Sample records for hardin liberty chambers

  1. Biography E. Hardin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More LikeAndreas Hampel Dr. Hampel willHardin

  2. Simulation of Heat Treatment Distortion R.A. Hardin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    quenched in water and in oil. Unfortunately, due to the lack of documentation on the heat treatment process a test piece casting to be produced at a participating foundry to provide data on heat treatmentSimulation of Heat Treatment Distortion R.A. Hardin1 and C. Beckermann2 1 Research Engineer, 2

  3. Liberty School 601 Filbert Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberty School 601 Filbert Street Pittsburgh, PA 15232 Shady Lane 100 North Braddock Pittsburgh, PA 15208 UCDC 635 Clyde St. Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Community Day School 6424 Forward Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15217 East Hills Elementary 2250 Centre Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Ellis School 6425 Fifth Avenue Pittsburgh

  4. 2010; doi: 10.1101/pdb.prot5541Cold Spring Harb Protoc Timothy Walston and Jeff Hardin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jeff

    and Hardin 2010b) and an ablation technique for killing individual cells within the C. elegans embryo, described in Laser Killing of Blastomeres in Caenorhabditis elegans (Walston and Hardin 2010c). MATERIALS

  5. 2010; doi: 10.1101/pdb.prot5540Cold Spring Harb Protoc Timothy Walston and Jeff Hardin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jeff

    Cell Contacts in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos (Walston and Hardin 2010b). An ablation technique. elegans embryo) is described in Laser Killing of Blastomeres in Caenorhabditis elegans (Walston and Hardin

  6. Hardin-Hilltop Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | OpenHalfWind Jump to:Hardin-Hilltop

  7. Hardin County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation Handbook forHansung A ETexas: EnergyHardin

  8. Liberty County State of the Community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Emily; Gao, Fan; Reja, Md Yousuf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    update, September 4, 2012) Toxic Release or Hazardous Material Toxic releases location or hazardous material sites is an important consideration for sustainable and resilient development. It has a great impact on health and safety... LIBERTY COUNTY State of the Community Emily Tedford Fan Gao Md Yousuf Reja 1 INTRODUCTION Liberty County, Texas is located in southeastern Texas and part of the Houston...

  9. Liberty Power Corp. (Illinois) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty Power Corp.Liberty

  10. Liberty Power Corp. (Maryland) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty PowerLiberty Power

  11. Liberty Power Corp. (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty PowerLiberty

  12. Liberty Power Corp. (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLibertyLiberty Power

  13. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  14. Liberty, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: EnergyTexas:Hill,Liberty,

  15. Liberty Power Corp. (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergy InformationLiberty

  16. Liberty Power Corp. (Delaware) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty Power Corp.

  17. Liberty Power Corp. (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty Power

  18. Liberty Power Corp. (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty

  19. Liberty Power Corp. (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLiberty PowerLibertyLiberty

  20. The administration of Hardin R. Runnels, Governor of Texas, 1857-1859

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, Sharon Anne

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. J. M. Nance Hardin Richard Runnels was a man of Southern back- ground and viewpoint, who emigrated to Texas in 1842 with his mother and three brothers. Shortly after settling in Bowie County, he entered politics as a state repre- sentative..., 1817- 1912, " ' fh Off' 1 d S ' t' 1 ~R' f fh S f ~Mf ' ' ' (N h 'll, 1912), 55. Ibid. , 56. While residing in Georgia, the Colonel served with distinction in the state legislature, representing at different times the counties of Washington...

  1. Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of the plant-creating enough energy to power the facility, as well as a co-located bioethanol plant. Project LIBERTY is co-located with POET's existing corn ethanol plant to...

  2. Exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  3. Liberty Power Corp. (Rhode Island) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergyLibertyLiberty Power Corp.

  4. NOx Emissions Reductions from Implementation of the 2000 IECC/IRC Conservation Code to Residential Construction in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Im, P.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designated as affected counties include: Bastrop, Bexar, Caldwell, Comal, Ellis, Gregg, Guadalupe, Harrison, Hays, Johnson, Kaufman, Nueces, Parker, Rockwall, Rusk, San Patricio, Smith, Travis, Upshur, Victoria, Williamson, and Wilson County. 5... Montgomery Galveston Jefferson Williamson Brazoria Smith Johnson Gregg Ellis Hays Parker Orange Guadalupe Victoria Comal San Patricio Kaufman Liberty Harrison Bastrop Hardin Rusk Rockwall Upshur Caldwell Wilson Waller Chambers County Population Figure 3...

  5. Ionization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walenta, Albert H. (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  6. McCullough to Liberty fiber optics project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace an existing overhead static wire with a shield wire that contains optical fibers (OPGW) on transmission lines from McCullough Substation, south of Las Vegas, Nevada, to Liberty Substation near Phoenix, Arizona. The replacement will occur on the McCullough-Davis, Davis-Parker No. 2, and Parker-Liberty No. 1 230-kV transmission lines. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the lines. Western prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) entitled ``McCullough to Liberty Fiber Optics Project`` (DOE/EA-1202). The EA contains the analysis of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the OPGW. Based on the analysis in the EA, Western finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and therefore, Western is issuing this Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Target Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafety Tag:8, 2013 FINALTarget Chamber The

  8. North Liberty, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby, Connecticut: EnergyLaurel, Maryland:Liberty,

  9. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  10. Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Northern Thailand Geophysics Field Camp: Overview of Activities Lee M. Liberty Boise State University conducted a geophysics field camp in northern Thailand in January, 2010 to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental and engineering challenges. Faculty, technicians

  11. Impact of Heavy Aircraft Operations on Airport Capacity at Newark Liberty International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gummadi, Ramakrishna

    Federal Aviation Administration IMC Instrument Meteorological Conditions JFK New York John F. Kennedy capacity. Acronyms ASPM Aviation System Performance Metrics EWR Newark Liberty International Airport FAA, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) departure and arrival rate data is col

  12. EIS-0100: Liberty-Coolidge 230-kV Transmission Line, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with an upgrade of electrical transmission capability between the Liberty and Coolidge Substations.

  13. Freedom and order : how democratic governments abridge civil liberties after terrorist attacks -- and why sometimes they don't

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Gabriel, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is driven by the following question: "What explains the variation in governments' civil liberty-abridging responses to terrorist attacks?" In the United States, it was not until a year after the 1995 ...

  14. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Injection Vacuum Chamber Located on beam line 1, the "Smith-Purcell box" has 140 liters of usable volume. Due to its size, it is mounted on a fixed platform. Hosted...

  15. BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chamber can be used for more than just plasma wakefield experiments. Dedicated 500 ls turbo pump and one auxiliary 200 ls turbo pump port. Normally operates in the 10-8 Torr...

  16. BNL | ATF Interaction Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with translation actuators. Beam profile monitors at interaction region as well as chamber entrance and exit. Available port for 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-8 Torr range...

  17. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    entrance and exit. Dedicated ion pumps (250 ls total) with a port for one 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-8 Torr range. Photo of open DWFA chamber, in-situ on beam...

