National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hardwood forest year

  1. Variation of treefall gap characteristics in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest: effects of microtopography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almquist, Benjamin Eric

    1998-01-01

    such as bottomland hardwood forests. This study examined differences in the treefall gap regime among three microtopographical classes - bowl, ridge, and slope - in a late-successional hardwood stand on the Neches River floodplain near Spurger, Texas. I tested...

  2. Forest Service -U.S. Department of Agriculture Markets for Hawaii Hardwood Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service - U.S. Department of Agriculture Markets for Hawaii Hardwood Lumber in New Single-Family Houses on Oahu, Hawaii John D. Zinnikas R. Sidney Boone U.S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW-41 1967;Zinnikas, John D., and Boone, R. Sidney 1967. Market for Hawaii hardwood lumber in new single-family houses

  3. Late-Successional Biomass Development in Northern Hardwood-Conifer Forests of the Northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Late-Successional Biomass Development in Northern Hardwood-Conifer Forests of the Northeastern of biomass dynamics in relation to stand development. Our study evaluated competing hypotheses regarding late-successional biomass dynamics in northern hardwood-conifer forests using a data set spanning the north- eastern United

  4. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighte d Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  5. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  6. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted

  7. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  8. Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    ARTICLE Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests for rehabilitation and increased carbon stores, yet few studies have examined the feasibility of using carbon markets to restore high-graded forests. We evaluated the effectiveness of rehabilitation on 391 ha of high

  9. U.S Markets for Certified and Non-Certified Hardwood Tropical Forest Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the fact that tropical forests have a longer growing period, hence encouraging the paper industry to use tropical hardwood pulp for paper production (U.S. and International Institutions 1983). In 2000, the United Agricultural Center Baton Rouge, Louisiana Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Working Paper #76

  10. The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest also acts as an antioxidant within a plant, reacting and neutralizing ozone and peroxides, though , and reacts photochemically in the presence of NOx to produce tropospheric ozone. The Model of Emissions

  11. Links between biomass and tree demography in a northern hardwood forest: a decade of stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    Links between biomass and tree demography in a northern hardwood forest: a decade of stability recent trends in tree biomass and demography. We found no significant change in live-tree biomass during the decade. Total biomass was 246 Mg·ha­1 (95%CI = 235­258) in 1995­1996 and 245 Mg·ha­1 (95%CI = 234

  12. Modelling and mapping temperate hardwood forest structural complexity as an indicator of biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Composition & configuration of forest structural attributes Keystone Structures ­ e.g. dead wood `Habitat. Animal species diversity driven by habitat heterogeneity/diversity: The importance of keystone structures

  13. Impact of a major ice storm on an old-growth hardwood forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechowicz, Martin J.

    , and Martin J. Lechowicz Abstract: We quantified the amount of woody biomass and volume lost in an old in northeastern North America. The woody biomass lost is the greatest recorded for any ice storm. The impact of this ice storm ranks among that of the most damaging windstorms and hurricanes recorded in forested land

  14. PAST IS PROLOGUE: A SYNTHESIS OF STATE FOREST MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AND HARDWOOD ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , frequency, and spatial scale. Disturbances play a particularly important role in shaping the development EXPERIMENT PRE-TREATMENT RESULTS G. Scott Haulton1 Abstract.--Disturbance plays an important role in forest historical disturbance events; therefore, an understanding of disturbance history is important when

  15. A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, Zachary Isaac

    2009-05-15

    Bottomland hardwood forests are highly productive ecosystems which perform many important ecological services. Unfortunately, many bottomland hardwood forests have been degraded or lost. Accurate land cover mapping is crucial for management...

  16. The University of Notre Dame Patterns of Leaf Mass, Area and Nitrogen in Young Northern Hardwood Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, John

    Forests JEN CRAMER', TIM FAHEY2 ANDJOHN BATTLES3 Departmentof Natural Resources,12 FernowHall, Cornell's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR

  17. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 648 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    The possible negative effects of timber harvesting on streams and riparian habitat are well documented. Forest implications for designing harvest roads and trails and effective streamside management zones (SMZs). 1 in water temperature and nutrient delivery to streams (LeDoux and Wilkerson 2006). In 1972, the Federal

  18. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 227 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    , the demands for forest goods and services also evolve in response to societal needs and attitudes. To guide practices must account for both present conditions and those desired in the future. The way that silvicultural practices implemented today will affect the management area and overall goals in the future

  19. Hardwood Markets and Marketing AHEC American Hardwood in Europe Convention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convention Venice, Italy 20-22 October 2004 Hardwood chapter highlights · EU production and consumption of hardwood flooring rose once again in 2003 · Production, trade and consumption of sawn hardwood all grew in central and eastern Europe · CIS subregion production and consumption of sawn hardwoods are forecast

  20. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 219 EFFECTS OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    OF NATURAL GAS DEVELOPMENT ON FOREST ECOSYSTEMS Mary Beth Adams, W. Mark Ford, Thomas M. Schuler, and Melissa-term research. In 2008, a natural gas well was drilled on the Fernow and a pipeline and supporting infrastructure constructed. We describe the impacts of natural gas development on the natural resources

  1. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  2. The effects of harvesting intensity on soil CO2 efflux and carbon content in an east Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londo, Andrew James

    1995-01-01

    land. I examined the effects of harvest intensity on in situ and mineral soil respiration, along with total soil and soluble organic carbon, were examined in a bottomland hardwood forest. Treatments included a clearcut, a partial cut, and a non...

  3. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 251 A PReLIMINARy AboveGRoUND LIve bIoMASS MoDeL FoR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRoUND LIve bIoMASS MoDeL FoR UNDeRSToRy HARDwooDS FRoM ARkANSAS, LoUISIANA, AND MISSISSIPPI Don C. bragg biomass and fuel loads, but few models are available to directly quantify this component. In part to determine diameter at breast height (d.b.h.), so conventional models (e.g., the National Biomass Estimators

  4. Twenty-Three-Year Changes in Upland and Bottomland Forest Soils of Central Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Twenty-Three-Year Changes in Upland and Bottomland Forest Soils of Central Illinois Jenwei Tsai, Mark B. David, and Robert G. Darmody Abstract: Soil formation is a complex process that varies

  5. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  6. Snow Removal and Ambient Air Temperature Effects on Forest Soil Temperatures in Northern Vermont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ', and `cool with low snow'. Snow-free soils were colder than where there is a persistent insulating snow layer-function of northeastern forests. The Intergovernmental plicated in dieback events in northern hardwood forestsPanel

  7. Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    is essential for good stewardship of these rapidly changing landscapes. Stand-replacing forest fires trigger one of the most notorious fires of the 20th Century. Yellowstone's postfire forests may be effective1 Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after

  8. A trial site planted with ash saplings. During the past year, Forest Research has continued to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A trial site planted with ash saplings. Our Research During the past year, Forest Research has the range of our current research. Ash dieback: finding resistant trees Ash dieback (Chalara fraxinea) is affecting ash trees in Britain, especially East Anglia and Kent. This is a very serious disease of one

  9. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  10. FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY FORESTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2003-2007 USDA FOREST SERVICE NORTHEAST CENTER FOR URBAN & COMMUNITY in the appropriate strategic plans of each participating agency. As outlined in the Forest Services most recent Strategic Plan, "in the next mil- lennium, choosing the path of innovation, integration, and expanded

  11. Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA/AVHRR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, P.O. Box 8089, Missoula, MT 59807, United States g NOAA forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. While forest fires in North America (NA) have

  12. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 234 evALUATIoN oF ToTAL AboveGRoUND bIoMASS AND ToTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAL AboveGRoUND bIoMASS AND ToTAL MeRCHANTAbLe bIoMASS IN MISSoURI Michael e. Goerndt, David R. Larsen, and Charles D. keating1 Abstract.--In recent years, the state of Missouri has been converting to biomass, there is a need to identify accurate and precise methods of estimating whole tree biomass and merchantable biomass

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  14. Prepared by: Ryan Nadel In August this year, the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (IUFRO) hosted its 23rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for people; Climate change and forestry; Bio-Energy; Forest Biodiversity Conservation; Forests and water

  15. Tree Improvement Forest Health, Productivity & Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Foresters maintain orchards to supply seed from select native hardwood trees for use in urban landscapes tax base. · The Lost Pines seed source was preserved off-site in a TFS drought- hardy loblolly orchard and is now providing source appropriate seed to aid in the Lost Pines Recovery Effort. · Seed orchards

  16. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01

    , Cahaba series. Lob- lolly pine, water oak, black gum, and red maple are the dominant species visible. Interior view of stand 3, Lucy series. The large tree is southern magnolia and the under- story is redbay. Interior view of the bayhead stand (12...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  17. Utilization Implications for Hardwoods Susceptible to Sudden Oak Death1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization Implications for Hardwoods Susceptible to Sudden Oak Death1 John R. Shelly2 The number (Lithocarpus densiflorus) utilization, one of the SOD susceptible species, provide valuable insight into the potential for utilizing SOD infected material. Tanoak was found to have very good woodworking properties

  18. The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    introduction of contaminants into water-ways. Although counter-intuitive, water itself has become a pollutant549 The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1 Thomas Scott2 Abstract Water Pollution is defined as the corruption of ecosystems, human health, and local economies by the inappropriate

  19. Physical and mechanical properties of mixed comrind and hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with phenol-formaldehyde resin Guangping Han Qinglin Wu Xinfang Duan Abstract Three-layer mixed comrind (CRD) and hardwood oriented strandboard (OSB) were manufactured using phenol- formaldehyde (PF) resin with comrind. With continuing production growth and decreasing quality wood supply, the cost of wood fibers used to manufacture

  20. The Legal Environment for Hardwood Lands in California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the local level. Attention has recently focused on the use and management of California's hardwood resources and President respectively, Pacific Meridian Resources, Emeryville, Calif.; Professor of Forestry and Resource Management, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.; and Consultant and lecturer in Geography, Department

  1. Wood Products-Utilization Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Products-Utilization 231 #12;Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-100. Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987. Utilization products. California's native and exotic hardwoods offer a wide range of utilization opportunities

  2. Forest Ecology (3 credits) FOR 3153C Section: 2265 Year: 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Description Ecological principles and their application to the management of forests; major sections include, consisting of instruction in both the classroom and the field. I have minimized the amount of lecturing both in the classroom and field, instead seeking your active engagement in (1) classroom discussions and activities

  3. 25 August 2015 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Growing consumption of pulp and paper in India has increased the demand for wood fiber for the domestic pulp industry in the country, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly of domestic forest resources has forced the pulp industry in India to increasingly rely on hardwood chips from

  4. System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waite, Darrell; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P.; Ceckler, William H.

    2015-06-30

    A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hydrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

  5. System and method for conditioning a hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, Darrell M; Arnold, Richard; St. Pierre, James; Pendse, Hemant P; Ceckler, William H

    2013-12-17

    A system and method for hardwood pulp liquid hydrolysate conditioning includes a first evaporator receives a hardwood mix extract and outputting a quantity of vapor and extract. A hydrolysis unit receives the extract, hyrolyzes and outputs to a lignin separation device, which separates and recovers a quantity of lignin. A neutralization device receives extract from the lignin separation device and a neutralizing agent, producing a mixture of solid precipitate and a fifth extract. The solid precipitate is removed from the fifth extract. A second evaporator removes a quantity of acid from the fifth extract in a vapor form. This vapor may be recycled to improve total acid recovery or discarded. A desalination device receives the diluted extract, separates out some of the acid and salt and outputs a desalinated solution.

  6. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  7. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Mapping Hardwood Mortality for the Early

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and identification of areas of hardwood mortality is a critical component in the management of sudden oak death (SOD a mortality stem map generated from aerial photo interpretation (Meentemeyer and others 2007) within the Big Detection Surveys (ADS) and Aerial Photo Interpretation Hardwood mortality was mapped from fixed

  8. Variation of Cellulose Microfibril Angles in Softwoods and Hardwoods--A Possible Strategy of Mechanical Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.

    Variation of Cellulose Microfibril Angles in Softwoods and Hardwoods-- A Possible Strategy beech). The tilt angle of the cellulose fibrils in the wood cell wall versus the longitudinal cell axis Words: cellulose; hardwood; microfibril angle; small-angle scattering; softwood; wood; X

  9. Wake Forest University Guidelines for Internal and External Support of Academic Year Research Salary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Research Salary This document provides guidance to tenured and tenure-track faculty who are interested on research/creative activity, or cover academic year salary related to research effort expended-out and recovery of academic year salary do not relieve individual faculty members of their concomitant service

  10. Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. . Research Inst.)

