Sample records for hardwood forest year

  1. Forest regeneration community dynamics following various levels of harvesting intensity in a bottomland hardwood forest: one-year results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Matthew Worley

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of clearcutting and partial cutting on early regeneration community composition was investigated in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest. The hypothesis tested was that species diversity would increase with harvest intensity. Tree...

  2. Epicormic branching on Central Appalachian hardwoods 10 years after deferment cutting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epicormic branching as monitored over a 10-year period following deferment cutting in four central Appalachian hardwood stands in West Virginia. Data from 545 codominant residual trees indicated that the average number of epicormic branches on the butt and second 16-food log sections increased significantly for the first 2 years after treatment. For upper log sections of basswood, northern red oak, and black cherry, significant increases continued from the second to the tenth year. The net effect on quality was that 11 percent of residual trees exhibited a reduction in butt-log grade due to epicormic branching. Of the few grade reductions observed, white oak, northern red oak, and black cherry were the most susceptible. Less than 1 percent of yellow-poplar trees had lower grades due to epicormic branching.

  3. Harvesting intensity influences the carbon distribution in a northern hardwood ecosystem. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strong, T.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies the effects of five cutting methods on soil and vegetative carbon after 40 years of management in a northern hardwood forest in Wisconsin.

  4. Hardwood price reporting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prices for red alder (Alnus rubra) hardwood logs are published and analyzed for reliability, consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions about land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the last 11 years.

  5. Development of understory vegetation in pine and pine-hardwood shelterwood stands in the Ouachita mountains: The first 3 years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, M.G.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelterwood reproduction cutting method using two overstory compositions (a pine basal area of 30 square feet per acre with and without 15 square feet per acre of hardwoods) and two methods of submerchantable hardwood control (chain-saw felling with and without stump-applied herbicide) was tested in a 2x2 factorial, split-plot design with four randomized complete blocks. Total coverage of understory vegetation after 3 years was greater in the pine overstory treatment (68 percent) than in the pine-hardwood overstory treatment (46 percent) and was slightly greater for manual than chemical hardwood control (60 versus 55 percent). Results indicate that 15 square feet per acre of scattered hardwoods can be retained through at least 3 years after harvest, but additional monitoring will be needed to determine the long-term success of reproduction. Early results suggest that the herbicide treatment was not justified in the stand and site conditions tested in this study; contributing factors were the abundant pine seed production and low levels of competing vegetation.

  6. 9-year evaluation of the effects of herbaceous competition on upland hardwoods that developed from sprouts on cutover sites. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cain, M.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth of 200 arborescent hardwoods per acre was monitored as part of an intensive competition control study in naturally regenerated, even-aged stands loblolly (pinus taeda L.) and shortleaf (P. echinata Mill.) pines in southern Arkansas. A 3-year-old thicket of brush on two 5-acre clearcuts was mowed above pine stumps to create a uniform height of vegetative cover. Pines regenerated by natural seeding, and hardwoods developed from sprouts. The study involved two levels of competition control: check, with no herbaceous control, and herbaceous control for 4 consecutive years using herbicides.

  7. Hardwood supply in the Pacific northwest: A policy perspective. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raettig, T.L.; Connaughton, K.P.; Ahrens, G.R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy framework for the hardwood resource and hardwood industry in western Oregon and Washington is examined. Harvesting trends, harvesting behavior of public and private landowners, and harvesting regulation are presented to complete the analysis of factors affecting short-run hardwood supply. In the short term, the supply of hardwoods is generally favorable, but in the long term, the supply is uncertain and cause for concern. Hardwoods need to be recognized in forest management in the Pacific Northwest.

  8. Variation of treefall gap characteristics in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest: effects of microtopography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almquist, Benjamin Eric

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as bottomland hardwood forests. This study examined differences in the treefall gap regime among three microtopographical classes - bowl, ridge, and slope - in a late-successional hardwood stand on the Neches River floodplain near Spurger, Texas. I tested...

  9. Variation of treefall gap characteristics in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest: effects of microtopography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almquist, Benjamin Eric

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as bottomland hardwood forests. This study examined differences in the treefall gap regime among three microtopographical classes - bowl, ridge, and slope - in a late-successional hardwood stand on the Neches River floodplain near Spurger, Texas. I tested...

  10. 10/17/2011 Hardwood Bottomland Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Management Manual Natural Flooding · Infuses forest with nutrients and organic matter · Flooding can slow: ­ Drier floodplains ­ Higher nutrient pooling ­ Greater herbaceous biomass ­ Lower water tables ­ Lower

  11. Financial aspects of partial cutting practices in central Appalachian hardwoods. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unveven-aged silvicultural practices can be used to regenerate and manage many eastern hardwood stands. Single-tree selection methods are feasible in stands where a desirable shade-tolerant commercial species can be regenerated following periodic harvests. A variety of partial cutting practices, including single-tree selection and diameter-limit cutting have been used for 30 years or more to manage central Appalachian hardwoods on the Fernow Experimental Forest near Parsons, West Virginia. Results from these research areas are presented to help forest managers evaluate financial aspects of partial cutting practices. Observed volume growth, product yields, changes in species composition, and changes in residual stand quality are used to evaluate potential financial returns. Also, practical economic considerations for applying partial cutting methods are discussed.

  12. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  13. Impact of in-woods product merchandizing on profitable logging opportunities in southern upland hardwood forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, D.M.; LeDoux, C.B.; Tansey, J.B.; Widmann, R.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report estimates profitable logging opportunities existing in upland hardwood forests in 14 Southern States and demonstrates the impact of three alternative product-merchandizing options on profitable logging opportunities and profit margins.

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 671 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 671 INTRODUCTION is corresponding author: to contact, call (859) 257-9153 or email at billy.thomas@uky.edu. #12;Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 672 and frequent communications were

  15. The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest also acts as an antioxidant within a plant, reacting and neutralizing ozone and peroxides, though , and reacts photochemically in the presence of NOx to produce tropospheric ozone. The Model of Emissions

  16. Links between biomass and tree demography in a northern hardwood forest: a decade of stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    Links between biomass and tree demography in a northern hardwood forest: a decade of stability recent trends in tree biomass and demography. We found no significant change in live-tree biomass during the decade. Total biomass was 246 Mg·ha­1 (95%CI = 235­258) in 1995­1996 and 245 Mg·ha­1 (95%CI = 234

  17. U.S Markets for Certified and Non-Certified Hardwood Tropical Forest Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    which approached 2 million (mainly wooden) houses (FAO/UNECE, 2004). By 1992, Latin America supplied 70 volume and 57 percent of value. Latin America was the second largest supplier of tropical hardwood veneer Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University

  18. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 673 The second edition of The Ecology and Silviculture of Oaks was recently published (Johnson and others

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 673 ABSTRACT. The first 16 proceedings of the Central Hardwood Forest Conference are important sources for much relevant@fs.fed.us. #12;Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 674 The content

  19. Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Microclimate may infl uence use of early successional habitat by birds. We assessed the relationships between avian habitat use and microclimate (temperature, light intensity, and relative humidity) in experimentally created canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest on the Savannah River Site, SC. Gaps were 2- to 3-year-old group-selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted from spring through fall, encompassing four bird-use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration), in 2002 and 2003. We used mist netting and simultaneously recorded microclimate variables to determine the influence of microclimate on bird habitat use. Microclimate was strongly affected by net location within canopy gaps in both years. Temperature generally was higher on the west side of gaps, light intensity was greater in gap centers, and relative humidity was higher on the east side of gaps. However, we found few relationships between bird captures and the microclimate variables. Bird captures were inversely correlated with temperature during the breeding and postbreeding periods in 2002 and positively correlated with temperature during spring 2003. Captures were high where humidity was high during post-breeding 2002, and captures were low where humidity was high during spring 2003. We conclude that variations in the local microclimate had minor infl uence on avian habitat use within gaps. Instead, habitat selection in relatively mild regions like the southeastern US is based primarily on vegetation structure, while other factors, including microclimate, are less important.

  20. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 559 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -scale bioenergy projects pose no real threat of significantly reducing the general supply of woody biomassProceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 559 INTRODUCTION trends in biomass energy adoption provide important background information and insight toward fulfilling

  1. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 306 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and others 2007). Currently, woody biomass is the leading domestic renewable energy supply and the U.S. Department of Energy forecasts an annual biomass supply of 1 billion tons by 2050 (English and Ewing 2002Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 306 INTRODUCTION

  2. Reducing the forces required to delimb hardwoods. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, J.A.; Sturos, J.B.

    1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Documents the forces required to delimb hardwoods as a function of knife parameters, and identifies opportunities to reduce forces and increase productivity of machines using delimbing knives.

  3. Tree-section harvesting of northern hardwood thinnings. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, J.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the results of a field trial of tree-section harvesting, a shortwood version of whole-tree harvesting, in a northern hardwood thinning. This technique is technically feasible and especially useful where the appearance of the residual stand is a primary concern.

  4. Cavity availability and use in hardwood forests with emphasis on wood ducks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolter, Derrick Wayne

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cavity use by vertebrates. Tree species, number of cavities by entrance size, stems per ha, basal area, and total cavities were recorded in 23, 15, and 15 plots in the cypress-tupelo (Taxodium distichum-Nyssa aquatica), mixed hardwood, and pine-oak...

  5. Method for applying group selection in central appalachian hardwoods. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.W.; Schuler, T.M.; Smith, H.C.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public concern over the adverse visual impact of clearcutting has heightened interest in developing and testing alternative regeneration practices for central Appalachian hardwoods. Group selection can meet aesthetic goals while providing suitable light conditions to reproduce shade-intolerant species. Volume control and residual stand density are used to reg8ulate periodic cuts. In central Appalachian hardwoods, openings must have a minimum size of 0.4 acre; all stems 1.0 inch d.b.h. and larger are cut to reproduce desirable shade-intollerant species. Openings should be located using the worst first approach to give the growing space occupied by mature trees or risky trees to faster growing, desirable regeneration.

  6. An Overview of World Tropical Hardwood Resources, Forest Products Trade and Environmental Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Venezuela (Butler 2001). South America accounts for 23 percent of global forests (Juslin and Hansen 2003

  7. Effects of aerially applied glyphosate and hexazinone on hardwoods and pines in a loblolly pine plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, J.D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Areas in a 4-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation were treated with aerially applied Roundup (glyphosate), Pronone 10G (hexazinone), and Velpar L (hexazinone) plus Lo Drift (a spray additive). All herbicides were applied with appropriate helicopter-mounted equipment. The proportion of free-to-grow pine trees increased over a 2-year period in both the treated and untreated areas, but the increase was slightly greater in the treated areas. Final loblolly pine height, d.b.h., and volume per tree did not differ significantly among the four treatments. About 1,200 hardwood trees and 4,700 shrubs over 3 ft tall per acre were present at the beginning of the study.

  8. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in hydrologic restoration as gradients are created that support a diverse community. Tree seedlings were subjected to experimental flooding regimes typical of floodplain forests in rural and urban settings. Growth rates of seedlings varied over time and differed...

  9. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 607 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the complexity and expense of existing certification systems effectively exclude sustainable hardwood timber from conscious. Results indicate that many companies pursue certification for their customers and to gain some

  10. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN CALCIUM AND ALUMINUM IN NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST FLOORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Richard P.

    -6955) (Received 23 December 2003; accepted 22 July 2004) Abstract. Acid rain results in losses of exchangeable: acid rain, Ca:Al, cation depletion, forest floor, soil 1. Introduction Acid rain is thought to have and Simonsson, 2003). Alternatively, mobilization of Al by acid rain from the mineral soil below may provide

  11. PAST IS PROLOGUE: A SYNTHESIS OF STATE FOREST MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AND HARDWOOD ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , frequency, and spatial scale. Disturbances play a particularly important role in shaping the development EXPERIMENT PRE-TREATMENT RESULTS G. Scott Haulton1 Abstract.--Disturbance plays an important role in forest historical disturbance events; therefore, an understanding of disturbance history is important when

  12. Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic shelters were used to grow red oak seedlings on good-to-excellent Appalachian hardwood growing sites in north central West Virginia. Preliminary results indicate that shelters have the potential to stimulate development of red oak seedlingheight growth, especially if height growth continues once the seedling tops are above the 5-foot-tall shelters.

  13. Herpetofaunal community response to timber harvest practices in an east Texas bottomland hardwood forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Kelly James

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Ambystoma opacum showed a significant difference in abundance among treatments and a continued reduction in numbers in clearcuts 2-5 years post harvest. However, the presence of A. opacum in the middle of clearcut plots provides evidence of this species...

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 253 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CREEK STATE FOREST, PENNSYLVANIA Patrick Brose1 Abstract.--One of the key steps in the oak regeneration

  15. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 490 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to manage forests. Pretreatment data were collected from 1991-1995, and management treatments were applied in 1996-1997. Post-treatment data were collected after harvest. Although MOFEP has had only one entry

  16. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 227 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the demands for forest goods and services also evolve in response to societal needs and attitudes. To guide practices must account for both present conditions and those desired in the future. The way that silvicultural practices implemented today will affect the management area and overall goals in the future

  17. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 648 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible negative effects of timber harvesting on streams and riparian habitat are well documented. Forest implications for designing harvest roads and trails and effective streamside management zones (SMZs). 1 in water temperature and nutrient delivery to streams (LeDoux and Wilkerson 2006). In 1972, the Federal

  18. Simulations of Forest Response To Climatic Change Must Learn from Experimental Accurate predictions for the response of the eastern deciduous hardwood forest to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulations of Forest Response To Climatic Change Must Learn from Experimental Results Accurate effects from precipitation change or ozone exposure. Multi-factor simulations that ignored experimentally pattern (a 20% increase) was obtained when `lessons-learned' from experimental studies were included

  19. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.; Marquis, D.A.; Ernst, R.L.; Simpson, B.T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM simulators, commonly used in the northeastern United States, were evaluated by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER stands out as the best simulator, no single simulator is clearly superior to the others for all locations within a forest type. In general, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and SILVAH performed best in the northern hardwood (beech-birch-maple) forest type: NE-TWIGS and SILVAH performed best in the Allegheny hardwood (cherry-maple) forest type; SILVAH and OAKSIM performed best in the oak-hickory forest type; and SILVAH was most suitable in the transition hardwood (mixture of northern hardwoods and oaks) forest type. The results give growth and yield model users more information for selecting the simulator most suitable for their particular needs. The results also can be used as a diagnostic tool for growth and yield model development.

