter sensitivity.

Bobrenko, Yu. N.; Pavelets, S. Yu., E-mail: pavelets@voliacable.com; Pavelets, A. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Spectral Measurements of Solar Ultraviolet-B Radiation in Southeast England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral measurements of the ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum have been made at Reading, southeast England (51.5°N) since July 1989. The data presented here show the daily and annual variability of and within the ultraviolet-B wave band, ...

Ann R. Webb

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

Gersh, Michael E. (Bedford, MA); Bien, Fritz (Concord, MA); Bernstein, Lawrence S. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling Ultraviolet Radiation at the Earth's Surface. Part II: Model and Instrument Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution measurements in the spectral region of 280?400 nm using a double monochromator are compared with detailed radiative transfer calculations at Reading, United Kingdom (52°N, 0°), for clear and totally overcast days, using aerosol ...

Piers M. De F. Forster; Keith P. Shine; Ann R. Webb

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Ultraviolet Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The key external stakeholders include: NASA; NOAA, DARPA, members of the semiconductor industry, and academic and industrial researchers ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Are peanuts harmful for squirrels?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Date: NA Question: Are peanuts harmful for squirrels? In the winter I put out field corn. Presently have one friendly female who looks for a treat to be tossed her way....

27

NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

Landi, E.; Young, P. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

29

Empirical Studies of Tropospheric Transmission in the Ultraviolet: Broadband Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the effects of absorption and scattering in the troposphere on solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground. A site was established in the city of Chicago for monitoring broadband ultraviolet irradiance, total sunlight, and ...

John E. Frederick; Anne E. Koob; Amy D. Alberts; Elizabeth C. Weatherhead

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Symposium-in-Print Interactive Effects of Ultraviolet-B Radiation and Temperature on Cotton Physiology, Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current conditions of 2–11 kJ m 22 day 21 of UV-B radiation and temperatures of>308C during flowering in cotton cultivated regions are projected to increase in the future. A controlled environment study was conducted in sunlit growth chambers to determine the effects of UV-B radiation and temperature on physiology, growth, development and leaf hyperspectral reflectance of cotton. Plants were grown in the growth chambers at three day/night temperatures (24/168C, 30/228C and 36/288C) and three levels of UV-B radiation (0, 7 and 14 kJ m 22 day 21) at each temperature from emergence to 79 days under optimum nutrient and water conditions. Increases in main stem node number and the node of first fruiting branch and decrease in duration to first flower bud (square) and flower were recorded with increase in temperature. Main effects of temperature and UV-B radiation were significant for net photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance, total chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations of uppermost, fully expanded leaves during squaring and flowering. A significant interaction between temperature and UV-B radiation was detected for total biomass and its components. The UV-B radiation of 7 kJ m 22 day 21 reduced boll yield by 68% and 97 % at 30/228C and 36/288C, respectively, compared with yield at 0 kJ m 22 day 21 and 30/228C. No bolls were produced in the three temperature treatments under 14 kJ m 22 day 21 UV-B radiation. The first-order interactions between temperature, UV-B radiation and leaf age were significant for leaf reflectance. This study suggests a growth- and process-related temperature dependence of sensitivity to UV-B radiation.

Hyperspectral Reflectance; K. Raja Reddy; Vijaya Gopal Kakani; Duli Zhao; Sailaja Koti; Wei Gao

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

32

A multi-sensor approach for assessing the impacts of ultraviolet-absorbing aerosols on top of atmosphere radiative fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year (June 2006-May 2007) of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are used with Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Aerosol Index (OMI-AI) data to assess the direct radiative ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Harm Reduction Journal BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bundling occupational safety with harm reduction information as a feasible method for improving police receptiveness to syringe access programs: evidence from three U.S. cities

Corey S Davis; Leo Beletsky; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Does Bankruptcy Protection Harm the Airline Industry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Bankruptcy Protection Harm the Airline Industry?lower fare during bankruptcy does not necessarily mean thatof this opportunity and how does the resulting change a¤ect

Lee, Hwa Ryung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NIST: Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Summary: Ultraviolet photoemission electron microscopy is used to study ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealedc consensus. Harmful Algae 8:3–13. 2. Sunda WG, Graneli E,of the United States. Harmful Algae 8:39–53. 4. Smayda TJ (

Grigoriev, Igor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

39

Estimation of Ultraviolet-B Irradiance under Variable Cloud Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods to estimate the irradiance of ultraviolet-B (UVB; 280–320 nm) radiation are needed to assess biological effects of changes in atmospheric composition. Measurements of the spatial distribution of sky cloud cover, temporal variability of ...

Richard H. Grant; Gordon M. Heisler

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

Reed, Scott (Albuquerue, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerue, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerue, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerue, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Technical assessment of the prevention of micro-fouling on OTEC heat-transfer surfaces through the use of ultraviolet radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To reduce or eliminate biofouling by microorganisms it has been suggested that the seawater entering the heat exchanger be sterilized (or at least sanitized) by uv radiation at 253.7 nm. The feasibility of applying this technology to OTEC is examined. Trivial calculations based on the Lambert-Beer equation and reasonable assumptions about seawater quality and the intensity of irradiation obtainable from a uv lamp suggest seawater may be transparent enough to a collimated beam of uv light to deliver effective germicidal doses to nearly 150 cm under some conditions. However, the practical limit on the depth of effective radiation from commercial lamps is severely restricted by many factors including the natural divergence of light, absorption and scattering in the media, intensity of radiation from the light source and so forth. Even under very favorable conditions a common design allowing uv light to penetrate 30 cm of water would have to permit the water at that distance to be in contact with the light for 20 seconds or so to deliver the germicidal effect of high quality sanitization but not necessarily sterilization. Macro-fouling, which may be more severe than micro-fouling, will not be affected by uv radiation (presuming an absence of symbiotic relationships). Parasitic power required for uv sources may be prohibitive under unfavorable conditions (i.e., unexpectedly high absorptivities of seawater, or excessive turbidity) or the absence of an industrial effort to scale up present uv equipment appropriate to OTEC needs. This latter event is unlikely for it appears that present uv lamps can be adapted to OTEC needs without major technological advancement. Power and cost estimates for uv installation and operation vary widely depending on the number of lamps needed for the OTEC configuration and the intensity of uv radiation actually required to prevent biofouling of heat transfer systems in OTEC designs.

Garrigan, G. A.; Schmitt, R. P.; Ciccone, V. J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Estimation of Ultraviolet-A Irradiance from Measurements of 368-nm Spectral Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of ultraviolet-A (UV-A) radiation across the earth’s surface is needed to model plant productivity and future impacts of ultraviolet-B radiation on plant productivity. We have developed two models to estimate the UV-A irradiance ...

R. H. Grant; J. R. Slusser

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Method for generating extreme ultraviolet with mather-type plasma accelerators for use in Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave uses two intersecting plasma beams generated by two plasma accelerators. The intersection of the two plasma beams emits electromagnetic radiation and in particular radiation in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. In the preferred orientation two axially aligned counter streaming plasmas collide to produce an intense source of electromagnetic radiation at the 13.5 nm wavelength. The Mather type plasma accelerators can utilize tin, or lithium covered electrodes. Tin, lithium or xenon can be used as the photon emitting gas source.

Hassanein, Ahmed (Bolingbrook, IL); Konkashbaev, Isak (Bolingbrook, IL)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

Aspirations and Well-Being: When Are High Aspirations Harmful?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Are high aspirations harmful or beneficial? The hedonic adaptation prevention model posits that lofty aspirations are detrimental to well-being (Lyubomirsky, 2011; Sheldon & Lyubomirsky, 2012),… (more)

Bao, Katherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

47

Harmful Exhaust Emissions Monitoring of Road Vehicle Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road vehicle improve the quality of people's life, however harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbon (HC), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), have become more and more unacceptable ... Keywords: optic absorption spectroscopy based gas sensor, harmful exhaust emission monitoring, engine vibration

Chuliang Wei; Zhemin Zhuang; H. Ewald; A. I. Al-Shamma'a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ultraviolet Complete Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ultraviolet complete (UV) quantum gravity theory is formulated in which vertex functions in Feynman graphs are entire functions and the propagating gravitons are described by local, causal propagators. A scalar-tensor action describes classical gravity theory. The cosmological constant problem is investigated in the context of the UV complete quantum gravity.

Moffat, J W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the ...

Bertrand, Erin Marie

51

Molecular insights into the niche of harmful brown tides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recurrent brown tide blooms caused by the harmful alga Alureococcus anophagefferens have decimated coastal ecosystems and shellfisheries along the Eastern U.S and South Africa. The exact mechanisms controlling bloom ...

Wurch, Louie L. (Louie Lorne)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... optical trap (MOT) for chromium with a fluorescence-detection efficiency sufficient to ... that first demonstrated a novel source of low-energy ions with a ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ultraviolet radiometry with synchrotron radiation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... give examples of the research of UV optical materials characterization by measuring the transmittance of fused silica and calcium fluoride windows. ...

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... occurs near liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor critical ... measurements of helium and other gases with uncertainties ... ab initio calculations of gas viscosity. ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ultraviolet radiometry with synchrotron radiation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A CaF2 window is inserted into the light path as a beam splitter to reflect a small portion of the beam onto a monitor photodiode. ...

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

56

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He earned high honors in physics for his thesis, "A new predictive scheme for rotating superconductors." He received his Ph.D. in physics from the ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... meet industrial needs. Research Interests: Atomic structure and orientation of nano-clusters and ultrathin films on surfaces; ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... helps maintain and improve the storage ring as the national primary UV irradiance ... of about 1 part in 10000 at the standard operating energy of 380 ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Quasi-Decadal Variability of the Stratosphere: Influence of Long-Term Solar Ultraviolet Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple regression statistical model is applied to investigate the existence of upper-stratospheric ozone, temperature, and zonal wind responses to long-term (solar cycle) changes in solar ultraviolet radiation using 11.5 years of reprocessed ...

L. L. Hood; J. L. Jirikowic; J. P. McCormack

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Portfolio  

Abstract Fees; Passivating Overcoat Bilayer for Multilayer Reflective Coatings for Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography. 5,958,605. A passivating overcoat bilayer is ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses of short duration (32). An ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulse of long duration (12) is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier (28), by a streaming plasma (22) that is produced by illuminating a solid target (16, 18) with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation (20). The short pulse of ultraviolet or X-ray laser radiation (32), which may be amplified to high power (40, 42), is separated out by passage through a slit aperture (30) in the opaque barrier (28).

MacGowan, Brian J. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs Biomedical devices from ultraviolet LEDs Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet Biomedical devices with active components could be made from nanostructured systems. February 24, 2012 Researcher working with nanocrystals A researcher at LANL works with nanocrystals. Get Expertise Researcher Sergio Brovelli Physical Chem & Applied Spectroscopy Email Research Team Leader Alberto Paleari University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy Such devices could, for example, selectively activate light-sensitive drugs for better medical treatment or probe for the presence of fluorescent markers in medical diagnostics. LEDs produce light in the ultraviolet range A process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range has been developed by a

63

Selective absorption of ultraviolet laser energy by human atherosclerotic plaque treated with tetracycline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tetracycline is an antibiotic that absorbs ultraviolet light at 355 nm and preferentially binds to atherosclerotic plaque both in vitro and in vivo. Tetracycline-treated human cadaveric aorta was compared with untreated aorta using several techniques: absorptive spectrophotometry; and tissue uptake of radiolabeled tetracycline, which showed 4-fold greater uptake by atheroma than by normal vessel. In addition, intravenous tetracycline administered to patients undergoing vascular surgery demonstrated characteristic fluorescence in surgically excised diseased arteries. Because of tetracycline's unique properties, the authors exposed tetracycline-treated and untreated aorta to ultraviolet laser radiation at a wavelength of 355 nm. They found enhanced ablation of tetracycline-treated atheroma compared with untreated atheroma. The plaque ablation caused by ultraviolet laser radiation was twice as extensive in tetracycline-treated vs nontreated plaque. This study demonstrates the potential of tetracycline plaque enhancement for the selective destruction of atheroma by ultraviolet laser radiation.

Murphy-Chutorian, D.; Kosek, J.; Mok, W.; Quay, S.; Huestis, W.; Mehigan, J.; Profitt, D.; Ginsburg, R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The hyperplanes of DW(5, 2) Harm Pralle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hyperplanes of DW(5, 2) Harm Pralle Abstract A (geometric) hyperplane of a geometry is a proper polar space DW(5, 2): Theoretical results from Shult, Pasini and Shpectorov, and the author guarantee embedding of DW(5, 2). MSC 2000: 05E15, 05E20, 51A50, 51E20 Key words: backtrack algorithm, dual polar

Pralle, Harm

65

Effect of Short-Term Solar Ultraviolet Flux Variability in a Coupled Model of Photochemistry and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability in the solar ultraviolet radiative flux is known to cause changes in the chemistry and dynamics of the middle and upper atmosphere. Specifically, the 27-day solar rotation signal in irradiance has been correlated with responses in ...

Xun Zhu; Jeng-Hwa Yee; Elsayed R. Talaat

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vacuum ultraviolet laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transitions from the 2p/sup 4/(/sup 1/S/sub 0/)3s /sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ state of atomic fluorine to all allowed loser states produces laser emission at six new wavelengths: 680.7A, 682.6A, 3592.7A, 3574.1A, 6089.2A, and 6046.8A. Coherent radiation at these new wavelengths can be generated in an atomic fluorine laser operated as an amplifier or as an oscillator.

Berkowitz, J.; Ruscic, B.M.; Greene, J.P.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Vacuum ultraviolet laser  

SciTech Connect

Transitions from the 2p.sup.4 (.sup.1 S.sub.0)3s .sup.2 S.sub.1/2 state of atomic fluorine to all allowed lower states produces laser emission at six new wavelengths: 680.7 .ANG., 682.6 .ANG., 3592.7 .ANG., 3574.1 .ANG., 6089.2 .ANG., and 6046.8 .ANG.. Coherent radiation at these new wavelengths can be generated in an atomic fluorine laser operated as an amplifier or as an oscillator.

Berkowitz, Joseph (Hinsdale, IL); Ruscic, Branko M. (Zagreb, YU); Greene, John P. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics  

SciTech Connect

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements demonstrated that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the first HAB genome (A. anophagefferens) and compared its gene complement to those of six competing phytoplankton species identified via metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on the gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 mbp) and more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen utilization, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.

Gobler, C J; Grigoriev, I V; Berry, D L; Dyhrman, S T; Wilhelm, S W; Salamov, A; Lobanov, A V; Zhang, Y; Collier, J L; Wurch, L L; Kustka, A B; Dill, B D; Shah, M; VerBerkomes, N C; Kuo, A; Terry, A; Pangilinan, J; Lindquist, E A; Lucas, S; Paulsen, I; Hattenrath-Lehmann, T K; Talmage, S; Walker, E A; Koch, F; Burson, A M; Marcoval, M A; Tang, Y; LeCleir, G R; Coyne, K J; Berg, G M; Bertrand, E M; Saito, M A; Gladyshev, V N

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

70

Ultraviolet imaging of hydrogen flames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have assembled an ultraviolet-sensitive intensified camera for observing hydrogen combustion by imaging the OH, A/sup 2/..sigma.. - X/sup 2//Pi/ bandhead emissions near 309 nm. The camera consists of a quartz and CaF achromat lense-coupled to an ultraviolet image intensifier which is in turn fiber-coupled to a focus projection scan (FPS) vidicon. The emission band is selected with interference filters which serve to discriminate against background. The camera provides optical gain of 100 to 1000 and is capable of being shuttered at nanosecond speeds and of being framed at over 600 frames per second. We present data from observations of test flames in air at standard RS-170 video rates with varying background conditions. Enhanced images using background subtraction are presented. Finally, we discuss the use of polarizaton effects to further discrimination against sky background. This work began as a feasibility study to investigate ultraviolet technology to detect hydrogen fires for the NASA space program. 6 refs., 7 figs, 2 tabs.