    1991-08-01

    An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

  11. 21USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. The Network Solution1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and more recently a fisheries dimension, to our forestry business. This company is family owned, having about hardwoods and the role of Registered Professional Foresters. The topics of timber company policies me begin by sharing my feelings as a resource manager for a timber company that owns 380,000 acres

  12. eBusiness in the United States Forest Products Industry in the Year 2000 Richard P. Vlosky1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    of the forest products industry in the United States. One thousand solid wood products and 300 pulp and paper in 2001. KEYWORDS: INTERNET, EBUSINESS, FOREST PRODUCTS, SOLID WOOD, PULP AND PAPER, UNITED STATES industry in the United States (Vlosky 1999). This paper discusses key findings from the most recent study

  13. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01

    to as the Southeastern Evergreen Forest (Braun, 1950). The forest is a mixed woodland dominated by loblolly pine and numerous hardwoods such as southern red oak, post oak, water oak, sweetgum, blackgun, and winged elm. The forest type map of the study sites within... Department at Texas A(M University and the Statistical Analysis System written by Anthony Barr and James Goodnight at North Carolina State University. The Texas A(M IBM 360, Model 65 computer was utilized for all mathematical and statistical analysis...

  14. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Sugarcane Rind and Mixed Hardwood Oriented Strandboard Bonded with PF Resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comrind and hardwoods oriented strandboard (OSB) was manufactured using phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin, accounting for more than 40% of the total U.S. production (Rowell 1995). Large quantities of outer rinds (i

  15. Mammals of Cabo Blanco: History, diversity, and conservation after 45 years of regrowth of a Costa Rican dry forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Lieberman, Diana; Lieberman, Milton; McClearn, Deedra

    2009-09-01

    remained forested and inaccessible with few roads and trails; most travel was by motor launch around the coast (Wallace, 1992; Hilje Quiros, 2002; Castrillo, personal com- munication). Residents of the Cabo Blanco area at that time recall that wildlife...

  16. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

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    4 YEAR 2012 Males 65 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 5 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 21 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 61 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 YEAR 2012 Males 52 Females 40 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 7 EN 04 13 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 38 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    558 YEAR 2013 Males 512 Females 46 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 220 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321 YEAR 2013...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11 YEAR 2012 Males 78 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 9 EN 05 1 EN 04 33 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    02 YEAR 2011 Males 48 Females 54 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

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    16 YEAR 2012 Males 84 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 26 EJEK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 39 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 10 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    34 YEAR 2012 Males 66 Females 68 YEAR 2012 SES 6 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 110 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 YEAR 2012 Males 51 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 22 EN 04 21 NN (Engineering) 14 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 21 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2012 Males 30 Females 11 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 9 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2012 Males 19 Females 12 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 115 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    00 YEAR 2012 Males 48 Females 52 YEAR 2012 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    137 YEAR 2013 Males 90 Females 47 YEAR 2013 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 30 EN 04 30 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 45 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Employees 14 GENDER YEAR 2012 Males 9 Females 5 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 2 NN (Engineering) 4 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2012 Males 21 Females 22 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    69 YEAR 2014 Males 34 Females 35 YEAR 2014 SES 5 EJEK 1 EN 05 8 EN 04 5 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 22 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    42 YEAR 2014 Males 36 Females 6 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 5 EN 05 7 EN 04 6 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  4. An Overview of World Tropical Hardwood Resources, Forest Products Trade and Environmental Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Comoros, Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea

  5. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15

    of geographic information systems (GIS) on student motivation and conceptual knowledge. Substantial losses of bottomlands in Texas necessitate restoration to regain the ecosystem services that they provide. Restoration of proper hydrology is the most important...

  6. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas exchange (measured by eddy-covariance methods), vertical CO2 profile sampling and soil respiration along with meteorological parameters were monitored continuously. Early...

  7. Herpetofaunal community response to timber harvest practices in an east Texas bottomland hardwood forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Kelly James

    1997-01-01

    abundance, of the most common species of herpetofauna and specifically the marbled salamander (Ambystoma opacum). Herpetofaunal response in terms of measures of species richness, diversity, and evenness were analyzed among treatments. This study was a...

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distribution and--

  9. Marketing of Tropical Hardwood Wood Products from Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Methodology · Trade and Industry Directory 254 forest products manufacturers 133 had fax addresses · Conducted be successfully reached by fax · 19 responded to questionnaire = 30.2% #12;Firm Size Based on Number of Employees (n = 19 respondents) Less than 50 employees 51-100 employees 101-250 employees 251-500 employees

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2012 Males 518 Females 45 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 209 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335 YEAR 2012...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 30 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 32 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 5 EN 05 3 EN 04 23 EN 03 9 NN (Engineering) 18 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    78 YEAR 2012 Males 57 Females 21 YEAR 2012 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 12 EN 04 21 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 24 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  1. Hardwood Biomass Inventories in California1 Norman H. Pillsbury and Michael L. Kirkley2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas. Those studies relating to tree inventory are often used for volume table development, while the increased value and utilization of wood and the decreasing hardwood land base. Even though the price designed to create volume tables. Approximately five reports containing volume tables for California

  2. USE OF SUPPLEMENTAL FEEDING LOCATIONS TO MANAGE CATTLE USE ON RIPARIAN AREAS OF HARDWOOD RANGELANDS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USE OF SUPPLEMENTAL FEEDING LOCATIONS TO MANAGE CATTLE USE ON RIPARIAN AREAS OF HARDWOOD RANGELANDS here was funded in part by a Renewable Resources Extension Act Minigrant. Abstract: Typical cattle use sites away from water sources and into areas of high amounts of RDM, the impact of cattle on riparian

  3. Pine sawlog markets remained slow. Pulp-wood and hardwood sawlog prices declined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    logging conditions and downward pressure from rising energy costs. Diesel prices soared 22 percent over by the end of April, mainly driven by higher energy and food prices. Middle East turmoil, rising demand fromPine sawlog markets remained slow. Pulp- wood and hardwood sawlog prices declined due to favorable

  4. Pine and hardwood pulpwood stumpage prices continued an upward trend in March/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pine and hardwood pulpwood stumpage prices continued an upward trend in March/ April 2010. The strong global pulp market and wet weather conditions in East Texas pushed up the pulpwood stumpage prices to a eight-month high. Lumber and panel prices continued rising. Observers com- mented that the price surge

  5. Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wet weather led to higher stumpage prices for hardwood (especially pulpwood) in East Texas during March/April 2012. Pine saw- log and pulpwood prices remained flat to slightly lower. Higher diesel costs put downward pressure on stumpage prices. Pine sawlog prices averaged $22.11 per ton, 6 percent lower

  6. Nitrogen Accumulation and Changes in Nitrate Leaching After Four Years of Intensive Forest Culture on Marginal Agricultural Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.M.; Gresham, C.A.

    2000-02-15

    Loblolly pine and sweetgum were grown with irrigation, continuous fertilizer application and insect pest control on a year old abandoned peanut field. Wells and tension lysimeters were used to measure nitrate-nitrogen in soil moisture and groundwater on three replicate transects for four years. Years 1 and 2, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration exceeded drinking water standards. Years 3 and 4, groundwater nitrate-nitrogen concentration decreased where the greatest reduction occurred in soil moisture at the shallowest depths.

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -9.09% YEAR 2012 2013 SES 1 1 0.00% EN 05 1 1 0.00% EN 04 11 11 0.00% NN (Engineering) 8 8 0.00% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 14 -17.65% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 2...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 942 YEAR 2012 SES 108 EX 4 SL 1 EJEK 96 EN 05 45 EN 04 196 EN 03 20 NN (Engineering) 452 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1291 NU (TechAdmin Support) 106 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  14. Selective depredation of planted hardwood seedlings by wild pigs in a wetland restoration area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.J.

    1999-12-17

    Following the planting of several thousand hardwood seedlings in a 69-ha wetland restoration area in west-central South Carolina, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) depredated a large percentage of the young trees. This planting was undertaken as part of a mitigation effort to restore a bottomland hardwood community in the corridor and delta of a third order stream that had been previously impacted by the discharge of heated nuclear reactor effluent. The depredated restoration areas had been pretreated with both herbicide and control burning prior to planting the hardwood seedlings. After discovery of the wild pig damage, these areas were surveyed on foot to assess the magnitude of the depredation on the planted seedling crop. Foraging by the local wild pigs in the pretreatment areas selectively impacted only four of the nine hardwood species used in this restoration effort. Based on the surveys, the remaining five species did not appear to have been impacted at all. A variety of reasons could be used to explain this phenomenon. The pretreatment methodology is thought to have been the primary aspect of the restoration program that initially led the wild pigs to discover the planted seedlings. In addition, it is possible that a combination of other factors associated with odor and taste may have resulted in the selective depredation. Future wetland restoration efforts in areas with wild pigs should consider pretreatment methods and species to be planted. If pretreatment methods and species such as discussed in the present study must be used, then the prior removal of wild pigs from surrounding lands will help prevent depredations by this non-native species.

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR93

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR93

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR9374

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268 YEAR

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268255 YEAR

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males 162685638

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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  7. Multiple scales of temporal variability in ecosystem metabolism rates: results from two years of continuous monitoring in a forested headwater stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Brian J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Hill, Walter [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Headwater streams are key sites of nutrient and organic matter processing and retention, but little is known about temporal variability in gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) rates as a result of the short duration of most ecosystem metabolism measurements in lotic ecosystems. We examined temporal variability and controls on ecosystem metabolism by measuring daily rates continuously for two years in Walker Branch, a first-order deciduous forest stream. Four important scales of temporal variability in ecosystem metabolism rates were identified: (1) seasonal, (2) day-to-day, (3) episodic (storm-related), and (4) inter-annual. Seasonal patterns were largely controlled by the leaf phenology and productivity of the deciduous riparian forest. Walker Branch was strongly net heterotrophic throughout the year with the exception of the open-canopy spring when GPP and ER rates were similar. Day-to-day variability in weather conditions influenced light reaching the streambed, resulting in high day-to-day variability in GPP particularly during spring (daily light levels explained 84% of the variance in daily GPP in April). Episodic storms depressed GPP for several days in spring, but increased GPP in autumn by removing leaves shading the streambed. Storms depressed ER initially, but then stimulated ER to 2-3 times pre-storm levels for several days. Walker Branch was strongly net heterotrophic in both years of the study (NEP = -1156 and -773 g O2 m-2 y-1), with annual GPP being similar (488 and 519 g O2 m-2 y-1) but annual ER being higher in 2004 than 2005 (-1645 vs. -1292 g O2 m-2 y-1). Inter-annual variability in ecosystem metabolism (assessed by comparing 2004 and 2005 rates with previous measurements) was the result of the storm frequency and timing and the size of the spring macroalgal bloom. Changes in local climate can have substantial impacts on stream ecosystem metabolism rates and ultimately influence the carbon source and sink properties of these important ecosystems.

  8. Sorption of lead by Salisbury biochar produced from British broadleaf hardwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zhengtao; Jin, Fei; Wang, Fei; McMillan, Oliver; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-06-27

    . 2 Materials and methods 2.1 Physicochemical properties of biochar Salisbury biochar was obtained from Southern Woodland products (Salisbury, UK). It was produced from British broadleaf hardwood at a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C. The biochar... ., Sarswat, A., Alexandre-Franco, M., Pittman, C.U., 2014. Cadmium and lead remediation using magnetic oak wood and oak bark fast pyrolysis bio-chars. Chem. Eng. J. 236, 513–528. doi:10.1016/j.cej.2013.09.057 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12...

  9. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  10. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  11. -Changes in the understory during 14 years following catastrophic windthrow in two Minnesota forests -841 Journal of Vegetation Science 11: 841-854, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    . Although small in magnitude, there was a direc- tional change in understory composition at both forests to major canopy disrup- tion occurs once or twice within a tree's life span. Wind disturbance must, Department of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building #508, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA; 4 Current address

  12. Fine root dynamics in a loblolly pine forest are influenced by free-air-CO2-enrichment: a six-year-minirhizotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    ). Accelerating rates of anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere, and accompanying forcing effects world, and that this will slow the rate of increase of atmospheric CO2 (DeLucia et al., 2005). In 1996Fine root dynamics in a loblolly pine forest are influenced by free-air-CO2-enrichment: a six

  13. Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except for a slight rise in hardwood pulpwood price. Pine sawlog price continued to fall during the January/February 2008 period. State- wide pine sawlog averaged $35.20/ton, the lowest price since January 2006. This was a 5

  14. Object-Based Image Analysis of Downed Logs in Disturbed Forested Landscapes Using Lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2011-01-01

    for species, fuel for forest fires, and function as a keyis a fuel source for forest fires, and is a key component ofsite was burned by the Star Forest Fire in 2001, eight years

  15. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Sandra R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2013-01-01

    bon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.10 years following boreal forest fires (Johnson and Curtis,follow- ing harvesting and forest fires may be controlled by

  16. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  17. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  18. Study of the Neutralization and Stabilization of a Mixed Hardwood Bio-Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moens, L.; Black, S. K.; Myers, M. D.; Czernik, S.