  18. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Beeman, Barton V. (San Mateo, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Hadley, Dean R. (Manteca, CA); Landre, Phoebe (Livermore, CA); Lehew, Stacy L. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  19. Liberty and British identity: printed reactions to the Quebec Act 1774-1775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Aaron Lukefahr

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1 October 1769 (Political Register, 1769)????.????... 92 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The rhetoric used by those debating the Quebec Act suggests that as the eighteenth century came to a close, liberty stood as the foundation for a British... brought to the surface numerous issues. Religion, government and law were all central to the debate between supporters and opponents of the bill. During the course of the debate the Quebec Act moved beyond the two houses of Parliament...

  20. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Secondary emission gas chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. In'shakov; V. Kryshkin; V. Skvortsov

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  3. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  4. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Richard L. (Roseville, MN); Jeffrey, Frank R. (Shoreview, MN); Westerberg, Roger K. (Cottage Grove, MN)

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  5. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA); Hiskes, John R. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  6. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renner, Tim R. (Berkeley, CA); Nyman, Mark A. (Berkeley, CA); Stradtner, Ronald (Kensington, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  7. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  8. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  9. Southeast Asia applied geophysics workshop: Geoscientists without borders Lee M. Liberty*, Spencer H. Wood, Emily A. Hinz, and Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University, Fongsaward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Southeast Asia applied geophysics workshop: Geoscientists without borders Lee M. Liberty*, Spencer of the SEG Foundation Geoscientists Without Borders program, we conducted a geophysics workshop in northern Thailand to train students and professionals in geophysical methods to address environmental

  10. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabil Ghodbane

    2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  11. VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL CALORIMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRIFT VC 1/2 FC 1/2 VERTEX CHAMBERS TARGET CELL DVC MC 1­3 HODOSCOPE H0 MONITOR BC 1/2 BC 3/4 TRD at Threashold Lambda Physics (u ­L spin transfer) Motivation: ­ W L Target cell e beam L p p e ­ Elastic: Peltier elements ( T ~ ­20C ) ­ Custom built electronics + HELIX chips low autgassing (

  12. State & Federal Initiatives Energy and Waste- The Landmark Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island Energy Savings Performance Contract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach, M. D.

    programs since the late 1970's due to the oil embargo of 1973-74. Federal energy management programs were further strengthened by the natural gas shortages of 1977-78 and heightened by the Iranian hostage crisis in 1979. These programs and/or tax... of Liberty and Ellis Island National Monument are perhaps the most visible Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) performed in the U.S. to date simply because of the international notoriety of the facilities themselves. While the technologies...

  13. Angela Hardin | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1Albuquerque, NMPerformanceof Energy4 * AugustAndrea

  14. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  15. Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty, and Spencer H. Wood, Boise State University, Fongsaward Singharajawarapan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Student-based archaeological geophysics in northern Thailand Emily A. Hinz*, Lee M. Liberty of Western Australia Summary As part of the 2010 near-surface geophysics workshop in Chiang Mai, Thailand, local archaeological targets were used as a basis for teaching geophysical data collection, processing

  16. TRU waste characterization chamber gloveboxes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. S.

    1998-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) is participating in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transuranic Waste Program in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Laboratory's support currently consists of intrusive characterization of a selected population of drums containing transuranic waste. This characterization is performed in a complex of alpha containment gloveboxes termed the Waste Characterization Gloveboxes. Made up of the Waste Characterization Chamber, Sample Preparation Glovebox, and the Equipment Repair Glovebox, they were designed as a small production characterization facility for support of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This paper presents salient features of these gloveboxes.

  17. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  18. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Temperature Studies for ATLAS MDT BOS Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Engl; O. Biebel; R. Hertenberger; R. Mameghani; D. Merkl; F. Rauscher; D. Schaile; R. Stroehmer

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data sets with high statistics taken at the cosmic ray facility, equipped with 3 ATLAS BOS MDT chambers, in Garching (Munich) have been used to study temperature and pressure effects on gas gain and drifttime. The deformation of a thermally expanded chamber was reconstructed using the internal RasNik alignment monitoring system and the tracks from cosmic data. For these studies a heating system was designed to increase the temperature of the middle chamber by up to 20 Kelvins over room temperature. For comparison the temperature effects on gas properties have been simulated with Garfield. The maximum drifttime decreased under temperature raise by -2.21 +- 0.08 ns/K, in agreement with the results of pressure variations and the Garfield simulation. The increased temperatures led to a linear increase of the gas gain of about 2.1% 1/K. The chamber deformation has been analyzed with the help of reconstructed tracks. By the comparison of the tracks through the reference chambers with these through the test chamber the thermal expansion has been reconstructed and the result shows agreement with the theoretical expansion coefficient. As the wires are fixed at the end of the chamber, the wire position calculation can not provide a conclusion for the chamber middle. The complete deformation has been identified with the analysis of the monitoring system RasNik, whose measured values have shown a homogeneous expansion of the whole chamber, overlayed by a shift and a rotation of the chamber middle with respect to the outer part of the chamber. The established results of both methods are in agreement. We present as well a model for the position-drifttime correction as function of temperature.

  20. IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF. I. Introduction One important class of issues concerning

  1. Cooperation Reliability Testing of the Clipper Windpower Liberty 2.5 MW Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-210

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clipper Windpower (CWP) has developed the Liberty 2.5 MW wind turbine. The development, manufacturing, and certification process depends heavily on being able to validate the full-scale system design and performance under load in both an accredited structural test facility and through accredited field testing. CWP requested that DOE/ NREL upgrade blade test capabilities to perform a scope of work including structural testing of the C-96 blade used on the CWP Liberty turbine. This funds-in CRADA was developed to upgrade NREL blade test capability, while enabling certification testing of the C-96 blade through the facility and equipment upgrades. NREL shared resource funds were used to develop hardware necessary to structurally attach a large wind turbine to the test stand at the NWTC. Participant funds-in monies were used for developing the test program.

  2. Commissioning of SLAC SLD 45-Degree Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. O. Eschenburg

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLD experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center had a significant gap in its muon tracking coverage, provided by the Warm Iron Calorimeter. Supplemental planes of limited streamer tube chambers were added to improve the coverage in the vicinity of the gap at 0.65 commissioning of the forty-five degree chamber region of the SLAC SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter is presented. This task involved the completion of the forty-five degree chamber region geometry for the Warm Iron Calorimeter's fitter and swimmer and the changing of the way multiple scattering effects are treated in the fitter algorithm.

  3. Simulation of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M.et al. , “Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion,”et al. , "Chamber Transport of `Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ion

  4. Intense ion beam propagation in a reactor sized chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vay, J.L.; Deutsch, C.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beams in a heavy ion fusion reactor chamber filled with lowIon Fusion, Intense Ion Beams, Reaction Chamber. P.A.C.S.heavy ion beam propagation in the reaction chamber, Fus.