  20. Six-year beechnut production in New Hampshire. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leak, W.B.; Graber, R.E.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beechnut production and losses were studied over a 6-year period in 41 northern hardwood stands ranging in age from 10 to 140 years in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Beechnut production increased consistently with stand age or diameter at base height of dominant trees and percentage of basal area composed of beech. Losses to insects, rodents, and birds before the seed reached the ground ranged from 24 to 100 percent; insects caused the greatest losses. Good seed years occurred about every third year.

  1. Closure of logging wounds after 10 years. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.; Miller, G.W.; Schuler, T.M.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closure of logging wounds on 96 sample trees was evaluated after 2, 5, and 10 years for Appalachian hardwood trees in north-central West Virginia. For yellow-poplar, northern red oak, black cherry, and white oak, many small wounds, 1 to 50 square inches in size, closed between 5 and 10 years after logging. For larger wounds, 50 to 200 square inches, it appears that many of these wounds may not close for at least 15 or perhaps 20 years after logging. Recommendations are provided to minimize logging wounds on residual trees in partially cut stands.

  2. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  3. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 219 EFFECTS OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT ON FOREST ECOSYSTEMS Mary Beth Adams, W. Mark Ford, Thomas M. Schuler, and Melissa-term research. In 2008, a natural gas well was drilled on the Fernow and a pipeline and supporting infrastructure constructed. We describe the impacts of natural gas development on the natural resources

  4. Aboveground tree biomass on productive forest land in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, D.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total aboveground woody biomass of trees on forest land that can produce 1.4 cubic meters per hectare per year of industrial wood in Alaska is 1.33 billion metric tons green weight. The estimated energy value of the standing woody biomass is 11.9 x 10 Btu's. Statewide tables of biomass and energy values for softwoods, hardwoods, and species group are presented.

  5. Repeated manual release in a young plantation: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, hardwoods, shrubs, forbs, and grasses. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were released by chain sawing and grubbing competing vegetation around them at different frequencies (0, 2, and 3 grubbings) over a 5-year period. After 5 years, average Douglas-fir stem diameter (measured at 12 inches above mean groundline) of seedlings grubbed at ages 1, 2, and 5 was 0.91 inches, and of seedlings grubbed after the first and fifth growing season was 0.95 inches. Both were significantly larger than counterparts in the control (0.57 inches).

  6. Soil animal communities in holm oak forests: influence of horizon, altitude and year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Soil animal communities in holm oak forests: influence of horizon, altitude and year Nassima-francois.ponge@wanadoo.fr Running title: Soil animals in holm oak forests hal-00498459,version1-7Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "European Journal of Soil Biology 39, 4 (2003) 197-207" DOI : 10.1016/j.ejsobi.2003.06.001 #12

  7. Seedfall, regeneration, and seedling development in group-selection openings. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Abbott, C.S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty-eight openings of 30, 60, and 90 feet in diameter were created in previously unmanaged mixed conifer-hardwood stands on a high-quality site in northern California in 1963. They were an attempt to convert an essentially even-aged forest to an uneven-aged arrangement and comprised the initial cut in the group-selection system. Five conifer and three hardwoods produced 36 seed crops that ranged from very light to heavy during the 10-year study period (1964-1973). Sound seed for four conifer species combined (not sugar pine) for 10 years amounted to the equivalent of more than 302,900 seeds per acre and, in general, did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Shade and roots from bordering trees were major influences on seedling survival and development in the openings. Density of established conifer and hardwood seedlings (at least 4 years old) ranged from 12 per acre for incense-cedar in 90-foot openings to about 9,600 ponderosa pines per acre in 60-foot openings after 10 years, and did not differ significantly among opening sizes. Conifer seedling heights ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 feet after 9 years. Average height of ponderosa pines and hardwoods differed significantly between the largest and smallest opening size with height being best in the largest. Normally multi-stemmed and wide-crowned shrubs were conspicuous by their single spindly stems.

  8. Forested tract-size profile of South Carolina`s NIPF landowners. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information gathered from 3078 permanent forest survey sample plots showed that nearly 0.9 million acres, or 10 percent of the nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) timberland in South Carolina is in forested tracts 10 acres or less. Forested tracts ranging from 11 to 100 acres accounted for the largest proportion of NIPF timberland. Forested tract size varied significantly by NIPF-ownership group. By NIPF-ownership group, the other corporate group recorded the highest average forested tract size of 3,802 acres. Volume of softwood growing stock as significantly higher in the larger tract size categories. Hardwood growing-stock volume per acre was significantly higher in the largest and smallest forested tract-size classes. Softwood growing-stock removals exceeded growth across all forested-parcel categories, whereas hardwood growing-stock growth surpassed hardwood removals in two tract-size classes.

  9. Hardwoods for Woody Energy Crops in the Southeast United States:Two Centuries of Practitioner Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Coleman, Mark [USDA Forest Service

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes opinions from forest industry experts on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the Southeast United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth potential. Experts observe that high productivity rates in southeastern plantations are confined to limited site conditions or require costly inputs. Eastern cottonwood and American sycamore grow quickly on rich bottomlands where they compete with higher-value crops. These species are also prone to pests and disease. Sweetgum is frost hardy, has few pest or disease problems, and grows across a broad range of sites, yet growth rates are relatively low. Eucalypts require few inputs and offer high potential productivity, but are limited by frost to the lower coastal plain and Florida. More time and investment in silviculture, selection, and breeding will be needed to develop hardwoods as competitive biofuel feedstock species. Loblolly pine has robust site requirements, growth rates rivaling hardwoods and lower costs of production. Because of existing stands and know-how, the forestry community considers loblolly pine to be a prime candidate for plantation bioenergy in the Southeast. Further research is required to study naturally regenerated hardwood biomass resources.

  10. Inventory-Measurements Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Inventory-Measurements 289 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Hardwood Inventory or region, or developing statewide hardwood policy guidelines. A physical inventory, while by no means

  11. Table 1. Annual estimates and uncertainty Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 23.5 16,486 3.6 19.0 All Species 26,915 1.3 100.0 86,707 2.0 100.0 Proportion of total sawtimber,000.000acres) Year Timberland Forest land 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Oak/pine Elm

  12. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  14. The Legal Environment for Hardwood Lands in California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    and suburban expansion have served to focus new demands on hardwood lands. Concerns today focus upon (1, residential, and agricultural uses. The use of California's hardwood lands is evolving rapidly stocking or hardwood land use. This inventory of state and Federal statutes was then combined with profiles

  15. Hardwood Biomass Inventories in California1 Norman H. Pillsbury and Michael L. Kirkley2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Hardwood Biomass Inventories in California1 Norman H. Pillsbury and Michael L. Kirkley2 1 Presented as well as several which have been completed in the last three or four years. Inventory studies can areas. Those studies relating to tree inventory are often used for volume table development, while

  16. acetylated hardwood lignins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: analysis the data was converted to raster and the same gird size as the CDFCDF) Hardwoods Rangeland Monitoring Project's map of the riparian areas in...

  17. Northeastern regional timber stumpage prices: 1961-91. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendak, P.E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and regional weighted averages were calculated for timber stumpage prices for the northeastern region. The weighting factor was the timber volume harvested. The regional price series for hardwood sawtimber, softwood sawtimber, hardwood pulpwood, and softwood pulpwood are reported for the 31-year period, 1961 to 1991. Hardwood sawtimber prices increased at the average annual rate of 10.3 percent (nominal), softwood sawtimber at 6.4 percent, hardwood pulpwood at 6.5 percent, and softwood pulpwood at 5.3 percent. Inflation, as measured by the All-commodity, Producer Price Index, averaged 5.7 percent per year over the 31-year period.

  18. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  19. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000,000 ft3 ) 15,552 1.8 3.9 Net volume of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 13,903 2.0 1.6 Annual net Area(1,000,000acres) Year Forest Land Timberland 0 1 2 3 4 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Elm

  20. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of vascular plants from the study area. Appreciation is also given to Mr. H. McEwen of the Soil Conser- vation Service, Livingston, Texas for his assistance in surveying the soils. Dr. P. Harcombe is acknowledged for the use of his unpublished data. Mr...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  1. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Cahaba series. Lob- lolly pine, water oak, black gum, and red maple are the dominant species visible. Interior view of stand 3, Lucy series. The large tree is southern magnolia and the under- story is redbay. Interior view of the bayhead stand (12...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  2. Understory vegetation 3 years after implementing uneven-aged silviculture in a shortleaf pine-oak stand. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, M.G.; Murphy, P.A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of retaining overstory hardwoods on understory vegetation were determined after implementing uneven-aged silviculture using single-tree selection in a shortleaf pin-oak stand (Pinus echinata Mill. and Quercus spp.) in the Ouachita Mountains. Treatments were the following hardwood basal areas (square feet per acre) and spatial arrangement: 0, 15-grouped, 15 scattered, 30-scattered, and untreated control.

  3. ONE-YEAR REPORT ON SB-071 THE FOREST RESTORATION PILOT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program was originally introduced in 2007 legislation as House Bill 1130. This report, required trees to the extent consistent with ecological values and science; o Replant trees in deforested areas forest restoration information; Include an assessment to: o Identify both the existing ecological

  4. The Lyman-? forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciències, torre C5 parell 2, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Pieri, Matthew M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rich, James; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Charlassier, Romain [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Busca, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Carithers, Bill; Cortês, Marina; Ho, Shirley; McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Croft, Rupert [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [University of Utah, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Medolin, Bumbarija, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [104-20 Queens Blvd 17A, Forest Hills, NY 11375 (United States); and others

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-? forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e{sup ??}) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h{sup ?1}Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-? forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ?CDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < ? < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+?) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on ? are asymmetric, with ? = 0 excluded at over 5? confidence level. The value of ? is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-? forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-? forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

  5. 11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projects, these ruminations are a sign that the forest industry in this part of the world sees the future an biofuel conglomerate at the site of the now closed pulpmill in Tofte, just south of the capital Oslo of softwood plantations worldwide, favorable global supply/demand balance for softwood pulp over hardwood pulp

  6. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000,000 ft3 ) 9,792.3 1.7 7.9 -2.0 Dry biomass of live trees 1-inch diameter or larger (1,000 tons) 256.6 7.40 Other hardwoods 3,608.3 2.8 1.50 11,504.9 3.5 5.70 All Species 9,963.7 1.6 6.30 34,736.9 2.0 9, sassafras (Sassafras albidum), American elm (Ulmus americana), and slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) are the top

  7. Mechanical and chemical release in a 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiddler, G.O.; McDonald, P.M.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 12-year-old ponderosa pine plantation on the Tahoe National Forest in northern California was mechanically treated with a Hydro-Ax in an attempt to increase the survival and growth of the planted seedlings. Other release methods were not feasible because the shrubs in the mixed-shrub community (greenleaf manzanita, mountain whitethorn, bittercherry, coffeberry) were too large (3 to 5 feet tall) and well developed. Additional treatments were a chemical treatment, in which 2,4-D was applied to a portion of the study site that had been treated with the Hydro-Ax 1 year previously, and control. Eleven growing seasons after treatment (1993), average pine crown cover was statistically higher in the mechanical treatment (Hydro-Ax alone) than in the control. This was the only significant enhancement of pine growth by the Hydro-Ax alone. Mean pine diameter and height did not differ statistically from the control after 11 years. In contrast, the Hydro-Ax plus herbicide (chemical) treatment statistically increased pine crown cover, height, and diameter over the Hydro-Ax alone and the control. Mean crown cover was 104 percent greater in the treated trees than for pines in the control, height was 45 percent greater, and diameter was 47 percent greater. Relative costs were $225 per acre for the Hydro-Ax alone (mechanical) and $273 per acre for the Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical). Altogether, the most cost-effective treatment was Hydro-Ax + herbicide (chemical).

  8. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  9. Size of clearcut opening affects species composition, growth rate, and stand characteristics. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.E.; Smith, H.C.; Pearcy, J.N.

    1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1950`s and early 1960`s, a series of studies was installed in the central hardwood forest to determine if size of clearcut opening affects the growth rate and species composition of new stands. In 1991, about 30 years after cutting, stand data were collected in 89 openings ranging in size from 0.04 to 1.61 acres. The number of stems per acre increased with opening size; however, the number of shade-tolerant species constituted a greater proportion of the stand in small openings (<0.5 acre), while the porportion of shade-intolerant species increased in larger openings. Results of this study indicate that opening size has a major influence on stand characteristics after about 30 years.