Yates, G.J.; Wilke, M.; King, N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

72

Why Plaintiffs Should Have to Prove Irreparable Harm in Copyright Preliminary Injunction Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a presumption of irreparable harm in Torpso Hockey v.Kor Hockey. 42 However, the court opined that “eBay?s logic

Samuelson, Pamela

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

74

RADIATION SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: April 4, 2012 Originating Office: Office of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation exposure "As Low as Reasonably Achievable" "Internal Radiation Permit" ("IRP") means and the general public from unnecessary or potentially harmful levels of radiation exposure. PURPOSE capable of generating X or Gamma radiation "Radiology" involves external exposure of humans to Radiation

Doedel, Eusebius

75

Measurements of electron and proton heating temperatures from extreme-ultraviolet light images at 68 eV in petawatt laser experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 68 eV extreme-ultraviolet light imaging diagnostic measures short pulse isochoric heating by electrons and protons in petawatt laser experiments. Temperatures are deduced from the absolute intensities and comparison with modeling using a radiation hydrodynamics code.

Gu Peimin; Zhang, B.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J. A.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric ... the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. (Solar Phys.

77

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Transmission Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The transmission of...

78

Feasibility of Determining Cloud-Top Heights Using the Backscattered Ultraviolet Satellite Observation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for determining cloud-top height by means of backscattered ultraviolet (BUV) solar radiation is presented. Cloud-top heights can be inferred using this technique if both the BUV radiance and its degree of polarization are measured by ...

Tadashi Aruga; Kaichi Maeda; Donald F. Heath

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including Ionization Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including A molecular dynamics model of UV-MALDI including ionization processes is presented. In addition/desorption of molecular systems, it includes radiative and nonradiative decay, exciton hopping, two pooling processes

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

80

Action Spectra for Human Skin Cells: Estimates of the Relative Cytotoxicity of the Middle Ultraviolet, Near Ultraviolet, and Violet Regions of Sunlight on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Action spectra for the cytotoxic action of electromagnetic radiation in the solar range 280-434 nm have been determined for human fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes derived from the same foreskin biopsy. The spectra for the two cell types are close to identical and coincide with our previously published data for a human lymphoblastoid line indicating that the mechanism of inactivation of the three human cell types is similar at any given wavelength. Using published data for ultraviolet transmission of human skin and sample spectral irradiarÃa'data, we have estimated the relative biological effectiveness of the middle ultraviolet (UVB) (290-320 nm), near ultraviolet (UVA) (320-380 nm), and violet (380-434 nm) regions of sunlight for cytotoxicity at the basal layer of the epidermis. We conclude that the UVB component in noon summer sunlight (the most UVB rich spectral conditions tested) may contribute only about 40 % of the total cytotoxic effectiveness of sunlight at 290-

Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux; Cancer Res; Contact The Aacr Publications; Epidermal Keratinocytes; Rex M. Tyrrell; Mireille Pidoux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microgap ultra-violet detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color...

83

NIST Ultraviolet Source Helps NASA Spacecraft Measure the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... space weather can originate. NIST's unique 'sliding spark source' (inside the glass tubing) feeds ultraviolet (UV) light into NASA's Solar Ultraviolet ...

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Chemistry of a Dry Cloud: The Effects of Radiation and Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined effect of ultraviolet radiation and turbulent mixing on chemistry in a cloud-topped boundary layer is investigated. The authors study a flow driven by longwave radiative cooling at cloud top. They consider a chemical cycle that is ...

Jordi Vilà-Guerau de Arellano; Joannes W. M. Cuijpers

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Method for plasma formation for extreme ultraviolet lithography-theta pinch  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave, utilizing a theta pinch plasma generator to produce electromagnetic radiation in the range of 10 to 20 nm. The device comprises an axially aligned open-ended pinch chamber defining a plasma zone adapted to contain a plasma generating gas within the plasma zone; a means for generating a magnetic field radially outward of the open-ended pinch chamber to produce a discharge plasma from the plasma generating gas, thereby producing a electromagnetic wave in the extreme ultraviolet range; a collecting means in optical communication with the pinch chamber to collect the electromagnetic radiation; and focusing means in optical communication with the collecting means to concentrate the electromagnetic radiation.

Hassanein, Ahmed (Naperville, IL); Konkashbaev, Isak (Bolingbrook, IL); Rice, Bryan (Hillsboro, OR)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band Ultraviolet - "Green" Energy in the "C" Band Speaker(s): Forrest Fencl Date: April 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Mr. Forrest Fencl of UV Resources, Inc. will discuss how air conditioning system operation, maintenance, and utilization influence system cooling capacity and indoor air quality. The use of ultraviolet germicidal radiation to clean heat exchangers and maintain their efficiency will be reviewed and energy savings estimates will be provided. Additionally, he will discuss why UV-C is considered the "green" cleaner and how widely it is used today as an engineering strategy for precluding the growth, dissemination and recirculation of microbial contaminants. For more information about this seminar, please contact: Bill Fisk(510) 486-591

87

NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

Lewandowski, A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Absorption of Solar Radiation by Atmospheric O4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopic measurements of the atmospheric solar radiation attenuation reveal that the near ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared absorption of the oxygen collision complex (O2)2, thus far omitted from models, is important for the direct heating ...

Klaus Pfeilsticker; Frank Erle; Ulrich Platt

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

types of mask defects recorded in several state-of-the-art tools: the AIT, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and a commercial deep ultraviolet (DUV) mask inspection tool....

90

Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthesis of higher plants  

SciTech Connect

Rates of net photosynthesis were measured until 13 different crop species grown under an enhanced UV light regime simulating that which would occur in the event of a 50% atmospheric ozone depletion. Results indicated that a 50% reduction in ozone would dramatically reduce yields of some major crop species. The effects of UV on photosynthesis were also studied; it was found that UV inhibited photosynthesis. 100 references, 6 figures, 15 tables.

Thai, V.K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The spectral distribution of solar ultraviolet radiation at the ground  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of spectral UV irradiance were made at Sutton Bonington and other sites in Saudi Arabia using a spectroradiometric system developed in this study. On clear days a linear relation between the logarithm of global irradiance I[sub [lambda

Albar, O.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Some Characteristic Differences in the Earth's Radiation Budget over Land and Ocean Derived from the Nimbus-7 ERB Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad spectral band Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment data are analyzed for top-of-the-atmosphere regional variations in near-ultraviolet visible and near-infrared reflected solar radiation. Regional differences in the noon vs ...

H. Lee Kyle; K. L. Vasanth

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

94

Real-time self-networking radiation detector apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is for a radiation detector apparatus for detecting radiation sources present in cargo shipments. The invention includes the features of integrating a bubble detector sensitive to neutrons and a GPS system into a miniaturized package that can wirelessly signal the presence of radioactive material in shipping containers. The bubble density would be read out if such indicated a harmful source.

Kaplan, Edward (Stony Brook, NY); Lemley, James (Miller Place, NY); Tsang, Thomas Y. (Holbrook, NY); Milian, Laurence W. (East Patchogue, NY)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM SUN-GRAZING COMETS  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory has observed two Sun-grazing comets as they passed through the solar atmosphere. Both passages resulted in a measurable enhancement of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiance in several of the AIA bandpasses. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Molecules in the comet rapidly sublimate as it approaches the Sun. They are then photodissociated by the solar radiation field to create atomic species. Subsequent ionization of these atoms produces a higher abundance of ions than normally present in the corona and results in EUV emission in the wavelength ranges of the AIA telescope passbands.

Bryans, P. [ADNET Systems Inc., NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pesnell, W. D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation for Preventing Infectious Disease Transmission Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The transmission of tuberculosis (TB) and other infectious diseases in health-care buildings has been a recognized hazard for decades. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) of upper room air is used as an engineering control method to prevent the spread of airborne infectious disease. Under full-scale conditions, the efficacy of UVGI for inactivating airborne bacterial spores and active cells was evaluated. A test room fitted with a modern UVGI system was used to conduct bio-aerosol inactivation experiments. UVGI efficacy can be affected by environmental factors such as relative humidity (RH), and air mixing

97

Development of Pattern Recognition Software for Tracks of Ionizing Radiation In Medipix2-Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and area monitors to characterize the general background radiation environment harmful to humansDevelopment of Pattern Recognition Software for Tracks of Ionizing Radiation In Medipix2-Based tool for the automated identification and classification of tracks of ionizing radiation as measured

Vilalta, Ricardo

98

Ultraviolet free-electron laser (uv FEL) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposal for a Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser Facility UV-FEL grew from the realization that neither existing lasers or synchrotrons, nor the third generation synchrotron radiation sources now under construction address all of the needs of scientists interested in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, particularly with respect to the combination of continuous wavelength selection, high peak power and short pulse duration. Several workshops have been held at BNL and elsewhere which explored applications and source requirements in the 5 to 30 eV range. A critical requirement determined was is for very high peak power and short wavelength, especially for applications in chemical physics and non-linear optics. The need for wavelength tuning with the ease and agility to which synchrotron radiation users have become accustomed has also been strongly emphasized. With these initial parameters in mind, the accelerator physics staff set about devising ways to produce this radiation. Their design is for an FEL that has unique characteristics both in terms of possible applications, and in the range of radiation it could produce. In addition, the proposed location of the UV-FEL adjacent to the NSLS means that pump-probe experiments involving radiation from both sources will be possible. Each successive design has been reviewed in consultation with potential users in an iterative process to arrive at the present proposal design.

Johnson, E.D.; Sutherland, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ultraviolet free-electron laser (uv FEL) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposal for a Ultraviolet Free-Electron Laser Facility UV-FEL grew from the realization that neither existing lasers or synchrotrons, nor the third generation synchrotron radiation sources now under construction address all of the needs of scientists interested in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, particularly with respect to the combination of continuous wavelength selection, high peak power and short pulse duration. Several workshops have been held at BNL and elsewhere which explored applications and source requirements in the 5 to 30 eV range. A critical requirement determined was is for very high peak power and short wavelength, especially for applications in chemical physics and non-linear optics. The need for wavelength tuning with the ease and agility to which synchrotron radiation users have become accustomed has also been strongly emphasized. With these initial parameters in mind, the accelerator physics staff set about devising ways to produce this radiation. Their design is for an FEL that has unique characteristics both in terms of possible applications, and in the range of radiation it could produce. In addition, the proposed location of the UV-FEL adjacent to the NSLS means that pump-probe experiments involving radiation from both sources will be possible. Each successive design has been reviewed in consultation with potential users in an iterative process to arrive at the present proposal design.

Johnson, E.D.; Sutherland, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Unraveling the fish kill mechanism(s) of the harmful alga Chattonella marina, from the perspective of osmotic disturbance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???The harmful algal bloom (HAB) species, Chattonella marina, has caused severe economic loss to marine fisheries worldwide. In the past three decades, suffocation or respiratory… (more)

Xu, Jingliang (???)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Ultraviolet Light Disinfection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some onsite wastewater treatment systems include a disinfection component. This publication explains how homeowners can disinfect wastewater with ultraviolet light, what the components of such a system are, what factors affect the performance of a UV light disinfection system, and how to maintain such a system.

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

Manos, Dennis M. (Williamsburg, VA); Diggs, Jessie (Norfolk, VA); Ametepe, Joseph D. (Roanoke, VA)

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Best Practices: Energy Savings Efficient energy use reduces Colorado State's total energy demand, decreases harmful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

square foot on campus has flattened out. Students making a difference In 2004, Colorado State became one, decreases harmful emissions, and minimizes the cost of providing energy to the campus. As a result of energy conservation initiatives that have been implemented over the past 20 years, growth in the average demand per

104

APPENDIX C Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Protect Forests From Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on insect and disease activity in the state. Because the current aerial survey is conducted by different1 APPENDIX C ­ Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Gaps Protect Forests From Harm o. Need updated LANDFIRE data on the current condition of Colorado's lodgepole pine forests. Need a fuel

105

Security Automation Considered Harmful? W. Keith Edwards Erika Shehan Poole Jennifer Stoll  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Automation Considered Harmful? W. Keith Edwards Erika Shehan Poole Jennifer Stoll School link in information security. Because of this perception, a growing body of research and commercial activity is focused on automated approaches to security. With these approaches, security decisions

Edwards, Keith

106

Aluminum complexation by catechol as determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometry were used to determine the stoichiometry and association constant for the Al-catechol complex from pH 3.8 to 4.6. Job's method of continuous variation indicated the Al-catechol complex had a 1:1 stoichiometry in the pH range studied. Aluminum titrations of catechol and pH titrations of catechol plus Al resulted in a shift in the UV spectra due to the formation of an Al-catechol complex absorbing UV radiation uniquely different than that of free catechol. General equations were developed for the determination of association constants assuming an organic and Al-organic complex absorb UV radiation. Aluminum titrations with constant catechol concentration yielded a log k/sub 0.1//sup c/ of 16.22 for a 1:1 Al-catechol complex. Calculated absorbance as a function of pH agree dwell with experimental pH titrations of solutions containing catechol plus Al. The fact that Al can be complexed by catechol at low pH indicates the o-hydroxy group provides a potential source for Al complexation in soil and surface waters.

Sikora, F.J.; McBride, M.B.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Concerns with low-level ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Populations have been studied in geographic areas of increased natural radiation, in radiation-exposed workers, in patients medically exposed, and in accidental exposures. No reproducible evidence exists of harmful effects from increases in background radiation three to ten times the usual levels. There is no increase in leukemia or other cancers among American military participants in nuclear testing, no increase in leukemia or thyroid cancer among medical patients receiving {sup 131}I for diagnosis or treatment of hypothyroidism, and no increase in lung cancer among nonsmokers exposed to increased radon in the home. The association of radiation with the atomic bomb and with excessive regulatory and health physics as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) radiation levels practices has created a climate of fear about the dangers of radiation at any level. However, there is no evidence that radiation exposures at the levels equivalent to medical usage are harmful. The unjustified excessive concern with radiation at any level, however, precludes beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity in medicine, science, and industry.

Yalow, R.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

Miller, S.D.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

110

THE EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATIONS ON PERIPHERAL NERVE. PART I. THE EFFECTS OF IN SITU X-IRRADIATION ON MAMMALIAN NERVE ACTION POTENTIAL. PART II. ALTERATION OF RESTING, ACTION AND LOCAL POTENTIALS OF CRAYFISH GIANT AXONS BY UV IRRADIATION. Progress Report, 1959-1960  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in studies on the sensitivity of nerves to exposure to x and ultraviolet radiation. Findings are reported on the response of the sciatic nerve of cats exposed in situ to x radiation and on the response of crayfish giant axons exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Data are presented graphically and results are discussed. (C.H.)

Duvall, C.P.; Gasteiger, E.L.; Daube, J.R.