    2009-01-01

    Fast-pyrolysis bio-oil that is currently produced from lignocellulosic biomass in demonstration and semicommercial plants requires significant modification to become an acceptable transportation fuel. The high acidity and chemical instability of bio-oils render them incompatible with existing petroleum refinery processes that produce gasoline and diesel fuels. To facilitate the use of bio-oil as a feedstock in a traditional refinery infrastructure, there is considerable interest in upgrading bio-oils through chemical pathways that include converting the carboxylic acids and reactive carbonyl compounds into esters and acetals using low-cost alcohols. In this article, we discuss our observations with different approaches to esterification and etherification chemistry using a crude bio-oil derived from mixed hardwoods. The high water content in crude bio-oils (ca. 20?30%) creates equilibrium limitations in the condensation reactions that hamper the upgrading process in that the neutralization and stabilization steps cannot easily be driven to completion. The lowest acid number that we were able to obtain without causing serious degradation of the flow properties of the bio-oil had a total acid number of about 20, a value that is still too high for use in a traditional petroleum refinery.

  19. Occurrence and severity of foliar ozone symptoms on sensitive hardwood species in Shenandoah National Park, VA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrand, E.; Skelly, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1993-02-01

    To assess the extent of foliar symptoms due to ozone on sensitive hardwoods in the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, three species were sampled and evaluated at sites of differing elevations adjacent to 3 ozone monitors in 1991 and 1992: black cherry, yellow poplar, and white ash. All foliar samples were evaluated to precent of symptomatic leaves on each branch and average precent leaf area affected. The Horsfall-Barratt rating scale was used to estimate the precent leaf area symptomatic. Ozone symptoms were manifested as stipple on the adazial leaf surface. In the preliminary 1991 sampling, 40, 87, and 7% of black cherry trees sampled were found to be symptomatic at the 3 sites; 63 and 67% of yellow poplar trees sampled were found to be symptomatic at sites 1 and 3, as were 43 and 63% of the white ash at sites 1 and 2 (3 complete sets were not found in 1991). In 1992, the sampling and rating of injury were repeated. Symptoms of ozone injury appeared on 23, 88, and 10% of black cherry, on 17, 7, and 80% of yellow poplar, and 27, 40, and 40% of white ash. Elevation and ozone exposure will be discussed.

  20. Are Forest Fires Predictable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-23

    Dynamic mean field theory is applied to the problem of forest fires. The starting point is the Monte Carlo simulation in a lattice of million cells. The statistics of the clusters is obtained by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm. We get the map $p_n\\to p_{n+1}$, where $p_n$ is the probability of finding a tree in a cell, and $n$ is the discrete time. We demonstrate that the time evolution of $p$ is chaotic. The arguments are provided by the calculation of the bifurcation diagram and the Lyapunov exponent. The bifurcation diagram reveals several windows of stability, including periodic orbits of length three, five and seven. For smaller lattices, the results of the iteration are in qualitative agreement with the statistics of the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000.

  1. -Fire disturbance and forest structure in old-growth mixed conifer forests -879 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 879-890, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    - Fire disturbance and forest structure in old-growth mixed conifer forests - 879 Journal how fire regimes influence stand structure and dynamics in old-growth mixed conifer forests across of abundance, fuel moisture, forest structure), but regional drought synchronizes fire in some years. Fire

  2. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  3. Reynolda Campus Wake Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Reynolda Campus Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Office of Research than NIH and NSF, such as the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and State

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  5. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  6. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  7. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  8. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  9. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  10. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; 1987.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    without close human supervision. By the year 2000, the sensing instruments may work from radiation, tGen. Tech. Rep. PSW-101 Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest

  11. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  13. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  14. Global Forests Syllabus -1 GLOBAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , and conservation. Another explores ongoing strategies that seek to sustain forests through markets and other (environmental, socioeconomic and political) under which forest products are harvested and transformed. A variety stakeholders & power Reading comments 18 Changing scenarios Reading comments 20 Costs, benefits

  15. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration and harvesting, and the physical properties of stands, trees and timber. Scope of our work Our research focuses expertise in forecasting forest growth is now applied to carbon assessment and management. We also work

  16. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Coporate Plan 2006­2009 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Corporate Plan 2006­2009 1Corporate Plan 2006­2009 #12;Chief Executive Professor Jim Lynch Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Surrey GU10 4LH Tel: 01420 22255 E-mail: research

  17. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  18. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  19. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  20. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    CO 2 and energy fluxes over a mixed hardwood forest in theand energy fluxes [Baldocchi et al. , 1988]. Forest Ecology

  1. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 153 ARE NITRATE EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    EXPORTS IN STREAM WATER LINKED TO NITROGEN FLUXES IN DECOMPOSING FOLIAR LITTER? Kathryn B. Piatek and Mary may contribute to N exports. We tested the hypothesis that nitrate exports in stream water are positively related to the N dynamics in foliar litter, with generally low exports during N immobilization

  2. Chaotic Dynamics of Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-25

    In the thermodynamic limit, a probabilistic cellular automaton can be approximated by a deterministic nonlinear map. Here we construct such a map for the forest fire problem. The construction is based on the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, performed on a square lattice of million cells. The results of the calculation are analyzed by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm (HKA). The only parameter of the map describes the probability that a tree appears at an empty cell during one time step. The obtained map seems to be non-differentiable at the percolation threshold. The Lyapunov exponent for the map is positive. Also, we found the cycle of length three by means of the method of symbolic dynamics. The results are illustrated by the experimental data on the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000. Although these data are fortunately far from thermodynamic limit, their qualitative character is reproduced for smaller lattices.

  3. Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014 Forest Products Trade between China. Whiletheglobaleconomicdownturnaffectedconsumptioninmanycountries,China'stradewithAfricaremained mostly unaffected. In particular, commodities, such as oil and gas

  4. FOREST PRODUCTS MARKET IN 2007 AND PROSPECTS FOR 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3 %); the pulp, paper and paper products (+ 13.1 %) and the furniture production (+ 10.8 %). The GDP evolution affecting the forest and forest industries sector In Romania, the year 2007 represents the sixth consecutive in the first semester, the services ­ with 51.4 % the second placed being the industry with 27

  5. United States Department of The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii:Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii:Agriculture Forest Service The First Technical Report PSW-111 #12;Nelson, Robert E. 1989. The USDA Forest Service in Hawaii: the first 20 years Service activities in Hawaii is from the vantage point of an author who during his two decades

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Effect of wildfires and post-fire forest treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    years after the fire, but decreased or even disappeared in unburnt ones, indicating that forest fires be a good way of increasing the conservation and economic value of areas affected by forest fires. Keywords Oryctolagus cuniculus . Forest fires . Mediterranean scrubland . Management . Burnt branches Introduction

  7. Forest Management Regime and Species choice options in a changing environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Management Regime and Species choice ­ options in a changing environment Bill Mason, Forest.mason@forestry.gsi.gov.uk May 18 2010 #12;2 Talk Structure 1. Introduction; 2. Species 3. Forest types; 4. Management regime; 5 essential] to make it more resilient to climate change over the next 50-100 years. Resilience implies

  8. Analysis of Forest Service Wildland Fire Management Expenditures: An Update1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Analysis of Forest Service Wildland Fire Management Expenditures: An Update1 Ervin G. Schuster2 Abstract Soaring expenditures for fire management in the USDA Forest Service have caused substantial. This report contains analysis of most Forest Service fire management expenditures between fiscal years 1970

  9. Fire impact on forest soils evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fire impact on forest soils evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration_vergnoux@hotmail.com Abstract The assessment of physico-chemical properties in forest soils affected by fires was evaluated Introduction The Mediterranean region is seriously affected by forest fires. Each year more than 50,000 fires

  10. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appeals Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses...

  11. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16 Forest in Rural Studies 17 International

  12. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing 13 Forest Inventory and Empirical Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16

  13. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  14. CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry sectors with PEFC C-o-C certification June 2003 Construction 1% Pulp & paper 4% Wood manufacturing% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers 5% Other primary forest industries 6% Sawmilling 39% Timber trade 43% #12;Forest industry sectors

  15. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  16. Estimated Demand for Lumber and Plywood in Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimated Demand for Lumber and Plywood in Hawaii by the Year 2000 George D. Frazier U S. FOREST for lumber and plywood in Hawaii by the year 2000. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Forest & Range Expt. Sta. 9 in Hawaii is expected to be between 78 and 128 million board feet. Hardwood lumber consumption is expected

  17. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  18. Pulp Production in Fray Bentos: Uruguayan Forest Development as a Source of Diplomatic Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoorl, Daniel Mateo

    2012-01-01

    of size and species of pine and eucalyptus. Departments withhectares (64, 250 acres) of eucalyptus forests planted andmillion tons of bleached eucalyptus per year. 3 The initial

  19. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    forests from catastrophic fire F ire has always been a partthe past 100 years, a national fire suppression policy hasthe natural order. “By studying fire scars on tree rings,

  20. Forest Estate Modelling (Part 2) Forest Research Institute, Rotorua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    adequate models of growth and yield, and data on costs and prices, it is not too difficult to find "optiForest Estate Modelling (Part 2) O. Garcia Forest Research Institute, Rotorua The Problem Given after centuries of continued forest management, exist in Europe. Some countries still base their forest

  1. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  2. FOREST CERTIFICATION:FOREST CERTIFICATION: BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS ORBIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stewardship Council (FSC) ­ 257 million acres Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC

  3. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  4. The Health of Colorado's Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current and Future Forest Resources #12;Acknowledgements William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International), is the primary author of the 2009 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests. Thanks to the following Colorado

  5. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  6. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    : First Author: Yu-Chuan Chen First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Yu-Chuan Chen Hyejung;Computational Statistics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Canonical Forest Yu-Chuan Chen

  7. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Landowners often need professional help after a weather-related disaster has damaged timber stands. A consulting forester can help a landowner develop management strategies that fit the landowner's objectives. This publication includes a checklist...

  8. An Overview of the Louisiana Forest Products Development Center &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Vinyl Decorating Layer Bio-Fiber/ Polymer Composites Mixed Hardwoods and Comrind OSB #12;New Product Center #12;Wood Quality #12;Recycling Treated Wood #12;Recycling Agricultural/ Wood Residues #12;Wood

  9. Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests? No. Some forests need burning on the forest floor 2. What are the types of forest fires? Broadly there are two types: low

  10. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  11. Purdue extension Hardwood Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is equal to nearly a ton of coal. Pecan is included in the hickory lumber category and NHLA graders grow throughout the Eastern United States and a portion of Canada along Lake Ontario and Lake Erie

  12. Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2010-05-29

    Pre-extraction–kraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called “near neutral” pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 °C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the “near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the “near-neutral” green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

  13. The determination of volumes of forage produced after one year of protection in pine-hardwood stand as compared with production under current grazing practices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Robert L

    1951-01-01

    la yaALal Alftllmeae ef the teyCtoaeaes for %he legree ef WLICRL Ol OOIOOOO SR 3INNRI?AIIQR OF VOKiWSL' OF FDRNIX PR)IXICNI k7%%t SKI ~ IIF ~XCe nI Fhe. NIIIneee 8Fuu W CeIFueu VZm l%8MSIOR ININI CIIIBm' IIIIAXXSS 1%NTICWI kpyrove4 e? to style... aa4 also for valaaQo aoeistaaee ia soeariag ih? yhetogra~ soataiaod horeia. Ss wishes to ?eyroos aypreeiatioa to Nr, %short R. Nhsdee ef tho Soyartaoai of Nsage aad forestry for his ai4 ia the tie%sr veloce stadioe aa4 fer other holyful saggostioas...