  10. Consequences of landscape patterns on the genetic composition of remnant hardwood stands in the Southeast: A pilot study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godt, Mary Jo, W.; Hamrick, J., L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of a pilot study intended to generate genetic data for a tree species in fragmented hardwood stands. It was anticipated that this data would permit assessment of the feasibility of long-term genetic research for which external funding support could be generated. A second objective was to initiate studies that addressed fundamental questions of how landscape structure, in conjunction with the population dynamics and reproductive characteristics of the tree species, influences genetic structure and long-term viability of hardwood forest stands on the Savannah River Site and in similar southeastern landscapes. Fragmentation of plant habitats can result in small, genetically isolated populations. Spatial isolation and small population size may have several consequences, including reduced reproduction, increased inbreeding and the stochastic loss of genetic variability. Such losses of genetic and genotypic diversity can reduce plant fitness and may diminish population viability. Deleterious genetic effects resulting from small population sizes can be ameliorated by gene flow via pollen and seed into fragmented populations.

  11. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

  12. System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waite, Darrell M; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P; Ceckler, William H

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hyrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

  13. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  14. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to as the Southeastern Evergreen Forest (Braun, 1950). The forest is a mixed woodland dominated by loblolly pine and numerous hardwoods such as southern red oak, post oak, water oak, sweetgum, blackgun, and winged elm. The forest type map of the study sites within... Department at Texas A(M University and the Statistical Analysis System written by Anthony Barr and James Goodnight at North Carolina State University. The Texas A(M IBM 360, Model 65 computer was utilized for all mathematical and statistical analysis...

  15. California Hardwood Rangeland Use and Productivity Changes, and the Economics of Regional Livestock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    California Hardwood Rangeland Use and Productivity Changes, and the Economics of Regional Livestock Production1 Gerald L. Horner James H. Cothern2 Abstract: Changes in the availability, productivity and cost of hardwood rangeland affects the production and location of range-fed livestock. The California Range

  16. Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

  17. Table 1. Annual estimates and uncertainty, and Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in live trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 15,510 1.9 3.6 Net volume of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 14,088 2.0/beech/birch Elm/ash/cottonwood Oak/pine Aspen / birch White/red pine Forest land (1,000,000 acres

  18. FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY FORESTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    FORESTRY United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Area #12;Page 2 D R AFT BACKGROUND AND MISSION The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry was estab- lished in October. The Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry responds to urban and community forestry information needs

  19. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

  20. 14 Warnell School of Forest Resources--UGA Alumni Association PublicationFall/Winter 2004 wenty years ago this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    't build themselves. Even now construction on the house continues as they fine- tune by expanding says. Teskey soon discovered that despite its wide appeal in the forest industry, not much was known of genetics, pollution, ozone and climate change. "I got interested in ozone because the Southeast is a hot

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  13. Aboveground production in southeastern floodplain forests: A test of the subsidy-stress hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Megonigal, J.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)]|[Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Conner, W.H. [Baruch Forest Science Inst., Georgetown, SC (United States); Kroeger, S. [and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodically flooded forests may have higher rates of aboveground net primary production than upland forests and near-continuously flooded forests, but the benefits of periodic inputs of nutrients and water may be diminished by stresses associated with anaerobic soils or drought. Groundwater table depths were measured and aboveground productivity in floodplain forests of South Carolina and Louisiana. Paired plots on locally dry, intermediate, and wet topographic positions across three hydrologic transects encompassed upland hardwood, bottomland hardwood, and cypress swamp forests. Aboveground net primary production (NPP) on wet plots was significantly lower than on intermediate and dry plots (P {le} 0.02). There was no significant difference between intermediate and dry plots. In addition, aboveground NPP on intermediate plots was not significantly different from 22 temperate upland forests in the literature. Combining data with data from the literature, aboveground NPP on wet plots was negatively related to MWD. On sites with evidence of hydrologic disturbance the slope of this line was 5 times greater. Conditions of periodic flooding and flowing water do not often lead to high rates of productivity compared with upland forests. However, extensive flooding is nearly always a significant stress on forest productivity, particularly when the flooding regime has been recently perturbed through levee construction or impoundment. The data support a more complex interaction between subsidy and stress factors. 79 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

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  15. Crop-tree release thinning in 65-year-old commercial cherry-maple stands (5-year results). Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.; Miller, G.W.; Lamson, N.I.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes a crop-tree release plan which was applied to a 65-year-old cherry-maple stand in north central West Virginia. Criteria were developed for selecting crop trees for high quality sawtimber and veneer products. Five-year stand growth, mortality, and ingrowth using basal areas, volume, relative density, and number of trees were discussed for the treatments.

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  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 2801

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733 280192

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMaythe Interior U.S.3 YEAR855733

  7. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working and.

  8. Six-year growth of Eucalyptus saligna plantings as affected by nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitesell, C.D.; DeBell, D.S.; Schubert, T.H.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growth responses of Eucalyptus saligna to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilizers were assessed in bioenergy plantations on abandoned sugarcane land in Hawaii. Fertilizers were applied three times (0.6, and 15 months after planting) in a factorial design with four dosages each of N(0, 25, 50, and 75 g urea per tree) and P(0, 30, 60, and 90 g triple superphosphate per tree). Phosphorus and the N x P interaction had little effect on tree growth. Effects of N, however, were dramatic during the first year, and benefits were sustained through 6 years. Effects of N on height growth and diameter growth dropped markedly during the third year and thereafter. Bioenergy plantations of E. saligna established on similar sites and soils will benefit from high dosages of N fertilizer and presumably from repeated applications.

  9. Utilization and composition of forage in a longleaf-pine-hardwood forest of Newton County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William B

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bluostem from s'tc 1& open& of forage clipped to simlulate grating as observed on site A Data on little bluestem from site B, intermediate ~ of fox age olipped to sgsulate graain" as observed on s" te B ~ ~ ~ o ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Data... on little bluestam from site C, intermediate& of forage clipped to simulate grasing as observed on site ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Cl IV ~ Vie Data on little bluestem fro= site D& heavy& of forage clipped to s+ulate grasping as observed on site...

  10. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    .6 Growth of planted mature tree species from Spring 2004 to Fall 2005. Bars on columns represent one SE, and different letters indicated differences at P ridges..., and sloughs with relative elevations??????????????... 51 4.2 Survival of planted pioneer tree species on ridges, mounds and pools, and flats from Spring 2004 to Fall 2005. Bars on columns represent one SE, and different letters indicate...

  11. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 14,104 2.0 3.1 Annual net growth of growing- stock trees (1,000 ft3 2000 2010 Area(1,000,000acres) Year Large Medium Small 0 1 2 3 4 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Elm

  12. Sixty years of change in tree numbers and basal area in central Utah Aspen stands. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueggler, W.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plots established in 1913-14 in three separate aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) stands on the Wasatch Plateau in central Utah were inventoried at irregular intervals over a 64-year period. The data indicate that (1) stem numbers declined continuously as the stands aged; (2) an inverse relationship existed between aspen site quality and stem numbers in middle age stands; (3) basal area peaked probably sometime around 80 years of age and declined appreciably by age 100; (4) greatest subsequent mortality in middle age stands was those stems in diameter size classes smaller than the mode; and (5) stands thinned between the ages of 40 and 70 contained more but smaller stems at maturity and greater total basal area than those not thinned.

  13. Shrews in Managed Northern Hardwood Stands in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrews in Managed Northern Hardwood Stands in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia W. Mark Ford 26287 Chris A. Dobony, Division of Forestry, West Virginia University, Box 6125, Morgantown, WV 26506 John W. Edwards, Division of Forestry, West Virginia University, Box 6125, Morgantown, WV 26506

  14. Financial and economic performance of long-rotation hardwood plantation investments in Queensland, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venn, Tyron

    -economically justified in most Hardwood Regions, even though financial returns from timber production may be negative. D 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Timber plantations; Ecosystem services; Financial communication).1 Forestry prospectus companies and the Queensland Depart- ment of Primary Industries (DPI

  15. Vegetative trends in a young conifer plantation after 10 years of grazing by sheep. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An 11-year-old ponderosa pine (pinus pronderosa) plantation in northern California was grazed annually in summer by 600-1150 dry (nonlactating) ewes in an attempt to reduce competing vegetation and increase growth of pine seedlings. The sheep also provided an opportunity to evaluate density and developmental trends in the pine, shrub, grass, thistle, and forb components of the plant community. A manual release and a deer-only treatment provided contrast to the effects of grazing by sheep. In general, stem diameter and foliar cover of ponderosa pines, rarely damaged by sheep or deer, were significantly greater in manually grubbed areas, but only after 8 years. Pines in grazed areas never differed significantly in height, stem diameter, or foliar cover from control areas. Density, cover, and height of deerbrush (Ceanothus integerrimus) were generally fewer and lower it grubbed and grazed, but grass and bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare) were larger and more numerous in these treatments. Forb cover was highest in the grubbed treatment.

  16. Certified Tropical Hardwood Product Markets in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seminars in Latin America 2005 ·Peru ·Brazil ·Columbia ·Ecuador ·Costa Rica ·Panama ·Nicaragua ·Bolivia Products Marketing Program Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural-cutting practices in North America. Photo: Richard Vlosky Photo: Geo-Images Univ. Cal. Berkeley #12;Generalized

  17. Stand characteristics of 65-year-old planted and naturally regenerated stands near Sequim, Washington. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Anderson, H.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree numbers, height, and volume were determined in six 63- to 66-year-old plantations of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsunga menziesii) (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii in northwest Washington. These stands resulted from the first extensive plantings of this species in the Pacific Northwest. Data from 0.25-acre plots in these plantations were compared to those from matched plots in adjacent, naturally regenerated stands with the same history of logging, wildfire, and absence of further siviculture after regeneration. Planting resulted in well-stocked Douglas-fir stands with volunteers of other tree species. Natural seeding resulted in similarly stocked stands of western hemlock (Tsunga heterophylla) (Raf.) (Sarg.) with Douglas-fir in the dominant crown class.

  18. -Changes in two Minnesota forests during 14 years following catastrophic windthrow -833 Journal of Vegetation Science 11: 833-840, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    mortality; Wind disturbance. Nomenclature: Kartesz (1994). Introduction Windstorms is one of the most 1988). On July 3, 1983, straight-line winds caused sub- stantial mortality in a number of forests tree damage and mortality following a catastrophic windthrow in permanent plots in an oak forest

  19. Tongass National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two long-term timber contracts in the Tongass National Forest require private companies to harvest prescribed amounts of timber within agreed upon time frames during the 50-year contract life. This report has reviewed the accuracy of Forest Service figures for the volume of timber actually harvested under the two contracts, timber deleted from the private companies' operating plans, and backlogged timber. The author was unable to verify the first two figures because the Forest Service had not complied with all of its internal controls and because documentation and records were incomplete. The author was able to verify the figure for backlogged timber. While the Forest Service has tried to better account for timber prepared for harvesting through improved internal controls, this report believes additional actions are needed to ensure that forest supervisors comply with the internal controls for documenting harvested timber volumes and the information needed to support and report changes in timber sale activities is accurately reported.

  20. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  1. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  2. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  3. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages

  4. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages Sustainability has become an essential

  5. Great price spike of '93: An analysis of lumber and stumpage prices in the pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes prices for red alder hardwood logs which are published and analyzed for reliability consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions regarding land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the past 11 years.

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  7. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  8. The influence of different site preparation methods on natural regeneration of bottomland hardwoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrissey, Jon Terry

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as sweetgum and black 1 t (Rh(. ' P d 1. L. ) h' h P d g t tl ly W dl of parent tree size (Kellison et al. 1981). The size of clearcut openings will often determine the species regen- erated and will have an effect on growth. Circular openings of 1/2-acre... cutting is a method of harvest-regeneration that theoreti- cally favors reproduction of wind-disseminated seed species. This regener- ation method appears unsuitable for southern hardwood management because seed trees have a minimal influence...

  9. THE HARDWOOD ECOSYSTEM EXPERIMENT: GOALS, DESIGN, AND IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the nine study areas is approximately 80 ha in size. Over the next 100 years, the impacts of even Region (Dalgleish and Swihart 2012). Acorns are readily available and rich in energy Lafayette, IN 47907; Research Analyst (CJM), Southwick Associates, PO Box 207, New Market, IN 47965. RAK

  10. An Exploratory Study of U.S. Home Builder and Architect Use of Tropical Hardwoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developing countries. Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Central Western Africa are the three main regions Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State

  11. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  12. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 341 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of time in cold storage decreases post-planting root growth and percent bud break, and increases stem cold storage to investigate the hypothesis that seedlings held over the summer months in cold storage decreased with increased time in cold storage. These results suggest that although reduced height growth can

  13. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 665 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    promote oak recruitment and impede the development of red maple competition. Brose and Van Lear (1998 as a single, high-intensity burn (Loftis 1990, Brose and Van Lear 1998). OBJECTIVE The objective of this study

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 270 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    settlement (Abrams 1992, Brose and others 2001, Nowacki and Abrams 2008). Due to the alteration of historical advance reproduction (Smith 1993, Lorimer and others 1994, Brose and others 1999). Underplanting can

  15. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 347 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exceeds seedling demand (Paramasivam and Alva 1997, Landis and van Steenis 2004, U.S. Environmental uptake by matching N-release patterns from CRF prills (plastic-coated synthetic granules) with plant N demand REDUCED RATES OF CONTROLLED-RELEASE FERTILIZER LOWER POTENTIAL NITROGEN LEACHING FROM A WISCONSIN

  16. Survival, growth, and juvenile-mature correlations in a West Virginia sugar maple provenance test 25 years after establishment. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.

    1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Survival, total height, diameter at breast height (d.b.h.), and stem quality of sugar maple trees of different provenances were compared 25 years after establishment in north-central West Virginia. Provenances were from Michigan, Minnesota, West Virginia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, and Quebec, Canada. There were significant differences between provenances for all traits except stem quality. By provenance, total tree height ranged from about 49 to 37 feet; d.b.h. from 6.7 to 3.6 inches; and survival from 100 to 15 percent. The predictability of total tree height 25 years after establishment based on mean provenance height at age 2, 6, 10, and 15 years is discussed.