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

112

Source of coherent short wavelength radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

114

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Wednesday, 28 July 2010 00:00 Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

115

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects Print Since the 1970s, the semiconductor industry has strived to shrink the cost and size of circuit patterns printed onto computer chips in accordance with Moore's law, doubling the number of transistors on a computer's central processing unit (CPU) every two years. The introduction of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, printing chips using 13-nm-wavelength light, opens the way to future generations of smaller, faster, and cheaper semiconductors. EUV lithography relies on specialized lenses made of curved mirrors with reflective coatings called multilayers to print patterns with high resolution. One special flat mirror called a mask is particularly sensitive to even the smallest imperfections. To better detect and characterize mask defects, scientists at Berkeley Lab worked with SEMATECH, an international semiconductor industry consortium, to create a unique Fresnel zone-plate microscope on Advanced Light Source Beamline 11.3.2 called the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT).

116

Has radiation protection become a health hazard?  

SciTech Connect

Scientists and engineers have a responsibility to speak out when their findings and recommendations lead to public harm. This can happen in several ways. One is when the media misinterpret or sensationalize a scientific fact misleading the public and creating unwarranted fear. Another is when regulations or public policy decision are purportedly based on scientific data but are, in fact, scientifically invalid. Fear of radiation has been far more detrimental to health than radiation itself. The author knows of no deaths to the public from accidental release of radiation, but the consequences of fear have been deadly.

Rockwell, T. [MPR Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nanograting-based compact vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer and ...  

Nanograting-based compact vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer and beam pro?ler for in situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

118

UVOC-MAC: a MAC protocol for outdoor ultraviolet networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UVOC-MAC: a MAC protocol for outdoor ultraviolet networks. Yiyang Li • Jianxia Ning • Zhengyuan Xu •. Srikanth V. Krishnamurthy • Gang Chen. Ó Springer ...

119

Exploring the physical properties of local star-forming ULIRGs from the ultraviolet to the infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an application of the da Cunha, Charlot & Elbaz (2008) model of the spectral energy distribution (SEDs) of galaxies from the ultraviolet to far-infrared to a small pilot sample of purely star-forming Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs). We interpret the observed SEDs of 16 ULIRGs using this physically-motivated model which accounts for the emission of stellar populations from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared and for the attenuation by dust in two components: an optically-thick starburst component and the diffuse ISM. The infrared emission is computed by assuming that all the energy absorbed by dust in these components is re-radiated at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. This model allows us to derive statistically physical properties including star formation rates, stellar masses, as well as temperatures and masses of different dust components and plausible star formation histories. We find that, although the ultraviolet to near-infrared emission represents only a small fraction of th...

da Cunha, Elisabete; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee; Marshall, Jason A; Elbaz, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The GALEX Ultraviolet Atlas of Nearby Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present images, integrated photometry, surface-brightness and color profiles for a total of 1034 nearby galaxies recently observed by the GALEX satellite in its far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1516A) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2267A) bands. (...) This data set has been complemented with archival optical, near-infrared, and far-infrared fluxes and colors. We find that the integrated (FUV-K) color provides robust discrimination between elliptical and spiral/irregular galaxies and also among spiral galaxies of different sub-types. Elliptical galaxies with brighter K-band luminosities (i.e. more massive) are redder in (NUV-K) color but bluer in (FUV-NUV) than less massive ellipticals. In the case of the spiral/irregular galaxies our analysis shows the presence of a relatively tight correlation between the (FUV-NUV) color and the total infrared-to-UV ratio. The correlation found between (FUV-NUV) color and K-band luminosity (with lower luminosity objects being bluer than more luminous ones) can be explained as due to an increase in the dust content with galaxy luminosity. The images in this Atlas along with the profiles and integrated properties are publicly available through a dedicated web page at http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/GALEX_Atlas/

A. Gil de Paz; S. Boissier; B. F. Madore; M. Seibert; Y. H. Joe; A. Boselli; T. K. Wyder; D. Thilker; L. Bianchi; S. -C. Rey; R. M. Rich; T. A. Barlow; T. Conrow; K. Forster; P. G. Friedman; D. C. Martin; P. Morrissey; S. G. Neff; D. Schiminovich; T. Small; J. Donas; T. M. Heckman; Y. -W. Lee; B. Milliard; A. S. Szalay; S. Yi

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiency in the UVB for Regions Affected by Saharan and Asian Mineral Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of mineral dust on ultraviolet energy transfer is studied for two different mineralogical origins. The aerosol radiative forcing ?F and the forcing efficiency at the surface ?Feff in the range 290–325 nm were estimated in ground-...

O. E. García; A. M. Díaz; F. J. Expósito; J. P. Díaz; A. Redondas; T. Sasaki

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-Enabled Titanium Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide

123

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

124

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Condenser for ring-field deep ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated or converging beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a flat or curved plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Condenser for ring-field deep-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condenser for use with a ring-field deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithography system. A condenser includes a ripple-plate mirror which is illuminated by a collimated beam at grazing incidence. The ripple plate comprises a plate mirror into which is formed a series of channels along an axis of the mirror to produce a series of concave surfaces in an undulating pattern. Light incident along the channels of the mirror is reflected onto a series of cones. The distribution of slopes on the ripple plate leads to a distribution of angles of reflection of the incident beam. This distribution has the form of an arc, with the extremes of the arc given by the greatest slope in the ripple plate. An imaging mirror focuses this distribution to a ring-field arc at the mask plane.

Chapman, Henry N. (Livermore, CA); Nugent, Keith A. (North Fitzroy, AU)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Controlled doping of graphene using ultraviolet irradiation  

SciTech Connect

The electronic properties of graphene are tunable via doping, making it attractive in low dimensional organic electronics. Common methods of doping graphene, however, adversely affect charge mobility and degrade device performance. We demonstrate a facile shadow mask technique of defining electrodes on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thereby eliminating the use of detrimental chemicals needed in the corresponding lithographic process. Further, we report on the controlled, effective, and reversible doping of graphene via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with minimal impact on charge mobility. The change in charge concentration saturates at {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} and the quantum yield is {approx}10{sup -5} e/photon upon initial UV exposure. This simple and controlled strategy opens the possibility of doping wafer-size CVD graphene for diverse applications.

Luo Zhengtang [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Pinto, Nicholas J.; Davila, Yarely [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Puerto Rico at Humacao, Humacao, 00792 (Puerto Rico); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

When Do Their Casualties Count? Exploring Wartime Decisions that Pit Security Against Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation offers a new understanding about wartime decision making in the face of likely, but unintended, harm to foreign civilians. It empirically identifies conditions under which leaders in democratic nations are more or less likely to choose to attack a target when confronted with a dilemma between pursuing national security objectives and avoiding civilian casualties. An innovative targeting decision model was constructed that described both the theorized structure of the decisions inputs and the process by which these inputs are assembled into a choice. The model went beyond the normal target benefit and civilian casualty cost considerations of proportionality to also include the contextual input of prospect frame. Decision makers were expected to address the same benefit and cost differently depending on whether they were winning or losing the conflict. This was because the prospect frame would influence their risk attitudes, as predicted by prospect theory. This model was then tested via two decision-making experiments that used military officers and defense civilians as participants. Additionally, a statistical analysis of data collected from an extended period of the second Intifada was done to seek evidence that the model also applied in actual wartime decision making. All three tests supported portions of the targeting decision model. Higher target benefit and lower civilian casualty estimates increased support for the planned attack. Prospect frame influenced decisions in the cases where both target value and the civilian casualty estimates were high and the resulting dilemma was very difficult. In these situations, those told that their forces were losing the conflict were less sensitive to humanitarian harm and more likely to support the attack than when they were told their side was winning. Furthermore, the Intifada data analysis of attacks approved by Israeli officials against Palestinians found this same effect of prospect frame held generally across all six years of observations.

Roblyer, Dwight Andrew

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ultraviolet Index Forecasts Issued by the National Weather Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Weather Service (NWS), in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), now issues an Ultraviolet (UV) index forecast. The UV index (UVI) is a mechanism by which the American public is forewarned of the next day's ...

Craig S. Long; Alvin J. Miller; Hai-Tien Lee; Jeannette D. Wild; Richard C. Przywarty; Drusilia Hufford

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Total Ozone Determination from the Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The algorithm used to derive total ozone from the Nimbus 4 Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) experiment is described. A seven-year global data set with more than one million retrievals has been produced and archived using this algorithm. The ...

K. F. Klenk; P. K. Bhartia; V. G. Kaveeshwar; R. D. McPeters; P. M. Smith; A. J. Fleig

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Two-Path, Two-Wavelength Ultraviolet Hygrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultraviolet-absorption hygrometer for airborne use was designed and tested. Here the principles of operation, the design, and the results of the first test flights are presented. The motivation for the new design is to overcome the ...

Andrew J. Weinheimer; Ronald L. Schwiesow

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect

Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

Nguyen, Khanh Bao

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Ultralight Aircraft as Platform for Research in the Lower Troposphere: System Performance and First Results from Radiation Transfer Studies in Stratiform Aerosol Layers and Broken Cloud Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultraviolet actinic radiation flux governing the photochemical reactions in the atmosphere is dependent on the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols and reflective surfaces of ground and clouds. Theoretical models exist for horizontal ...

Wolfgang Junkermann

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

137

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation  

SciTech Connect

The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The concept of information overload: A preliminary step in understanding the nature of a harmful information-related condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of content, both on and offline, to which people in reasonably affluent nations have access has increased to the point that it has raised concerns that we are now suffering from a harmful condition of ¿information overload.' Although the phrase ... Keywords: attention, information ethics, information excess, information overload, information problem, normative standards, technostress

Kenneth Einar Himma

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

POST-FLARE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES EXPLAINED WITH THERMAL INSTABILITY OF LOOP PLASMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we study the C8 flare that occurred on 2000 September 26 at 19:49 UT and observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation spectrometer from the beginning of the impulsive phase to well beyond the disappearance in the X-rays. The emission first decayed progressively through equilibrium states until the plasma reached 2-3 MK. Then, a series of cooler lines, i.e., Ca X, Ca VII, Ne VI, O IV, and Si III (formed in the temperature range log T = 4.3-6.3 under equilibrium conditions), are emitted at the same time and all evolve in a similar way. Here, we show that the simultaneous emission of lines with such a different formation temperature is due to thermal instability occurring in the flaring plasma as soon as it has cooled below {approx}2 MK. We can qualitatively reproduce the relative start time of the light curves of each line in the correct order with a simple (and standard) model of a single flaring loop. The agreement with the observed light curves is greatly improved, and a slower evolution of the line emission is predicted, if we assume that the model loop consists of an ensemble of subloops or strands heated at slightly different times. Our analysis can be useful for flare observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

Reale, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Orlando, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

Finite element simulation for ultraviolet excimer laser processing of patterned Si/SiGe/Si(100) heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Ultraviolet (UV) Excimer laser assisted processing is an alternative strategy for producing patterned silicon germanium heterostructures. We numerically analyzed the effects caused by pulsed 193 Excimer laser radiation impinging on patterned amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) and germanium (a-Ge:H) bilayers deposited on a crystalline silicon substrate [Si(100)]. The proposed two dimensional axisymmetric numerical model allowed us to estimate the temperature and concentration gradients caused by the laser induced rapid melting and solidification processes. Energy density dependence of maximum melting depth and melting time evolution as well as three dimensional temperature and element distribution have been simulated and compared with experimentally obtained results.

Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S.; Gontad, F.; Gonzalez, P. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Martin, E. [Dpto. Mecanica, Maquinas, Motores Termicos y Fluidos, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain); Serra, C. [CACTI, University of Vigo, E-36310 Vigo (Spain)

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

145

Ultraviolet Renormalization of the Nelson Hamiltonian through Functional Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from the N-particle Nelson Hamiltonian defined by imposing an ultraviolet cutoff, we perform ultraviolet renormalization by showing that in the zero cutoff limit a self-adjoint operator exists after a logarithmically divergent term is subtracted from the original Hamiltonian. We obtain this term as the diagonal part of a pair interaction appearing in the density of a Gibbs measure derived from the Feynman-Kac representation of the Hamiltonian. Also, we show existence of a weak coupling limit of the renormalized Hamiltonian and derive an effective Yukawa interaction potential between the particles.

M. Gubinelli; F. Hiroshima; J. Lorinczi

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development and Characterization of a New Solar Ultraviolet-B Irradiance Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of an instrument for measuring solar ultraviolet-B irradiance are presented together with a description of the instrument. The instrument measures direct and scattered broadband ultraviolet irradiance (wavelengths between 280 and ...

B. K. Dichter; A. F. Beaubien; D. J. Beaubien

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

149

IMPRINTED GENES & TRANSPOSITIONS: EPIGENOMIC TARGETS FOR LOW DOSE RADIATION EFFECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) elicits adaptive responses in part by causing heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. This novel postulate was tested by determining if the level of DNA methylation at the Agouti viable yellow (A{sup vy}) metastable locus is altered, in a dose-dependent manner, by low dose radiation exposure (radiation hormesis, bringing into question the assumption that every dose of radiation is harmful. Our findings not only have significant implications concerning the mechanism of hormesis, but they also emphasize the potential importance of this phenomenon in determining human risk at low radiation doses. Since the epigenetic regulation of genes varies markedly between species, the effect of LDIR on other epigenetically labile genes (e.g. imprinted genes) in animals and humans needs to be defined.

Randy Jirtle

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

150

Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Dust and the ultraviolet energy distribution of quasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ultraviolet energy distribution of quasars shows a sharp steepening of the continuum shortward of 1000 A (rest-frame). We describe how we came to consider the possibility that this continuum break might be the result of absorption by carbon crystallite dust grains.

Luc Binette; Christophe Morisset; Sinhue Haro-Corzo

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of ultra-violet laser irradiation on graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene can be applied for transparent electrodes instead of indium tin oxide (ITO). For patterning of ITO, the maskless laser process was reported as a simple and fast process. Raman spectra and electrical resistances of graphene were measured before ... Keywords: Graphene, Maskless laser process, Ultra-violet laser

Fujio Wakaya; Tsuyoshi Teraoka; Toshiya Kisa; Tomoya Manabe; Satoshi Abo; Mikio Takai

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) /  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Title Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-62202 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Report Number LBNL-62202 Abstract We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680 - 780 m3/h (400 - 460 cfm).

154

Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

Not Available

1994-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

156

The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope: Instrument and Data Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) was flown as part of the Astro observatory on the Space Shuttle Columbia in December 1990 and again on the Space Shuttle Endeavor in March 1995. Ultraviolet (1200-3300?A) images of a variety of astronomical objects, with a 40 ? field of view and a resolution of about 3 ? ? , were recorded on photographic film. The data recorded during the first flight are available to the astronomical community through the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC); the data recorded during the second flight will soon be available as well. This paper discusses in detail the design, operation, data reduction, and calibration of UIT, providing the user of the data with information for understanding and using the data. It also provides guidelines for analyzing other astronomical imagery made with image intensifiers and photographic film. – 3 –

Theodore P. Stecher; Robert H. Cornett; Michael R. Greason; Wayne B. L; Jesse K. Hill; Robert S. Hill; Ralph C. Bohlin; Peter C. Chen; Nicholas R; Michael N. Fanelli; Joan I. Hollis; Susan G. Neff; Robert W. O’connell; Joel D. Offenberg; Ronald A. Parise; Joel Wm. Parker; Morton S. Roberts; M. Smith; William H. Waller

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Durable Corrosion and Ultraviolet-Resistant Silver Mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion and ultra violet-resistant silver mirror for use in solar reflectors; the silver layer having a film-forming protective polymer bonded thereto, and a protective shield overlay comprising a transparent multipolymer film that incorporates a UV absorber. The corrosion and ultraviolet resistant silver mirror retains spectral hemispherical reflectance and high optical clarity throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors.