  5. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion W. M. Sharp,Peterson, "Chamber Transport of 'Foot' Pulses for Heavy-Ionstate of beam ions. Although several chamber- transport

  6. Chamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization on Heavy-Ion-Fusion Chamber Transport," to beChamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion W.chamber-transport effectiveness is the fraction of enclosed beam ions

  7. Depth and mineralogy of the magma source or pause region for the Carboniferous Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, J.A.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of Al content geobarometry on clinopyroxene inclusions in plagioclase from the Carboniferous Liberty Hill pluton, South Carolina, yields pressure estimates of 8-10 kbar. Amphibole crystallization pressures are 3.1-4.7 kbar; contact metamorphic pressure are 4.5 kbar. Clinopyroxenes could be early crystallization products from the melt, restite crystals from the source region, xenocrysts from the magma conduit walls, or xenocrysts from a more mafic magma. Compositional uniformity of granitoid clinopyroxenes but dissimilarity with those in contemporaneous gabbroids is evidence against a xenocrystic origin. The deeper depths are interpreted as either the source region or a pausing place important in the crystallization history of the magma during its ascent to the upper crust. Early crystallization assemblage of the granitoid, and possibly the assemblage of the source region, was amphibole + clinopyroxene +/- plagioclase-bearing. An amphibolitic lower crustal source is consistent with the Sr and O isotopic and rare-earth-element studies of this and many other similar-age granitoids in the southern Appalachians.

  8. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission x-ray microscopy measurements under water vapor. An environmental sample chamber for reliable scanning transmission...

  9. Mini-PROTEAN Multi-Casting Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ºC for future use. 1.2 Specifications Materials of construction Clamps Glass filled polycarbonate Casting chamber, sealing plate Molded polycarbonate Gasket Silicone tubing Overall size 10 cm x 10 cm x 16

  10. Formation mechanisms of combustion chamber deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Christopher J. (Christopher John)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion chamber deposits are found in virtually all internal combustion engines after a few hundred hours of operation. Deposits form on cylinder, piston, and head surfaces that are in contact with fuel-air mixture ...

  11. Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitcher, C. S.

    .main chamber recycling 3.ion flux to the upper part of the outer plate 4.upper divertor leakage #12Main Chamber Pressure why do we care about it? - neutrals in the main chamber imply a particle-surface interaction there which may result in impurity production and erosion - neutrals in the main chamber may

  12. Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    with RAFS Advanced: He gas cooling system with SiC/SiC Research on several advanced concepts: FLiBe, Li, Li cooled blanket system for higher thermal efficiency - High temperature gas cooled blanket system with Si Programs on Chamber/Blanket · Recent Progress on Liquid Walls - IFE & MFE - Basic Principles - Plasma

  13. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  14. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaching chambers distribute treated wastewater into the soil. This publication lists the advantages and disadvantages of leaching chamber systems, explains how to maintain them and gives estimates of costs....

  15. POET Project Liberty, LLC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreachDepartment567 Prepared for theDepartmentPOCs

  16. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)] [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  17. Chapter 7.32 Centura-MxP+ Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    P+ is a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etch chamber typically used for etching oxide and nitride patternsChapter 7.32 Centura-MxP+ Chamber (centura-mxp) (586) 1.0 Equipment Purpose 1.1 The Centura Mx in the wafer. 1.2 The Centura platform is a fully automated, multi-wafer capacity, multi-chamber system

  18. Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview of Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE Wayne Meier Deputy Program Leader Fusion Energy power plant are illustrated here Target Factory and Injector Fusion ChamberDriver Power Conversion Review 1/30/11 4 Tritium Processing #12;There have been >50 IFE chamber design concepts and power plant

  19. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutralization on heavy-ion fusion chamber transport,” totechniques for heavy ion fusion chamber transport,” Nucl.liquid heavy-ion fusion target chambers,” Fusion Technol.

  20. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF.

  1. A spark chamber for cosmic ray research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelinek, Al Vincent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chambez *re r- -e evenis, anc to obtain good sta- s s ical data with the prese. . i sysiezz wou'8 require t! e exarina- iion o" severs' '. '. ous" no. pictures. ne effic ency zoz two simu ianeous particles in argon oius alcohol vspour is e timasec.... to be 75I15~ji. The effic ency of the . con-he' ium and the helium-alcohol vapour zillings are 1 igner about 85- 5(i. 3. Spurious Sparking Spurious sparks in the chamber can be attributed to a num- ber of factors. The most probable cause is ions left...

  2. The Monitored Drift Tube Chambers of Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atlas experiment has been designed to explore the high energy physics frontier at the TeV energy scale and to investigate on the physics of the Standard Model and beyond at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern. The Muon Spectrometer represents the most part of the Atlas detector. It has been designed to provide standalone measurement of the transverse muon momenta with a relative accuracy of 3% over a wide momentum range up to 10% for momenta of 1 TeV. This high accuracy is provided by the Monitored Drift-Tube chambers (MDT) which can determine the track trajectory with a precision of 40 {mu}m.

  3. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF BEAM PROFILES WITH A MULTI-WIRE CHAMBER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, J.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the beam with a small ion chamber. Both of these techniquesstudies of the chamber. A for heav;' ion radiotherapy beam

  4. Optical Alignment System for the PHENIX Muon Tracking Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Murata; A. Al-Jamel; R. L. Armendariz; M. L. Brooks; T. Horaguchi; N. Kamihara; H. Kobayashi; D. M. Lee; T. -A. Shibata; W. E. Sondheim

    2002-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A micron-precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers is developed. To ensure the required mass resolution of vector meson detection, the relative alignment between three tracking station chambers must be monitored with a precision of 25$\\mu$m. The OASys is a straightness monitoring system comprised of a light source, lens and CCD camera, used for determining the initial placement as well as for monitoring the time dependent movement of the chambers on a micron scale.

  5. Dielectric liquid ionization chambers for detecting fast neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Erin M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three ionization chambers with different geometries have been constructed and filled with dielectric liquids for detection of fast neutrons. The three dielectric liquids studied were Tetramethylsilane (TMS), Tetramethylpentane ...

  6. air wall ionization chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of California eScholarship Repository Summary: chamber, passive sampling, passive solar house, measurementhouse, we planed the distribution of fresh air, passivepassive...

  7. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author's recollections of his experience in the use of bubble chambers and the discoveries of strange resonances are given. (LEW)

  8. Exciting Internship at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Exciting Internship at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce Take advantage of the opportunity@americanarab.com with the subject "Internship Opportunity." Include a brief statement on why you would like to work at the American Arab Chamber of Commerce, along with your availability. If you are looking for an internship to fulfill

  9. aerosol test chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol test chamber First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 IFE Chamber Technology Testing...

  10. EFFECTS OF CHAMBER GEOMETRY AND GAS PROPERTIES ON HYDRODYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF IFE Zoran Dragojlovic1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    -rays and ions travel through the chamber and deposit some of their energy in the chamber background gas; the effects of various heat sources and transfer mechanisms such as photon and ion heat deposition and chamberEFFECTS OF CHAMBER GEOMETRY AND GAS PROPERTIES ON HYDRODYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF IFE CHAMBERS Zoran

  11. Vacuum chamber for ion manipulation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D; Anderson, Gordon A; Baker, Erin M

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area. A predetermined number of pairs of surfaces are disposed in one or more chambers, forming a multiple-layer ion mobility cyclotron device.