  14. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade: Scenarios and challenges:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European Conference ­ 4 ­ 5 May 2010 ­Phnom Penh 2 Long Ratanakoma (Cambodia) - Climate change, forest conversion

  15. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.; Zak, Donald R.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to “progressive N limitation”. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

  16. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  17. Forest Research Wildfires in Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 recorded grassfires and nearly 550 forest fires in South Wales; this equates to eight times more per unit

  18. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  19. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  20. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  1. developing and forests: finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ncreif.org/indices/timberland.phtml. T he chief attribute of the forestry asset class is its superior historical risk- return pro le producing growing sites and lower establishment and labour costs than the temperate forests of mature products make Africa an attractive forestry option. Typical emerging market risks as well as environmental

  2. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the unintended consequence of government regulation in the global marketplace has been to shift the supply agendas of industrial associations, environmental organizations, government agencies, and forest landowner, certification has become a focal point for the wide range of social, cultural, environmental and economic

  3. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management problems, such as Planning-Programing-Budgeting, will require automated procedures to col- lect in terms of products and services and alter- native methods of producing them . The out- puts from PPBS- semble forest data up to an economic limit of about 50,000 lines of map data at an average cost of 0

  4. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Human impacts on fire occurrence: a case study of hundred years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Human impacts on fire occurrence: a case study of hundred years of forest fires: 18 April 2012 Ó Springer-Verlag 2012 Abstract Forest fire regimes are sensitive to alterations Anthropogenic fires Á Climate Á Valais Á Central Alps Á Switzerland Introduction Forest fires are a major

  6. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests' carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980's in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country's total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  7. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 4: Mexico: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests` carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980`s in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country`s total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  8. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  9. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  10. By Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -intensity lightning fires kept tree density down and the forests were very well adapted to fire because of the healthyBy Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist, Nebraska Forest Service Thinning is an excellent management tool for forest landowners to use to improve forest health and productivity

  11. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  12. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  13. Extreme flood sensitivity to snow and forest harvest, western Cascades, Oregon, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Extreme flood sensitivity to snow and forest harvest, western Cascades, Oregon, United States J. A; published 3 December 2010. [1] We examined the effects of snow, event size, basin size, and forest harvest delivered 75% more water to soils than rain events. Peak discharges of >10 year rainonsnow events were

  14. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    (World Energy Council, Nature 390, p. 215) and increasing at a rate of about 0·1 Gt year­1 primary productivity. The carbon balance of forests is determined by a number of component processes in the carbon balance of each biome are also reviewed, and the evidence for a carbon sink in each forest biome

  15. Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment Diana H hydrogen were monitored every 24 minutes for three years (1996­1998) above Harvard Forest, Massachusetts. These observations suggest that automobiles are the major anthropogenic source of atmospheric hydrogen

  16. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  17. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  18. Radiative forcing of natural forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalcar- bon and energy cycling in the boreal forests, includingand Forest Meteorology, Liu HP, Randerson JT (2008) Interannual variability of surface energy

  19. Health Consequences of Forest Fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; McKee, Douglas; Thomas, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    to Lung Health of Haze From Forest Fires: The SingaporeJim, C.Y. 1999. “The Forest Fires in Indonesia 1997-1998:A Study of the 1997 Forest Fires in South East Asia Using

  20. Using neutrons to fight forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, Hal; Walker, Ronald; Flocchini, R.

    2006-01-01

    USING NEUTRONS TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES Hal Egbert, Ronaldretardant to the scene of forest fires. One system that goesretardant to the scene of forest fires. MAFFS is the acronym

  1. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  2. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Future Forests Program Plan 2013 ­ 2016 (November 2012) #12;2 Summary Mission and vision The mission of Future Forests is to provide management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision

  3. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  4. Contrasting responses of forest ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2: Implications for the global C cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norby, Richard J [ORNL; DeLucia, E. H. [University of Illinois; Moore, D J [University of Illinois

    2005-01-01

    In two parallel but independent experiments, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology was used to expose plots within contrasting evergreen loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and deciduous sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) forests to the level of CO2 anticipated in 2050. Net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) increased in both forests. In the year 2000, after exposing pine and sweetgum to elevated CO2 for approximately 5 and 3 years, a complete budget calculation revealed increases in net ecosystem production (NEP) of 41% and 44% in the pine forest and sweetgum forest, respectively, representing the storage of an additional 174 gC m-2 and 128 gC m-2 in these forests. The stimulation of NPP without corresponding increases in leaf area index or light absorption in either forest resulted in 23-27% stimulation in radiation-use efficiency, defined as NPP per unit absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. Greater plant respiration contributed to lower NPP in the loblolly pine forest than in the sweetgum forest, and these forests responded differently to CO2 enrichment. Where the pine forest added C primarily to long-lived woody tissues, exposure to elevated CO2 caused a large increase in the production of labile fine roots in the sweetgum forest. Greater allocation to more labile tissues may cause more rapid cycling of C back to the atmosphere in the sweetgum forest compared to the pine forest. Imbalances in the N cycle may reduce the response of these forests to experimental exposure to elevated CO2 in the future, but even at the current stimulation observed for these forests, the effect of changes in land use on C sequestration are likely to be larger than the effect of CO2-induced growth stimulation.

  5. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification (PEFC), the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative

  6. November2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade #12;#12;Timber Trade Flows and Actors in MyanmarNovember2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance Timber Trade Flows and Actors The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade Kevin Woods November 2013 #12;Acknowledgments The author, Kevin

  7. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ... Bronze Age...

  8. Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xuening

    2013-01-01

    Los Angeles Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests Aof the Thesis Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests bydata emerges, data mining is finally in the spotlight. This

  9. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  10. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  11. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  12. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  13. Forest fire management in Portugal : developing system insights through models of social and physical dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Ross D. (Ross Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    Managing forest fires is a serious national problem in Portugal. Burned area has increased steadily over the past several decades, with particularly devastating years in 2003 and 2005. Ignitions also spike dramatically in ...

  14. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession.ecosystem productivity (NEP), gross ecosystem productivity (Mg C ha ?1 at 80 years. Peak NEP ranged from 0.9 to 2.9 Mg C

  15. Using climate policies and carbon markets to save tropical forests : the case of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpels, Marisa (Marisa Carina)

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s, advocates for forest conservation thought that climate change could provide a lever to motivate developing countries to reduce deforestation. Fifteen years after the first climate change ...

  16. Modeling Endemic Bark Beetle Populations in Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Christopher

    2015-02-20

    at the spatial distribution and susceptibility of host trees in southwestern US forested landscapes. To do this, I (1) analyzed 21 years of field data to examine the population dynamics of bark beetles and the factors that affect them, (2) created a statistical...

  17. Managing a Coastal Bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus) Forest1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Managing a Coastal Bluegum (Eucalyptus globulus) Forest1 Ralph S. Osterling2 HISTORY In 1853 eucalyptus was introduced from Australia into California by Mr. Abbot McKinley3. At first, plantings were scattered over several areas on an expanded trial basis. Some fifty years later eucalyptus plantings

  18. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's Eve according to the Lunar...

  19. 11 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The pulp and paper industry in the Nordic countries has started to see a new dawn with a growing demand for pulp and paper products made from long wood fiber from the vast conifer forests in Northern Europe in a much brighter light than just a few years ago. In addition to the investments in the pulp and paper

  20. 24 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Global pellet market to reach $9 billion by 2020 By Sue Retka Schill 24. The global market for pellets is expected to double in the next seven years, growing from a $4 DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 2 commitment to pellets to provide

  1. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  2. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating Energy, Products, and Land's Note M.T. Goergen Jr. SAF TASK FORCE REPORT Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating EnergyThis Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows Climate­Forest Interactions Biomass Use and Feedstock

  3. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication Volume 6 2003 Number 3 Issue Summary Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the rural community perspective of managing the forest Land, Chadwick D. Oliver Series Editor Mary L. Tyrrell Rural Communities and Forests A summary

  4. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  5. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  6. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  7. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  8. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  9. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    to fossil fuel Regenerated forest energy used in the LoggingManaging forests because carbon matters: Integrating energy,Energy from post-consumer residues relevant private forest

  10. A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1 Richard P. Vlosky2 Louisiana Forest Products reviews the history of forest certification, development of different certification schemes

  11. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  12. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  13. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  14. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Polar Till Define-i Our Seasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sun-Eanh Energy Relations Earth-Sun Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Sun Affects Our Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Local Energy Relations

  15. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  16. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  17. 16 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their businesses from Europe to Asia as demand increases in Japan and South Korea. · Wood pellet prices fell / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP 1 Global Timber and Wood Products Markets 2Q/2014 Global Timber Markets Prices · Both the Softwood and Hardwood Fiber Price Indices (SFPI and HFPI), which track wood fiber

  18. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUMBER POTENTIAL OF 12-YEAR-OLD SALlGNA EUCALYPTUS TREES IN HAWAl Roger G. Satolmen USDA F Q P ~ S ~Service Resea~ckl o k g PSW-288 1974 Abstract: The sawtimber potential of 12-year-old Eucalyptus saligna when pressure treated. Oxford: 176.1(969): 812.31: 852:2. Retrieval Terms: Eucalyptus saligna; Hawaii

  19. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    because of its Humans and forest fire credibility on allof the 20th century, natural forest fires out forest fuelsto make Sierra Nevada forests more fire resil- ient is an

  20. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

  1. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 67 -15.19% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 44 34 -22.73% Females 35 33 -5.71% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 6 4 -33.33% EJEK 1 1 0% EN 05 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 6 5 -16.67% NN...

  2. Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    . HRS. 2nd Year Fall __________ (year) 2nd Year Spr. _________ (year) 2nd Year Sum. _________ (yearName Major Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year) SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR

  3. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    annual rainfall of 45 inches. Mean an- nual temperature is 57" F; January temperature aver- ages 54" F steep gulch. Annual rainfall averaged 54 inches for the 11-year period-20 percent higher than the mean

  4. DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    1 DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Professor in Sustainable Resource Sciences, UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences PARTICIPANTS Tom Gower ­ Professor, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI Rick

  5. Pursuing Carbon and ForestPursuing Carbon and Forest SustainabilitySustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biomass Energy ProductionIn Forest Biomass Energy Production University of WashingtonCommissioner of Public Lands PeterPeter GoldmarkGoldmark''ss Forest Biomass Energy Initiative Pilot Projects 2009Pilot BioaviationBioaviation Fuel 2011Fuel 2011 #12;3 Forest Biomass Energy InitiativeForest Biomass Energy

  6. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

  7. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  8. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry Texas Forest Service College Station, Texas November 2006 #12;Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Texas economy. METHODS This study uses the input-output method to estimate the direct and total economic

  9. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  10. Forest Landowners' Guide to the Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal income tax consid- erations for Forest Land, including capital costs, reforestation tax incentives, timber income and capital gains, government program cost-share payments, tax treatment of other forest

  11. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  12. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  13. Sawn hardwood marketsSawn hardwood markets 20022002 --20032003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGOs continuesPressure from ENGOs continues Producers are respondingProducers are responding PEFC and SFI still seek mutual recognitionPEFC and SFI still seek mutual recognition with other credible

  14. Community D Mixed/Pine Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood Mixed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments responseScience SHERWOODAMF/GNDRAD _D Mixed/Pine

  15. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The price development of the forest industry's end products, such as paper, has been negative for several

  16. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 184 eSTAbLISHING PeReNNIAL SeeD-bASeD eNeRGy CRoPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a locally abundant and low-cost fuel, its high carbon emissions coupled with the low price of natural gas driver for the central Appalachian region for more than a century. Coal and gas/oil extraction have concern over the environmental impacts of nonrenewable energy development including recent shale gas

  17. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 283 eSTIMATING bARk THICkNeSSeS oF CoMMoN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , estimate the volume of solid wood available. Determining the volume or weight of bark for a log including mulch, charcoal filters, as a source of tannins for leather and textile processing, or as boiler fuel. Knowing the thickness of bark along the stem is critical in order to accurately estimate bark

  18. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 271 CoMPARISoNS oF SeDIMeNT LoSSeS FRoM A NewLy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concerns about the social, economic, and environmental effects of drilling and hydraulic fracturing have the new wells, pipeline construction has simultaneously been expanding. For example, 1,854 km of pipeline extensive impacts than those associated with drill pad development; however, there has been little research

  19. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 263 bLACk wILLow TRee IMPRoveMeNT: DeveLoPMeNT oF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRACT Introduction Short rotation woody crops, such as willows (Salix spp.), continue to be examined as biomass regenerated. Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) fits well into a biomass program for the southern United States number of sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nutt.) clones were included. Survival of the sandbar clones

  20. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 312 IMPACTS oF CoNSTRUCTIoN MARkeTS oN FIRM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    associated with new construction declined. Overall economic conditions and development of new products were, remodeling expenditures, offshore competition, and entry of domestic competitors all were rated as causes of sales declines during the period. As most companies pursued both cost reduction and revenue

  1. Forests and The Texas Economy. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    , while maintain ing a healthy forest environment, requires the cooperation and understanding of many individuals, groups, and organizations. This document provides a unique statistical base for understanding the current status of forestry in Texas... or wood-based industry is a part of the manufactur ing industry that is a vital component of Texas' diverse econ omy (Figures 5-1 to 5-3). As indicated below, Texas is one of the top producers of forest products in the country: ? Texas is one...