Jorgensen, G. J.; Gee, R.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Radiation Control Act is designed to prevent any associated harmful effects upon the environment or the health and safety of the public through the institution and maintenance of a regulatory program for radioactive material waste sources. The act provides that all facilities or sites for the concentration, storage or burial of radioactive waste must be constructed and operate pursuant to a permit issued by the Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD). The director may specify in the

159

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

160

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Variable Sky-View Platform for the Measurement of Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the more difficult tasks confronting atmospheric researchers today is the acquisition of long-term radiometric measurements that encapsulate variability in the sky hemisphere as well as time. High quality spatial measurements would allow ...

Christopher Kuchinke; Manuel Nunez

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Slow neutron detection without 3He: far ultraviolet noble-gas-excimer radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that lowest end, often referred to as fast-neutron physics, falls outside the announced interests of NSSA have on neutron studies generally and on physics generally. Will it encourage formation of other spin-off groups promoting their special inter- ests--for example, an American So- ciety for Fast-Neutron Physics

Titov, Anatoly

166

Numerical Simulation of an Open Channel Ultraviolet Waste-water Disinfection Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The disinfection characteristics of an open channel ultra-violet (UV) wastewater disinfection reactor are investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The model is based… (more)

Saha, Rajib Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Determination of electron-heated temperatures of petawatt laser-irradiated foil targets with 256 and 68 eV extreme ultraviolet imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of plasma temperature at the rear surface of foil targets due to heating by hot electrons, which were produced in short pulse high intensity laser matter interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser, are reported. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging at 256 and 68 eV energies is used to determine spatially resolved target rear surface temperature patterns by comparing absolute intensities to radiation hydrodynamic modeling. XUV mirrors at these two energies were absolutely calibrated at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Temperatures deduced from both imagers are validated against each other within the range of 75-225 eV.

Ma, T. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T. W.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Offermann, D. T.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); King, J. A.; Beg, F. N. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Zhang, B. [University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

170

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

171

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Optical Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Metrology Laboratory Optical Metrology Laboratory Photo of a laser and a spectral irradiance calibration system used to create lamp-detector alignment. Researchers use a spectral irradiance calibration alignment jig and a laser beam to align a calibration source and test unit. The NREL Optical Metrology Laboratory ensures that optical radiation resource measurement equipment is calibrated to national or international standards to ensure the quality and traceability of data. NREL considers optical radiation to range from 250 nm to 2,500 nm and to include the ultraviolet (250-400 nm), visible (400-750 nm), near infrared (750-1,100 nm), and shortwave infrared (1,100-2,500 nm) ranges. Activities The Optical Metrology Laboratory provides National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable measurements for:

172

Gamma Ray Burst Constraints on Ultraviolet Lorentz Invariance Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a unified general formalism for ultraviolet Lorentz invariance violation (LV) testing through electromagnetic wave propagation, based on both dispersion and rotation measure data. This allows for a direct comparison of the efficacy of different data to constrain LV. As an example we study the signature of LV on the rotation of the polarization plane of $\\gamma$-rays from gamma ray bursts in a LV model. Here $\\gamma$-ray polarization data can provide a strong constraint on LV, 13 orders of magnitude more restrictive than a potential constraint from the rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization proposed by Gamboa, L\\'{o}pez-Sarri\\'{o}n, and Polychronakos (2006).

Tina Kahniashvili; Grigol Gogoberidze; Bharat Ratra

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modelling the ultraviolet/submillimeter spectral energy distributions of normal galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the factors shaping the ultraviolet (UV)/optical - far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of normal (non-starburst) galaxies. Particular emphasis is placed on the influen ce of the geometry of dust and stars on the propagation of light through the int erstellar medium. Although strong constraints can be placed on the amount and la rge scale distribution of dust in disks from the appearance of the galaxies in t he optical/UV range, this dust does not account for the observed amplitude and c olour of the FIR/submm radiation. Additional, optically thick components of dust associated with the young stellar population on large and small scales are requ ired to account for the complete UV/optical - FIR/submm SEDs. Self-consistent mo dels for the calculation of SEDs of spiral galaxies are reviewed, and their pred ictions for the dust emission and the attenuation of starlight are compared and contrasted.

Cristina C. Popescu; Richard J. Tuffs

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

174

SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from {approx}0.01 {mu}m sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm{sup -2}, behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii {approx}> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii {approx}<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

Perez-Becker, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chiang, Eugene [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NF-kB activation by ultraviolet light not dependent on a nuclear signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure of mammalian cells to radiation triggers the ultraviolet (UV) response, which includes activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). This was postulated to occur by induction of a nuclear signaling cascade by damaged DNA. Recently, induction of AP-1 by UV was shown to be mediated by a pathway involving Src tyrosine kinases and the Ha-Ras small guanosine triphosphate-binding protein, proteins located at the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated here that the same pathway mediates induction of NF-kB by UV. Because inactive NF-kB is stored in the cytosol, analysis of its activation directly tests the involvement of a nuclear-initiated signaling cascade. Enucleated cells are fully responsive to UV both in NF-kB induction and in activation of another key signaling event. Therefore, the UV response does not require a signal generated in the nucleus and is likely to be initiated at or near the plasma membrane.

Devary, Y.; Rosette, C.; DiDonato, J.A.; Karin, M. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

1993-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

FAR-ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATION OF THE AQUILA RIFT WITH FIMS/SPEAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of far ultraviolet (FUV) observations of the broad region around the Aquila Rift including the Galactic plane. As compared with various wavelength data sets, dust scattering is found to be the major origin of the diffuse FUV continuum in this region. The FUV intensity clearly correlates with the dust extinction level for E(B - V) 0.2 due to heavy dust extinction combined with the effect of nonuniform interstellar radiation fields. The FUV intensity also correlates well with H{alpha} intensity, implying that at least some fraction of the observed H{alpha} emission could be the dust-scattered light of H{alpha} photons originating elsewhere in the Galaxy. Most of the Aquila Rift region is seen devoid of diffuse FUV continuum due to heavy extinction while strong emission is observed in the surrounding regions. Molecular hydrogen fluorescent emission lines are clearly seen in the spectrum of 'Aquila-Serpens', while 'Aquila-East' does not show any apparent line features. CO emission intensity is also found to be higher in the 'Aquila-Serpens' region than in the 'Aquila-East' region. In this regard, we note that regions of star formation have been found in 'Aquila-Serpens' but not in 'Aquila-East'.

Park, S.-J.; Min, K.-W. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seon, K.-I.; Han, W.; Lee, D.-H. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Edelstein, J., E-mail: einpark75@kaist.ac.kr [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Application of Ultraviolet Germicidal Technology in HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most significant issues for today's HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) engineer is Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). Many building owners, operators, and occupants complain of foul odors emanating from HVAC systems. The objectionable odor is the byproduct of the microbial growth (mold and fungus) that accumulates and develops on wet surfaces of HVAC units, causing foul odors to emanate from affected systems and degrading the IAQ and unit performance. This objectionable odor has been appropriately named the "Dirty Sock" syndrome. Less obvious to the building occupants, but of equal importance, are the physical effects the microbial organisms have on HVAC equipment. They restrict the airflow and limit the heat transfer capability, which increases the operating costs of the equipment. Fortunately, IAQ degradation, foul odor, and increased expenses can be eliminated with the installation of the ultraviolet 'C' band (W-C) lamps. The ultraviolet germicidal lamps are designed to kill odor causing mold and fungus that grow in wet evaporator sections of HVAC units. These lamps are installed inside HVAC systems and irradiate areas inhabited by the offending organisms, making it impossible for them to survive. The organisms disappear, the odors disappear, and most importantly, the IAQ complaints disappear. This guide will discuss the microbial growth and IAQ contaminant problems in the HVAC industry, the W-C lamp and other possible solutions, and the benefits of using the HVAC Duty W-C lamp.

Taylor, M. J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy of the R Aquarii symmetrical jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first ultraviolet spectrum of the southwest (SW) component of the symmetrical jet in the R Aquarii binary system has been obtained in the range 1200-2000 A with the IUE. These results are compared to more encompassing spectra of the central H II region taken at the same time and also similar spectra of the northeast (NE) jet component obtained six months earlier. Moreover, optical spectra of both the NE and SW jet components in the range 3400-9800 A were obtained within about 6 months and about 1 month, respectively, of the ultraviolet spectra. These highly complementary observations argue that excitation of the symmetrical jet may be due to shock excitation as the jet components overtake and impact the previously ionized material associated with the expanding inner nebulosity. The problems with this shock model as well as problems with competing photoionization models are discussed. It is suggested that the jet components were ejected less than 90 years ago. 28 refs.

Hollis, J.M.; Oliversen, R.J.; Michalitsianos, A.G.; Kafatos, M.; Wagner, R.M. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States) Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

PULSE: Palomar Ultraviolet Laser for the Study of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PULSE is a new concept to augment the currently operating 5.1-m Hale PALM-3000 exoplanet adaptive optics system with an ultraviolet Rayleigh laser and associated wavefront sensor. By using an ultraviolet laser to measure the high spatial and temporal order turbulence near the telescope aperture, where it dominates, one can extend the faintness limit of natural guide stars needed by PALM-3000. Initial simulations indicate that very-high infrared contrast ratios and good visible-light adaptive optics performance will be achieved by such an upgraded system on stars as faint as mV = 16-17 using an optimized low-order NGS sensor. This will enable direct imaging searches for, and subsequent characterization of, companions around cool, low-mass stars for the first time, as well as routine visible-light imaging twice as sharp as HST for fainter targets. PULSE will reuse the laser and wavefront sensor technologies developed for the automated Robo-AO laser system currently operating at the Palomar 60-inch telescope, as...

Baranec, Christoph; van Dam, Marcos; Burruss, Rick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report  

SciTech Connect

This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blackbody radiation.emit equilibrium (blackbody) radiation characteristic of theand that lost to blackbody radiation from the reemission

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ultraviolet electroabsorption modulator based on AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultraviolet electroabsorption modulator based on AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells I. Friel, C online 20 June 2005 An ultraviolet electroabsorption modulator based on AlGaN/GaN quantum wells is demonstrated. Enhanced excitonic absorption in the quantum wells at around 3.48 eV was achieved using

Moustakas, Theodore

185

Ultra-violet laser processing of graphene on SiO2/Si  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A graphene transparent electrode might be used in industry in the near future instead of indium tin oxide (ITO). For patterning of ITO, the maskless laser process was reported as a simple and fast process. In this paper, effects of ultra-violet laser ... Keywords: Graphene, Maskless laser process, Ultra-violet laser

Fujio Wakaya, Tadashi Kurihara, Satoshi Abo, Mikio Takai

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry in the Analysis of Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry in the Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Ultraviolet-Visible

188

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

190

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in ...

191

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided {approx}2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and {approx}800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of {approx}25-fold at 244 nm and {approx}190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

Short, B J; Carter, J C; Gunter, D; Hovland, P; Jagode, H; Karavanic, K; Marin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J; Moore, S; Norris, B; Oliker, L; Olschanowsky, C; Roth, P C; Schulz, M; Shende, S; Snavely, A; Spear, W

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Whole-cell sensing for a harmful bloom-forming microscopic alga by measuring antibody--antigen forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Aureococcus anophagefferens, a harmful bloomforming alga responsible for brown tides in estuaries of the Middle Atlantic U.S., has been investigated by atomic force microscopy for the first time, using probes functionalized with a monoclonal antibody specific for the alga. The rupture force between a single monoclonal antibody and the surface of A. anophagefferens was experimentally found to be 246 6 11 pN at the load rate of 12 nN/s. Force histograms for A. anophagefferens and other similarly-sized algae are presented and analyzed. The results illustrate the effects of load rates, and demonstrate that force-distance measurements can be used to build biosensors with high signal-to-noise ratios for A. anophagefferens. The methods described in this paper can be used, in principle, to construct sensors with single-cell resolution for arbitrary cells for which monoclonal antibodies are available. Index Terms—Atomic force microscopy, Aureococcus anophagefferens, biosensors, force-distance measurements, single-cell identification.

Er S. Lee; Mrinal Mahapatro; David A. Caron; Aristides A. G. Requicha; Life Fellow; Beth A. Stauffer; Mark E. Thompson; Chongwu Zhou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

198

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials ...

199

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Compatibility of the ultraviolet light-ozone system for laundry waste water treatment in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As an alternative treatment system for laundry waste water in nuclear power plants, a system was chosen in which such organic compounds as surfactant would be oxidized by ultraviolet (UV) light and ozone. The system compatibility, UV light source, and dissolved ozone concentration were examined through experiments. First, ozone gas was absorbed in the waste water. After the dissolved ozone concentration equilibrated at the desired value, the waste water was irradiated by a mercury lamp. Then, the time dependence of the concentrations of the organic compounds, the dissolved ozone, and the hydrogen peroxide were measured to estimate the treatment rate of the system. The mercury lamp with a 10{sup 5}-Pa vapor pressure achieved large UV radiation and a treatment rate increase, leading to a compatible system without secondary waste generation. The effect of the dissolved ozone concentration on the treatment rate was saturated when concentration was >3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mol/10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3} at the time UV radiation was started. Numerical results indicated the saturation was due to hydrogen peroxide generation, which prevents hydroxyl radical generation.

Matsuo, Toshiaki; Nishi, Takashi; Matsuda, Masami; Izumida, Tatsuo [Hitachi, Ltd. (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Comparison of Solar UVA and UVB Radiation Measured in Selangor, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation data was measured at Physics Building, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (2 degree sign 55' N, 101 degree sign 46' E, 50m asl) by the Xplorer GLX Pasco that connected to UVA Light sensor. The measured solar UVA data were compared with the total daily solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation data recorded by the Malaysian Metrological Department at Petaling Jaya, Malaysia (3 degree sign 06' N, 101 degree sign 39' E, 50m asl) for 18 days in year 2007. The daily total average of UVA radiation received is (298{+-}105) kJm{sup -2} while the total daily maximum is (600{+-}56) kJm{sup -2}. From the analysis, it shows that the values of UVA radiation data were higher than UVB radiation data with the average ratio of 6.41% between 3-14%. A weak positive correlation was found (the correlation coefficient, r, is 0.22). The amount of UVA radiation that reached the earth surface is less dependence on UVB radiation and the factors were discussed.

Kamarudin, S. U.; Gopir, G.; Yatim, B. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Level 2, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sanusi, H. [Institute of Space Science (ANGKASA), Level 2, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mahmud, P. S. Megat; Choo, P. Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

REVIEW ARTICLE Ozone depletion and increased UV-B radiation: is there a real threat to photosynthesis?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on photosynthetic competence or light-interception. It is concluded that O depletion and the concurrent rise This critical review of recent literature questions earl-3 in UV-B irradiance is not a direct threat to photosynier predictions that photosynthetic productivity of thetic productivity of crops and natural vegetation. higher plants is vulnerable to increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation as a result of stratospheric ozone (O) 3 Key words: Biomass, development, ozone depletion, depletion. Direct UV-B-induced inhibition of photosyn- photosynthesis, ultraviolet-B. thetic competence is observed only at high UV-B irradiances and primarily involves the loss of soluble Calvin

Damian J. Allen; Salvador Nogués; Neil R. Baker

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently undertaking research into nano-enabled titanium dioxide (TiO2) ultraviolet (UV) protective layers for cool-color roofing applications. Project Description This project entails optimizing and scaling up silicon dioxide-coated TiO2 nanocrystal synthesis and functionalization in aqueous solution in order to formulate a 10 gallon waterborne clear UV protective nanocomposite coating material. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between DOE and Nanotrons, a Massachusetts-based company that uses nano-engineering technologies to

205

Total Ozone Variations 1970-74 Using Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) and Ground-Based Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most long-lived satellite set of ozone observations, to date, is that derived from the Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) ozone sensor on Nimbus 4 and extends from April 1970 through 1976. Unfortunately, this experiment suffered spacecraft power ...