  17. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  18. Thinking about efficiency of resource use in forests Dan Binkleya,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binkley, Dan

    of forests can be described as a function of the supply of resources, the proportion of resources captured not represent those that occur at the scale of forests and years, owing to more complete biomass accounting of biomass partitioning to optimize resource capture and use. Patterns in the growth of forests, across

  19. Simulating the Future Forested Landscapes of the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University June 10, 2002 #12;Technical Assistance Jonathan Brooks, GIS #12;Technical Assistance · Marie 2500000 3000000 3500000 5 20 50 80 100 Years Acres Forest Industry - Losses to Urban & Rural Resid. Forest Industry - Remaining Wildland Forest Non-Industrial Private - Losses to Urban & Rural Resid. Non

  20. SCIENCE AND FOREST CONCESSIONS Bastiaan Louman, Fernando Carrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUMMARY Can forest concessions be a means to conserve natural state forests? Bolivia has 10 years availability of information, however, outside assistance has been necessary. Bolivia has the longest history of concessions in Bolivia, Guatemala and Peru include the costs of forest management, slow and difficult

  1. Ten-year development of douglas-fir and associated vegetation after different site preparation on coast range clearcuts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.I.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-years results are presented from an operational-sized, replicated experiment in the Coast Ranges of Oregon to determine the effects of six site-preparation methods on the subsequent survival and growth of Douglas-fir and associated species. Site preparation and seedling protection with plastic mesh tubing significantly enhanced tree development. Site preparation also produced large differences in frequency and cover of associated species but only minor differences in the species represented.

  2. 20 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 U.S. Forest Service Helps Fund Harvard Forest Green Energy Project in a recent U.S. surge in the use of this form of green energy. Since 2005, the Forest Service's woody biomass more than $1 million per year. As we look toward America's future of green energy and energy

  3. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  4. Remote sensing and forest damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, N.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

  5. Survival and growth of white ash families and provenances 15 years after establishment in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The survival, growth, and stem form of 45 white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) families nested within 22 provenances were evaluated 15 years after establishment in North Central West Virginia. Geographic family origins encompassed a wide area in the eastern and central United States, including locations from Maine in the North to Mississippi in the South to Nebraska in the West. Significant differences were identified among provenances for survival, stem form, total height. Latitude was a significant indicator of provenance performane with performance declining north and south of the plantation latitude.

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  7. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  8. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  9. Survival, growth, and target canker infection of black walnut families 15 years after establishment in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The survival, growth, and rate of target canker infection of 34 black walnut (Juglans nigra) families were evaluated 15 years after establishment in north-central West Virginia. The progenies originated at locations in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. There were significant differences between families in survival, incidence of target-canker infection, total height, and diameter at breast height. The North Carolina and Tennessee sources were less suitable for the growing conditions of the test site, local and slightly more northern sources seem more suitable. Near the northern extremity of the range of black walnut, maintaining a viable native population of this species and using local seed sources in artificial regeneration activities are recommended.

  10. Study of the Neutralization and Stabilization of a Mixed Hardwood Bio-Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moens, L.; Black, S. K.; Myers, M. D.; Czernik, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast-pyrolysis bio-oil that is currently produced from lignocellulosic biomass in demonstration and semicommercial plants requires significant modification to become an acceptable transportation fuel. The high acidity and chemical instability of bio-oils render them incompatible with existing petroleum refinery processes that produce gasoline and diesel fuels. To facilitate the use of bio-oil as a feedstock in a traditional refinery infrastructure, there is considerable interest in upgrading bio-oils through chemical pathways that include converting the carboxylic acids and reactive carbonyl compounds into esters and acetals using low-cost alcohols. In this article, we discuss our observations with different approaches to esterification and etherification chemistry using a crude bio-oil derived from mixed hardwoods. The high water content in crude bio-oils (ca. 20?30%) creates equilibrium limitations in the condensation reactions that hamper the upgrading process in that the neutralization and stabilization steps cannot easily be driven to completion. The lowest acid number that we were able to obtain without causing serious degradation of the flow properties of the bio-oil had a total acid number of about 20, a value that is still too high for use in a traditional petroleum refinery.

  11. Ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret fertilizers increase volume growth of 57-year-old douglas-fir trees within a gradient of nitrogen deficiency. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Reukema, D.L.; Hazard, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nitrogen-deficient plantation in southwest Washington, the authors (1) compared effects of 224 kg N/ha as ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret on volume growth of dominant and codominant Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco); (2) determined how 8-year response of these trees to fertilization was related to their distance from a strip of the plantation interplanted with nitrogen-fixing red alder (alnus rubra Bong.); and (3) observed effects of biuret on understory vegetation. On both sides of the strip centerline, the authors grouped subject trees into 30 plots of 4 trees each, based on slope position and distance from alder. The authors randomly assigned three fertilizers and a control within each plot. They analyzed separately data from east and west of the mixed stand certerline. Initial volume differed greatly among the 120 trees on each side, so they used covariance analysis to adjust observed treatment means. Adjusted mean volume growth was increased (p equal to or less than 0.10) by 22 to 28 percent on the east side and by 11 to 14 percent on the west side, with no significant difference in response to the three fertilizers.

  12. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  13. Statewide Forest Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

  14. Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  15. Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Collaboration Case Study #12;Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  16. Forest Inventory and Analysis Research The Nation's Forest Census

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census The U.S. Forest Inventory Monitoring Symposium November 4, 2008 #12;Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census FIA Program Perspectives · Only comprehensive forest inventory for each of the 50 States, Puerto

  17. Will a Forest Habitat Network in the Scottish Highlands be both feasible and truly sustainable? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Vanessa

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest Habitat Network (FHN) concept has emerged in recent years as a strategy to reverse processes of deforestation and ecosystem degradation by connecting existing woodland habitat and increasing forest area. This thesis presents a wide...

  18. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  19. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  20. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  1. Author's personal copy Using the Landsat record to detect forest-cover changes during and after the collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    forest-cover changes in the temperate zone of European Russia between 1985 and 2010 in 5-year increments that Russia's temperate forests underwent substantial changes during the observed period. Overall, forested mitigating climate change (Bonan, 2008; FAO, 2010). Remote sensing has played a key role in monitoring forest

  2. Selecting a Consulting Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

  3. Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valley, near the spectacular Cornish coast Outdoor delights on your doorstep Come to the heart of Britain, rivers and streams, dramatic mountains, deep valleys and peaceful forest glades - they're all of exciting news, events, information and a great competition. Happy reading! In this issue of Forest Life we

  4. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Working Party 1.01.08 ­ Ecology and Silviculture of Spruces; co-hosted by the EU Interreg Project Forest of Alberta, Canada "Ecology and Silviculture of White Spruce in the Canadian Boreal Forest for Multiple Forest Integrity; Why Spruce is a Good Option" Kristina Blennow, SLU, Sweden "Perception of Risks

  5. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lead to a more efficient model to achieve and document high levels of forest stewardship by Oregon comes from well-managed forests. For wood products companies that do business with the likes of Home by the State of Oregon to be less competent or protective of forest resources than those landowners who become

  6. Forest ecology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

  7. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  8. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  9. Spatial and temporal patterns of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial and temporal patterns of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000 carbon emission from forest fires in China is about 11.31 Tg per year, ranging from a minimum level of 8 of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05313, doi:10

  10. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  11. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Implications and challenges of decentralized China's collective forest management Heng Sok (National Forest:00-10:30 Moderator: Heng Sok (Forestry Administration, Cambodia) Session: Forests and the market for timber products

  12. Gray squirrel usage of hardwood ravines within pine plantations in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McElfresh, Robert William

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;of capture points falling in each type ~Pa e 13 2. Stand type map of plot 2 showing the absolute and relative area covered by each forest type, squirrel capture points, and the relative number of capture points falling in each type 3. Stand type map... morning beginning about two hours after sunrise. Redwood box traps baited with freshly broken pecans were found to work very well in capturing squirrels. The easiest way to handle an animal was to slip a mesh bait bag {Nylon Net Co. , Memphis) over...

  13. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment A Foundation for Strategic Discussion and Private Forestry Redesign Initiative 2 National Guidance for Statewide Forest Resource Assessments 4 The Colorado Statewide Resource Assessment and all appendices are available online on the Colorado State Forest

  14. Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy 2007 ­ 2012 November 2006 #12;Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOOTHILLS MODEL FOREST Business Strategy for April 2007 to March 2012 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................... 4 2.4 Foothills Model Forest Values

  15. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  16. Opportunities for Future Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .V.Birnie * Forest Research 1 #12;This document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the ISO 9001

  17. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  18. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  19. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 14 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,728 trees sampled in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  20. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  1. Certification as a new private global forest governance system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : the first estimations of deforestation rates expressed in "football fields per minute", traditional forest released into the atmosphere every year are caused by deforestation, and the deforestation rate is highest

  2. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  3. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    1976 . Disturbance during logging stimulates re- generation of koa. USDA Forest Servo Res. Note PSW-306 and distribution of Acacia koa re- genera tion after logging were studied on a 500-acre (202-ha) tract of koa forest heavily infested with Passi- /1ora mol/issima vines on the island of Hawaii. Koa seedling density

  4. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  5. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  7. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  8. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 153 ARE NITRATE EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO NITROGEN FLUXES IN DECOMPOSING FOLIAR LITTER? Kathryn B. Piatek and Mary may contribute to N exports. We tested the hypothesis that nitrate exports in stream water are positively related to the N dynamics in foliar litter, with generally low exports during N immobilization

  9. Short-term response of herpetofauna to timber harvesting in conjuction with streamside-management zones in seasonally-flooded bottomland-hardwood forests of southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Daniel Hughes

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Clearcutting increased abundance of 3 species and had no impact on I I species. No species decreased in abundance in SMZs of either selection-cut or clearcut plots. Two species increased in abundance in SMZs implemented within selection-cuts. Two species...

  10. Impact of forested fallows on fertility and mercury content in soils of the Tapajs River region, Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    associated with a lower fertility recovery after 15years. · Repeated burnings seriously impaired edaphic for short cycle crop cultivation. However, small scale farmers tend nowadays to re-burn secondary forests km2 of primary forest had al- ready been converted to pastures, fields, secondary forest and other

  11. Research Note NRS-136 This publication provides an overview of forest resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of live trees (1,000 ft 3/ year) 619,902 2.0 -1.1 Annual mortality of live trees (1,000 ft 3 /year) 296/beech/birch Elm/ash/cottonwood Aspen/birch Area of Forest Land (1,000 acres) Forest-typeGroup Large Medium Small

  12. 5 Putting Science into Action on Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Putting Science into Action on Forest Service Lands William M. Block u.s. Forest Service, Rocky into Action on Forest Service Lands t':: Research and Development, National Forest Systems, State and Private Forestry, International Programs

  13. Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

  14. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University; Zak, Donald R. [University of Michigan; Kubiske, Mark E. [USDA Forest Service; Pregitzer, Kurt S. [University of Idaho

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to “progressive N limitation”. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

  15. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    and increasing deadwood, increasing recreation activities in forests, climate change, ... ) need for multi and Merlo, 2005 - Mediterranean Forest Values:37-68 133 ha-1 (overall average value in 18 Mediterranean

  16. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  17. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

  18. Mensuration protocol National Forest Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NFI: Mensuration protocol for the National Forest Inventory June 2010 E. D. Mackie, R. W. Matthews and A. Brewer1 FR Biometrics Division 1 IFOS, Forestry Commission #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI or square boundary. In the case of a section 2 #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI): Mensuration Protocol

  19. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  20. ForestDevelopment Community Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    in Africa as a basis for developing applied integrated, multiple use forest resource management for timber and non-timber forest products from these systems, and for forest rehabilitation af- ter degradation from to Fusarium circinatum. Forestry companies worldwide have tried to hybridise P. radiata with other Pinus

  1. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  2. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  3. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS; Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  4. atlantic forest state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 credits FORT 110* Forest Inventories (3) FORT 140 Forest Surveying (3) FORT 160 to Forestry 1 FORT 105 - Forest Mensuration* 3 FORT 110 - Forest...

  5. Forest Landscape Description and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Forest Landscape Description and Inventories a basis for landplanning and design Pacific Southwest landscape description and inventories ­ a basis for land plan- ning and design. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Illustrates their application in two inventories made to aid managers and landscape architects in planning

  6. Extension Note Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based harvesting systems led to the development of the "Site Degradation Guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region to validate soil disturbance guidelines, were lacking at that time. Early attempts had been made to assess, and to measure tree growth over the longer term as an indication of site productivity. The first trial

  7. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    speeches 1305-1310 Welcome by Chair of IUFRO Group 1.01.08 Ulf Johansson, SLU, Sweden 1310-1325 Opening-1440 The challenges of sustainability delivering multiple ecosystem services in a private sector commercial forest of Edinburgh, UK 1600-1620 Early thinning of energy wood in dense mixtures of Norway spruce and birch

  8. What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information about forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information is the information gathered? Data for the National Forest Inventory is being collected using ground surveys, aerial representative picture of the state of Britain's forests and woodland. National Forest Inventory #12;Has

  9. FCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 Forest operations and red squirrels in Scottish forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts on red squirrels. The survey, forest design and operational planning practices set outFCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 1 Forest operations Guidance Note: Forest operations and wildlife in Scottish forests. This note sets out further advice on how

  10. Old growth in northwestern California National Forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, D.; Warbington, R.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates old-growth forest area and summarizes stand characteristics of old growth in northwestern California National Forests by forest type. Old-growth definitions for each forest type are used.