  2. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  3. 4, 27472779, 2004 Boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  4. Forest Research No. 37 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research No. 37 May 2007 Contents m Editorial m Direct sowing ­ useful or useless details Forest Research - © Crown copyright 2007 Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are the epitome. ©AndreaKiewitt EcoThe Biodiversity and Conservation Newsletter of Ecology Division Forest Research type

  5. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  6. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  7. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  8. 7, 49254979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in the European free troposphere A. Petzold et al. Title forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP Experiment in summer 2004 A. Petzold1 , B. Weinzierl1 , H Correspondence to: A. Petzold (andreas.petzold@dlr.de) 4925 #12;ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes

  9. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  10. 6, 32273264, 2006 Forest fire smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3227­3264, 2006 Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Modeling of trace gases from the 1998 North Central Mexico forest fire smoke plume, as measured Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  11. Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest.nfs.unl.edu Dr. Scott Josiah State Forester & Director (402) 472-1467 sjosiah2@unl.edu Don Westover Wildland Fire

  12. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http://www.icfpa.org/_documents/ICFPAStatement1.pdf #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3

  13. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12

  14. C SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ROWH OF YOUNG SALlGNA EUCALYPTUS IN HAWA 6 years after thinning Craig D. Wbibesli One of the most favored introduced tree species for reforestation in Hawaii is saligna eucalyptus (Eu- calyptus saligna Sm. Research NO& p$w-239 Specific guides are needed for management of fast- 1975 growing eucalyptus stands

  15. GRADUATE POPULATION: Spring, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRADUATE POPULATION: Spring, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Program ABX = DCE Absentia *DCE status is assigned to post-5th year enrolled students, whether still 2.5 years) VSRCs: Christine Angel Mc Lauren de Riordan mclderio@princeton.edu (7/31/13 ­ 6

  16. GRADUATE POPULATION: Fall, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    GRADUATE POPULATION: Fall, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status Nathaniel (Nat) Tabris Daniel Wolt (Grad Rep) *DCE status is assigned to post-5th year enrolled students Program ABX = DCE Absentia ON LEAVE: Josh O'Rourke (Fall 2014; completed 2.5 years) VSRC: Neil Dewar

  17. Forest Roads June 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    or encroach on streamside management zones (SMZs). Best Management Practices (BMP) compliance checks and streamside management zones will also be covered. This course is designed for foresters, timber buyers with numerous classroom and field exercises designed to improve the skills used in timber ac- cess road planning

  18. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    , and recreation. Some disturbances can be functions of both nat- ural and human conditions (e.g., forest fire ignition and spread) (Figure 2). Virginia H. Dale (e-mail: vhd@ornl.gov) is a senior scientist and Paul J. Hanson is a research scientist...

  19. Mapping forests with Lidar provides flexible, accurate data with many uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi; Tommaso, Stefania Di

    2015-01-01

    to develop inputs for forest fire behavior modeling, and tovegetation inputs for forest fire behavior modeling canopy (across public forests. Forest fire behavior models need a

  20. Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary & Secondary Forest Products Industry Center #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 2 Abitibi Paper Co. Camp 40 Thunder Bay, Ontario #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 3 Accidents in Forest Products Industry Accident Statistics Primary industry

  1. Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest. Final in north central BC. Using ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS), buffers 25m deep were created

  2. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  3. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    recreational opportunities and store carbon, all while providing us a valuable renewable resource and important forest products, it also provides an economic motivation for forest landowners to keep their land products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  4. Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect on forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ecosystem's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy, sustain life10/13/2010 1 Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect

  5. Terms of Reference AFF Forest certification experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the review develop training modules on forest certification (One expert, for all regions and also, identify opportunities and challenges, analyse institutional and technical training needs and based

  6. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  7. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees Local economy Less people visiting = less spending Forest Fires Ski Resort Concerns Forest Fires of a forest fire. Vail Eagle County Vail $500,000 for thinning -2008 Helicopter to remove beetle infected

  8. Physiological responses of a black spruce forest to weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    a black spruce forest to weather Michael L. Goulden, • Bruceresponses of the forest to weather. The annual rates ofgross forest CO 2 exchange to weather is required before the

  9. Forest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    forests tend to yield more water. Further reading: Bales RC,et al. 2011. Forests and Water in the Sierra Nevada: SierraForest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra

  10. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T.analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects ofnet effect of a boreal forest fire on climate, on the basis

  11. Tropical dry-forest mammals of Palo Verde: Ecology and conservation in a changing landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoner, Kathryn E.; Timm, Robert M.

    2004-02-01

    More than 114 species of mammals originally were present in Costa Rica’s tropical dry forest, and perhaps 110 species are still found there today. Bats are the most diverse group, with more than 66 species, followed by 11 species of rodents, 7 species of marsupials, 6 species in the weasel family, 5 species of cats, 3 species in the raccoon family, 3 species of primates, 3 species of artiodactyls, 2 species of canids, 2 species of xenarthrans (edentates), 1 rabbit, and 1 tapir. Costa Rica has no endemic dry forest mammals. The species that have been extirpated from this region were either highly prized game species that have been eliminated by overhunting (white-lipped peccaries) or were specialists that either feed on specific foods or have very specific habitat requirements that have been eliminated by habitat destruction. In Costa Rica 10 of the 13 mammal species recognized as endangered and 7 of the 14 found in reduced populations are found within tropical dry forest habitat. Mammals that inhabit tropical dry forest areas must be capable of dealing with high temperatures, low precipitation in the dry season, and large fluctuations in the availability of food resources during the year. Most mammals of the dry forest can be characterized as resident generalists that shift their diets in order to utilize seasonally available food resources; as resident specialists that forage on insects, seeds, or fruit and nectar; or as migrants that occupy dry forests only seasonally and move to other habitats during periods of low food availability in their foraging area in search of food sources in other areas. Bats, some of which serve as pollinators and seed dispersers, are important components of the dry forest fauna. Some species of bats change habitats within the dry forest or migrate into and out of the dry forest seasonally. Hunting has been, and continues to be, an important threat to most large mammals in dry forest habitats. As early as 1880, large numbers of deer skins were exported from Costa Rica to Europe, the majority of which came from Guanacaste. Illegal poaching is still a serious problem in the protected areas of Guanacaste. Throughout Mesoamerica, deforestation to create pastures and, in recent years, for crop cultivation has negatively affected many populations of tropical dry forest mammals. Approximately 50% of the 250,000 ha area in the lower Tempisque Basin had been deforested by 1956 and by 1970 most of the dry forest had been converted into pastureland. The spread of introduced African grasses and seasonal fires have continued to eliminate mature dry forest in northern Costa Rica in the last decades. Contamination by pesticides from agricultural fields has become a serious threat to the mammalian fauna in the region. The use of cattle as a management tool also threatens the mammalian fauna in tropical dry forest due to their affect on the natural vegetation. Cattle were reintroduced into Parque Nacional Palo Verde in the 1980s in an attempt to control the rapidly expanding cattails in the marsh, which were eliminating habitat for aquatic birds. However, cattle have been ineffective at controlling cattails, and overgrazing of tree seedlings has hindered regeneration of the forest because cattle graze selectively on seedlings of native species. The mammals of the tropical dry forest are among the most poorly known of any of the bioclimatic life zones. Conservation measures for this endangered fauna should include expanded research, training and educational programs for park personnel, economic alternatives, and sustainable development. In addition, efforts should be made for the creation of additional protected areas with buffer zones and for the development of natural regeneration programs.... contaminación por pesticidas en los campos agrícolas se ha convertido en una seria amenaza para los mamíferos de la región. El uso de ganado como herramienta de manejo también es una amenaza para la fauna de mamíferos en el bosque tropical seco debido a su...

  12. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  13. Sustaining the Productivity and Function of Intensively Managed Forests - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A.; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2001-03-23

    The main goal of this study is to ensure sustainable management of wetland forests in the southeastern United States. The study is projected to measure soil, hydrology, and forest responses to several management scenarios across a complete forest cycle. From August 1997 to August 2000 the study has received funding as one of the Agenda 2020 projects, from the U.S. Department of Energy (Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC07-97ID13551), the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, and Westvac Corporation. Quarterly progress reports were submitted regularly to the Department and all project participants. This final report summarizes the project results and progress achieved during this 3-year period. Over the past three years all research objectives planned for this project were completed.

  14. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andsurface energy exchange in the Amazonian terra firme forestvapour, energy, and CO 2 exchange. The rates of whole-forest

  15. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  16. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community...

  17. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  18. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  19. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  20. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  1. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource...

  2. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  3. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  4. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  5. Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbu, Lungten

    2002-01-01

    in 1953 sums up in support of forest grazing by stating that "grazing on the commercial timberland offers few complications as long as grazing is managed so that forage is not damaged. If forage is not damaged, there will be no damage to timber... and Development in the Philippines”, Proceedings of a workshop "on Integration of Ruminants into Plantation Systems in Southeast Asia " at Lake Toba, North Sumatra, Indonesia ACIAR proceedings No 64, Editors-B.F. Mullen and H.M. Shelton 5. Chamling, K...

  6. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynam- ics of a central Amazonian rain forest.

  7. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  8. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  9. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  10. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community Tyrrell Sustaining Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community viability and sustainable forestry #12;Issue SummaryPage 3 | Contents Contents

  11. New England Forests: The Path to Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    on forests for the quality and abundance of our region's outstanding drinking water. Forests cool and clean could be more certain that our wood is harvested sustainably and is not contributing to environmental fossil fuels extracted from deep within the earth at great cost to our environment and the climate

  12. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paper products. The Texas forest sector also produces many value-added forest products such as millwork, wood kitchen cabinets, prefabricated wood buildings, wood furniture, and various paper products in terms of total industry output, value-added, employment, and labor income. Total industry output

  13. Riparian Forest Grows Trees fall in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Forest Grows Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave the littoral zone "Life" Cycle of Coarse Woody Habitat #12;Riparian Forest Grows What factors drive the species composition and stand factors drive the species composition and stand structure? Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave

  14. Italian Forest Certification System Seeks Re-Endorsement by PEFC MAR 03 2010 | INTERNATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Italian Forest Certification System Seeks Re-Endorsement by PEFC MAR 03 2010 | INTERNATIONAL process of national systems seeking recognition by PEFC at international level. The current endorsement in the standard setting forum," said Antonio Brunori, Secretary General of PEFC Italy. "The year- long process

  15. What is the future of Amazon f sts d li t h ?forests under climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    10/11/2010 1 What is the future of Amazon f sts d li t h ?forests under climate change? -Increase kinds of philosophy in predicting Amazon future Climate Model coupled with Vegetation Dynamics Similar scenarios in history used to predict future NowPast (~21,000 years BP) Future (2100) Savana grasslands

  16. Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using Long disturbances, such as hurricanes, have profound effects on pop- ulations, either directly by causing mortality of resources. In the last 20 years, two major disturbances, Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and Hurricane Georges

  17. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Six Years of Aerial and Ground Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium 323 Six Years of Aerial and Ground that causes sudden oak death (SOD). Each year the aerial and ground surveys monitored much of California of California forest and woodland were flown by helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft over six years of aerial

  18. Onset of deep drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    plains (Argentina) M. L. Amdan,1 R. Aragon,2,3 E. G. Jobbagy,3 J. N. Volante,4 and J. M. Paruelo1-fed agriculture and pasture, with different age of clearance (>30 years, 20 and 3 years) in Salta, Argentina, we drainage and salt mobilization following forest clearing and cultivation in the Chaco plains (Argentina