A. J. Miller; R. M. Nagatani; T. G. Rogers; A. J. Fleig; D. F. Heath

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Airborne Doppler Lidar Investigation of Sea Surface Reflectance at a 355-nm Ultraviolet Wavelength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the sea surface reflectance for different incidence angles based on observations of an airborne Doppler lidar at an ultraviolet wavelength of 355 nm is described. The results were compared to sea surface reflectance models, ...

Zhigang Li; Christian Lemmerz; Ulrike Paffrath; Oliver Reitebuch; Benjamin Witschas

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dual-band ultraviolet-short-wavelength infrared imaging via luminescent downshifting with colloidal quantum dots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) cameras in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions is limited by the absorption of high-energy photons in inactive regions of the imaging array. Dual-band UV-SWIR imaging ...

Geyer, Scott M.

208

Radiation-induced gene responses  

SciTech Connect

In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Studying the Pulsation of Mira Variables in the Ultraviolet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an empirical study of the Mg II h & k emission lines of selected Mira variable stars, using spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). The stars all exhibit similar Mg II behavior during the course of their pulsation cycles. The Mg II flux always peaks after optical maximum near pulsation phase 0.2-0.5, although the Mg II flux can vary greatly from one cycle to the next. The lines are highly blueshifted, with the magnitude of the blueshift decreasing with phase. The widths of the Mg II lines are also phase-dependent, decreasing from about 70 km/s to 40 km/s between phase 0.2 and 0.6. We also study other UV emission lines apparent in the IUE spectra, most of them Fe II lines. These lines are much narrower and not nearly as blueshifted as the Mg II lines. They exhibit the same phase-dependent flux behavior as Mg II, but they do not show similar velocity or width variations.

Brian E. Wood; Margarita Karovska

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

211

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

215

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell [Space Sciences Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mariska, John; Warren, Harry [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Schrijver, Carolus J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Webb, David F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Bailey, Scott [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tobiska, W. Kent, E-mail: tom.woods@lasp.colorado.edu [Space Environment Technologies, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

219

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

222

An ultraviolet barrier-discharge OH molecular lamp  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy and spectral parameters of a barrier discharge in a mixture of argon with hydroxyl {sup .}OH are studied experimentally. A sealed lamp with the radiation intensity maximum at {lambda} = 309.2 nm, an emitting surface area of {approx}700 cm{sup 2}, and a radiant excitance of 1.5 mW cm{sup -2} has been fabricated. The radiant power of the lamp is 1.1 W. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Sosnin, E A; Erofeev, M V; Avdeev, S M; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Panarin, V A; Skakun, V S; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Shitts, D V [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

224

EU promises new biofuel rules won't harm the environment http://www.pr-inside.com/eu-promises-new-biofuel-rules-won-t-r385258.htm 1 of 2 1/16/2008 12:32 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Earth Europe on Monday called for the EU to step away from its 10 percent biofuel target unless it couldEU promises new biofuel rules won't harm the environment http://www.pr-inside.com/eu-promises-new-biofuel promises new biofuel rules won't harm the environment © AP 2008-01-14 16:21:49 - BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP

225

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

226

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Access Policy Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the facility was upgraded to a state-of-the-art third generation lightsource in 2004, providing major improvements in emittance, ring current and new or upgraded beam lines. SSRL's research programs include both the x-ray and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. SSRL is primarily supported by the DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences

229

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

231

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

Synthesis of materials with infrared and ultraviolet lasers  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses three divergent examples of synthesis of materials with lasers. The three techniques are: (1) infrared (CO/sub 2/) laser synthesis of silane (SiH/sub 4/) from disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/); (2) excimer (ArF) laser production of fine silicon powders from methyl- and chloro-substituted silanes; and, (3) excimer (KrF) laser production of fine metallic powders by laser ablation. The mechanism for each process is discussed along with some conclusions about the features of the laser radiation that enable each application. 19 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Lyman, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

235

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

236

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

237

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiation hormesis. Its emerging significance in medical practice [see comments  

SciTech Connect

Because of the strong scientific evidence in support of radiation hormesis, we can no longer ignore this concept. There is, however, need for additional, carefully documented investigations in selected biological systems exposed to LLIR if the matter of radiation hormesis is to be settled once and for all. This need should be addressed without delay, as the matter of benefits derived from LLIR exposure could have major economic and epidemiologic implications. If radiation hormesis becomes firmly established, the requirements for LLIR protection might be relaxed, leading to a sizable cost saving, and the fear of nuclear energy should abate. If this happens, the evergrowing problems associated with energy production from fossil fuels on the one hand and the continued improvements in nuclear reactor technology on the other, will force a world-wide reassessment of risks and benefits associated with nuclear energy. Furthermore, as discussed herein, the major source of exposure from background radiation comes from the inhalation of radon gas. The very high cost associated with effective radon abatement would lead to an abandonment of this mitigation effort so that the limited funds available to improve public health world wide could be used more effectively elsewhere. Thus, we conclude that the time is now to consider eliminating the concept of the radiation paradigm from scientific thinking. We must not continue to unequivocally accept the propositions that (1) all radiation is harmful and (2) that the health effects of LLIR may be directly inferred by scaling down from known deleterious high-dose effects, in as much as there is no scientific basis for an agent not to cause multiple effects.

Loken, M.K.; Feinendegen, L.E. (Univ. of Minnesota Hospital, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

242

RADIATION PRESSURE ON BACTERIAL CLUMPS IN THE SOLAR VICINITY AND THEIR SURVIVAL BETWEEN INTERSTELLAR TRANSITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Radiation pressure cross-sections for clumps of hollow bacterial grains with thin coatings of graphite are calculated using rigorous Guttler formulae. The carbonized skins are expected to form through exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, but a limiting thickness of about 0.03 µm is determined by opacity effects. The ratios of radiation pressure to gravity P/G are calculated for varying sizes of the clumps and for varying thickness of the graphite coatings. Bacterial clumps and individual desiccated bacteria without coatings of radii in the range 0.3–8 µm have P/G ratios less than unity, whereas particles with coatings of 0.02µm thickness have ratios in excess of unity. Such coatings also provide protection from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Putative cometary bacteria, such as have been recently collected in the stratosphere, are thus not gravitationally bound in the solar system provided they possess carbonised exterior coatings. They are rapidly expelled from the solar system reaching nearby protosolar nebulae in timescales of a few million years. Even with the most pessimistic assumptions galactic cosmic rays are unable to diminish viability to an extent that vitiates the continuity of panspermia. 1.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct gap of the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloy system extends continuously from InN (0.7 eV, in the near IR) to GaN (3.4 eV, in the mid-ultraviolet). This opens the intriguing possibility of using this single ternary alloy system in single or multi-junction (MJ) solar cells of the type used for space-based surveillance satellites. To evaluate the suitability of In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N as a material for space applications, high quality thin films were grown with molecular beam epitaxy and extensive damage testing with electron, proton, and alpha particle radiation was performed. Using the room temperature photoluminescence intensity as a indirect measure of minority carrier lifetime, it is shown that In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N retains its optoelectronic properties at radiation damage doses at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than the damage thresholds of the materials (GaAs and GaInP) currently used in high efficiency MJ cells. This indicates that the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N is well-suited for the future development of ultra radiation-hard optoelectronics. Critical issues affecting development of solar cells using this material system were addressed. The presence of an electron-rich surface layer in InN and In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N (0 < x < 0.63) was investigated; it was shown that this is a less significant effect at large x. Evidence of p-type activity below the surface in Mg-doped InN was obtained; this is a significant step toward achieving photovoltaic action and, ultimately, a solar cell using this material.

Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

244

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

245

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

246

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

247

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation ...

250

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part IV: Overview Part IV: Overview In part IV we present the overall findings of the Advisory Committee's inquiry and deliberations and the recommendations that follow from these findings. In chapter 17, findings are presented in two parts, first for the period 1944 through 1974 and then for the contemporary period. These parts, in turn, are divided into findings regarding biomedical experiments and those regarding population exposures. We begin our presentation of findings for the period 1944 through 1974 with a summation of what we have learned about human radiation experiments: their number and purpose, the likelihood that they produced harm, and how human radiation experimentation contributed to advances in medicine. We then summarize what we have found concerning the nature of federal rules and policies governing research involving human subjects during this period, and the implementation of these rules in the conduct of human radiation experiments. Findings about the nature and implementation of federal rules cover issues of consent, risk, the selection of subjects, and the role of national security considerations.

251

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

252

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

256

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

260

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Far Ultraviolet Continuum Emission: Applying this Diagnostic to the Chromospheres of Solar-Mass Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The far ultraviolet (FUV) continuum flux is recognized as a very sensitive diag- nostic of the temperature structure of the Sun's lower chromosphere. Until now analysis of the available stellar FUV data has shown that solar-type stars must also have chromospheres, but quantitative analyses of stellar FUV continua require far higher quality spectra and comparison with new non-LTE chromosphere models. We present accurate far ultraviolet (FUV, 1150-1500^{\\circ}) continuum flux measurements for solar-mass stars, made feasible by the high throughput and very low detector background of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubbble Space Telescope. We show that the continuum flux can be measured above the detector background even for the faintest star in our sample. We find a clear trend of increasing continuum brightness temperature at all FUV wavelengths with decreasing rotational period, which provides an important measure of magnetic heating rates in stellar chromospheres. Comparison with semiempirical so...

Linsky, Jeffrey L; Ayres, Tom; Fontenla, Juan; France, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Element abundances in cool white dwarfs. II. Ultraviolet observations of DZ white dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a small data base of homogeneously derived photospheric element abundances of DZ white dwarfs and related objects. Our previous investigations are supplemented with the analysis of ultraviolet spectra for nine white dwarfs. Of particular interest is the detection of Lalpha absorption in van Maanen 2 and a determination of the effective temperature of this star. The new value is about 1000K lower than previous results due to the strong ultraviolet absorption by metals which has to be considered consistently. The metal abundances of our sample stars are compatible with the predictions from the two-phase accretion model of Dupuis et al. (1992, 1993). Small deviations can be observed for the abundance ratios in some objects. This could indicate non-solar metal-to-metal ratios in the accreted material. Hydrogen can be detected in virtually all of our objects. However, its average accretion rate must be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the metal accretion rate.

B. Wolff; D. Koester; J. Liebert

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dynamics of Line-Driven Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei II: Effects of Disk Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore consequences of a radiation driven disk wind model for mass outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGN). We performed axisymmetric time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations using the same computational technique as Proga, Stone and Kallman (2000). We test the robustness of radiation launching and acceleration of the wind for relatively unfavorable conditions. In particular, we take into account the central engine radiation as a source of ionizing photons but neglect its contribution to the radiation force. Additionally, we account for the attenuation of the X-ray radiation by computing the X-ray optical depth in the radial direction assuming that only electron scattering contributes to the opacity. Our new simulations confirm the main result from our previous work: the disk atmosphere can 'shield' itself from external X-rays so that the local disk radiation can launch gas off the disk photosphere. We also find that the local disk force suffices to accelerate the disk wind to high velocities in the radial direction. This is true provided the wind does not change significantly the geometry of the disk radiation by continuum scattering and absorption processes; we discuss plausibility of this requirement. Synthetic profiles of a typical resonance ultraviolet line predicted by our models are consistent with observations of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs.

D. Proga; T. R. Kallman

2004-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented.

Ma, T; MacPhee, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Mackinnon, A; Chen, C; Barbee, T; Freeman, R; King, J; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B; Beg, F

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

269

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radiation induction of cancer of the skin  

SciTech Connect

The induction of epidermal tumors was studied using exposures to 25 kV x-rays with or without subsequent exposures to 12-0-tetradeconyl phorbol-13 acetate (TPA) or ultraviolet radiation (uvr) 280-400 nm. Fractionation regimens and total exposure up to 4000R produced no squamous cell carcinomas. When these regimes were followed by TPA an incidence of about 80% was obtained, and incidence of 60% when uvr exposures followed the x-irradiation. A dose-dependent increase in fibrosarcomas was found when x-irradiation was followed by 24 weeks of topical treatment with TPA. These results support the contention that uvr can enhance the expression of cells initiated by x-rays. The experimental evidence is compared with the data from the tinea capitis patients treated with x-rays. In C3HF/He male mice exposed to 50, 100, 150 and 200 rads /sup 137/Cs gamma rays the induction rate for fibrosarcomas was 2.9 x 10/sup -4/ per cGy/per mouse. This result compares with 2.5 x 10/sup -6/ transformations per surviving cell per cGy with 10T1/2 cells that are fibroblasts derived from C3H mice. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.; Burns, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5x10{sup 17} m{sup -3} which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr [Institut fuer Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Burhenn, Rainer [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

277

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

278

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

279

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

280

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

282

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

284

Radiation detection system  

SciTech Connect

A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar radiation modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sun is the main energy source of the life on the Earth. Thus, solar radiation energy data and models are important for many areas of research and applications. Many parameters influence the amount of solar energy at a particular standing point of ... Keywords: Digital elevation model, Energy of quasiglobal radiation, Meteorology, Shadows, Virtual Sun motion

Klemen Zakšek; Toma Podobnikar; Krištof Oštir

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electromagnetic radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

Benson, Jay L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hansen, Gordon J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

288

Underwater radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM); McKnight, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Slide Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Health Effects of Radiation Health Effects of Radiation Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation PDF Background Radiation PDF Bystander Effects PDF Dirty Bombs PDF DNA Damage...

291

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Funding Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Radiation Research Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Centers for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological and...

292

National Solar Radiation Data Base

The National Solar Radiation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) is the most comprehensive collection of solar data freely available. The 1991 - 2005 NSRDB contains hourly solar radiation (including...

293

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

296

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

297

NVLAP Radiation Detection Instruments LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Detection Instruments LAP. Leticia Pibida uses a hand-held radiation detection device to check cargo. Photo: Copyright Robert Rathe. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

299

Radiation Effects in Nanoporous Gold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foams with filament and porous sizes in the range of nanometers could be unusually resistant to radiation because radiation induced point defects cannot ...

300

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

METHOD FOR MEASURING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring an unknown integrated quantity of radiation with a condenser ionization chamber is described. The chamber is initially charged to a predetermined voltage by a voltage source. The chamber is then removed from the source and exposed to an unknown quantity of radiation for a period of time. The quantity of radiation to which the chamber was exposed is then measured by detecting the magnitude of the pulse of current necessary to recharge the chamber of its initial value through a suitable impedance. The current pulse is amplified and measured directly by a suitable pulse height analyzing system. (AEC)

Roesch, W.C.; McCall, R.C.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)  

SciTech Connect

We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kerber, Florian [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electron heated target temperature measurements in petawatt laser experiments based on extreme ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent methods (extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, imaging at 68 and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultraintense laser-plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 and 256 eV photon energies give a planar deuterated carbon target rear surface pre-expansion temperature in the 125-150 eV range, with the rear plasma plume averaging a temperature approximately 74 eV.