  12. May 31-June 1, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Dry Chamber Walls as Preliminary Step in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 6 Photon and Ion Attenuations in Carbon and Tungsten #12May 31-June 1, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Dry Chamber Walls as Preliminary Step in Defining Key Processes for Chamber Clearing Code 1 Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Configurations

  13. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  14. IMAGING WITH A MULTIPLANE MULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, W.T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. When the he^vy ions penetrate the chamber, the resultingMULTIWIRE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER USING HEAVY-ION BEAMS* U. T.Ion Beam Studies and Imaging with a Nultiplane Multiwire Proportional Chamber,"

  15. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  16. November 8-9, 2005 Blanket Design for Large Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    - Max. FS/Li interface temp. ODS Advanced Case Advanced Case RAFS RAFS ODS FS ODS FS Chamber radius, Rchamb (m) 10.5 10.5 11 11 Rep rate 5

  17. Neutral Gas Expansion in a Cylindrical Helicon Discharge Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    ­1500 G) magnetic field parallel to the axis of the tube. In many helicon experiments for basic plasma research, the discharge chamber is composed of a small diameter (2­10 cm), relatively long (0.5­1.75 m

  18. atlas muon chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  19. atlas mdt chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  20. atlas muon chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured...

  1. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chamber System is an tool designed to study the evolution of aerosols under conditions identical or similar to those of the surrounding environment. Our motivation was to quantify the sensitivity...

  3. A self-triggered readout for a time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Andrew Thompson, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-triggering readout for a time projection chamber (TPC) is presented, with applications to novel forms of data acquisition for high energy physics application. The construction and initial testing of the readout ...

  4. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Zimmermann, ”LC e-Cloud Activities at CERN”, talkal. , Simulations of the Electron Cloud for Vari- ous Con?E-CLOUD BUILD-UP IN GROOVED CHAMBERS ? M. Venturini † LBNL,

  5. Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy: Three recent examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are 1) protecting the first wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of x rays, target debris, and high energy neutrons, and 2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 5-10 Hz (i.e., re-establishing, the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall from x rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted to 1) reduce the cost of electricity by avoiding the cost and down time of changing damaged structures, and 2) reduce the cost of development by avoiding the cost of developing a new, low-activation material. Various schemes have been proposed to assure chamber clearing and renewal of the protective features at the required pulse rate. Representative chamber concepts are described, and key technical feasibility issues are identified for each class of chamber. Experimental activities (past, current, and proposed) to address these issues and technology research and development needs are discussed.

  6. Laser calibration system for the CERES Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dariusz Miskowiec; Peter Braun-Munzinger

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to simulate charged particle tracks at known positions in the CERES Time Projection Chamber at the CERN SPS. The system was primarily developed to study the response of the readout electronics and to calibrate the electron drift velocity. Further applications were the determination of the gating grid transparency, the chamber position calibration, and long-term monitoring of drift properties of the gas in the detector.

  7. Eigenmodes in Two Simplified Chamber Structures Studied for Spurious Microwaves in the APS Storage Ring Beam Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    calculate the transverse electric field Ey at two points BPM+ and BPM - shown in Figures 2 and 3 the transverse electric field Ey at two points BPM+ and BPM - in the simplified chamber structure with a short

  8. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark; /Chicago U.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  9. June 17-21, 2007 SOFE07, Albuquerque 1 Conceptual Study of Integrated Chamber Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    as advanced option to reduce or eliminate ion threat on chamber wall · Chamber core concept based on magnetic target (~24% of the energy is in ions and ~1% in photons), a large chamber (~10.75 m) is required options that would reduce the ion threat spectra on the armor and allow for more compact chambers

  10. LASER IFE DIRECT DRIVE CHAMBER CONCEPTS WITH MAGNETIC INTERVENTION A. R. Raffray1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    is the survival of the chamber wall under the ion threat spectra (representing ~25% of the yield energy). The possibility of steering the ions away from the chamber to specially-designed dump chambers using magnetic to accommodate the ion fluxes in the dump chamber provided the right measures are taken to prevent the liquid

  11. Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Aug. 8-9, 2006 HAPL meeting, GA 1 Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention: - Ion Dump and Thermal Response of Dump Plates Estimated for Cone-Shaped Chamber · For example case with ~10%of ion wall chamber to satisfy target and laser requirements ·Separate wetted wall chamber to accommodate ions

  12. High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

  13. Reanalysis of bubble chamber measurements of muon-neutrino induced single pion production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callum Wilkinson; Philip Rodrigues; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson; Kevin McFarland

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a longstanding disagreement between bubble chamber measurements of the single pion production channel $\

  14. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  15. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  16. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  17. Extreme-UV lithography vacuum chamber zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Herron, Donald Joe (Manteca, CA); Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Replogle, William C. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of particle contamination on the reticle and carbon contamination of optical surfaces in photolithography systems can be achieved by the establishment of multiple pressure zones in the photolithography systems. The different zones will enclose the reticle, projection optics, wafer, and other components of system. The system includes a vacuum apparatus that includes: a housing defining a vacuum chamber; one or more metrology trays situated within the vacuum chamber each of which is supported by at least one support member, wherein the tray separates the vacuum chamber into a various compartments that are maintained at different pressures; and conductance seal devices for adjoining the perimeter of each tray to an inner surface of the housing wherein the tray is decoupled from vibrations emanating from the inner surface of the housing.

  18. The PEP-II Lower Pressure HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBarger, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wright, D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This new vacuum chamber has been installed from 12 to 21 meters upstream of the BaBar detector in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER) to reduce lost particle backgrounds. The backgrounds from HER now dominate the backgrounds in the BaBar detector and the present vacuum pressure is 1 x 10{sup -9} Torr. The new chamber will increase the pumping significantly by adding 18 x 2000 l/s titanium sublimation pumps to the existing 5 x 440 l/s ion pumps, and is expected to reduce the pressure by about a factor of five. Features of the chamber include improved water cooling, improved vacuum conductance through copper RF screens featuring over 15,000 small square holes and the ability to sublimate titanium while the beam is still on.