  19. 327USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. The Influence of Cattle Grazing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    327USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. The Influence of Cattle Grazing of grazing leads to disappearance of squirrels. I compared moderate cattle grazing and grazing removal year-round by cattle but had not been grazed for 3 years before the study because of an extended

  20. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

  1. Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks MOHAMED HEFEEDA Simon Fraser University, Canada Forest fires cost millions of dollars in damages and claim many human lives for early detection of forest fires. We first present the key aspects in modeling forest fires. We do

  2. Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors by New Forests Asset Management Pty Limited ("New Forests"). The material in this report is from sources believed by New Forests to be reliable, but the information is not warranted and may contain errors

  3. Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23November 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23­November 12, 2014 Forests, Foraging and Fires Catherine, Shannon Durbin is fascinated by the conflict between the role of fire in maintaining healthy forests beauty of forest fires." In the installation Thank You, Fog, Spencer Finch presents 60 photographs made

  4. LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start Title: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan: Date_of_Release: File Type: MS Word Local Name: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan Category: Overview: 004s001 Revision: a Doc_info_end #12;LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 4 TO SECURE THE LBTO ENCLOSURE

  5. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  6. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  7. Educational Needs of Southern Forest Landowners October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use tax rolls to develop forest landowner databases. Once developed, newsletters, pamphlets, brochures

  8. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  9. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Small and Medium Sized Primary Forest Products Processors Author: Smith, Robert L.; Cesa , Edward T

  10. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-american-wood-fuel-european-power/Energy & Sustainability a seafaring protest during a forest industry conference. Participants at this week's Mid-Atlantic Forest

  11. The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one). Many forests, however, have been degraded over the past century by misguided fire management, as well fire regimes in some forest types (Covington and Moore 1994; Schoennagel et al. 2004). Key structural

  12. Year 1 Year 2 Anne 3 Anne 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Languages, Sport EP Third Year: - First 2 trimesters of courses (specialization) - Third trimester: researchYear 1 Year 2 Année 3 Année 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 «« INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN »» MASTERMASTER PhDPhD Two to three years of undergraduate studies Education

  13. Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

    2012-12-17

    During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

  14. Credit Points Overview Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    6. Public Presentations / Project Reports (i.e. Retreats) All N/A N/A 10 0 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 5 First N/A N/A 3,33 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 3,33 3rd Year Third N/A N/A 3,33 8. Presentation of Manuscripts at Journal Club All N/A N/A 3 0 1st Year First N/A N/A 1 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 1 3rd Year Third

  15. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalwhereas latent energy fluxes in spruce forests, with theirenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:

  16. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    stand age on the bo- real forest energy balance, Agr. Forestenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:diox- ide and energy fluxes, Agr. Forest Meteorol. , 96,

  17. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    EFFECTS ON SURFACE ENERGY EXCHANGE forest: Evidence from1998), Energy balance storage terms in a mixed forest,and energy exchanges of a boreal black spruce forest, J.

  18. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  19. Industry MeetIng for sustaInabIlIty Native Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ NATIONAL CONFEDERATION OF INDUSTRY ­ BRAZIL Robson Braga de Andrade President EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY: CNi, 2012. 54 p.: il (rio+20 sectorial fascicle) 1.sustainability 2. United Nations Conference) .................................................... 24 Figure 7. leading Exporter states of sawn Hardwoods in brazil (2011) ............... 24 Figure 8

  20. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  1. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Integrated Market-Based Value-Added Forest Sector Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder analysis Sustainability Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder

  2. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  3. Working Paper #7 Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    -rich communities. Further, secondary forest products wages often exceed average wages of other jobs in rural areas companies (12). In addition, export oriented timber related #12;3 companies may offer rural communities

  4. Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre (Including the Advanced Wood Processing;Building Emergency Response Plan 17/05/2013 Page 1 Table of Contents Emergency Telephone Numbers ......................................................................................................................... 5 Life Safety Systems and Building Features

  5. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  6. Universal scaling of forest fire propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Porterie; Pierre, Clerc Jean; Nouredine, Zekri; Zekri, Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we use a variant of the Watts-Strogatz small-world model to predict wildfire behavior near the critical propagation/nonpropagation threshold. We find that forest fire patterns are fractal and that critical exponents are universal, which suggests that the propagation/nonpropagation transition is a second-order transition. Universality tells us that the characteristic critical behaviour of propagation in real (amorphous) forest landscapes can be extracted from the simplest network model.

  7. Fiscal Year 2012 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2012 | 1 NPR ANNUAL REPORT 2012 #12;12 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal Year 2012 | 2 TABLE Supporters Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities 3 5 6 7 9 14 15 #12;12 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal the most dynamic and informative content to the air and on NPR.org in accordance with our mission

  8. Fiscal Year 2014 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2014 | 1 NPR ANNUAL REPORT 2014 #12;14 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal Year 2014 | 2 TABLE Supporters Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities 3 6 7 8 10 15 16 #12;14 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal radio news and stories curated for them. Informing, engaging, inspiring and surprising, it's an entirely

  9. Fourth Year Curriculum Fourth Year (IE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    + 2013/14 Fourth Year Curriculum #12;+ Fourth Year (IE) ! Core ! MIE463F Integrated System Design ! CS Elective (1) #12;+ Fourth Year (ME): Fall ! Core ! MIE491Y Capstone ! Stream Courses (2) ! MIE422F * : Students may take only one of MIE422 and AER525; AER525 has limited enrolment. #12;+ Fourth Year (ME

  10. 255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Vitality inventories of Scots pine stands, the most common species in Poland, have been done since 1991 by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Vitality inventories of Scots pine as the primary indicator of stand vitality. During 1991 to 1995, SO2 and NOx were measured at 1,417 forest, decreasing concentrations of SO2 and NOx were observed during the past 5 years. Changes of vitality in Scots

  11. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year Experience (IE) course is a senior year requirement for all students who entered

  12. CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Endangered Species. For further information please contact: R. Juge Gregg, Washington, DC, rjgregg for ecosystem services provided by forests such as watershed protection, biodiversity and carbon storage. Forest NGOs and investment institutions. For further information, please contact: Kerstin Canby, kcanby

  13. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  14. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  15. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, David Bryan

    2012-08-02

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  16. Forest sector: A world bank policy paper. Sector forestal: Documento de politica del banco mundial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Forests are the most extensive terrestrial ecosystem, and nearly 500 million people depend on forests for their livelihood. Since the World Bank issued its forestry sector policy paper in 1978, there has been growing concern about the accelerated rate of destruction of the remaining primary forests in various parts of the world. The policy paper identifies two key challenges: to slow the alarmingly rapid rates of deforestation, especially (although not exclusively) in the tropical moist forests, and to ensure adequate planting of new trees to meet the rapidly growing demand for fuelwood in developing countries. The Bank intends to move vigorously to promote the conservation of natural forests and the sustainable development of managed forestry resources.

  17. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  18. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Sandra R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2013-01-01

    bon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.in forests. For example, forest fires burn an aver- age of ?type included: burn, forest fire, prescribed fire,

  19. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16 Credits 16

  20. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16

  1. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 66 Credits

  2. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of gaduation. C O O P 66 Credits 16 Credits 13

  3. Path Planning Algorithm for Extinguishing Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M P Sivaram

    2012-01-01

    One of the major impacts of climatic changes is due to destroying of forest. Destroying of forest takes place in many ways but the majority of the forest is destroyed due to wild forest fires. In this paper we have presented a path planning algorithm for extinguishing fires which uses Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks (WSANs) for detecting fires. Since most of the works on forest fires are based on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and a collection of work has been done on coverage, message transmission, deployment of nodes, battery power depletion of sensor nodes in WSNs we focused our work in path planning approach of the Actor to move to the target area where the fire has occurred and extinguish it. An incremental approach is presented in order to determine the successive moves of the Actor to extinguish fire in an environment with and without obstacles. This is done by comparing the moves determined with target location readings obtained using sensors until the Actor reaches the target area to extinguish f...

  4. LITHUANIAN FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Studies on forestry, technology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................20 3.3. Calculation of forest fuel cost production in Rokiskis forest enterprise Final report Financed by Swedish Energy Agency Girionys ­ 2002 http..................................................................................................22 3.5. Cost effecting factors

  5. Global forest governance --Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global forest governance -- Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland Technical, global environmental problems are complex issues. Political decision makers increasingly depend will draw upon an alternative, broader conception of `global forest governance'. After pointing out

  6. FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK. of the Interior, University of Vermont, National Park Service, Rubenstein School of Environment Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller and Natural Resources National Historical Park #12;Forest Monitoring at the Marsh

  7. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  8. Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials and The Forest Products Industry: University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension with support from: Sustainable Forestry Initiative N............................................................................................................................2 Road Access

  9. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  10. One-dimensional general forest fire processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressaud, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional generalized forest fire process: at each site of $\\zz$, seeds and matches fall according some i.i.d. stationary renewal processes. When a seed falls on an empty site, a tree grows immediately. When a match falls on an occupied site, a fire starts and destroys immediately the corresponding connected component of occupied sites. Under some quite reasonable assumptions on the renewal processes, we show that when matches become less and less frequent, the process converges, with a correct normalization, to a limit forest fire model. According to the nature of the renewal processes governing seeds, there are four possible limit forest fire models. The four limit processes can be perfectly simulated. This study generalizes consequently a previous result of the authors where seeds and matches were assumed to fall according to Poisson processes.

  11. Forest Stewardship Council FSC, A.C. All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % in the UK have started to shift to eco-friendly options such as FSC. Source: Publishers World #12;Forest

  12. INTRODUCTION: The success of a forest residual based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    to hydro power, but not at the expense of hydro power." These findings demonstrate that while family forest

  13. Japanese Large Corporations' Use of Forest Certification in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,107 (April 2011), PEFC: 205 (June 2011), SGEC: 409 (June 2011) As a major importer of forest products, Japan

  14. JAPAN GOING TOWARD FOREST CERTIFICATION September 24, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )........................................................... 4 PEFC (Pan-European Forest Certification Certificates (3 companies, 15th Sep. 2004) ................................... 8 PEFC COC Certificates (2

  15. Forest Certification Programs in North and South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and principles Tree Farm / SFI - PEFC mutual recognition FSC small forests program All U.S. systems revised

  16. Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

  17. The effect of expertise on the quality of forest standards implementation: The case of FSC forest certification in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental norms and standards in a specific local context. They interpret abstract global standards through environmental governance project. We then describe the FSC certification procedure and identify key actors Experts Forest certification Forest management assessment Environmental auditing The central question

  18. Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1 , Bithika Khargharia2 , Bernard P. Zeigler2 , Maria J. Vasconcelos3 Abstract In this paper we discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform and non-uniform environmental

  19. PNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 -2036 MORE TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papers, tissues and packaging · Timber is a natural, renewable, energy efficient resource. · ForestPNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 - 2036 · MORE TREES · MORE INVESTMENT · MORE JOBS · MORE RURAL DEVELOPMENT PNG Forest Industry Development Plan 2001-2036 1 http://www.pomcci.org.pg/hiri2001/PNGFIA.doc #12

  20. Marketing a National Forest: The Resource Manager's Dilemma1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marketing a National Forest: The Resource Manager's Dilemma1 Howard A. Clonts Jeffrey R. Hibbert 2 Forest in Alabama were surveyed to develop appropriate marketing strategies. Cluster analysis showed marketing strategies. Forest based recreation is continually gaining participants. Opportunities to pursue

  1. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th January 2014 2 / 20 #12;Overview This talk is about the mean field forest fire model

  2. Prediction of Forest Fires using Data Mining Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, Ian

    Prediction of Forest Fires using Data Mining Methods By Hye Rin Kim Supervised by Dr. McLeod Master's Project July 2009 #12;Contents 1 Executive Summary 2 2 Introduction 2 2.1 Forest Fire Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5 Conclusion 13 6 References 14 1 #12;1 Executive Summary Forest fires are a major environmental

  3. Dead Wood: From Forester's Bane to Environmental Boon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dead Wood: From Forester's Bane to Environmental Boon1 Jack Ward Thomas2 Abstract Forest managers is the first rule of intelligent tinkering." Dead wood, standing and down, is one of those "cogs and wheels wood in managed forests. Much of this new information will be discussed at this conference. What

  4. Research Summary Consultation and community involvement in forest planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Consultation and community involvement in forest planning: research in Cranborne of the Forestry Commission's `Long-Term Forest Plan' process. It also builds on various investigations into stakeholder analysis and the use of participatory tools in relation to Forest Design Plans (FDPs). The NFNF