Ma, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Beg, F. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Chung, H.-K.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Hatchett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Offermann, D. T.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in an ion source plasma using a vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system to determine the density and temperature of ground state hydrogen atoms in a plasma by vacuum ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy is described. The continuous tunability of the spectrometer allows for analysis at any of the Lyman transitions. The narrow bandwidth of the laser system allows for the accurate determination of the absorption lineshape and hence the translational temperature. The utility of the system is exemplified by data obtained on an ion-source plasma. The measurements demonstrate the quality of the data as well as illustrating the behavior of this ion source under varying discharge conditions. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.; Worth, G.T.; Stevens, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effect of high-energy neutral particles on extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy in large helical device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra measured by an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer frequently suffer large spike noise when Large Helical Device is operated in low-density range ({order to examine the effect of NBI, a carbon filter with thickness of 150 nm was installed in the EUV spectrometer. As a result, the spike noise was reduced by an order of magnitude. It is experimentally verified that the spike noise is caused by escaping high-energy neutral particles resulting from the circulating high-energy hydrogen ions borne from NBI.

Dong Chunfeng; Sakaue, Hiroyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Tokitani, Masayuki; Goto, Motoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Wang, Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Zushi, Hideki [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580, Fukuoka (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region  

SciTech Connect

A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of {approx}8 to {approx}120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

Plogmaker, Stefan; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Rensmo, Haakan; Feifel, Raimund; Siegbahn, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Linusson, Per [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Eland, John H. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Baker, Neville [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principal of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, L.H.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

311

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

312

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiation Stress Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stresses Sij associated with the propagation of wind-generated waves are principal driving forces for several important surf-zone processes. The accurate estimation of the onshore flux of longshore-directed mean momentum Syx, using ...

S. S. Pawka; D. L. Inman; R. T. Guza

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

319

Impact of Xe partial pressure on the production of excimer vacuum ultraviolet emission for plasma display panels  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the effect of the Xe partial pressure on the excimer vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission intensity of the plasma display panels is investigated, both by measuring the spectral emission directly and by two-dimensional simulations. Experimentally, we find that at the high Xe partial pressure levels, there is an supra-linear increase of excimer VUV radiation and that determines the strong increase of luminance at the high pressures and high voltage. Due to the increase of the luminance and the almost unchanged discharge current, the luminous efficacy strongly increases with the Xe partial pressure. In addition, we also investigated the dynamics of the VUV generation, by measuring the decay time of the excimer VUV light as a function of the gas pressure. It is found that the decay time decreases with the increase of gas pressure. The spatial characteristics of the excimer VUV emission are also discussed. Different from the Ne and near-infrared emission, the excimer VUV emission is generated near the surface of the electrodes and increases uniformly on both sides of the anode and cathode (i.e., the bulk plasma region). Most importantly, it is found that the VUV production occurs during the afterglow period, while it is almost zero at the moment of the discharge itself. From the simulations, it can be seen that the Xe{sub 2}*({sup 3}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) excimer species, which are generated from Xe*(1s{sub 5}), play a dominant role in the excimer VUV emission output at the high Xe partial pressure. The two-dimensional simulations also show that the strong increase of Xe excimer excitation states in the case of high pressure is mainly the result of the high conversion efficiency of the Xe excimer states, especially in the afterglow period. Due to the high conversion efficiency of Xe excitation species to Xe excimer species by the high collision rate in the case of high pressure, there is a strong increase of excimer VUV production, especially from the cathode.

Zhu Di [Display R and D center, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Zhang Xiong [Display R and D center, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Kajiyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Advanced Science of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

322

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

323

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR 6268 IONIZING RADIATION DIVISION. The Neutron Interferometer. The neutron ...

325

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Technical Activities 2000" - Table of Contents, Division home page. Ionizing Radiation Division. ...

326

Ultraviolet Spectra of CV Accretion Disks with Non-Steady T(r) Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive grid of synthetic mid- and far-ultraviolet spectra for accretion disks in cataclysmic variables has been presented by Wade and Hubeny (1998). In those models, the disk was assumed to be in steady-state, that is T_eff(r) is specified completely by the mass M_WD and radius R_WD of the accreting white dwarf star and the mass transfer rate M_dot which is constant throughout the disk. In these models, T_eff(r) is proportional to r^{-3/4} except as modified by a cutoff term near the white dwarf. Actual disks may vary from the steady-state prescription for T_eff(r), however, e.g. owing to outburst cycles in dwarf novae M_dot not constant with radius) or irradiation (in which case T_eff in the outer disk is raised above T_steady). To show how the spectra of such disks might differ from the steady case, we present a study of the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of models in which power-law temperature profiles T_eff(r) is proportional to r^{-gamma} with gamma < 3/4 are specified. Otherwise, the construction of...

Orosz, J A; Orosz, Jerome A.; Wade, Richard A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Molecular Hydrogen Emission Lines in Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Mira B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of Mira A's wind-accreting companion star, Mira B. We find that the strongest lines in the FUSE spectrum are H2 lines fluoresced by H I Lyman-alpha. A previously analyzed Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrum also shows numerous Lyman-alpha fluoresced H2 lines. The HST lines are all Lyman band lines, while the FUSE H2 lines are mostly Werner band lines, many of them never before identified in an astrophysical spectrum. We combine the FUSE and HST data to refine estimates of the physical properties of the emitting H2 gas. We find that the emission can be reproduced by an H2 layer with a temperature and column density of T=3900 K and log N(H2)=17.1, respectively. Another similarity between the HST and FUSE data, besides the prevalence of H2 emission, is the surprising weakness of the continuum and high temperature emission lines, suggesting that accretion onto Mira B has weakened dramatically. The UV fluxes observed by HST on 1999 August 2 were previously reported to be over an order of magnitude lower than those observed by HST and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) from 1979--1995. Analysis of the FUSE data reveals that Mira B was still in a similarly low state on 2001 November 22.

Brian E. Wood; Margarita Karovska

2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

328

ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSIONS ACCOMPANYING SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used Transition Region and Coronal Explorer 1600 A images and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) magnetograms to compare ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the chromosphere to longitudinal magnetic field changes in the photosphere during four X-class solar flares. An abrupt, significant, and persistent change in the magnetic field occurred across more than 10 pixels in the GONG magnetograms for each flare. These magnetic changes lagged the GOES flare start times in all cases, showing that they were consequences and not causes of the flares. Ultraviolet emissions were spatially coincident with the field changes. The UV emissions tended to lag the GOES start times for the flares and led the changes in the magnetic field in all pixels except one. The UV emissions led the photospheric field changes by 4 minutes on average with the longest lead being 9 minutes; however, the UV emissions continued for tens of minutes, and more than an hour in some cases, after the field changes were complete. The observations are consistent with the picture in which an Alfven wave from the field reconnection site in the corona propagates field changes outward in all directions near the onset of the impulsive phase, including downward through the chromosphere and into the photosphere, causing the photospheric field changes, whereas the chromosphere emits in the UV in the form of flare kernels, ribbons, and sequential chromospheric brightenings during all phases of the flare.

Johnstone, B. M.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Scripting in Radiation Therapy: An Automatic 3D Beam-Naming System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scripts can be executed within the radiation treatment planning software framework to reduce human error, increase treatment planning efficiency, reduce confusion, and promote consistency within an institution or even among institutions. Scripting is versatile, and one application is an automatic 3D beam-naming system that describes the position of the beam relative to the patient in 3D space. The naming system meets the need for nomenclature that is conducive for clear and accurate communication of beam entry relative to patient anatomy. In radiation oncology in particular, where miscommunication can cause significant harm to patients, a system that minimizes error is essential. Frequent sharing of radiation treatment information occurs not only among members within a department but also between different treatment centers. Descriptions of treatment beams are perhaps the most commonly shared information about a patient's course of treatment in radiation oncology. Automating the naming system by the use of a script reduces the potential for human error, improves efficiency, enforces consistency, and would allow an institution to convert to a new naming system with greater ease. This script has been implemented in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center since December 2009. It is currently part of the dosimetry protocol and is accessible by medical dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. This paper highlights the advantages of using an automatic 3D beam-naming script to flawlessly and quickly identify treatment beams with unique names. Scripting in radiation treatment planning software has many uses and great potential for improving clinical care.

Holdsworth, Clay, E-mail: clayhholdsworth@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Phillips, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Cancer Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

339

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Near ultraviolet emission from nonpolar cubic AlxGa1-xN/GaN quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near ultraviolet emission from nonpolar cubic AlxGa1-xN/GaN quantum wells J. Schörmann,a S and multiple quantum wells. The well widths ranged from 2.5 to 7.5 nm. Samples were grown by rf-plasma assisted wells clear reflection high energy electron diffraction oscillations were observed indicating a two

As, Donat Josef

343

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Toward Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability of Sulfonyl Imide Anions I. A. Shkrob, T. W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, J. L. Hatcher, and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B...

347

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hyperon radiative decay  

SciTech Connect

The radiative decay widths of the low-lying strange baryons are calculated both within the relativistic quark bag model and the nonrelativistic potential model. These widths are found to depend sensitively upon the quark-model dynamics through multiplet mixing and q/sup 4/q-bar admixtures. The comparison between our calculated results and the very limited experimental data is discussed.

Kaxiras, E.; Moniz, E.J.; Soyeur, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

354

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

SciTech Connect

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Optical data of meteoritic nano-diamonds from far-ultraviolet to far-infrared wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used different spectroscopic techniques to obtain a consistent quantitative absorption spectrum of a sample of meteoritic nano-diamonds in the wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (0.12 $\\mu$m) to the far infrared (100 $\\mu$m). The nano-diamonds have been isolated by a chemical treatment from the Allende meteorite (Braatz et al.2000). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) extends the optical measurements to higher energies and allows the derivation of the optical constants (n & k) by Kramers-Kronig analysis. The results can be used to restrain observations and to improve current models of the environment where the nano-diamonds are expected to have formed. We also show that the amount of nano-diamond which can be present in space is higher than previously estimated by Lewis et al. (1989).

H. Mutschke; A. C. Andersen; C. Jaeger; Th. Henning; A. Braatz

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

The effects of concentrated ultraviolet light on high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The importance of stability in the performance of solar cells is clearly recognized as fundamental. Some of the highest efficiency silicon solar cells demonstrated to date, such as the Point Contact solar cell and the Passivated Emitter solar cell, rely upon the passivation of cell surfaces in order to minimize recombination, which reduces cell power output. Recently, it has been shown that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light of wavelengths present in the terrestrial solar spectrum can damage a passivating silicon-oxide interface and increase recombination. In this study, we compared the performance of Point Contact and Passivated Emitter solar cells after exposure to UV light. We also examined the effect of UV exposure on oxide-passivated silicon wafers. We found that current Passivated Emitter designs are stable at both one-sun and under concentrated sunlight. The evolution of Point Contact concentrator cell performance shows a clear trend towards more stable cells. 15 refs., 18 figs.

Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B. [and others

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ultraviolet laser spectroscopy of neutral mercury in a one-dimensional optical lattice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present details on the ultraviolet lattice spectroscopy of the (6s{sup 2}) {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible} (6s6p) {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition in neutral mercury, specifically {sup 199}Hg. Mercury atoms are loaded into a one-dimensional vertically aligned optical lattice from a magneto-optical trap with an rms temperature of {approx}60 {mu}K. We describe aspects of the magneto-optical trapping, the lattice cavity design, and the techniques employed to trap and detect mercury in an optical lattice. The clock-line frequency dependence on lattice depth is measured at a range of lattice wavelengths. We confirm the magic wavelength to be 362.51(0.16) nm. Further observations to those reported by Yi et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 073005 (2011)] are presented regarding the laser excitation of a Wannier-Stark ladder of states.

Mejri, S.; McFerran, J. J.; Yi, L.; Le Coq, Y.; Bize, S. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, FR-75014 Paris (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ultraviolet stimulated electron source for use with low energy plasma instrument calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the development of a versatile, compact, low to medium energy electron source. A collimated, monoenergetic beam of electrons, up to 50 mm in diameter, is produced with energies ranging from 0.03 to 30 keV. A uniform electron beam profile is generated by illuminating a metal cathode plate with a near ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diode (LED). A parallel electric field accelerates the electrons away from the cathode plate towards a grounded grid. The beam intensity can be controlled from 10 - 10^9 electrons cm-2 s-1 and the angular divergence of the beam is less than 1 degree FWHM for energies greater than 1 keV.

Henderson, Kevin; Funsten, Herb; MacDonald, Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ultraviolet stimulated electron source for use with low energy plasma instrument calibration  

SciTech Connect

We have developed and demonstrated a versatile, compact electron source that can produce a mono-energetic electron beam up to 50 mm in diameter from 0.1 to 30 keV with an energy spread of <10 eV. By illuminating a metal cathode plate with a single near ultraviolet light emitting diode, a spatially uniform electron beam with 15% variation over 1 cm{sup 2} can be generated. A uniform electric field in front of the cathode surface accelerates the electrons into a beam with an angular divergence of <1 Degree-Sign at 1 keV. The beam intensity can be controlled from 10 to 10{sup 9} electrons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

Henderson, Kevin; Harper, Ron; Funsten, Herb; MacDonald, Elizabeth [Space Science and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Spectroscopy of the Nova-like BB Doradus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer ({\\it{FUSE}}) spectra of the little-known southern nova-like BB Doradus. The spectrum was obtained as part of our Cycle 8 {\\it FUSE} survey of high declination nova-like stars. The FUSE spectrum of BB Dor, observed in a high state, is modeled with an accretion disk with a very low inclination (possibly lower than 10deg). Assuming an average WD mass of 0.8 solar leads to a mass accretion rate of 1.E-9 Solar mass/year and a distance of the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low galactic reddening in its direction. The spectrum presents some broad and deep silicon and sulfur absorption lines, indicating that these elements are over-abundant by 3 and 20 times solar, respectively.

P. Godon; E. M. Sion; P. E. Barrett; P. Szkody; E. M. Schlegel

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Spectroscopy of the Nova-like BB Doradus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer ({\\it{FUSE}}) spectra of the little-known southern nova-like BB Doradus. The spectrum was obtained as part of our Cycle 8 {\\it FUSE} survey of high declination nova-like stars. The FUSE spectrum of BB Dor, observed in a high state, is modeled with an accretion disk with a very low inclination (possibly lower than 10deg). Assuming an average WD mass of 0.8 solar leads to a mass accretion rate of 1.E-9 Solar mass/year and a distance of the order of 650 pc, consistent with the extremely low galactic reddening in its direction. The spectrum presents some broad and deep silicon and sulfur absorption lines, indicating that these elements are over-abundant by 3 and 20 times solar, respectively.

Godon, P; Barrett, P E; Szkody, P; Schlegel, E M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

QUIET-SUN INTENSITY CONTRASTS IN THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET AS MEASURED FROM SUNRISE  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution images of the Sun in the near-ultraviolet spectral range between 214 nm and 397 nm as obtained from the first science flight of the 1 m SUNRISE balloon-borne solar telescope. The quiet-Sun rms intensity contrasts found in this wavelength range are among the highest values ever obtained for quiet-Sun solar surface structures-up to 32.8% at a wavelength of 214 nm. We compare the rms contrasts obtained from the observational data with theoretical intensity contrasts obtained from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For 388 nm and 312 nm the observations agree well with the numerical simulations whereas at shorter wavelengths discrepancies between observed and simulated contrasts remain.

Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Borrero, J. M.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37434 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Afram, N.; Unruh, Y. C. [Astrophysics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Berdyugina, S. V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Bonet, J. A.; MartInez Pillet, V. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: hirzberger@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Rise of radiation protection: science, medicine and technology in society, 1896--1935  

SciTech Connect

The history of radiation protection before World War II is treated as a case study of interactions between science, medicine, and technology. The fundamental concerns include the following: are how medical and technical decisions with social impacts are made under conditions of uncertainty; how social pressures are brought to bear on the development of science, medicine, and technology; what it means for medicine or technology to be scientific; why professional groups seek international cooperation; and the roles various professionals and organizations play in controlling the harmful side effects of science, medicine, and technology. These questions are addressed in the specific context of protection from the biological effects of x-rays and radium in medical use.

Serwer, D.P.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CHARACTERIZING ULTRAVIOLET AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES FOR GALAXIES. I. INFLUENCES OF DUST ATTENUATION AND STELLAR POPULATION AGE  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between infrared-to-ultraviolet luminosity ratio and ultraviolet color (or ultraviolet spectral slope), i.e., the IRX-UV (or IRX-{beta}) relation, found in studies of starburst galaxies is a prevalent recipe for correcting extragalactic dust attenuation. Considerable dispersion in this relation discovered for normal galaxies, however, complicates its usability. In order to investigate the cause of the dispersion and to have a better understanding of the nature of the IRX-UV relation, in this paper, we select five nearby spiral galaxies, and perform spatially resolved studies on each of the galaxies, with a combination of ultraviolet and infrared imaging data. We measure all positions within each galaxy and divide the extracted regions into young and evolved stellar populations. By means of this approach, we attempt to discover separate effects of dust attenuation and stellar population age on the IRX-UV relation for individual galaxies. In this work, in addition to dust attenuation, stellar population age is interpreted to be another parameter in the IRX-UV function, and the diversity of star formation histories is suggested to disperse the age effects. At the same time, strong evidence shows the need for more parameters in the interpretation of observational data, such as variations in attenuation/extinction law. Fractional contributions of different components to the integrated luminosities of the galaxies suggest that the integrated measurements of these galaxies, which comprise different populations, would weaken the effect of the age parameter on IRX-UV diagrams. The dependence of the IRX-UV relation on luminosity and radial distance in galaxies presents weak trends, which offers an implication of selective effects. The two-dimensional maps of the UV color and the infrared-to-ultraviolet ratio are displayed and show a disparity in the spatial distributions between the two galaxy parameters, which offers a spatial interpretation of the scatter in the IRX-UV relation.

Mao Yewei; Kong Xu [Center for Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Hao, Cai-Na [Tianjin Astrophysics Center, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Zhou Xu, E-mail: owen81@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ultraviolet Spectra of CV Accretion Disks with Non-Steady T(r) Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive grid of synthetic mid- and far-ultraviolet spectra for accretion disks in cataclysmic variables has been presented by Wade and Hubeny (1998). In those models, the disk was assumed to be in steady-state, that is T_eff(r) is specified completely by the mass M_WD and radius R_WD of the accreting white dwarf star and the mass transfer rate M_dot which is constant throughout the disk. In these models, T_eff(r) is proportional to r^{-3/4} except as modified by a cutoff term near the white dwarf. Actual disks may vary from the steady-state prescription for T_eff(r), however, e.g. owing to outburst cycles in dwarf novae M_dot not constant with radius) or irradiation (in which case T_eff in the outer disk is raised above T_steady). To show how the spectra of such disks might differ from the steady case, we present a study of the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of models in which power-law temperature profiles T_eff(r) is proportional to r^{-gamma} with gamma grid, to allow comparison. We discuss both the UV spectral energy distributions and the appearance of the UV line spectra. We also briefly discuss the eclipse light curves of the non-standard models. Comparison of these models with UV observations of novalike variables suggests that better agreement may be possible with such modified T_eff(r) profiles.

Jerome A. Orosz; Richard A. Wade

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

369

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

370

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Character of Solar and Circumsolar Radiation. Proceedings ~all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thethat attenuate the solar radiation available to terres-

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thea suitable site for solar radiation measurements. A requestused to estimate the solar radiation per unit wavelength at

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3395 (1977). H. Winick, VUV Radiation Physics, edited by E.M. W. Zemansky, Resonance Radiation and Exci- ted Atoms, (II. III. Appendix A - Radiation Trapping. Appendix B -

Poliakoff, E.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Synchrotron Radiation at 33 GHz NOIiWNPQaa s x s sthe Cosmic Background Radiation Philip Michael Lubin Spacethe Cosmic Background Radiation. The ground-based experiment

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to resistance; and strengthen the case for a role in survival of systems involved in manganese and iron homeostasis.

Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hybrid Radiator-Cooling System  

Technology Development & Commercialization Current Challenges Coolant radiators in highway trucks are designed to transfer maximum heat at a ...

383

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coherent Radiation in Insertion Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the coherent radiation in an undulator/wiggler with a vacuum chamber of arbitrary cross section. The backward radiation is a coherent and it has wavelengths about twice the period of the undulator/wiggler. Mostly of coherent radiation is going with the wavelengths approximately the bunch length at small angles however.

Mikhailichenko, A A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Cerenkov radiation of spinning particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cerenkov radiation of a neutral particle with magnetic moment is considered, as well as the spin-dependent contribution to the Cerenkov radiation of a charged spinning particle. The corresponding radiation intensity is obtained for an arbitrary value of spin and for an arbitrary spin orientation with respect to velocity.

I. B. Khriplovich

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Time-resolved visible and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of laser-produced tin plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma: an optically thin corona and an optically thick conductionplasma heating occurs indirectly through radiative transfer and electron conduction.conduction carries energy in the laser absorption zone beyond the critical surface to heat the higher density plasma.

O'Shay, Joseph Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

389

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Multilayer radiation shield  

SciTech Connect

A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

395

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Planck’s blackbody radiation law”. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

Radiation damage considerations  

SciTech Connect

The designs of nuclear fission and fusion power plants do not, in general, appear to make unusual demands on materials in terms of mechanical- property requirements. Radiation environments produce unique effects on the composition, microstructure, and defect population of these alloys, resulting in time-dependent and time-independent changes in mechanical properties. To illustrate these problems, the materials needs of the core of a Liquid-Metal Fast- Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and of the first wall of a fusion reactor are discussed. In the case of the LMFBR core, the phenomenon of void swelling causes serious design problems, and a search is being made for a low-swelling alloy that has adequate mechanical properties. The fusion reactor poses different problems because the neutron energy is high (14 MeV) and is accompanied by a high flux of charged particles. The long-term choices for a wall material have been narrowed to vanadium and niobium alloys. In the search for low-swelling alloys, it has become clear that minor elements play an important role in determining the nature of the radiation effects. The segregation of minor elements to void surfaces and the dispersion and reformation of second-phase precipitates are two important radiation-induced phenomena that require additional study in view of their influence on void swelling and high-temperature properties. (auth)

Frost, B.R.T.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NIST Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility. ... Radiation hardness testing; Electron-beam sterilization; Beam diagnostics; Industrial CT scanning. ...

399

On the collective curvature radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with the one possible mechanism of the pulsar radio emission, i.e., with the collective curvature radiation of the relativistic particle stream moving along the curved magnetospheric magnetic field lines. It is shown that the electromagnetic wave containing one cylindrical harmonic exp{is{\\phi}} can not be radiated by the curvature radiation mechanism, that corresponds to radiation of a charged particle moving along curved magnetic field lines. The point is that the particle in vacuum radiates the triplex of harmonics (s, s \\pm 1), so for the collective curvature radiation the wave polarization is very important and cannot be fixed a priori. For this reason the polarization of real unstable waves must be determined directly from the solution of wave equations for the media. Its electromagnetic properties should be described by the dielectric permittivity tensor \\^{\\epsilon}({\\omega},k,r), that contains the information on the reaction on all possible types of radiation.

Istomin, Ya N; Beskin, V S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radiation control standards and procedures  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

1956-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Novel Integration of an Ultraviolet Nitrate Sensor On Board a Towed Vehicle for Mapping Open-Ocean Submesoscale Nitrate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial results from a deployment of the SUV-6 ultraviolet spectrophotometer, integrated with the SeaSoar towed vehicle, are presented. The innovative, combined system measures nitrate concentration at high spatial resolution (4 m vertically, 5 ...

Rosalind Pidcock; Meric Srokosz; John Allen; Mark Hartman; Stuart Painter; Matt Mowlem; David Hydes; Adrian Martin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Long-term nitrate measurements in the ocean using the In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer: sensor integration into the Apex profiling float  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reagent-free, optical nitrate sensors (ISUS: In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer) can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the ...

Kenneth S. Johnson; Luke J. Coletti; Hans W. Jannasch; Carole M. Sakamoto; Dana D. Swift; Stephen C. Riser

406

Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

Ge Jin [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fishman, Jessica [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Annenberg School for Communication at University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xie, Sharon X. [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mao, Jun J., E-mail: maoj@uphs.upenn.edu [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

408

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

409

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

410

RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

Dunegan, H.L.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

RADIATION DETECTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to radiation detection devices and presents a unique detection system especialiy desirable for portable type instruments using a Geiger-Mueller for a high voltage battery, thereby reducing the size and weight of the instrument, by arranging a one-shot multivibrator to recharge a capacitance applying operating potential to tho Geiger-Mueller tube each time a nuclear particle is detected. When detection occurs, the multivibrator further delivers a pulse to an appropriate indicator doing away with the necessity for the pulse amplifier conventionally intermediate between the detector and indicator in pulse detection systems.

Gundlach, J.C.; Kelley, G.G.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

414

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Research Societies with Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Societies with Radiation Concerns Academy of Radiology Research American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Nuclear Society American Roentgen Ray Society American...

415

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research: Outreach and Resources Authors: Antone L. Brooks and Lezlie A. Couch Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The...

417

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Response in Normal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genes. Using rigorous computational methods, we characterized the dose-dependent, radiation-induced gene expression of HSF-42, a primary cell culture. Our preliminary results...

418

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

420

Grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet spectrometer fielded with time resolution in a hostile Z-pinch environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This recently developed diagnostic was designed to allow for time-gated spectroscopic study of the EUV radiation (4 nm power generator (1 MA, 100 ns risetime) at University of Nevada, Reno on a series of wire array z-pinch loads. Within this harsh z-pinch environment, radiation yields routinely exceed 20 kJ in the EUV and soft x-ray. There are also strong mechanical shocks, high velocity debris, sudden vacuum changes during operation, energic ion beams, and hard x-ray radiation in excess of 50 keV. The spectra obtained from the precursor plasma of an Al double planar wire array contained lines of Al IX and AlX ions indicating a temperature near 60 eV during precursor formation. Detailed results will be presented showing the fielding specifications and the techniques used to extract important plasma parameters using this spectrometer.

Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Wilcox, P. G.; Cline, W.; Batie, S.; LeGalloudec, B.; Nalajala, V.; Astanovitsky, A. [Plasma Physics and Diagnostics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Study of Possible Ultraviolet Zero of the Beta Function in Gauge Theories with Many Fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the possibility of an ultraviolet (UV) zero in the $n$-loop beta function of U(1) and non-Abelian gauge theories with $N_f$ fermions for large $N_f$. The effect of scheme transformations on the coefficients of different powers of $N_f$ in the $n$-loop term in the beta function is calculated. A general scheme-independent criterion is given for determining whether or not the $n$-loop beta function has a UV zero for large $N_f$. We compare the results with exact integral representations of the leading terms in the beta functions for the respective Abelian and non-Abelian theories in the limit $N_f \\to \\infty$ limit with $N_f \\alpha$ finite. As part of this study, new analytic and numerical results are presented for certain coefficients, denoted $b_{n,n-1}$, that control the large-$N_f$ behavior at $n$-loop order in the beta function. We also investigate various test functions incorporating a power-law and essential UV zero in the beta function and determine their manifestations in series expansions in powers of coupling and in powers of $1/N_f$.

Robert Shrock

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

THE FIRST MAXIMUM-LIGHT ULTRAVIOLET THROUGH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF A TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first maximum-light ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectrum. This spectrum of SN 2011iv was obtained nearly simultaneously by the Hubble Space Telescope at UV/optical wavelengths and the Magellan Baade telescope at NIR wavelengths. These data provide the opportunity to examine the entire maximum-light SN Ia spectral energy distribution. Since the UV region of an SN Ia spectrum is extremely sensitive to the composition of the outer layers of the explosion, which are transparent at longer wavelengths, this unprecedented spectrum can provide strong constraints on the composition of the SN ejecta, and similarly the SN explosion and progenitor system. SN 2011iv is spectroscopically normal, but has a relatively fast decline ({Delta}m{sub 15}(B) = 1.69 {+-} 0.05 mag). We compare SN 2011iv to other SNe Ia with UV spectra near maximum light and examine trends between UV spectral properties, light-curve shape, and ejecta velocity. We tentatively find that SNe with similar light-curve shapes but different ejecta velocities have similar UV spectra, while those with similar ejecta velocities but different light-curve shapes have very different UV spectra. Through a comparison with explosion models, we find that both a solar-metallicity W7 and a zero-metallicity delayed-detonation model provide a reasonable fit to the spectrum of SN 2011iv from the UV to the NIR.

Foley, Ryan J.; Marion, G. Howie; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Berta, Zachory K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kromer, Markus; Taubenberger, Stefan; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Roepke, Friedrich K.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, Franco; Seitenzahl, Ivo R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Folatelli, Gaston [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Hsiao, Eric Y.; Morrell, Nidia I. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Simcoe, Robert A., E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-664D Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ultraviolet photodissociation of iodine monochloride (ICl) at 235, 250, and 265 nm  

SciTech Connect

ICl photolysis in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (235-265 nm) is studied using the Slice Imaging technique. The Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and the I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})/I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) branching ratio between the I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) + Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})/Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) and I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) + Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})/Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) channels is extracted from the respective iodine and chlorine photofragment images. We find that ground state chlorine atoms (Cl({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})) are formed nearly exclusively with excited state iodine atoms (I*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})), while excited spin-orbit chlorine atoms (Cl*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2})) are concurrently produced only with ground state iodine atoms (I({sup 2}P{sub 3/2})). We conclude that photolysis of ICl in this UV region is a relatively ''clean'' source of spin-orbit excited chlorine atoms that can be used in crossed molecular beam experiments.

Diamantopoulou, N.; Kitsopoulos, Theofanis N. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Iraklion 71110 (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Iraklion 71003 (Greece); Kartakoulis, A.; Glodic, P.; Samartzis, Peter C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Iraklion 71110 (Greece)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

425

Infrared and ultraviolet cutoffs in variational calculations with a harmonic oscillator basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I abstract from a recent publication [1] the motivations for, analysis in and conclusions of a study of the ultraviolet and infrared momentum regulators induced by the necessary truncation of the model spaces formed by a variational trial wave function. This trial function is built systematically from a complete set of many-body basis states based upon three-dimensional harmonic oscillator (HO) functions. Each model space is defined by a truncation of the expansion characterized by a counting number (N) and by the intrinsic scale ($\\hbar\\omega$) of the HO basis. Extending both the uv cutoff to infinity and the ir cutoff to zero is prescribed for a converged calculation. In [1] we established practical procedures which utilize these regulators to obtain the extrapolated result from sequences of calculations with model spaces. Finally, I update this subject by mentioning recent work on our extrapolation prescriptions which have appeared since the submission of [1]. The numerical example chosen for this contribution consists of calculations of the ground state energy of the triton with the "bare" and "soft" Idaho N3LO nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction.