  11. age ten-year retrospective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Koch; Now Koch 148 Ten years after wildfires: How does varying tree mortality impact fire hazard and forest resiliency? Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 30...

  12. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  13. Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment Diana H hydrogen were monitored every 24 minutes for three years (1996­1998) above Harvard Forest, Massachusetts. These observations suggest that automobiles are the major anthropogenic source of atmospheric hydrogen

  14. A Vision of the Future Michigan State University undertakes forest management on its properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2-year-old aspen regeneration in a clearcut, (3) sugar maple seedlings wait for release, (4) high slowly. The first surveyors found that most of Neebish Island was covered by aspen-birch forests around. The forests are still primarily dominated by aspen and bir

  15. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  16. The determination of volumes of forage produced after one year of protection in pine-hardwood stand as compared with production under current grazing practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Robert L

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    la yaALal Alftllmeae ef the teyCtoaeaes for %he legree ef WLICRL Ol OOIOOOO SR 3INNRI?AIIQR OF VOKiWSL' OF FDRNIX PR)IXICNI k7%%t SKI ~ IIF ~XCe nI Fhe. NIIIneee 8Fuu W CeIFueu VZm l%8MSIOR ININI CIIIBm' IIIIAXXSS 1%NTICWI kpyrove4 e? to style... of enclosure. ~ ~ 39 ywg EWRRNQRt'LOW Oy %8AN88 & RNARI WAWCgy Atm CSI %MA% Oy PSOfNH0% RR ygyL4IWRA}0$ SgLIO kg 00?FAIRD WS% y3050t8lgg ggjSR ~ IQL44$50 ygN7ylggg Isaac ss4 ttabor sero fw4sasatsl astaral rsssareee of ihe 3aet yosao ttabor Coasts lssg...

  17. The determination of volumes of forage produced after one year of protection in pine-hardwood stand as compared with production under current grazing practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Robert L

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iosgloaf sniola gas?Log Ln nedina to hoary she&? 41 ~ brseasodgo, ~mwt~h g/~gQLNih, Figaro 17, was infrequent La the aron? the plants wssa proninent dae to their toll wyridht growth habits. i eoapkote list of plants growiag oa the plots La Ihe stsdr... 16. lswgleaf sniola ~wing in megius to hearr oha4es in iinber plo4 nnnber 6. . . . . . . . . . . . , , . . . . . 8f 19. Rroonsegge ass infrsouent but individual plants were e. nspieuous within the one f&urth acre timber plots ~ ~ 26 18. Tinber plot...

  18. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  19. Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel Revised Fourth Edition Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Research Program Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research Program #12;Kelp Forests of the Santa

  20. Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

  1. Forest density mapping in the lower 48 states: A regression procedure. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) research unit conducted a project to map the distribution of forest lands for the entire United States. Forest types and forest densities were mapped, and a new forest type group map for the country was produced (Powell and others, in press; Zhu and Evans 1992). The project supported the 1993 Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Update program, by which the Forest Service was required to provide statistics on current forest land and rangeland conditions.

  2. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Paper Company Sara Kendall Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn Professor

  3. Purdue extension Hardwood Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees tend to be hollow, but this is beneficial as shelter for wildlife. Wood Color and Texture finish. As a result, it has had some unique uses such as wooden clothes pins as well as brush backs

  4. Using climate policies and carbon markets to save tropical forests : the case of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpels, Marisa (Marisa Carina)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s, advocates for forest conservation thought that climate change could provide a lever to motivate developing countries to reduce deforestation. Fifteen years after the first climate change ...

  5. Forest fire management in Portugal : developing system insights through models of social and physical dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Ross D. (Ross Daniel)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing forest fires is a serious national problem in Portugal. Burned area has increased steadily over the past several decades, with particularly devastating years in 2003 and 2005. Ignitions also spike dramatically in ...

  6. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's ...

  7. In this issue: Congratulations Mike Adams: 2009 Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    of the finest examples of sustainable, multiple- use forest management in Florida, earning Mr. Adams the title-use management objectives for the property incorporate timber, wildlife habitat, soil and water conservation St. Johns County in 1989. Land management practices started that year with removal and control

  8. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Environmental Pre-Law provides a solid undergraduate-use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Specialization: Environmental Pre-Law Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest Resources

  9. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  10. 24 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Global pellet market to reach $9 billion by 2020 By Sue Retka Schill 24. The global market for pellets is expected to double in the next seven years, growing from a $4 DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 commitment to pellets to provide

  11. FAOFAO''s Support tos Support to National Forest Monitoring and AssessmentNational Forest Monitoring and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and trees outside forests Uses and users of resources Improving information management systems Long term Qualityinformation National policy making Sustainable resources management CapacityBuilding Support to sectoral (nfp agents Health condition Stem quality Commercial height Total height Year since cut Diameter height Dbh

  12. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  13. The Future of Forest Certification in A Roundtable Discussion by Forest Stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and respect people's rights. · Multiple forest certification upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services they provide. Rather than remain mired in win

  14. For Immediate Release: January 30, 2008 Sustaining Virginia's Forests through Forest Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and products processed in ways that sustain forest health, minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and the people and communities that depend upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services

  15. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Element of SFM Reference number Good forestry practice requirement Reference #12;UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;ii Forests

  16. Guidelines on local European forest energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    fellings, ... and · Biodisel, bioethanol and oil from crops (forest) · cutting 20% of the GHS gas emissions

  17. Forests and The Texas Economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in tree mortality caused by pine bark beetles and the con version of timberland to other uses. The effects of pro jected land use changes are illustrated in Figure 10-1. The future of the forest industry sector depends on the sol ution to timber growth... organizations interested in forestry in Texas. As an indication of the economic and social importance of forests, both the public and private sectors are well represented. The forest products industry, an important component of the forestry sector...

  18. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  19. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  20. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest...

  1. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 29 JUNE 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2277 Primary forest cover loss in Indonesia over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    in Indonesia over 2000­2012 Belinda Arunarwati Margono1,2 *, Peter V. Potapov1 , Svetlana Turubanova1 , Fred and temporal trends of primary forest clearing in Indonesia. Here we report a spatially and temporally explicit on average by 47,600 ha per year. By 2012, annual primary forest loss in Indonesia was estimated to be higher

  2. Effect of Forest Site Preparation and Livestock Grazing on Stormflow and Water Quality in the South East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, T. K.; Blackburn, W. H.; Weichert, A. T.; Dobrowolski, J. P.

    /or forest management practices that will maintain a productive forest environment and minimize off-site water quality impacts. It is imperative that if Texas in the next 30 years is: 1) to help meet the timber product demand that is projected to be placed...

  3. Effect of Forest Site Preparation and Livestock Grazing on Stormflow and Water Quality in the South East 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, T. K.; Blackburn, W. H.; Weichert, A. T.; Dobrowolski, J. P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /or forest management practices that will maintain a productive forest environment and minimize off-site water quality impacts. It is imperative that if Texas in the next 30 years is: 1) to help meet the timber product demand that is projected to be placed...

  4. Special Issue: High Elevation Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . They yield raw material for rustic homes, exquisite paneling, and life-giving energy. They capture, purify gathering, hunting, and places to wow visitors. (For the purpose of this report, high country forests

  5. Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has expanded dramatically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has or tree spacing is adequate to allow sufficient room for equipment operation. b. Carefully review

  6. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  7. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Nancy Marek Project Manager Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn

  8. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Pennsylvania John Gordon InterForest Rose Harvey The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology and Director

  9. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme The Forestland Group Ralph Grossi American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home

  10. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling Chadwick Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest

  11. Department of Forest Resourcesand Environmental Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    , MF, MNR, and PhD). Its research areas include Forest Ecology and Management, Forest Biometrics on a perception-based score plus a citation-and-publication-based composite index. The National Research Council

  12. KELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grazing Rates on Kelp Assimilation of Kelp-derived Organic Carbon in Kelp Forest Food Webs | 33 IntertidalKELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS: Ecosystem-Level Effects of Predator Depletion and Recovery

  13. National Forest Inventory Description of attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory Description of attributes Woodland_S: Woodland source (a) NFI base map have been mapped in accordance with the NFI mapping rules. National Forest Inventory #12;(f) 2010 AP

  14. Forests and biodiversity UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL001/FC-GB(MMJ)/JTCP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal

  15. Relating forest biomass to SAR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeToan, T.; Beaudoin, A. (Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements CNRS- Univ. Paul Sabatier Toulouse (FR)); Riom, J.; Guyon, D. (Lab. de Bioclimatologie INRA, Bordeaux (FR))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experiment defined to demonstrate the use of radar to retrieve forest biomass. The SAR data, after calibration, has been analyzed together with ground data collected on forest stands from young stage (8 yrs) to nature stage (46 yrs). The dynamic range of the radar backscatter intensity from forest was found maximum at P-band and decreases with increasing frequencies. Also, cross-polarized backscatter intensity yields the best sensitivities to variations of forest biomass. L-band data confirmed past results on good correlation with forest parameters. The most striking observation has been the strong correlation of P-band backscatter intensity to forest biomass. In order to develop algorithms to infer forest biomass from spaceborne SAR's, the experimental results will be compared with observations on other forest ecosystems and will be interpreted by theoretical modeling.

  16. Forest plantations in the Midsouth, USA. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plantation forestry is one means of controlling the temporal and spatial aspects of stand regeneration after harvest. Intensive plantation forestry can ultimately reduce harvesting pressure and disturbance on natural stands and and stands intended to be set aside for esthetics, recreation, or watershed protection. Reported here is the status of forest plantations in the Midsouth States. It is important to know if plantations are meeting their fullest potential and what shortcomings, if any, need to be addressed. Information gathered includes plantation area, forest type, ownership, volume, site class, and stockings. Additionally, comparisons were made to see if there was a difference between plantation and natural-stand volumes.

  17. Assessing Urban Forest Effects and Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Scranton area. The Authors DAVID J. NOWAK is a research forester and project leader, ROBERT E. HOEHN III

  18. Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations and Their Impacts on The Private College of Forest Resources continued its Denman Forestry Issues Series on May 30, 2001. Alumni landowners. Policy analysts and speakers representing the Washington Farm Forestry Assn., Washington Forest

  19. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and climate change #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal of SFM Reference number #12;Forests and climate change Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry

  20. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July ­ September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

  1. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 3, October - December 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 ISSN: 2218-8045 October - December 2010 Editor-in-Chief Dr. Abid

  2. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April ­ June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April ­ June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

  3. Global integration for metals, mining and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as coils, bars and sheets. · Forest and paper companies own or lease forests, cut timber, process woodBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial commitment by IBM Global Business Services to provide analysis and viewpoints that help companies realize

  4. North Dakota`s forest resources, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, D.E.; Piva, R.J.; Kingsley, N.P.; Harsel, R.A.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third inventory of North Dakota`s forests reports 44.1 million acres of land, of which 673 thousand acres are forested. This paper contains detailed tables related to area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership of North Dakota`s forests.

  5. Forests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL006/FC-GB(MMJ)/JCTP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number LegalForests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements

  6. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and scientific experts in sustainable forest management. Our scientists, mathematical modellers and survey staff and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management and land-use management, whose work focuses on the use of applied science for tree, woodland and forest

  7. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's FinancialForest Products Forest Products

  8. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America B. D. Amiro,1 A. G, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a standreplacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most

  9. Forest Fuels ReductionForest Fuels Reduction Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    the initial fuels reduction treatments leave the site with regard to long-term forest vegetation and soil are the productivity and cost rates for alternative choices of equipment for mechanical fuels reduction; what reduction operations for existing markets and new markets? (eg. biomass energy) Research Rationale

  10. Effects of seed production, seedbed condition, and overstory basal area on the establishment of shortleaf pine seedlings in the Ouachita Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, M.G.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First-year seedlings establishment was determined across an array of seedbed conditions and overstory basal areas in stands of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) and hardwoods following the initial harvest implementing uneven-aged silviculture. Results indicate the importance of regulating overstory basal area in the application of uneven-aged silviculture in stands featuring short-leaf pine. When total overstory basal area was within the guidelines for uneven-aged stands (45 to 75 sq.ft.acre), seedbeds of mineral soil and partial and undisturbed litter resulted in ample regeneration even with seed crops that were slightly below regional averages. Composition of the overstory basal area apparently did not strongly affect initial seedling establishment in areas having sparse ground vegetation and should not be extended to longer time periods or other conditions.

  11. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Watershed Science & Management Watershed Science & Management prepares students to address the many management issues associated with water

  12. COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER COMMUNITY-BASED AND CONVENTIONAL TENURES IN BRITISH OF MASTER OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT In the School of Resource and Environmental Management © David Mealiea 2011 of Canada, this work may be reproduced, without authorization, under the conditions for Fair Dealing

  13. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Progress of Slash Breakdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 with slash are based in part on information on its rate of breakdown and decay. Slash changes in structure. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests

  14. COLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference on W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference on.outcomes on the ground.outcomes on the ground. o Foundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide

  15. 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Caring Timm Schaubert, Outreach Division Supervisor. Thanks also to William M. Ciesla, Forest Health;A January 2014 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report As your new Colorado State Forester, it is my

  16. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contracts with logging companies covering more than 15 million hectares of forest," the report stated with logging companies instead giving villages gifts of salt and beer worth less than $100. "In a contextIllegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests

  17. Forest statistics for Michigan's eastern upper peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) is a continuing endeavor as mandated by the Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978. The objective of FIA is to periodically inventory the Nation's forest land to determine its extent, condition, and volume of timber, growth, and removals. Up-to-date resource information is essential to frame forest policies and programs.