  5. FOREST VALUES IN NORTHERN ONTARIO: PUBLIC TRADEOFFS AND SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOREST VALUES IN NORTHERN ONTARIO: PUBLIC TRADEOFFS AND SUSTAINABILITY by Jeff Moore H Management PROJECT TITLE: Forest Values in Northern Ontario: Public Tradeoffs and Sustainability REPORT NO. To ensure sustainability for the forests of northern Ontario, critical minimum levels of natural, social

  6. What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career Choosing a career involves more than just finding out what is open to you. Knowledge about yourself is central.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Forest Engineering? Forest engineering is a hybrid of engineering, forestry and management

  7. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract A probability distribution derived from percolation theory is #12;tted to large datasets on the sizes of forest forest #12;res and oil #12;elds as percolation phenomena as well as suggesting the consideration of a new

  8. Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge of California Hunters William S. Folkman U;Folkman, William S. 1963. Levels and sources of forest fire prevention knowl- edge of California hunters-managerial occupations. Their level of knowl- edge about forest fire prevention is generally high, but their knowledge

  9. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T. Randerson,1 * H. Liu,2 M. G. Flanner,1 S measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black the concept of radiative forcing (12) to assess quantitatively the net effect of a boreal forest fire

  10. Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire OVER THE PAST HALF-CENTURY, wildfire has Creek Fire on its deadly rampage across the Pine Ridge. The good news is that due to active forest no infrastructure and its forest survived the fire intact. About 90 percent of the Park burned, with the majority

  11. forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and Future Maintenance of Fuels limited to affect fire severity and the Forest Service has predominantly focused on suppression, and institutional barriers to increased fire use that we discuss. Keywords: fire policy, fire suppression, forest

  12. APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntaimo, Lewis

    APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo Department of Industrial. Speedway Tucson, AZ 85721 In this article, the authors discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire to obtain timely simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform

  13. Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 2006 Research Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    in 2009, based on research done by Vogt et al. The Landscape Fragmentation Tool maps the types Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 ­ 2006 Research Summary About the Project Forest for the fragmentation of Connecticut's forests, and how fragmentation has progressed over time, CLEAR researchers

  14. Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02 Report of Visiting Group ­ Forest Research Environmental Research Branch 29 ­ 30 October 2001 1. Review Procedures On the invitation of Mr Jim Dewar, Chief visited the Alice Holt Research Station of Forest Research on 29 and 30 October 2001. Secretarial support

  15. DWARF MISTLETOE CONTROL IN RESIDENTIAL FORESTS-1/ John G. Laut-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DWARF MISTLETOE CONTROL IN RESIDENTIAL FORESTS-1/ 2/ John G. Laut- Abstract: Residential forests-pressure. These people demand answers to questions about tree manage- ment -- not necessarily forest management people-pressures present new problems with new dimensions that demand new potential . solutions

  16. Forest Products Market Information Systems in the UNECE region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Market Information Systems in the UNECE region. L. Farquharson August 2007 #12;#12;A report into Forest Products Market Information Systems_____________________________ 1 1. EXECUTIVE____________________________________________________15 #12;2 ____________________________ A report into Forest Products Market Information Systems 2 1

  17. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  18. TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES& A&comprehensive&analysis&of®ulating& and&cultural&services&provided&by&Texas'&forests& & & & & & October&2013 June 2009 #12;#12;Texas&Statewide&Assessment&of&& Forest&Ecosystem&Services& A&comprehensive&analysis&of&the®ulating&and&& cultural&services&provided&by&Texas

  19. SCIENCE AND FOREST CONCESSIONS Bastiaan Louman, Fernando Carrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of experience with forest concessions while Guatemala ventured into its first community concession in 1994. Peru. In Guatemala 14 concessions exist that cover a total of 512,786 has of forest while in Peru the process has of concessions in Bolivia, Guatemala and Peru include the costs of forest management, slow and difficult

  20. Simulating the Future Forested Landscapes of the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeled 1. Small gap (wind, disease, other) 2. Private land development 3. Forest management, especially Lennette, Landscape Modeling · Jonathan Thompson, Analysis · Justin Goodwin, Analysis #12;Topics 1. Types to 2095). #12;Present 2096 PUBLIC & TRIBAL LANDS PRIVATE LANDS Urban Forest Urban Non-Forest Low

  1. Impact of Biomass Harvesting on Forest Soil Productivity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Biomass Harvesting on Forest Soil Productivity in the Northern Rocky Mountains Woongsoon; Keyes, Christopher R.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah. 2015. Impact of biomass harvesting on forest soil of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 35 p. Abstract Biomass harvesting extracts

  2. Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard VloskyLSU Agricultural Center England Air ParkEngland Air Park--January 18, 2005January 18, 2005 Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;Outline · Industry Development

  3. FIEA Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    FIEA ­ Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship Forest Industry, including any NZQA Unit Standards that you have completed. NOTES: 1. The Regulations for this award be received by the Dunedin office of Forest Industry Engineering Association by 1 March 2012

  4. Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and N. M. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners. http://www.jstor.org #12;497 ENERGY AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS OF FOREST FLOORS IN THREE MINNESOTA FORESTS and subsequent utilization by heterotrophs is a major pathway of energy flow. Forest floors can also

  5. Session K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285 Estimating Forest Fuels in the Southwest Using Forest Inventory Data1 objective of this study was to demonstrate the linkages between forest inventory data and hazardous fuelSession K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen

  6. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004. 93 Linking Vegetation Patterns to Potential Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to compare fuel loading, modeled fuel consumption, smoke production, fire behavior, and susceptibility and Alvarado USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004.94 consumption, smoke production, fire Smoke Production and Fire Hazard1 Roger D. Ottmar2 and Ernesto Alvarado3 During the past 80 years

  7. Analyzing Spatio – Temporal changes in the forest cover of Chamoli District, Uttarakhand in India from 1999 to 2010 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awachat, Amruta

    2011-11-24

    This paper makes an attempt to map the changes in forest cover from 1999 to 2010 in Chamoli District of India using remote sensing techniques. Landsat ETM+ imageries of year 1999, 2006 and 2010, having a spatial resolution of 30m have been used...

  8. 83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40-to 90-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    83USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Woody Root Biomass of 40- to 90- Year. Bledsoe2 Jerry Tecklin3 Abstract: This research examined biomass of blue oak (Quercus douglasii Hook root biomass outside the root ball. Root ball mass ranged from 7 to 184 kg, and estimated total root

  9. Forest Products Marketing on the Internet "When history is written, the creation of the Internet may be ranked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Marketing on the Internet Bob Smith "When history is written, the creation of the Internet may be ranked alongside Johann Gutenberg's printing press and Marconi's radio as among the major attention in the past year than the Internet. Every major newspaper, magazine, and television station have

  10. Effect of stand age on whole ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Canadian boreal forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    information on the fractional coverage of stands in different age classes and measurements of ecosystem gasEffect of stand age on whole ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Canadian boreal forest Marcy Litvak1 ), and moderate in the 70 and 130 year old stands (À6.3 and À7.1 mmol mÀ2 sÀ1 , respectively). Whole-ecosystem

  11. 16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR building rating system in the world: USGBC's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Richard P. Vlosky, Ph.D. Director Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Crosby Land & Resources

  12. 18 December 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USFSA/bulletins/e3831c USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 12/16/2014 02:57 PM EST USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 2014 Farm Bill Program Generates Renewable Energy of dead or diseased trees from National Forests and Bureau of Land Management lands for renewable energy

  13. 31 March2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including leaving forests untouched, burning wood for energy, and using various solid wood products31 March2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR fuels Earth, Energy & Environment A Yale University-led study has found that using more wood and less

  14. 11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTORT/FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    market signals for forest products, including energy. As stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTORT it's time to get the policy right on biomass energy carbon accounting The clock is ticking

  15. 2 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; and continues to be one of the top ten manufacturing sectors in the state. The report analyzes data collected products such as lumber, structural panels, paper and pulp. Manufacturing of secondary forest products like and visit TexasForestInfo.com for additional information on economic impacts of the Texas forest sector

  16. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP Fracking gets green light in largest national forest on East Coast US will allow a form of natural gas drilling known as fracking to occur in parts of the largest national forest on the East Coast. The U.S. Forest Service originally planned to ban fracking in the 1.1 million-acre George

  17. 27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of its landmass to combat climate change and soil erosion, the State Forestry Administration said27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR of the new forested land was low-quality, and pointed out that while new trees are planted rapidly, data

  18. Fiscal Year 2008 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2008 | 1 SPONSORS 08 FISCAL YEAR $1 million+ Angie's List General Motors Corporation Earth Share Ethanol Promotion and Information Council FOX Broadcasting Company #12;SPONSORS 08 FISCAL Motor Corporation Union of Concerned Scientists Universal Music Group University of Michigan School

  19. Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan June 15, 2009 Rev.1 1 Biohazard Waste without a permit from the Solid Waste Section. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulate Bloodborne Pathogens and Exposure Control Plans. Under state regulations a solid waste generator

  20. Directory of Tennessee's forest industries 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A directory of primary and secondary forest industries is presented. Firm names and addresses are listed by county in alphabetical order. The following information is listed for each industry: type of plant, production and employee size class, products manufactured, and equipment. For the primary industries, the major species of trees used are listed. (MHR)

  1. GIS, SPATIAL STATISTICAL GRAPHICS, AND FOREST HEALTH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    1 GIS, SPATIAL STATISTICAL GRAPHICS, AND FOREST HEALTH. James J. Majure, Noel Cressie, Dianne Cook, and Jürgen Symanzik ABSTRACT This paper discusses the use of a geographic information systems (GIS), Arcview, into a geographic information system (GIS), Arcview 2.1 (ESRI 1995), and its use in the statistical analysis of spa

  2. The Compiler Forest Mihai Budiu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Gordon

    The Compiler Forest Mihai Budiu1 , Joel Galenson1,2 , and Gordon D. Plotkin1,3 1 Microsoft Research the problem of writing compilers targeting complex ex- ecution environments, such as computer clusters composed of machines with multi-core CPUs. To that end we introduce partial compilers. These compilers can

  3. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the USDA Forest Service, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, University of California at Davis, University at Davis, the University of Nevada at Reno, and the Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada. #12;Lake Tahoe Senator Harry Reid, President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore

  4. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in tourism The impact of trees on the well-being of residents on two inner-London social housing estates for recreation and nature tourism ­ European COST Action E33 Forest School: a marvellous opportunity to learn for health and well-being in Scotland: research to understand and overcome barriers to accessing woodlands

  5. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standard Guidelines #12;© Crown Copyright 2011 You may re-use this information (not including logos) free, visit: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence or write to the Information Policy Team; ecosystem services; environment; forestry; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL002/FC

  6. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  7. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  8. @ SOUTH ES'T FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -01 EX^er LUMBER GRADE RECOVERY FROM HAWA ROBUSTA EUCALYPTUS LOGS Roger G.Skolmen USDA forest Service Research Note PW-204 1970 Lumber has been produced from plantation-grown robusta eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grade yield of Hawaii-grown timber, 30 robusta eucalyptus logs were shipped lo a Michigan sawmill

  9. Forest Growth Under Extensive Annual Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    aridity factor (precipitation/potential evaporation) of about 0.18. Annual received solar energy of ~7 forests/ Count' area K ha K ha % Morocco 2491 534 6.8 Algeria 1427 718 0.9 Tunisia 308 202 3.1 Egypt 0 72

  10. New Forests International Journal on the Biology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    of Afforestation and Reforestation ISSN 0169-4286 Volume 45 Number 3 New Forests (2014) 45:301-309 DOI 10.1007/s silviculture programs in many companies and countries around the world and tree breeding programs have produced live in a rapidly changing world faced with: increasing demands for food, energy and water

  11. Forest Mensuration Instructor: Mr. Ken Oser, RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    covered include: individual and stand level volume estimation, natural resources inventories, sampling of principles of forest mensuration and their applications to estimate forestry resources. Some of the topics) For information on current UF policies for assigning grade points, see https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info

  12. An environmental and social assessment of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in forest certification: FSC,PEFC,SFI and CSA 5 The assessment I Objective,comprehensive,and performance Table 1: The number of hectares certified under the FSC,PEFC,SFI and CSA Box 2: Governments and industry the PEFC Sweden and FSC Sweden standard Table 3: Comparison between the SFI and FSC USA standard Box 4