Sidney A Coon

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Observations of the Temperature Structure of the Quiet Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6 to 6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of Iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1" pixels...

Brooks, David H; Williams, David R; Watanabe, Tetsuya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TEMPERATURE AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET INTENSITY IN A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY AND STREAMER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the temperature and EUV line emission of a coronal cavity and surrounding streamer in terms of a morphological forward model. We use a series of iron line ratios observed with the Hinode Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on 2007 August 9 to constrain temperature as a function of altitude in a morphological forward model of the streamer and cavity. We also compare model predictions to the EIS EUV line intensities and polarized brightness (pB) data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) Mark 4 K-coronameter. This work builds on earlier analysis using the same model to determine geometry of and density in the same cavity and streamer. The fit to the data with altitude-dependent temperature profiles indicates that both the streamer and cavity have temperatures in the range 1.4-1.7 MK. However, the cavity exhibits substantial substructure such that the altitude-dependent temperature profile is not sufficient to completely model conditions in the cavity. Coronal prominence cavities are structured by magnetism so clues to this structure are to be found in their plasma properties. These temperature substructures are likely related to structures in the cavity magnetic field. Furthermore, we find that the model overestimates the EUV line intensities by a factor of 4-10, without overestimating pB. We discuss this difference in terms of filling factors and uncertainties in density diagnostics and elemental abundances.

Kucera, T. A. [NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science, Space Research Building, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Tripathi, D. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag-4, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Poll of radiation health scientists  

SciTech Connect

A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them.

Cohen, B.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

UV Radiative Feedback During the Advanced Stages of Reionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionizing ultraviolet background (UVB) during reionization can suppress the gas content of low-mass galaxies, even those capable of efficient atomic cooling, and thus lead to an extended reionization epoch. In this work, we explore the importance of negative UV radiative feedback on Tvir > 10^4 K halos during the middle and late stages of reionization. We do not try to self-consistently model reionization; instead, we explore a large parameter space in an attempt to draw general, robust conclusions. We do this using a tiered approach. Using 1-D hydrodynamical simulations, we model the collapse of gas onto halos of various masses under UVBs of various intensities. We then generate realistic, parametrized maps of the inhomogeneous UVB, using large-scale semi-numeric simulations. By combining these results, we find that under all reasonably conservative scenarios, UV feedback on atomically-cooled halos is not strong enough to notably delay the bulk of reionization. Such a delay is only likely if ionizing efficiencies of z > 10 sources are much higher (~ two orders of magnitude) than z ~ 6 data seem to imply. We also find that feedback is very strongly dependent on halo mass. Our results suggest that the natural time-scale for the bulk of reionization is the growth of the global collapsed fraction contained in Tvir > 10^4 K halos. Finally, our results underscore the importance of taking into account extended dynamical ranges when modeling reionization.

Andrei Mesinger; Mark Dijkstra

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Deterministic methods in radiation transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

436

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Current State of Radiation Protection Philosophy.Against Pergamon Ionizing Radiation from External Sources,for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from Supplement to

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

diffuse radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon diffuse radiation Dataset Summary...

438

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

439

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the rate at which a free tachyon (faster than light particle) would emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

443

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-2) Rev July-2012 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

444

Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation  

SciTech Connect

For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farrel W. Lytle Award was established by the SSRL Organization Executive Committee to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based...

446

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

light shines brilliantly these days at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)". The Secretary of Energy sent these words to be conveyed at the formal opening of...

447

Ionizing Radiation Division Quality Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 08 47020C Low-energy Photon Brachytherapy Seeds, ... Calibrated for Surface Dose Rate 10 ... Sources Calibrated for Radiation Protection Ionization ...

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

Top-surface imaging resists for lithography with strongly attenuated radiation  

SciTech Connect

Strong resist photoabsorption at wavelengths below 248 nm necessitates the use of a thin layer imaging (TLI) scheme for microlithography using 193 nm, 157 nm, or 13.4 nm radiation. Previous to this work, a TLI process commonly known as silylated top surface imaging (TSI) was developed by a Sandia/AT and T team for use in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) at 13.4 nm. Using this bilayer process, 0.13 {micro}m resolution with 87{degree} sidewalls in 0.7 {micro}m of resist was achieved for EUV exposures. New imaging layer polymers, silylation reagents and crosslinkers, and process conditions were screened for improvement in this TSI process with the ultimate goal of demonstrating a resist technology capable of 0.10 {micro}m critical dimension (CD). The results of these attempted improvements to the TSI process are described in this report.

Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Kubiak, G.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.; Pollagi, T.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Ultrafast time dynamics studies of periodic lattices with free electron laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that radiation from free electron laser (FEL) at Hamburg (FLASH) can be used for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments based on the near-infrared (NIR) pump/FEL probe scheme. Here, investigation probing the ultrafast structural dynamics of periodic nano-crystalline organic matter (silver behenate) with such a scheme is reported. Excitation with a femtosecond NIR laser leads to an ultrafast lattice modification which time evolution has been studied through the scattering of vacuum ultraviolet FEL pulses. The found effect last for 6 ps and underpins the possibility for studying nanoperiodic dynamics down to the FEL source time resolution. Furthermore, the possibility of extending the use of silver behenate (AgBh) as a wavelength and temporal calibration tool for experiments with soft x-ray/FEL sources is suggested.

Quevedo, W.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Rajkovic, I. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 {mu}g per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection against the harmful effects of LDR radiation.

Lim Yiting [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kastan, Michael B. [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States) [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Matsui, William, E-mail: matsuwi@jhmi.edu [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)] [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L., E-mail: deweete@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17# New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy Commission F O A M SEPARATION Progress Report for March, 1959 Abstract Appreciable cesium enrichment in the foam has been obtained using the system sodium tetraphenyl boron-Geigy reagent. Enrichment ratios varied from 1.5 to 3.5 depending upon operating conditions. The en- richment appears to depend on the ratio of the sodium tetraphenyl boron to Geigy reagent rather than on the absolute values of the indi- vidual concentrations. Further experiments are being conducted to verify and extend the range of results. Continuous countercurrent column operation has been continued.

453

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation and photochemistry section  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The highlights of this past year in the Radiation and Photochemistry Section at Argonne include: (1) picosecond optical studies of radical cations and excited states produced in hydrocarbon radiolysis provided the first kinetic measurements of ion transformation and production of triplet and singlet excited states by ion recombination. (2) studies of radical cations of alkyl-substituted amines and sulfides provided insights into ion-molecule reactions of radical cations in the condensed phase. (3) studies of the behavior of strained alkane radical cations, such as cubane {sup +}{center dot}, revealed new rearrangements and remarkable, medium-dependent differences in their structures. (4) H{center dot}atom reactions yielding e{sub aq}{sup {minus}} provided the first reliable measurements of hydrated-electron enthalpy and entropy and forced the revision of some previous thinking about the driving force in {sub aq}{sup {minus}} reactions.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field in 2002 A BioSync Report. Issued by the Structural Biology Synchrotron users Organization, October, 2002. 2 Table of Contents: Introduction .................................................................................................... 3 Abbreviations .................................................................................................. 5 Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 6 General Concerns ............................................................................................ 9 Synchrotron operations and maintenance ............................................... 9 NSLS, CHESS and the geographical distribution of beam lines

457

Effects of Atmospheric Absorption of Incoming Radiation on the Radiation Limit of the Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The limit of the planetary radiation (longwave radiation) of a planet with oceans on its surface is determined by various mechanisms called “radiation limits,” which can be classified as the Komabayashi–Ingersoll limit and the radiation limit of ...

Hiroyuki Kurokawa; Taishi Nakamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Medical Consultation Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Continuing Medical Education Radiation Emergency Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Health Physics in Radiation...

459

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Enhancing extreme ultraviolet photons emission in laser produced plasmas for advanced lithography  

SciTech Connect

Current challenges in the development of efficient laser produced plasma sources for the next generation extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) are increasing EUV power and maximizing lifetime and therefore, reducing cost of devices. Mass-limited targets such as small tin droplets are considered among the best choices for cleaner operation of the optical system because of lower mass of atomic debris produced by the laser beam. The small diameter of droplets, however, decreases the conversion efficiency (CE) of EUV photons emission, especially in the case of CO{sub 2} laser, where laser wavelength has high reflectivity from the tin surface. We investigated ways of improving CE in mass-limited targets. We considered in our modeling various possible target phases and lasers configurations: from solid/liquid droplets subjected to laser beam energy with different intensities and laser wavelength to dual-beam lasers, i.e., a pre-pulse followed by a main pulse with adjusted delay time in between. We studied the dependence of vapor expansion rate, which can be produced as a result of droplet heating by pre-pulse laser energy, on target configuration, size, and laser beam parameters. As a consequence, we studied the influence of these conditions and parameters on the CE and debris mass accumulation. For better understanding and more accurate modeling of all physical processes occurred during various phases of laser beam/target interactions, plasma plume formation and evolution, EUV photons emission and collection, we have implemented in our heights package state-of-the art models and methods, verified, and benchmarked against laboratory experiments in our CMUXE center as well as various worldwide experimental results.

Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noise ratio Keck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopy for a sample of 36 events at intermediate redshift (z=0.5) discovered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We introduce a new method for removing host galaxy contamination in our spectra, exploiting the comprehensive photometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and their host galaxies, thereby providing the first quantitative view of the UV spectral properties of a large sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrum has not evolved significantly over the past 40percent of cosmic history, precise evolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of a comparable sample of high-quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum of our z~;;=0.5 SNe Ia and its dispersion is tabulated for use in future applications. Within the high-redshift sample, we discover significant UV spectral variations and exclude dust extinction as the primary cause by examining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitor metallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see are much larger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expected patterns. An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelength of selected UV features with phase. We also demonstrate systematic differences in the SN Ia spectral features with SN light curve width in both the UV and the optical. We show that these intrinsic variations could represent a statistical limitation in the future use of high-redshift SNe Ia for precision cosmology. We conclude that further detailed studies are needed, both locally and at moderate redshift where the rest-frame UV can be studied precisely, in order that future missions can confidently be planned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

Nugent, Peter E; Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

464

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

465

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

466

Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

Kublak, Glenn D. (124 Turquoise Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately accounting for radiative energy balance between the incoming solar and the outgoing infrared radiative fluxes is very important in modeling the Earth's climate. Water vapor absorption plays a critical role in the radiative heating rate ...

D. D. Turner; E. J. Mlawer

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Femto-Second Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation" A. A. Zholents 1) and M. S.Pulses of Synchrotron Radiation' I) A. A. Zholents l , andpulses of syn- chrotron radiation is proposed. It is based

Zholents, A.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Radiation Budgets in the Western Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usefulness of the radiances measured by operational satellites in deriving radiation budgets is demonstrated by comparing the model calculations with the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) fluxes. The radiation budgets in the atmosphere ...

Mino-Dah Chou

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Spatial Variability of Outgoing Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment scanning radiometer aboard the NOAA-9 operational meteorological satellite are used to investigate the spatial variability of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). Daily and monthly radiation maps at ...

G. Louis Smith; David Rutan

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Surface Solar Radiation Flux and Cloud Radiative Forcing for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP): A Satellite, Surface Observations, and Radiative Transfer Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents surface solar radiation flux and cloud radiative forcing results obtained by using a combination of satellite and surface observations interpreted by means of a simple plane-parallel radiative transfer model called 2001. This ...

Catherine Gautier; Martin Landsfeld

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

THE RADIATION CHEMISTRY OP AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS IN RELATION TO THE RADIATION STERILIZATION OF HIGH-PROTEIN FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Various Ionizing Radiations. Radiat. Res. , 22, 694 (1968). W. M. Garrison, Radiation Induced Reactions of AminoFrozen Aqueous Solutions, in Radiation Chemistry of Aqueous

Garrison, W.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Energy transfer and non-linear optical properties at near ultraviolet wavelengths: rare earth 4f->5d transitions in crystals and glasses. Progress report, June 1, 1985-May 31, 1986. [Ce-doped CaF2 and LiYF4  

SciTech Connect

The project has considered several aspects of how high-fluence, near-ultraviolet laser light modifies the optical properties of cerium-doped crystals. Illumination of CeT :CaF2 at 308 nm leads to a two-photon photoionization and the subsequent creation of photochromic color centers. A one-photon photobleaching of these centers and the finite electron acceptor density leads to a complex but solvable rate equation. The electron acceptors are trivalent cerium ions at quasi-cubic sites, which become divalent following the electron capture. The photo-bleaching involves the photoionization of the divalent cerium ions, with the electron returning to the original tetragonal symmetry site. Thermoluminescence measurements are used to study the thermally activated recombination radiation. Measurements of optical gain and loss in CeT :LiYF4 are presented.

Hamilton, D.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE THERMAL RADIATION ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... developed for radiation ignition studies and was not adjusted from its normal settings which approximates to the radiation from a black body at 900 ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

475

Direct Detector for Terahertz Radiation - Energy ...  

Patent 7,420,225: Direct detector for terahertz radiation A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor ...

476

NREL: Solar Radiation Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's solar radiation research supports industry, government, and academia by providing solar radiation measurements, models, maps, and support services. These resources are used...

477

FAQ 4-What is radioactivity and radiation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiation? What is radioactivity and radiation? Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both...

478

Present and Future Computing Requirements Radiative Transfer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiative shock (e.g., ensman 1994) gas temperature radiation temperature Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) non-equilibrium (NLTE) CaII microphysics 1GB atomic data...

479

Fiber-Optic Environmental Radiation Dosimeter  

coupled remote radiation sensor using NRL’s ... Laser-heated Thermoluminescence Dosimeter for Remote Radia-tion Sensing”. Appl. Phys. Lett., 68, 3377 ...

480

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "harmful ultraviolet radiation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

482

Radiation-induced disruption of skeletal remodeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiation may be exacerbated by other skeletal challenges, such as those posed by aging and physical inactivity. Our central hypothesis is that radiation modulates subsequent...

483

Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

484

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

485

Radiation Inspection System Lab (RISL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Inspection System Lab May 30, 2013 This team has the background and experience to test and optimize radiation detection systems from handheld background survey meters to...

486

Radiation Stability of GFR Candidate Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stability of these ceramics were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to understand the effect of radiation on lattice stability,  ...

487

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

488

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

489

NIST: Testing of Radiation Detection Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing of Radiation Detection Systems. ... The GRaDER program will provide users with information about the performance of radiation instruments. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

490

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

491

Low Dose Radiation Program: Selected Websites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The views expressed in these links do not necessarily reflect the view of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Scientific Links Agencies with Radiation Regulatory...

492

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORAU Director Oak Rigde Associated Universities (ORAU) Radiation Emergency...

493

A comparative study of ultraviolet photoconductivity relaxation in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films deposited by different techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoresponse characteristics of ZnO thin films deposited by three different techniques namely rf diode sputtering, rf magnetron sputtering, and electrophoretic deposition has been investigated in the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) configuration. A significant variation in the crystallinity, surface morphology, and photoresponse characteristics of ZnO thin film with change in growth kinetics suggest that the presence of defect centers and their density govern the photodetector relaxation properties. A relatively low density of traps compared to the true quantum yield is found very crucial for the realization of practical ZnO thin film based ultraviolet (UV) photodetector.

Yadav, Harish Kumar; Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007 (India)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

494