  18. PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providing brief explanations of alternative management practices. An on-site survey of recreationists to forest management on public land, the present study used survey methodologies to examine stakeholder254 PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST Shannon C

  19. EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

  20. Tropical dry-forest mammals of Palo Verde: Ecology and conservation in a changing landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoner, Kathryn E.; Timm, Robert M.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 114 species of mammals originally were present in Costa Rica’s tropical dry forest, and perhaps 110 species are still found there today. Bats are the most diverse group, with more than 66 species, followed by 11 species of rodents, 7 species of marsupials, 6 species in the weasel family, 5 species of cats, 3 species in the raccoon family, 3 species of primates, 3 species of artiodactyls, 2 species of canids, 2 species of xenarthrans (edentates), 1 rabbit, and 1 tapir. Costa Rica has no endemic dry forest mammals. The species that have been extirpated from this region were either highly prized game species that have been eliminated by overhunting (white-lipped peccaries) or were specialists that either feed on specific foods or have very specific habitat requirements that have been eliminated by habitat destruction. In Costa Rica 10 of the 13 mammal species recognized as endangered and 7 of the 14 found in reduced populations are found within tropical dry forest habitat. Mammals that inhabit tropical dry forest areas must be capable of dealing with high temperatures, low precipitation in the dry season, and large fluctuations in the availability of food resources during the year. Most mammals of the dry forest can be characterized as resident generalists that shift their diets in order to utilize seasonally available food resources; as resident specialists that forage on insects, seeds, or fruit and nectar; or as migrants that occupy dry forests only seasonally and move to other habitats during periods of low food availability in their foraging area in search of food sources in other areas. Bats, some of which serve as pollinators and seed dispersers, are important components of the dry forest fauna. Some species of bats change habitats within the dry forest or migrate into and out of the dry forest seasonally. Hunting has been, and continues to be, an important threat to most large mammals in dry forest habitats. As early as 1880, large numbers of deer skins were exported from Costa Rica to Europe, the majority of which came from Guanacaste. Illegal poaching is still a serious problem in the protected areas of Guanacaste. Throughout Mesoamerica, deforestation to create pastures and, in recent years, for crop cultivation has negatively affected many populations of tropical dry forest mammals. Approximately 50% of the 250,000 ha area in the lower Tempisque Basin had been deforested by 1956 and by 1970 most of the dry forest had been converted into pastureland. The spread of introduced African grasses and seasonal fires have continued to eliminate mature dry forest in northern Costa Rica in the last decades. Contamination by pesticides from agricultural fields has become a serious threat to the mammalian fauna in the region. The use of cattle as a management tool also threatens the mammalian fauna in tropical dry forest due to their affect on the natural vegetation. Cattle were reintroduced into Parque Nacional Palo Verde in the 1980s in an attempt to control the rapidly expanding cattails in the marsh, which were eliminating habitat for aquatic birds. However, cattle have been ineffective at controlling cattails, and overgrazing of tree seedlings has hindered regeneration of the forest because cattle graze selectively on seedlings of native species. The mammals of the tropical dry forest are among the most poorly known of any of the bioclimatic life zones. Conservation measures for this endangered fauna should include expanded research, training and educational programs for park personnel, economic alternatives, and sustainable development. In addition, efforts should be made for the creation of additional protected areas with buffer zones and for the development of natural regeneration programs.... contaminación por pesticidas en los campos agrícolas se ha convertido en una seria amenaza para los mamíferos de la región. El uso de ganado como herramienta de manejo también es una amenaza para la fauna de mamíferos en el bosque tropical seco debido a su...

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader. Forest Products Case Studies Advanced Quality Control System for the Thermomechanical Pulping Process Improves Quality and Reduces...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    versions of the calculation tools are available at the NCASI web site. Estimating Product Sequestration AF&PA, again working with the International Council of Forest and Paper...

  4. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for biodiversity conservation, water protection, recreational needs, climate change mitigation management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision; · Communication of ne

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and...

  6. Sustaining the Productivity and Function of Intensively Managed Forests - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A.; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this study is to ensure sustainable management of wetland forests in the southeastern United States. The study is projected to measure soil, hydrology, and forest responses to several management scenarios across a complete forest cycle. From August 1997 to August 2000 the study has received funding as one of the Agenda 2020 projects, from the U.S. Department of Energy (Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC07-97ID13551), the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, and Westvac Corporation. Quarterly progress reports were submitted regularly to the Department and all project participants. This final report summarizes the project results and progress achieved during this 3-year period. Over the past three years all research objectives planned for this project were completed.

  7. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 658 White pine (Pinus strobus L.) is one of the most important timber trees in the northeastern United States and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for wind breaks and erosion control and as an ornamental. Unusual mortality of bare-root seedlings of white throughout the state. There are numerous possible explanations for white pine seedling mortality which may all influence seedling mortality after planting (Venator 1985). Also, extreme weather conditions after

  8. The European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody biomass from the forests in the EU can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biomass from the forests in the EU can be significantly increased The supply of woody biomass from and recycled wood) for the 27 EU member states. As with woody biomass from forests, the supply of woody biomassThe European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody

  9. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  10. atlantic forest landscape: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of pub- lic preferences, park Standiford, Richard B. 8 Forests and landscape UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Renewable Energy Websites Summary: for sustainable forest...

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  12. amazonian forest regrowth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 2 Plant species...

  13. amazonian forest french: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  14. amazonian forest culture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  15. amazonian forests implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  16. area determines forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been inadequate to accurately determine forest carbon stocks, much less the effects logging is known to be widespread, the exact areas of tropical forest subject to logging...

  17. amazon forest biomass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar - and biomass. Part of Our Rural Economy - forest product companies now can 162 Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Environmental Sciences...

  18. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  19. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  20. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  1. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  2. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Breakout Session 2D-Building Market Confidence and...

  3. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets...

  4. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  5. Changing national forest values: A content analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, D.N.; Xu, Z.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This evolution of forest values is currently being widely discussed and debated in the forestry community. It is often claimed that a fundamental shift in forest values has taken place in recent decades. Gordon argued that a shift in public values is part of the explanation for the declining influence of the multiple-use sustained-yield paradigm of forest management. It is increasingly recognized that the values people hold about forest ecosystems are an important part of the social underpinning of ecosystem management, the emerging forest management paradigm. In either case, values play a critical role in identifying ecosystem management goals, setting the context for decisionmaking, and guiding our choices.

  6. Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using Long disturbances, such as hurricanes, have profound effects on pop- ulations, either directly by causing mortality of resources. In the last 20 years, two major disturbances, Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and Hurricane Georges

  7. Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Horticultural & Forest crops 2014 Grapes: Weed Control in Vineyards 3-19 Weed Control in Vineyards and postemergence herbicides can be made to control existing vegetation and control weeds germinating from seed oz) Vines must be established at least 5 years. Do not use in soils high in sand or gravel. Apply

  8. Olli Haltia Forest Academy Finland 3. 5.12.2003 1(6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the sector. The fact that the consumption of paper and wood products per capita in the new EU countries of some #12;Olli Haltia Forest Academy Finland 3.­ 5.12.2003 2(6) 120 kg paper per capita will gradually during the next ten years. Paper consumption follows clo- sely the pace of GDP growth, and the expansion

  9. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, and tree species may alter nutrient cycles within the same location and soil type through time. This study examined the influence of 33 years of sit occupancy by lobolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and oak (Quercus spp.) plantations on forest floor mass...

  10. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity, and tree species may alter nutrient cycles within the same location and soil type through time. This study examined the influence of 33 years of sit occupancy by lobolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and oak (Quercus spp.) plantations on forest floor mass...

  11. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , comprising a total value of £1.4 billion (2 billion), the bulk of which is produced by European forest tree stock in an inactive condition for extended periods, and to ensure plant quality where supply. #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2004­2005 41 Assessing seedling quality Despite

  12. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy www.csfs.colostate.edu Colorado Forest resource assessments had to be completed by June 2010 ­ required to receive S&PF funds in the future (2008;Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Colorado Division

  13. Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought, and several other partner organizations. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest

  14. Functional Differential Equations in Sustainable Forest Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    regulation. The sustainability of harvesting a given constant volume in a simplified forest model is studied regulation model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.2 A different discretization) Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract This article deals with the dynamics of the volume control method in forest

  15. Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration Mark Gillis and Michael Brady: · Timber supply analysis · Management unit planning Management Inventory #12;· Canada's NFI-2001 ­ NFI 2006... National Inventory #12;Canada's National Forest Inventory (1976-2001) ­ compilation

  16. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts to plant diversity at a forest scale.3% were within 4 m of an artefact and 8.4% were located on an artefact. The artefact contribution to total included or not in the artefact contribution. Road verges were the least frequent artefacts but provided

  18. Community D Mixed/Pine Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood Mixed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov Conference, 19... 1\

  19. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nater Use Soil Recharge 50 Potential Evapotranspiration late r Surplus J F M A M J J A 5 0 N D Fig. 2. Mean mater balance diagram for Conroe, Fexas based upon fifty years of record and for a soil mater storage capacity of 254 mm... SOIL-SITE RELATIONSHIPS TO PHOTODELINEATED FOREST TYPES A Thesis by DALE ROBERT KING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major...

  20. Onset of deep drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    plains (Argentina) M. L. Amdan,1 R. Aragon,2,3 E. G. Jobbagy,3 J. N. Volante,4 and J. M. Paruelo1-fed agriculture and pasture, with different age of clearance (>30 years, 20 and 3 years) in Salta, Argentina, we drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina

  1. Stennis Space Center Use of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center Prototypical Early Warning System (EWS) results ­ Posting of NRT results on-line for use by USFS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center

  2. Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove Volume 2, pp 814­820 in Encyclopedia, Chichester, 2002 #12;Forest inventory Forest inventory is an accounting of trees and their related by a comprehensive survey of all households in the country. Similarly, forest inventories seek to enumerate

  3. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  4. Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

  5. 31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the materials from the forests through the supply chain. Brian Condon, the wood procurement manager for Bio pointed out they have foresters working every day making sure the biomass plant is maintaining31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  6. Impacts of disturbance initiated by road construction in a subtropical cloud forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico Lydia P. Olandera,* , F.N Scatenab , Whendee L. Silverc a Department Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Call Box 25000, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, 00928-2500, USA c Ecosystem tropical forests, were evaluated in the subtropical cloud forests of Puerto Rico. The vegetation, soil

  7. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  8. Kenya's forests: going up in smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, G.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed forest and commercially valuable woodland account for at most 11,406 square miles in Kenya (about 5.2% of the country's area). Plantation forests, mainly of exotic conifers, cover more than 550 square miles, and it is hoped that exotic plantation species will entirely replace dependence on the indigenous forests for pulp, sawn timber and other roundwood. However, reliance on charcoal as a fuel has led to widespread deforestation, particularly along highways and within 20 miles of towns and major villages. Deforestation is likely to increase with increasing population pressure.

  9. SIZE OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS 5 YEARS AFTER GIRDLING AND REMOVAL TREATMENTS IN 50-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE PLANTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Boyd Edwards

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PP 108 -113 in: Connor, Kristina F., ed. 2004. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS?71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 594 p. Abstract: In 1996, a study began at Savannah River Site to investigate large-scale replicated forest areas to control coarse woody debris for integrated biodiversity objectives. Research design was a randomized complete block with four treatments replicated in four blocks, resulting in 16 plots. The treatments applied to 50-year-old loblolly pine stands were (1) control, (2) girdling of 25 percent of trees to create catastrophic simulation, (3) annual removal of down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter, and (4) annual removal of both standing and down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter. The study tracks coarse woody debris recruitment and loading, rates of decomposition, and effects on the forest ecosystem.

  10. 188 Forest health surveillance in Victoria Australian Forestry 2008 Vol. 71 No. 3 pp. 188195

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available for sustainable timber production (VictorianAssociation of Forest Industries 2008). Native forestForests. While several companies manage plantations in Victoria, HVP Plantations (formerly Hancock Victoria

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating forest fire Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large areas of the Pacific Summary: change, nutrition and sustainability, fire effects, restoration, and forest-stream linkages... forests. Many dense, young forests were...

  12. Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile Economic Sustainability and Ecological and Comparisons · Production and Processing · Sales and Markets · Economic and Ecological Contributions Sawmills · 1/4 for Roundwood (post and pole, vigas, house logs), furniture, excelsior etc. ­ Sawmill

  13. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Conservation Union (IUCN) Eva Mary Tyrrell Executive Director Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture

  14. Geospatial Analysis School of Forest Resources &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Geospatial Analysis GIS 4121 School of Forest Resources & Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 4121 Geospatial Analysis INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr MATERIALS: de Smith, MJ, Goodchild, MF, & Longley, PA (2010). Geospatial Analysis (3rd ed.). Leicester

  15. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  16. Robust scheduling in forest operations planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Lui Cheng

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest operations planning is a complex decision process which considers multiple objectives on the strategic, tactical and operational horizons. Decisions such as where to harvest and in what order over different time ...

  17. Food Habits of Wild Turkeys in National Forests of Northern California and Central Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... foraged primarily on grasses, forbs, and hardwood mast (Smith and Browning 1967). In southern California, turkeys select as ... by both season and sex, as found also in central California (Smith and Browning 1967) and other western states (Wakeling and Rogers 1996, ...