  19. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  20. Method to calibrate fission chambers in Campbelling mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geslot, Benoit; Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Di Salvo, Jacques; Breaud, Stephane; Villard, Jean-Francois [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, SPEx, LDCI, F-13108 S Paul Lez Durance, (France); Unruh, Troy C. [INL, Idaho Natl Lab, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission chambers are neutron detectors which are widely used to instrument experimental reactors such as material testing reactors or zero power reactors. In the presence of a high level mixed gamma and neutron flux, fission chambers can be operated in Campbelling mode (also known as 'fluctuation mode' or 'mean square voltage mode') to provide reliable and precise neutron related measurements. Fission chamber calibration in Campbelling mode (in terms of neutron flux) is usually done empirically using a calibrated reference detector. A major drawback of this method is that calibration measurements have to be performed in a neutron environment very similar to the one in which the calibrated detector will be used afterwards. What is proposed here is a different approach based on characterizing the fission chamber response in terms of fission rate. This way, the detector calibration coefficient is independent from the neutron spectrum and can be determined prior to the experiment. The fissile deposit response to the neutron spectrum can then be assessed independently by other means (experimental or numerical). In this paper, the response of CEA-made miniature fission chambers in Campbelling mode is studied. A theoretical model of the signal is used to calculate the calibration coefficient. The model's input parameters come from statistical distribution of individual pulses. Supporting measurements were made in the CEA Cadarache zero power reactor MINERVE and results are compared to an empirical Campbelling mode calibration. The tested fission chamber calibration coefficient is roughly 2*10{sup -26} A{sup 2}/Hz/(c/s). Both numerical and empirical methods give consistent results, however a deviation of about 15% was observed. (authors)

  1. Chamber and target technology development for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M; Besenbruch, G; Duke, J; Forman, L; Goodin, D; Gulec, K; Hoffer, J; Khater, H; Kulcinsky, G; Latkowski, J F; Logan, B G; Margevicious, B; Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Morley, N; Nobile, A; Payne, S; Peterson, P F; Peterson, R; Petzoldt, R; Schultz, K; Steckle, W; Sviatoslavsky, L; Tillack, M; Ying, A

    1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion chambers and high pulse-rate target systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) must: regenerate chamber conditions suitable for target injection, laser propagation, and ignition at rates of 5 to 10 Hz; extract fusion energy at temperatures high enough for efficient conversion to electricity; breed tritium and fuel targets with minimum tritium inventory; manufacture targets at low cost; inject those targets with sufficient accuracy for high energy gain; assure adequate lifetime of the chamber and beam interface (final optics); minimize radioactive waste levels and annual volumes; and minimize radiation releases under normal operating and accident conditions. The primary goal of the US IFE program over the next four years (Phase I) is to develop the basis for a Proof-of-Performance-level driver and target chamber called the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE will explore beam transport and focusing through prototypical chamber environment and will intercept surrogate targets at high pulse rep-rate. The IRE will not have enough driver energy to ignite targets, and it will be a non-nuclear facility. IRE options are being developed for both heavy ion and laser driven IFE. Fig. 1 shows that Phase I is prerequisite to an IRE, and the IRE plus NIF (Phase II) is prerequisite to a high-pulse rate. Engineering Test Facility and DEMO for IFE, leading to an attractive fusion power plant. This report deals with the Phase-I R&D needs for the chamber, driver/chamber interface (i.e., magnets for accelerators and optics for lasers), target fabrication, and target injection; it is meant to be part of a more comprehensive IFE development plan which will include driver technology and target design R&D. Because of limited R&D funds, especially in Phase I, it is not possible to address the critical issues for all possible chamber and target technology options for heavy ion or laser fusion. On the other hand, there is risk in addressing only one approach to each technology option. Therefore, in the following description of these specific feasibility issues, we try to strike a balance between narrowing the range of recommended R&D options to minimize cost, and keeping enough R&D options to minimize risk.

  2. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  3. Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    Computation of azimuthal combustion instabilities in an helicopter combustion chamber C. Sensiau to compute azimuthal combustion instabilities is presented. It requires a thermoacoustic model using a n - formulation for the coupling between acoutics and combustion. The parameters n and are computed from a LES

  4. LASER FUSION CHAMBER DESIGN James P. Blanchard1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    the energy emitted by the target in such a way that the plant can achieve a commercially viable power approaches required for commercially viable laser fusion power plants, the issues driving those designs define the chamber size by providing flux limits for the various threats. In cases where a dry

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Eric A. Zielke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke May 5, 2006 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke ii List of Tables 1 First Law Thermodynamic Efficiencies from Experimental Data . . . . . . . 9 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke iii List of Figures 1 Representation of Anaerobic (anode portion

  6. QER- Comment of PA Chamber of Business and Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On behalf of Gene Barr, President & CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, please find attached our comments regarding Natural Gas Transmission, Storage & Distribution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 21, 2014. Thanks in advance for the attention to our comments and for holding a hearing today in our state. All the best, Kevin

  7. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  8. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES – WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL – LESS RISKY – MORE PRODUCTIVE – MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising – gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math – millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive – and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him – if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs – and to environmental pollution and other

  9. Security, Liberty, and Electronic Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landau, Susan

    of al Qaeda leaders were so harsh that the FBI would not let its agent participate 36 . We live in times Prohibition, but, because FBI Di- rector J. Edgar Hoover ignored it, so did the Federal government. Several

  10. POET-DSM Project LIBERTY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreachDepartment567 Prepared for

  11. Solar Liberty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSodaAtlas (PACADecker MackSolar

  12. WPo4.9 SIMULATION OF IFE CHAMBER DYNAMIC RESPONSE BY A SECOND ORDER GODUNOV METHOD WITH ARBITRARY GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    explosion. After the target-generated X-rays and ion debris traverse the chamber, the chamber environment scale occur in the chamber following the target explosion. The resultant X-rays, ion debris and neutron from the target travel through the chamber. Depending on the chamber constituents, X-rays and ion

  13. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis for a Heavy Ion Beam Chamber with Plasma Channelsthe target chamber wall, an adiabatic lens to focus the ionchamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion

  14. Cosmic Ray Test of Mini-drift Thick Gas Electron Multiplier Chamber for Transition Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Yang; S. Das; B. Buck; C. Li; T. Ljubicic; R. Majka; M. Shao; N. Smirnov; G. Visser; Z. Xu; Y. Zhou

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) chamber with an effective readout area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^{2}$ and a 11.3 mm ionization gap has been tested along with two regular gas electron multiplier (GEM) chambers in a cosmic ray test system. The thick ionization gap makes the THGEM chamber a mini-drift chamber. This kind mini-drift THGEM chamber is proposed as part of a transition radiation detector (TRD) for identifying electrons at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) experiment. Through this cosmic ray test, an efficiency larger than 94$\\%$ and a spatial resolution $\\sim$220 $\\mu$m are achieved for the THGEM chamber at -3.65 kV. Thanks to its outstanding spatial resolution and thick ionization gap, the THGEM chamber shows excellent track reconstruction capability. The gain uniformity and stability of the THGEM chamber are also presented.

  15. Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Passivity Based Adaptive Control of a Two Chamber Single Rod Hydraulic Actuator Meng Wang and Perry based backstepping controller using a physical compressibility energy function for a chamber hydraulic produces an accurate trajectory tracking performance. I. INTRODUCTION Electronically controlled hydraulic

  16. SciTech Connect: ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Since its invention by Glaser in 1953, the bubble...

  17. The Laser Calibration System of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Renault; B. S. Nielsen; J. Westergaard; J. J. Gaardhøje

    2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\\eta|laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.