  13. By Rebecca Barnard, Forest Certification Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - administered land. Third party and annual surveillance audits maintain or improve the DNR's forest management that their products Continued on page 4 Chain of Custody Market Outlook 2 Certification Web sites 5 Stumpage Prices 6 percent long-run trend level by mid-2009. However, energy and fuel prices have increased to levels well

  14. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Preston, Caroline M; Schmidt, Michael W. I; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-01-01

    Ecological effects of forest fires, Bot. Rev. , 26, 483 –1 ] In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance andal. , 1999]. Risk of forest fires was high during the entire

  15. Forest Biomass Supply for BioForest Biomass Supply for Bio--productionproduction in the Southeastern United Statesin the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Forest Biomass Supply for BioForest Biomass Supply for BioBio--production and biomass utilizationsproduction and biomass utilizations Industrial sector: for heat and steam Utility sector: for electricity Forest biomass: Agricultural biomass: Transportation sector: for biofuels

  16. 4. Lower Oregon Columbia Gorge Tributaries Watershed 4.1 Subbasin Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    habitats interspersed within coniferous forest. Forest communities include riparian hardwoods including red, wet meadows, dryland balds, riparian woodlands, and subalpine communities on the higher peaks, industrial, rural residential, forestry, agriculture, and shallow draft marinas. Economy Outdoor recreatio

  17. Accomplishments Fiscal Year 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorke, James

    18 Accomplishments Fiscal Year 2012 #12;Office of Information Technology: Providing Computing of MarylandAccomplishment Highlights -- Fiscal Year 2012 For many years, the Office of Information Technology. This publication will inform you about the organization's accomplishments during fiscal year 2012 -- or July 1

  18. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-27

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experimentmore »in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.« less

  19. Moderate forest disturbance as a stringent test for gap and big-leaf models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Fisk, Justin P.; Holm, Jennifer; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance-induced tree mortality is a key factor regulating the carbon balance of a forest, but tree mortality and its subsequent effects are poorly represented processes in terrestrial ecosystem models. It is thus unclear whether models can robustly simulate moderate (non-catastrophic) disturbances, which tend to increase biological and structural complexity and are increasingly common in aging US forests. We tested whether three forest ecosystem models – Biome-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), a classic big-leaf model, and the ZELIG and ED (Ecosystem Demography) gap-oriented models – could reproduce the resilience to moderate disturbance observed in an experimentally manipulated forest (the Forest Accelerated Succession Experiment in northern Michigan, USA, in which 38% of canopy dominants were stem girdled and compared to control plots). Each model was parameterized, spun up, and disturbed following similar protocols and run for 5 years post-disturbance. The models replicated observed declines in aboveground biomass well. Biome-BGC captured the timing and rebound of observed leaf area index (LAI), while ZELIG and ED correctly estimated the magnitude of LAI decline. None of the models fully captured the observed post-disturbance C fluxes, in particular gross primary production or net primary production (NPP). Biome-BGC NPP was correctly resilient but for the wrong reasons, and could not match the absolute observational values. ZELIG and ED, in contrast, exhibited large, unobserved drops in NPP and net ecosystem production. The biological mechanisms proposed to explain the observed rapid resilience of the C cycle are typically not incorporated by these or other models. It is thus an open question whether most ecosystem models will simulate correctly the gradual and less extensive tree mortality characteristic of moderate disturbances.

  20. Seasonal exchange of CO 2 and delta 18 O-CO 2 varies with postfire succession in boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welp, L. R; Randerson, J. T; Liu, H. P

    2006-01-01

    change on Canadian forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 31,1998), Climate change and forest fire potential in Russianat three stands in a boreal forest fire chronosequence. Our

  1. Californians must learn from the past and work together to meet the forest and fire challenges of the next century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocher, Susan

    2015-01-01

    state and federal forest and fire agencies. Moving forwardtogether to meet the forest and fire challenges of the nextmixed conifer forest: Habitat and fire hazard implications.

  2. Forest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission FR Science Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission FR Science Focus 2011-16 Understanding forests and providing solutions for a sustainable future #12;Forest Research - Who we are Forest Research (FR) is the Forestry Commission's Research Agency and is the UK's foremost body for forest

  3. Competitive Interactions Between Appalachian Hardwood Species and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    failure Burger et al. 2002 Groundcovers being used in project Four different ground covers are going ·Soil erosion ·Mass failure With previous lack of regulations, there was little effort in reclamation However.. 1977: Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) was passed Creation of the Office

  4. Seasonally Flooded Hardwood Bottomlands Topography and Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    to river dredging and flood control practices by farming operations · Deforestation and drainage have · Plug Drainage Ditches · Restore Microtopography #12;Acorn Collection · Acorns collected each autumn;Nursery Culture and Processing · Seedlings lifted in early February · Visually evaluated (height, root

  5. Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith T.Gower

    2010-03-03

    A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

  6. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  7. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for geothermal leasing in the West, including Alaska. The draft PEIS considers all public lands and national forests with geothermal...

  8. Methane emissions from upland forest soils and vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Megonigal, ABB

    2008-01-01

    Crill. 2006. A source of methane from upland forests in thecontrolling atmospheric methane con- sumption by temperateand T.B. Parkin. 2001. Methane oxidation and produc- tion

  9. Lacunarity as a texture measure for a tropical forest landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of tropical forest cover alters terrestrial plant and animal population dynamics, reduces biodiversity and carbon storage capacity, and, as a global phenomenon could affect regional and global climate patterns. Lacunarity as a texture measure can offer a simple solution to characterize the texture of tropical forest landscape and determine spatial patterns associated with ecological processes. Lacunarity quantifies the deviation from translational invariance by describing the distribution of gaps within a binary image at multiple scales. As lacunarity increases, the spatial arrangement of tropical forest gaps will also increase. In this study, we used the Spatial Modeler in Imagine as a graphic programming tool to calculate lacunarity indices for a tropical forest landscape in Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala. Lacunarity indices were derived from classified Landsat MSS images acquired in 1974 and 1984. Random-generated binary images were also used to derive lacunarity indices and compared with the lacunarity of forest patterns derived from the classified MSS images. Tropical forest area declined about 17%, with most of the forest areas converted into pasture/grassland for grazing. During this period, lacunarity increased about 25%. Results of this study suggest that tropical forest fragmentation could be quantified with lacunarity measures. The study also demonstrated that the Spatial Modeler can be useful as a programming tool to quantify spatial patterns of tropical forest landscape by using remotely sensed data.

  10. An anthropological view of the forest culture of Peten, Guatemala

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, N.B.

    1995-12-31

    Traditional farmers and harvesters of non-timber forest products in Peten treat the forest in ways that conserve and regenerate its resources. They believe no one owns the forest outright. Humans share it with other life forms and therefore no one has the right to monopolize or destroy forest resources. Traditional Peteneros find a use for almost everything in the forest, and believe it neither smart nor proper to use a given area for a single purpose, for example, to clear an area of all trees and devote it exclusively to a cattle pasture. In the traditional system most medicinal plants, basic foodstuffs, fuelwoods and construction materials are taken from the bosque (secondary forests within walking distance of human settlements). Peteneros` sustainable use of bosques eases pressure on the monte (primary forests). In the monte Peteneros` harvesting practices are protective of resources, causing minimal damage. Finding almost everything in the forest useful, Peteneros believe all soils and plants should be tended and allowed to regenerate. However, modern developments such as uncontrolled logging, large-scale, unorganized colonization, cattle raising and market demands leading to monocropped farm plots imperil the forests of Peten and a way of life that subsumes a practical conservation ethic.

  11. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wisconsin. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi Community Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and...

  12. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the...

  13. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Protectio Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land Protectio...

  14. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Climate change; phenology; spring; autumn; trees; forest; warming; Betula alleghaniensis;...

  15. Clive Brasier, Forest Research Flaws in international protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    moth, Oak processionary moth, Chestnut gall wasp... Especially Phytophthora pathogens ­ eg to the long term biosecurity and sustainability of European forests and natural ecosystems, egs .. #12;Mainly

  16. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  17. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  18. Effects of selective logging on tropical forest tree growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J.water content cannot explain the increases in diameter observed before the onset of rains.

  19. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations Feedstock Supply and Logistics: Biomass as a Commodity Feedstock Supply and Logistics:Biomass as a Commodity...

  20. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    forests provide more carbon sequestration benefits than let-the relative carbon sequestration benefits of let-growlife cycle carbon sequestration benefits, averaged over 120,

  1. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    First Update to the Climate Change Scoping Plan: Building onManaging forests for climate change mitigation. Science 320:IPCC] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2006. IPCC

  2. Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a challenging (consumption and demand) V. Forest products trade VI. Conclusions VII. Discussion #12;Promoting Sustainable Sustainable Consumption Workshop, Geneva, 2011 As shaped by forest products production Sources: Worldmapper

  3. Management of Giant Sequoia on Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Demonstration State Forest is a 4,800 acre tract of forest land in Tulare County managed. It reads "The Mountain Home Tract Forest in Tulare County shall be developed and maintained, pursuant

  4. Interannual variability of surface energy exchange depends on stand age in a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance, Agric. For.RANDERSON: BOREAL FOREST FIRE AND ENERGY EXCHANGE Johnstone,AND RANDERSON: BOREAL FOREST FIRE AND ENERGY EXCHANGE uous

  5. Age-dependent variation in the biophysical properties of boreal forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    for long term energy flux data sets. Agricultural and ForestBOREAL FOREST atmosphere exchange of both carbon and energy.forests account for a large portion of terrestrial biomass and their rates of mass and energy

  6. The effect of post-fire stand age on the boreal forest energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    reserved. Keywords: Energy balance; Forest fire; Borealstand age on the boreal forest energy balance B.D. Amiro a,energy and water fluxes at mature and disturbed forest

  7. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    C. S. : The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,W. : Climate change and forest fire poten- tial in Russianflight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon diox-

  8. The effect of post-fire stand age on the boreal forest energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.W.R. , 2002. Large forest fires in Canada, 1959– 1997. J.flight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon dioxide

  9. header for SPIE use Evolving forest fire burn severity classification algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    header for SPIE use Evolving forest fire burn severity classification algorithms for multi, to the classification of forest fire burn severity using Landsat 7 ETM+ multispectral imagery. The details. Keywords: Multispectral imagery, Genetic programming, Supervised classification, Forest fire, Wildfire. 1

  10. Interannual variability of surface energy exchange depends on stand age in a boreal forest fire chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Heping; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01

    LIU AND RANDERSON: BOREAL FOREST FIRE AND ENERGY EXCHANGE2006), The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,pathways by which boreal forest fire influences the surface

  11. A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    A Forest Fire Simulation Tool for Economic Planning in Fire Suppression Management Models fire spread behavior of forest fires provides important information for decision-making. Specific resource positioning to control and extinguish forest fire, decisions can be validated before

  12. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    C. S. : The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,W. : Climate change and forest fire poten- tial in Russianand Flannigan, M. D. : Forest fire oc- currence and climate

  13. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2006), The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,J. , et al. (2003), Large forest fires in Canada, 1959–1997,2003; U.S. National Interagency Forest Fire Centre, http://

  14. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    at Fourth Symposium on Forest and Fire Meteorology, Am.flight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon dioxideNorth American boreal forest, in Fire, Climate Change and

  15. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    precipitation (MAP), forest type, and fire regime. [ 7 ] Thein mid-elevation conifer forests, where fire suppression is20th century fire suppression in western US forests, and a

  16. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06

    in low-yielding farming systems, but there was considerable turnover between these systems and forests, with widespread generalists replacing narrowly endemic forest-dependent species. Species most dependent on forest as a natural habitat, those...

  17. The potential for trickle up : how local actors' experiments influence national forest policy planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blockhus, Jill M

    2006-01-01

    The loss of forests in Vietnam encouraged central government policy makers to consider new ways to manage forest resources. A major forest policy shift -- moving away from state-led management -- began in earnest in pilot ...

  18. Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    Structuring institutional analysis for urban ecosystems: A key to sustainable urban forest in urban settings with a specific focus on sustainable urban forest management. We conclude that urban management . Urban forest policy. Institutional analysis . Ecosystem services . Public goods . Sustainability

  19. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    in Canadian boreal forest fires, Can. J. Forest Res. , 39,emissions from boreal forest fires, J. Geophys. Res. -Atmos,released from peat and forest fires in Indonesia during

  20. Abstract--Certified timber product is a market-linked tool to address the need for sustainable forest management and support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification schemes (PEFC). Malaysia has the world's largest area of certified tropical forest