  18. POLICY, AND PLANNING 567USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    management, Dr. Richard Standiford provided an overview of the Integrated Hardwood Range Management Program, March 19­22, 1996, San Luis Obispo, Calif. 2 Professor, Natural Resources Management Department, Cali for reservoir development. The important issues of potential net habitat displacement and the permanence

  19. source: American Forest & Paper Association Test Your Knowledge of Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    years ago Question 4: Timber growth in the United States exceeds harvest and losses due to insects the SFI program, member companies reforested 1.3 million acres by planting, seeding, & natural regeneration bringing the three year total for reforested company lands to: a) 3.3 million b) 2.7 million c) 3

  20. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, David Bryan [University of Maine

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  1. Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

  2. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top

  3. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  4. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    forests and trees are to our state's economy. While the statistics in this publication focus on economic Acknowledgements: Funding for this report was provided by the Public Service Company of NH and the U.S. Endowment products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  5. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  6. A Guide for Virginia Forest Landowners Jennifer L. Gagnon, Coordinator, Virginia Forest Landowner Education Program,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Education Program, Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech Introduction As a private of timber harvest planning and how to work with professional foresters and natu- ral resource management final management decisions. Resources for learning more about any of the topics covered are available

  7. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  8. What's Happening in Colorado's Aspen Forests? Gradual, longterm changes and recent widespread death of aspen trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What's Happening in Colorado's Aspen Forests? Gradual, longterm changes and recent widespread death of aspen trees The normal development of forests includes changes, with most trees forests experience fire, insect outbreaks, severe winds, or major droughts. All the aspen forests

  9. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  10. Forest cover change and illegal logging in the Ukrainian Carpathians in the transition period from 1988 to 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Forest cover change and illegal logging in the Ukrainian Carpathians in the transition period from 2009 Keywords: Forest harvesting Illegal logging Forest disturbance Landsat Support vector machines Ukraine Carpathians Forest inventory data Forest resource assessment Post-socialist transition Illegal

  11. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  12. THE FOREST BIOLOGY RESEARCH COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Staudhammer, SFRC, Biometrics COOPERATORS Industrial: Plum Creek Timber Company, Rayonier, Weyerhaeuser CoGen, CellFor; Together, these companies produce over 400 million tree seedlings per year, more than a fourth

  13. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: xwang25@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Padgett, Jennifer M. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Powell, John S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Campus Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup ?1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than previously reported.

  14. Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    ; harvesting and supply; biomass conversion; energy production; marketing of bio-energy; economicsDepartment of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014 Postgraduate Diploma Enquiries: Head of Department Contact details: Department of Forest and Wood Science Stellenbosch University

  15. atlantic forest area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    techniques to forest group and basal area mapping using satellite imagery and forest inventory data CiteSeer Summary: Accurate, current, and cost-effective fire fuel data are...

  16. Forest Plan A summary of a forum explor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  17. acuminata forests affected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  18. austrocedrus chilensis forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  19. argentinean yungas forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  20. alnus acuminata forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StationRICULTUR , CALIFORN FOREST SERVICE. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests in northern California Willis W....

  1. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage...

  2. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  3. People and Forests: a case study from Benin, West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Erika Beth

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate how sacred forests in Benin, West Africa, contribute to forest conservation. Local use of natural resources is well-practiced in maintaining wooded space; the same use of those ...

  4. Evalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Environmental Life cycle assessment (LCA) to understand impacts of forest productsEvalua&ng Forest Biomaterials with Environmental Life Cycle Assessment Hosted in the industrial sphere, with addiKonal effects 6 #12;Life Cycle Assessment Method

  5. In Search of Sustainable (Urban) Forest Management in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), 1981 · Research associate, EIA, 1981-83 · PhD, forest management and EIA, 1983-86 · Research scholar

  6. Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

  7. Institutional change in the forest sector : the Russian experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulybina, Olga

    of corporate responsibility, forest certification, model forests, foreign forest management practices and visions of sustainability. The results of both state and non-state activities aimed at reforming the forest sector are debatable and yet to be seen... ecological crisis of his day’, namely the problem of soil fertility within capitalist agriculture, the antagonism of town and country, and the necessity of ecological sustainability. Idealist Structuralism Similarly to materialist structuralists, Emile...

  8. Preordered forests, packed words and contraction algebras Anthony Mansuy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an increasing condition, we obtain the Hopf subalgebra of heap-ordered forests Hho (see [FU10, GL90]). Moreover

  9. International Symposium "The evaluation of forest Policies and Programmes"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    for the internalisation of Carbon sequestration function Forest management (art. 3.4): - after Decision 11 COP 7: 15

  10. 83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40-to 90-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40- to 90- Year. Bledsoe2 Jerry Tecklin3 Abstract: This research examined biomass of blue oak (Quercus douglasii Hook root biomass outside the root ball. Root ball mass ranged from 7 to 184 kg, and estimated total root

  11. 2012 School of Forest Resources Job Fair RSVP ___ YES, I will be attending the Tuesday, February 7, 2012 Job Fair.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2012 School of Forest Resources Job Fair RSVP ___ YES, I will be attending the Tuesday, February 7, 2012 Job Fair. ___ NO, I will be unable to attend the 2012 Job Fair, but please invite me next year. ___ NO, I will not be attending the 2012 Job Fair and please remove me from your mailing list. Company

  12. Einstein's Miraculous Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasant Natarajan; V Balakrishnan; N Mukunda

    2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With each passing year, the young Albert Einstein's achievements in physics in the year 1905 seem to be ever more miraculous. We describe why the centenary of this remarkable year is worthy of celebration.

  13. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  14. Principles of Forest Stewardship1 1As per the Foresters Act S.4(2)(b) "to advocate for and uphold principles of stewardship of forests, forest lands, forest resources and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and resilience of the ecosystem. Ecological integrity refers to the wholeness of ecosystems, as well. Ecological Integrity 4 2. Information and Understanding 4 3. Forest Management Goals and Objectives 4 4 and landscape levels which maintains and protects ecosystem function, integrity and resilience. It is based upon

  15. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM): Model structure and policy applications. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.M.; Alig, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; McCarl, B.A.; Winnett, S.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest and Agricultural Sector Opimization Model (FASOM) is a dynamic, nonlinear programming model of the forest and agricultural sectors in the United States. The FASOM model initially was developed to evaluate welfare and market impacts of alternative policies for sequestering carbon in trees but also has been applied to a wider range of forest and agricultural sector policy scenarios. The authors describe the model structure and give selected examples of policy applications. A summary of the data sources, input data file format, and the methods used to develop the input data files also are provided.

  16. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturing industry developed to track certified forest products from the forest through the supply chain management (Ozanne and Vlosky 1997). In addition to reducing negative perceptions by consumers in the wood manufacturing industry developed to verify certified forest products. CoC works as a control

  17. Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02 Report of Visiting Group ­ Forest Research Environmental Research Branch 29 ­ 30 October 2001 1. Review Procedures On the invitation of Mr Jim Dewar, Chief visited the Alice Holt Research Station of Forest Research on 29 and 30 October 2001. Secretarial support

  18. Is Forestry Right Do you care about forests, wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Is Forestry Right For You? · Do you care about forests, wildlife, water, wilderness interest in the future of forestry? · Do you feel there should be changes made to forest practices? · Do at www.unbc.ca/forestry BSc Natural Resources Management Forest Ecology and Management #12;Some Career

  19. WISDOM number two / page 7 IN THE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Thomas D.

    a decision support tool for land managers that met the needs of the BLM managers perfectly. The ForestERA project was in the final stages of a 2 million acre analysis of forest and fire risk management jurisdictions, they could accomplish for- est management planning to address fire risks. Luckily, the Forest

  20. What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career Choosing a career involves more than just finding out what is open to you. Knowledge about yourself is central.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Forest Engineering? Forest engineering is a hybrid of engineering, forestry and management

  1. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  2. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    size distribution model for estimating oil reserves and for use in forest management under the `natural estimates of oil reserves, and be of use for ecosystem based forest management under the `naturalFOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract

  3. ForestGALES A PC-based wind risk model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be needed to uproot or break the tree? 3.1 What wind speed would create the force required to damageForestGALES A PC-based wind risk model for British Forests User's Guide Version 2.0 June 2004 Barry by strong winds in Britain 1.1 Historical context ­ Previous predictive windthrow model 1.1 What does Forest

  4. ESTIMATION OF FOREST CARBON VOLUME AND VALUE IN TENNESSEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ¨ Acknowledgement INTRODUCTION ¨ U.S. Forest ¤188 Million Acres ¤16% carbon sequestration occurred in forest ¤310Carl. 2001. "The Economics of Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Soils." Department of Agricultural of The Potential for Carbon Sequestration by Forests: Evidence from Southern Mexico." Ecological Economics 33

  5. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest, 22 June 2011 Ed.Pepke@efi.int 1 Global forest products market trends by Dr. Ed Pepke Senior Timber European Forest Institute Contents I. Introduction II. Global market drivers III. Global trade trends IV

  6. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random process and the Brownian CRT. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th

  7. ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

  8. Year of last Year of last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herring 2003 2002 Transboundary Resource Assessment Committee Monkfish Northern Monkfish 2003 2003FMP Stock Year of last assessment Year of last data used in last stock assessment Source document for stock assessment Atlantic Sea Scallop Atlantic Sea Scallop 2000 2000 Stock Assessment Workshop (SAW

  9. 11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply. Biomass Power Secure is ensuring their wood supply is of high quality and environmentally the biomass is #12;11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  10. 26 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Rothschild Biomass Plant Only Getting 10 Percent of Fuel from Forest26 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR 10 percent of its fuel from logging waste, which originally was supposed to supply nearly all

  11. 2 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; and continues to be one of the top ten manufacturing sectors in the state. The report analyzes data collected products such as lumber, structural panels, paper and pulp. Manufacturing of secondary forest products like and visit TexasForestInfo.com for additional information on economic impacts of the Texas forest sector

  12. 10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 Wood Pellets Out of 80.9 MGT of wood expected to be consumed by viable projects, wood pellet production is expected to hold the largest share at 34.2 MGT, most10 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  13. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains are located in Appendices F through K. II. Purpose This cooperative operating plan facilitates assistance ordered through the Compact and used on joint US Federal/State fires will be considered agents

  14. Faculty of Forest Sciences Gender and Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Forest Sciences Gender and Forestry - a bibliography Lillemor Lyrén Forestry Library #12;SLU Forestry Library SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden Jan 2006 1 #12;Preface The initiative to this bibliography was taken by the IUFRO Working Party 6.28.01, Gender research in forestry. The work started in spring 2003

  15. By Rebecca Barnard, Forest Certification Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - administered land. Third party and annual surveillance audits maintain or improve the DNR's forest management that their products Continued on page 4 Chain of Custody Market Outlook 2 Certification Web sites 5 Stumpage Prices 6 percent long-run trend level by mid-2009. However, energy and fuel prices have increased to levels well

  16. VANCOUVER FOREST REGION 2100 LABIEUX ROAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Paul Kuster and Frank Ullmann, Operations Manager. Assistance in planning and fieldwork were provided days and work on weekends and nights. Funding for this project was provided by Her Majesty the Queen, through the Vancouver Regional Office Research budget and the Squamish Forest District operational budget

  17. Forest Certification in Brazil Peter H. May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Certification in Brazil Peter H. May Executive Secretary, Brazilian Agroforestry Network Studies New Haven, Connecticut, USA June 10 & 11, 2004 http://www.yale.edu/forestcertification/symposium/pdfs/brazil, Economic, and Ecological Effects Brazil DRAFT PAPERS ­ PLEASE DO NOT CITE 2 ABSTRACT This paper reviews

  18. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  19. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  20. Forest Growth Under Extensive Annual Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    forests/ Count' area K ha K ha % Morocco 2491 534 6.8 Algeria 1427 718 0.9 Tunisia 308 202 3.1 Egypt 0 72 aridity factor (precipitation/potential evaporation) of about 0.18. Annual received solar energy of ~7

  1. Forest Service Patrol Captains and Patrol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means and public property. Nationally, a successful program was characterized as one with sufficient resources of Agriculture is dedicated to the principle of multiple use management of the Nation's forest resources

  2. Comparison of AVHRR classification and aerial photography interpretation for estimation of forest area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lannom, K.B.; Evans, D.L.; Zhu, Z.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service Southern Forest Experiment Station`s Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) unit uses a dot count method to estimate the percentage of forest area in counties or parishes from aerial photographs. The research reported in this paper was designed to determine whether Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data could be used to estimate forest area at the county or parish level. For this study, AVHRR data for three parishes in central Louisiana were extracted from a 1991 AVHRR forest type map of the United States. Photo interpretation data were obtained from a digital mosaic of aerial photography of the parishes. Forest area estimates obtained by means of photo interpretation did not differ significantly from those obtained by analyzing AVHRR data.

  3. Managing lodgepole pine to yield merchantable thinning products and attain sawtimber rotations. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, D.M.; Koch, P.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper suggests solution for a longstanding problem in managing lodgepole pine forests- that of managing individual stands to reach their planned rotation age, despite serious hazard from bark beetles and wildfire. The management regimes presented yield merchantable thinning products. The 80-year sawtimber rotation can be achieved using these management recommendation. Thinning at 30 years of age is central to achieving the recommended alternative management regimes. The authors suggest that agencies give roundwood operators a portion of the thinning stemwood as payment. Management regimes that provide attainable rotations are presented in summary tables, by three site index classes and a number of initial stand density classes.

  4. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experimentmore »in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.« less

  5. Current stand characteristics of Louisiana Timberland Harvested between 1975 and 1991. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study population, using 1,216 forest survey continuous forest inventory (C.F.I.) plots, was constructed to analyze the current stocking trends and performance of timberland harvested in Louisiana between 1975 and 1991. A total of 6,888,000 acres was harvested; 4,011,600 acres by partial harvest, 219,900 acres by seed tree and shelterwood methods, 2,562,000 acres by clearcut, and 94,500 acres by salvage cut. Of the 2,454,700 acres of clearcut upland forest types, 640,500 acres converted to the oak-hickory type. It is taking 6 to 7 years, after harvesting, for softwoods to reach the 3.0-inch diameter threshold. Additionally, softwood stand volume 13 to 17 years after clearcut harvest is below that expected for normal sites. Low softwood stocking levels and lengthy regeneration lag time are cited as two possible reasons for low yields at this stage of stand development.