  18. Chamber for the optical manipulation of microscopic particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Upham, Bryan D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle control chamber enables experiments to be carried out on biological cells and the like using a laser system to trap and manipulate the particles. A manipulation chamber provides a plurality of inlet and outlet ports for the particles and for fluids used to control or to contact the particles. A central manipulation area is optically accessible by the laser and includes first enlarged volumes for containing a selected number of particles for experimentation. A number of first enlarged volumes are connected by flow channels through second enlarged volumes. The second enlarged volumes act as bubble valves for controlling the interconnections between the first enlarged volumes. Electrode surfaces may be applied above the first enlarged volumes to enable experimentation using the application of electric fields within the first enlarged volumes. A variety of chemical and environmental conditions may be established within individual first enlarged volumes to enable experimental conditions for small scale cellular interactions.

  19. HOM Sensitivity in the PEP-II HER Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; Sullivan, Mike; /SLAC

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is the main source of vacuum chamber heating in the PEP-II storage ring collider. This heating is reduced substantially as lattice energy is lowered. Energy scans over {Upsilon} energy states were performed by varying the high energy ring (HER) lattice energy at constant gap voltage and frequency. We observed unexpected temperature rise at particular locations when HER lattice energy was lowered from 8.6 GeV ({Upsilon}(3S)) to 8.0 GeV ({Upsilon}(2S)) while most other temperatures decreased. Bunch length measurements reveal a shorter bunch at the lower energy. The shortened bunch overheated a beam position monitoring electrode causing a vacuum breach. We explain the unexpected heating as a consequence of increased higher order mode (HOM) power generated by a shortened bunch. In this case, temperature rise helps to identify HOM sources and HOM sensitive vacuum chamber elements. Reduction of gap voltage helps to reduce this unexpected heating.

  20. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Fuels in a Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30 % of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and - by means of the hot detonation products - energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm3, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum powder, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or sucrose and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in three different chambers of 4-1, 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume. In general, the booster charge was sufficient to initiate burning of the fuel. This modifies the pressure signatures measured with a number of wall gages and increases the quasi-static overpressure level obtained in the chambers. On the one hand the time-scale and the yield of the pressure rise depend on the fuel and its characteristics. On the other hand they also depend on the flow dynamics in the chamber, which is dominated by shock reverberations, and thus on the chamber geometry and volume. The paper gives a survey of the experimental results and discusses the possible influences of some basic parameters.

  1. Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

  2. Low Pressure Negative Ion Drift Chamber for Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Snowden-Ifft; C. J. Martoff; J. M. Burwell

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an attractive candidate for the dark matter thought to make up the bulk of the mass of our universe. We explore here the possibility of using a low pressure negative ion drift chamber to search for WIMPs. The innovation of drifting ions, instead of electrons, allows the design of a detector with exceptional sensitivity to, background rejection from, and signature of WIMPs.

  3. Ion Chamber Arrays for the Numi Beam at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovic; R. Zwaska; R. Keisler; S. Mendoza; S. Kopp; M. Proga; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; M. Bishai; M. Diwan; B. Viren; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays.

  4. Progress and critical issues for IFE blanket and chamber research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Nobile, A.; Peterson, P.F.; Petti, D.; Schultz, K.R.; Tillack, M.S.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in high gain target designs for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and the initiation of construction of large megajoule-class laser facilities in the U.S. (National Ignition Facility) and France (Laser-Megajoule) capable of testing the requirements for inertial fusion ignition and propagating burn, have improved the prospects for IFE. Accordingly, there have recently been modest increases in the US fusion research program related to the feasibility of IFE. These research areas include heavy-ion accelerators, Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers, diode-pumped, solid-state (DPSSL) lasers, IFE target designs for higher gains, feasibility of low cost IFE target fabrication and accurate injection, and long-lasting IFE fusion chambers and final optics. Since several studies of conceptual IFE power plant and driver designs were completed in 1992-1996 [1-5], U.S. research in the IFE blanket, chamber, and target technology areas has focused on the critical issues relating to the feasibility of IFE concepts towards the goal of achieving economically-competitive and environmentally-attractive fusion energy. This paper discusses the critical issues in these areas, and the approaches taken to address these issues. The U.S. research in these areas, called IFE Chamber and Target Technologies, is coordinated through the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) formed by the Department of Energy in December 1998.

  5. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  6. IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPACT OF BEAM TRANSPORT METHOD ON CHAMBER AND DRIVER DESIGN FOR HEAVY ION INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY D propagate in thick-liquid-wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers. KEYWORDS: heavy ion fusion, ion beam transport, reactor chamber design I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. heavy ion fusion ~HIF! program is working toward

  7. September 29, 2008 TOFE08, San Francisco 1 Laser IFE Direct Drive Chamber Concepts with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    ion threat with dry chamber wall · Magnetic intervention as advanced option to reduce or eliminate ion MJ target (~24% of the energy is in ions and ~1% in photons), a large chamber (~10.75 m) is required chamber as baseline and look at options to accommodate ion threat spectra on the armor. - Engineered armor

  8. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an Ionization Chamber in col- laboration with the company IBA (Ion Beam Applications). This monitoring deviceCharacterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA patented and five IC2/3 chambers were de- Preprint submitted to Elsevier June 28, 2013 in2p3

  9. IFE chamber walls: requirements, design options, and synergy with MFE plasma facing components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    rights reserved. PACS: 52.40.H Keywords: Internal fusion; Chamber wall material; X-ray deposition; Ion and ion energy deposition while providing the required lifetime. Chamber concepts utilizing both solid injected into the chamber. The driver (laser or heavy ion) beam is focused on the target, compressing

  10. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    provided a more detailed assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct much faster than the ions and would reach the chamber wall within about 20 ns in the case without protective gas. The ions take longer to reach the chamber wall. As an example, a simple estimate of the ion

  11. CLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE INVOLVING REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SUBATOMIC RADIOACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    " by the radiation-generated ion patterns in the glass chamber. If John plays in one way the ion particlesCLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE INVOLVING REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN SUBATOMIC RADIOACTIVE, Harwell, Oxford, UK ABSTRACT ,,Cloud Chamber is a live performance created by composer Alexis Kirke

  12. October 27-28, 2004 HAPL meeting, PPPL Overview of the Components of an IFE Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    of MFE design and R&D info) System (including power cycle) Dry wall chamber (armor must accommodate ion Spectra and Chamber Conditions Prior to Each Shot Must Be Well Characterized (UW) · Attenuation of ion 29% 48% Re-radiation Time Scale (µs) 300-700 300-700 Chamber Gas Ion and Photon Attenuation

  13. Dec 12-13, 2006 HAPL meeting, PPPL Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Dec 12-13, 2006 HAPL meeting, PPPL 1 Advanced Chamber Concept with Magnetic Intervention: - Ion; provision of samples for additional testing elsewhere to follow. · Separate ion dump chamber for magnetic-change dry wall or wetted wall chamber to accommodate ions and provide long life. · Have to make sure

  14. IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 1 Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    assessment of dry chamber wall [6] based on ion and photon spectra from new direct-drive target from NRL [3 for an Example Case Without a Protective Chamber Gas #12;IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 8 Photon and Ion Time of Temporal Distribution for Photons and Ions Based on Direct Drive Spectrum and 6.5 m Chamber without