  6. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  7. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,444.8 12.6 -4.4 3,144.0 4.6 10.3 5,452.0 8.3 2.0 Other softwood species Other hardwood species All species.3 3 American elm 247.1 9.0 12.2 198.4 22.9 20.2 4 Green ash 244.0 11.5 8.8 420.3 17.8 17.6 5 Osage

  8. Estimators and characteristics of logging residue in California. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.O.; Bulgrin, J.K.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ratios are presented for estimating volume and characteristics of logging residue. The ratios relate cubic-foot volume of residue to thousand board feet of timber harvested and to acres harvested. Tables show gross and net volume of residue with and without bark, by diameter and length classes, by number of pieces per acre, by softwoods and hardwoods, by percent soundness, and by degree of slope and distance to roads.

  9. Saltstone Disposal Facility Closure Cap Configuration and Degradation Base Case: Institutional Control to Pine Forest Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Performance Assessment (PA) for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) is currently under revision. As part of the PA revision and as documented herein, the closure cap configuration has been reevaluated and closure cap degradation mechanisms and their impact upon infiltration through the closure cap have been evaluated for the institutional control to pine forest, land use scenario. This land use scenario is considered the base case land use scenario. This scenario assumes a 100-year institutional control period following final SDF closure during which the closure cap is maintained. At the end of institutional control, it is assumed that a pine forest succeeds the cap's original bamboo cover. Infiltration through the upper hydraulic barrier layer of the closure cap as determined by this evaluation will be utilized as the infiltration input to subsequent PORFLOW vadose zone contaminant transport modeling, which will also be performed as part of the PA revision. The impacts of pine forest succession, erosion, and colloidal clay migration as degradation mechanisms on the hydraulic properties of the closure cap layers over time have been estimated and the resulting infiltration through the closure cap has been evaluated. The primary changes caused by the degradation mechanisms that result in increased infiltration are the formation of holes in the upper GCL by pine forest succession and the reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the drainage layers due to colloidal clay migration into the layers. Erosion can also result in significant increases in infiltration if it causes the removal of soil layers, which provide water storage for the promotion of evapotranspiration. For this scenario, infiltration through the upper GCL was estimated at approximately 0.29 inches/year under initial intact conditions, it increased to approximately 11.6 inches/year at year 1000 in nearly a linear fashion, and it approached an asymptote of around 14.1 inches/year at year 1800 and thereafter. At year 1800, it was estimated that holes covered approximately 0.3 percent of the GCL due to root penetration, and that this resulted in an infiltration near that of typical background infiltration (i.e. as though the GCL were not there at all). This demonstrated that a very small area of holes essentially controlled the hydraulic performance of the GCL.

  10. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  11. 457USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. California Black Oak--From Firewood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    to Lumber, the Lumber Recovery Story1 Eini C. Lowell2 Marlin E. Plank2 Abstract: Interest in use of local western hardwoods is increasing, especially among secondary manufacturers. In the case of black oak, trees volume recovery and value recovery by tree and log grade. Two types of mills, a portable sawmill

  12. Disturbance legacies and climate jointly drive tree growth and mortality in an intensively studied boreal forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Rocha, Adrian; Calvin, Katherine V.; Holmes, Bruce; Wang, Chuankuan; Goulden, Michael L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How will regional growth and mortality change with even relatively small climate shifts, even independent of catastrophic disturbances? This question is particularly acute for the North American boreal forest, which is carbon-dense and subject The goals of this study were to combine dendrochronological sampling, inventory records, and machine-learning algorithms to understand how tree growth and death have changed at one highly studied site (Northern Old Black Spruce, NOBS) in the central Canadian boreal forest. Over the 1999-2012 inventory period, mean DBH increased even as stand density and basal area declined significantly from 41.3 to 37.5 m2 ha-1. Tree mortality averaged 1.4±0.6% yr-1, with most mortality occurring in medium-sized trees. A combined tree ring chronology constructed from 2001, 2004, and 2012 sampling showed several periods of extreme growth depression, with increased mortality lagging depressed growth by ~5 years. Minimum and maximum air temperatures exerted a negative influence on tree growth, while precipitation and climate moisture index had a positive effect; both current- and previous-year data exerted significant effects. Models based on these variables explained 23-44% of the ring-width variability. There have been at least one, and probably two, significant recruitment episodes since stand initiation, and we infer that past climate extremes led to significant NOBS mortality still visible in the current forest structure. These results imply that a combination of successional and demographic processes, along with mortality driven by abiotic factors, continue to affect the stand, with significant implications for our understanding of previous work at NOBS and the sustainable management of regional forests.

  13. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  14. 21cm Forest with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciardi, Benedetta; Mack, Katherine J; Xu, Yidong; Bernardi, Gianni

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative to both the tomography technique and the power spectrum approach is to search for the 21cm forest, that is the 21cm absorption features against high-z radio loud sources caused by the intervening cold neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) and collapsed structures. Although the existence of high-z radio loud sources has not been confirmed yet, SKA-low would be the instrument of choice to find such sources as they are expected to have spectra steeper than their lower-z counterparts. Since the strongest absorption features arise from small scale structures (few tens of physical kpc, or even lower), the 21cm forest can probe the HI density power spectrum on small scales not amenable to measurements by any other means. Also, it can be a unique probe of the heating process and the thermal history of the early universe, as the signal is strongly dependent on the IGM temperature. Here we show what SKA1-low could do in terms of detecting the 21cm forest in the redshift range z = 7.5-15.

  15. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Year in Review.............................................................. 8 Academic Accomplishments

  16. Regulating forest practices in Texas: a problem analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreesen, Alan D

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practices law. Attitudes about the best administrative structure. . . Could a forest practices act help meet future wood needs?. Miscellaneous Section. Su~mary. 30 30 31 34 42 44 52 55 56 56 57 60 74 75 79 Chapter V. Conclusions...) National Forest Products Association (NFPA) (Industry) Southern Forest Products Association (SFPA) (Industry) Ovens-Illinois Corporation (Industry) Louisiana-Pacific Corporation (Industry) Champion International Corporation (Industry) Kirby Lumber...

  17. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    -have the potential 10 increase biomass supply. Unlike metals, concrete, and plastic, forest products store carbon sources. Expanding forest biomass use for biofuels and energy generation will competeanagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land Management Policy

  18. QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS Job Title: Dean of the School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrath, Richard E.

    , environmental sciences, forestry, forest biotechnology, and natural resources education and research statewide/or EXPERIENCE: REQUIRED: Ph.D. in ecology, environmental science, forestry, forest biotechnology, natural and Environmental Science Department: School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Salary Range

  19. Estimating regional forest cover in East Texas using Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the 1930s, is used by state forest agencies, private timber companies and individual foresters for planning and timber resources in the United States as part of its Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program (USFS

  20. Appendix B Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Sources and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountain Poor-Site Lodgepole Pine Forest Aspen o 2011 Rocky Mountain Aspen Forest and Woodland o 2061 Intermountain Basins Aspen-Mixed Conifer Forest and Woodland Mixed Conifer o 2051 Southern Rocky Mountain Dry

  1. The potential for trickle up : how local actors' experiments influence national forest policy planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blockhus, Jill M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss of forests in Vietnam encouraged central government policy makers to consider new ways to manage forest resources. A major forest policy shift -- moving away from state-led management -- began in earnest in pilot ...

  2. Borax Lake Pattern Assemblages on the Shasta-Trinity National Forests, North-Central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundahl, Elaine; Henn, Winfield

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assemblages on the Shasta-Trinity National Forests, North-I E L D H E N N , Shasta-Trinity National Forests, Redding,CA 96001. X HE Shasta-Trinity National Forests curve around

  3. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 161GTR-NRS-P-105 TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE FOREST CARBON INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 161GTR-NRS-P-105 TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE FOREST CARBON INVENTORY OF THE UNITED STATES: RECENT PAST AND NEAR FUTURE Abstract.--The Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service has explicitly assumed

  4. adjacent mangrove forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water flux circulated Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 4 Ecological effects of small-scale cutting of Philippine mangrove forests Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  5. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forests provide more carbon sequestration benefits than let-the relative carbon sequestration benefits of let-growlife cycle carbon sequestration benefits, averaged over 120,

  6. 5to CONGRESO FORESTAL DE CUBA "BOSQUES PARA LAS PERSONAS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    .............................................................. 29 COMISI�N 7. Protección forestal y manejo de plagas...... 31 COMISI�N 8. Ordenación e Inventario de

  7. assess forest carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013FC 6 Carbon Cycling in Tropical and Boreal Forests Environmental...

  8. acid forest soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Succession Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon...

  9. achieving forest carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013FC...

  10. acid forest soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Succession Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon...

  11. acid deposition forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 400 metres height above ground level) to scale the contributions from different wind directions to total deposition at any selected receptor site 38 105USDA Forest...

  12. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia AgencyCompany Organization United States Agency for International Development, Global...

  13. atlantic forest reserve: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Archive Summary: An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central...

  14. amazon forest results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there has been significant degradation in forest cover over recent decades as a result of logging, conversion to crop, plantation, and pasture land, or disasters (natural or man...

  15. adjacent natural forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sectors?" Louisiana's Forests Louisiana ranks 10th nationally in total production of sawn timber compared Associate Dr. Richard P. Vlosky Assistant Professor December 19. 1995...

  16. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DA MOTTA, R. Economic Incentives and Forest Concessions inin monitoring and economic incentives that may lead to theeconomic relationships involving risk sharing and incentives.

  17. andean moist forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    moist temperate old-growth forests: A global review Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: for significance through Monte-Carlo permutation procedure. We...

  18. araucaria angustifolia forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as lumber, wood-based panel, pulp, paper and packaging productsBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial;...

  19. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pulppaperprofile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment...

  20. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potawatomi Community July 21, 2014 - 12:03pm Addthis Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. | Image from Forest County Potawatomi...

  1. acidified forested catchment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forest management systems, and fora for collaborative planning. Keywords Economic sustainability Vermont, University of 6 Long-term changes in precipitation and stream water...

  2. Forest Grove Light & Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest Grove Light & Power offers a variety of rebates through Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

  3. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories Cobalt Discovery Replaces Precious Metals Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Climate Change Cripples Forests Associate Director Of Environmental Programs Taking...

  4. JAPAN GOING TOWARD FOREST CERTIFICATION September 24, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN JAPAN ............................... 3 ISO14001 (International Organization for Standardization customers are becoming aware of forest certification. In addition to the widespread of international

  5. Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary of Remote Sensing Technical Capability, 2009-2015 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  6. Partnership Logging Accidents Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership Logging Accidents · by · Cornelis de Hoop, LA Forest Products Lab · Albert Lefort Agreement · 1998 & 1999 Accident Reports · 25 injuries reported · 185 loggers signed up · 8 deaths 1999

  7. amazon forest degradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Amazon forests are a key but poorly understood component of the global carbon cycle. If, as anticipated, they dry this century, they might accelerate...

  8. Calendar Year 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    > Year1999NEFINA1.pdf" class"">Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02

  9. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growth in network traffic to storage over the years. Network Traffic Growth Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2010 Network Distribution 2009 Network Distribution...

  10. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Edwards, Nelson T [ORNL; Walker, Ashley V [ORNL; O'Hara, Keiran H [ORNL; Campion, Christina M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  11. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  12. Commonality and variability in the structural attributes of moist temperate old-growth forests: A global review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Sustainable forest management Carbon sequestration Biodiversity Late-successional forests a b s t r a c

  13. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  14. Biomass yields for small trees, shrubs, and herbs in northern lake states forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass yield information by forest type is presented for lesser vegetation in northern Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota based on data from recent field inventories.

  15. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  16. Ten-year record of forest response to elevated CO2 provides evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental, Tennessee 3University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia #12;HD Matthews. 2007. Global Change Biology 13 conductance Light-use efficiency Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation APAR is function of leaf

  17. Multi-Year Lags between Forest Browning and Soil Respiration at High Northern Latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Bunn, Andrew G.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-latitude northern ecosystems are experiencing rapid climate changes, and represent a large potential climate feedback because of their high soil carbon densities and shifting disturbance regimes. A significant carbon flow from these ecosystems is soil respiration (RS, the flow of carbon dioxide, generated by plant roots and soil fauna, from the soil surface to atmosphere), and any change in the high-latitude carbon cycle might thus be reflected in RS observed in the field. This study used two variants of a machine-learning algorithm and least squares regression to examine how remotely-sensed canopy greenness (NDVI), climate, and other variables are coupled to annual RS based on 105 observations from 64 circumpolar sites in a global database. The addition of NDVI roughly doubled model performance, with the best-performing models explaining ~62% of observed RS variability

  18. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity of a boreal aspen forest during and followingarea index of a boreal aspen-hazelnut forest in relation toPursh), TA: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. ),

  19. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindtranath, N.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches to analysis of climate change impacts on forestsimpacts and adaptation to climate change in the forestABORATORY LBNL Pending Climate change and forests in India:

  20. Forests 2011, 2, 200-217; doi:10.3390/f2010200 ISSN 1999-4907

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract: In this review paper, we assess the economical, governance, and technical conditions that shape. Forest degradation translates into losses of biodiversity, reduced capacity of forests to provide