  15. Technique to Collimate Ions in a Hall-Effect Thruster Discharge Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    Technique to Collimate Ions in a Hall-Effect Thruster Discharge Chamber Kunning G. Xu and Mitchell in the discharge chamber to repel ions away from the wall and focus them toward centerline. The electrodes repel ions with trajectories that intersect the chamber wall, which results in a more collimated ion exhaust

  16. March 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL Status of Chamber and Blanket Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Spectra Spectra in a 10.75 m Chamber #12;March 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL 5 Smoothness of Plot of Ion Plates Estimated for Cone-Shaped Chamber · Duck bill configuration assumed for the equatorial ion dumpMarch 21-22, 2006 HAPL meeting, ORNL 1 Status of Chamber and Blanket Effort A. René Raffray UCSD

  17. MOBILITIES OF POSITIVE IONS IN SOME GAS MIXTURES USED IN PROPORTIONAL AND DRIFT CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    67 MOBILITIES OF POSITIVE IONS IN SOME GAS MIXTURES USED IN PROPORTIONAL AND DRIFT CHAMBERS G proportional chambers or drift chambers with gas mixtures, using isobutane as a quencher. The positive ions, révisé le 11 juin 1976, accepté le 2 septembre 1976) Résumé. 2014 Le coefficient de mobilité des ions

  18. Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling , Zongping Shao b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    Recent advances in single-chamber fuel-cells: Experiment and modeling Yong Hao a , Zongping Shao b; accepted 6 May 2006 Abstract Single-chamber fuel cells (SCFC) are ones in which the fuel and oxidizer is discussed. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell; Single chamber

  19. Complete fabrication of target experimental chamber and implement initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drift Compression Magnet Chamber Ion Beam Background Plasmaand reheating of the ion source, the target chamber can betarget chamber ports are reserved for ion beam diagnostics

  20. Dual chamber system providing simultaneous etch and deposition on opposing substrate sides for growing low defect density epitaxial layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S. (Knoxville, TN); Kasica, Richard J. (Ashburn, VA) ,

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-chamber reactor can include a housing enclosing a volume having a divider therein, where the divider defines a first chamber and a second chamber. The divider can include a substrate holder that supports at least one substrate and exposes a first side of the substrate to the first chamber and a second side of the substrate to the second chamber. The first chamber can include an inlet for delivering at least one reagent to the first chamber for forming a film on the first side of the substrate, and the second chamber can include a removal device for removing material from the second side of the substrate.

  1. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)] [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany); Willborn, K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)] [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The ?-values of the Gaussian dose response function for a single detector of the array were found to be (0.72 ± 0.25) mm at 6 MV and (0.74 ± 0.25) mm at 15 MV and the corresponding low pass cutoff frequencies are 0.22 and 0.21 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. For the inner 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region and the outer 11 × 11 cm{sup 2} region of the array the Nyquist theorem is fulfilled for maximum sampling frequencies of 0.2 and 0.1 mm{sup ?1}, respectively. An IMRT field verification with a Gamma-Index analysis yielded a passing rate of 95.2% for a 3 mm/3% criterion with a TPS calculation as reference.Conclusions: This study shows the applicability of the Octavius 1000SRS in modern dosimetry. Output factor and dose profile measurements illustrated the applicability of the array in small field and stereotactic dosimetry. The high spatial resolution ensures adequate measurements of dose profiles in regular and intensity modulated photon-beam fields.

  2. Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber Clearing Code Effort 1 Progress Livermore November 13-14, 2001 #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Progress Report on Chamber.g. - CFDRC - HEIGHTS - RECON · Code implementation and integration of packages #12;Nov 13-14, 2001 A. R

  3. Statistics of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -B. Gros; U. Kuhl; O. Legrand; F. Mortessagne; O. Picon; E. Richalot

    2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study of the electromagnetic response of a chaotic reverberation chamber (RC) in the presence of losses. By means of simulations and of experiments, the fluctuations in the maxima of the field obtained in a conventional mode-stirred RC are compared with those in a chaotic RC in the neighborhood of the Lowest Useable Frequency (LUF). The present work illustrates that the universal spectral and spatial statistical properties of chaotic RCs allow to meet more adequately the criteria required by the Standard IEC 61000-4-21 to perform tests of electromagnetic compatibility.

  4. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    that are alternated between the two using 3-way valves. There are two Teflon ports for gases and a stainless steel port for aerosol injection and withdrawal. The walls of the room are covered with UV-reflective aluminum panels. A 54 kW air conditioning system... W black lights. The walls of the room are covered with reflective aluminum panels. During operation the inlet and outlet flow rates are matched. The University of California at Riverside environmental chamber consists of two ~90 m3 Teflon bags...

  6. Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Measurements of IN Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |ContactFlow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC)

  7. Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce Business Awards Gala

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch Briefs TheSanket A. Deshmukh ArgonneSanta Fe Chamber

  8. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  9. Shock-Dispersed-Fuel Charges: Combustion in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies we have investigated after-burning effects of a fuel-rich explosive (TNT). In that case the detonation only releases about 30% of the available energy, but generates a hot cloud of fuel that can burn in the ambient air, thus evoking an additional energy release that is distributed in space and time. The current series of small-scale experiments can be looked upon as a natural generalization of this mechanism: a booster charge disperses a (non-explosive) fuel, provides mixing with air and, by means of the hot detonation products, the energy to ignite the fuel. The current version of our miniature Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges consists of a spherical booster charge of 0.5 g PETN, embedded in a paper cylinder of approximately 2.2 cm, which is filled with powdered fuel compositions. The main compositions studied up to now contain aluminum flakes, hydrocarbon powders like polyethylene or hexosen (sucrose) and/or carbon particles. These charges were studied in four different chambers: two cylindrical vessels of 6.6-1 and 40.5-1 volume with a height-to-diameter ratio of approximately 1, a rectangular chamber of 41 (10.5 x 10.5 x 38.6 cm) and a 299.6 cm long tunnel model with a cross section of 8 x 8 cm (volume 19.21) closed at both ends.

  10. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taler, J.; Taler, D. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  11. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herrmann, Hans W. (Los Alamos, NM); Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  12. Finite element solution of Laplace's equation for ion-atom chambers Jacob Golde, Janine Shertzer, and Paul Oxley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxley, Paul

    Finite element solution of Laplace's equation for ion-atom chambers Jacob Golde, Janine Shertzer for ion-atom chambers. We first consider a simplified model chamber for which an analytical solution can is carried out in an ion-atom chamber. The atomic beam first passes through a region of the cham- ber where

  13. Factors influencing preferences for waterbased recreation in Hardin County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stribling, James Clayton

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Mail Questionnaire 5. Total Response ? Personal Interview (Personal interview was reduced to one respondent class due to 100K response to preference to freshwater) 6. Total Response ? Mail Questionnaire and Personal Interview No a priori selection... personal interview revealed that 21 (100X) of the respondents preferred freshwater boating. 15 cc a 4 'Cl o ~a 10 w 0 4 m e / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / I / / / / / II /4 / \\ \\ I / / s?/ \\ \\ e V CI m u s a 4 e e 4...

  14. Hardin Valley Academy's Feldman receives 2015 UT-Battelle Scholarship |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG - SSC DataTheornl.gov

  15. Hardin County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | OpenHalfWind Jump to:

  16. Hardin County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. Hardin County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Hardin County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Hardin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Dose response of selected ion chambers in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, M. [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The magnetic fields of an integrated MR-Linac system will alter the paths of electrons that produce ions in the ionization chambers. The dose response of selected ion chambers is evaluated in the presence of varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields. The investigation is useful in calibration of therapeutic x-ray beams associated with MR-Linac systems. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model the irradiation of NE2571, and PR06C ionization chambers in the presence of a transverse and longitudinal (with respect to the photon beam) magnetic fields of varying magnitude. The long axis of each chamber was simulated both parallel and perpendicular to the incident photon beam for each magnetic field case. The dose deposited in each chamber for each case was compared to the case with zero magnetic field by means of a ratio. The PR06C chamber's response was measured in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with field strengths ranging from 0.0 to 0.2 T to compare to simulated results. Results: The simulations and measured data show that in the presence of a transverse magnetic field there is a considerable dose response (maximum of 11% near 1.0 T in the ion chambers investigated, which depends on the magnitude of magnetic field, and relative orientation of the magnetic field, radiation beam, and ion chamber. Measurements made with the PR06C chamber verify these results in the region of measurement. In contrast, a longitudinal magnetic field produces only a slight increase in dose response (2% at 1.5 T) that rises slowly with increasing magnetic field and is seemingly independent of chamber orientation. Response trends were similar for the two ion chambers and relative orientations considered, but slight variations are present from chamber to chamber. Conclusions: Care must be taken when making ion chamber measurements in a transverse magnetic field. Ion chamber responses vary not only with transverse field strength, but with chamber orientation and type, and can be considerable. Longitudinal magnetic fields influence ion chamber responses relatively little (2% at 1.5 T), and only at field strengths in excess of 1.0 T.

  1. Additives That Prevent Or Reverse Cathode Aging In Drift Chambers With Helium-Isobutane Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Boyarski

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Noise and Malter breakdown have been studied at high rates in a test chamber having the same cell structure and gas as in the BaBar drift chamber. The chamber was first damaged by exposing it to a high source level at an elevated high voltage, until its operating current at normal voltages was below 0.5nA/cm. Additives such as water or alcohol allowed the damaged chamber to operate at 25 nA/cm, but when the additive was removed the operating point reverted to the original low value. However with 0.02% to 0.05% oxygen or 5% carbon dioxide the chamber could operate at more than 25 nA/cm, and continued to operate at this level even after the additive was removed. This shows for the first time that running with an O2 or CO2 additive at high ionisation levels can cure a damaged chamber from breakdown problems.

  2. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  3. TEST OF A LIQUID ARGON CHAMBER WITH 20-u m RMS RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Kirschbaum, A.R.; Eberhard, P.H.; Ross, R.R.; Sclmitz, F.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electronics to build chambers with spacings of , "'rJ about 40 fJ-m to increase the signal to noise and hence reliability

  4. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Ross; M. T. Hedges; I. Jaegle; M. D. Rosen; I. S. Seong; T. N. Thorpe; S. E. Vahsen; J. Yamaoka

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and compare them with simulation.

  5. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  6. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual e...

  7. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism, and thereby design full-scale systems with greatly improved explosive efficiency.

  8. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  9. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    1 IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffrary2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  10. IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    IFE CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY ­ STATUS AND FUTURE CHALLENGES W.R. Meier1 , A.R. Raffray2 , S.I. Abdel.gov (925) 422-8536 2. University of California, San Diego, CA 3. Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry- wall

  11. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  12. Plasma Chamber and APEX Budget Plans for FY 2000 (and FY 2001)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Plasma Chamber and APEX Budget Plans for FY 2000 (and FY 2001) Spokesperson: Mohamed Abdou OFES: Plasma Chamber Spokesperson: M. Abdou Part I: VLT Director's Proposed Budget: $2200K Task Description Plans and Budgets Technology Area: APEX Spokesperson: M. Abdou Part I: VLT Director's Proposed Budget

  13. In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells D.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane under methane-to-oxygen ratio (Rmix) of 2. Anode-supported fuel cells are investigated regarding

  14. Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Vigor

    1 Combustion in Meso-scale Vortex Chambers Ming-hsun Wu* , Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A) #12;2 COMBUSTION IN MESO-SCALE VORTEX CHAMBERS Ming-hsun Wu, Yanxing Wang, Vigor Yang and Richard A with the chemical energy varying from 25 to 174W. For the largest combustion volume, hydrogen and hydrocarbons

  15. A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A simple analytical model to study and control azimuthal instabilities in annular combustion analytical method to compute the azimuthal modes appearing in annular combustion chambers and help analyzing exper- imental, acoustic and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) data obtained in these combustion chambers

  16. A time dependent solution for the operation of ion chambers in a high ionization background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christos Velissaris

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived a time dependent solution describing the development of space charge inside an ion chamber subjected to an externally caused ionization rate N. The solution enables the derivation of a formula that the operational parameters of the chamber must satisfy for saturation free operation. This formula contains a correction factor to account for the finite duration of the ionization rate N.

  17. Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    Analytical and numerical studies of heavy ion beam transport in the fusion chamber IGOR D to acceptable levels. During ion beam propagation in the chamber, electrons are drawn into the beam, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Abstract The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion charge bunch

  18. Simulation of Gas Dynamic Behavior in Dry-Wall Inertial Fusion Energy Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    . In this work, the code TSUNAMI [2] was used to model chamber gas dynamics for different shapes, sizes of size scaling. Previous- ly, TSUNAMI was used primarily for studying liquid protec- ted chambers which the basic response charac- teristics (with emphasis on the evolution towards a quiescent state

  19. Vapor chambers with jumping-drop liquid return from superhydrophobic condensers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    Vapor chambers with jumping-drop liquid return from superhydrophobic condensers Jonathan B. Boreyko January 2013 Accepted 28 January 2013 Keywords: Jumping drops Vapor chamber Superhydrophobicity Wick-propelled jumping drops on a superhydrophobic condenser offer a new mechanism to return the working fluid

  20. Beam Measurements of a CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasper Kirkby

    2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A striking correlation has recently been observed between global cloud cover and the flux of incident cosmic rays. The effect of natural variations in the cosmic ray flux is large, causing estimated changes in the Earth's energy radiation balance that are comparable to those attributed to greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. However a direct link between cosmic rays and cloud formation has not been unambiguously established. We therefore propose to experimentally measure cloud (water droplet) formation under controlled conditions in a test beam at CERN with a CLOUD chamber, duplicating the conditions prevailing in the troposphere. These data, which have never been previously obtained, will allow a detailed understanding of the possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds and confirm, or otherwise, a direct link between cosmic rays, global cloud cover and the Earth's climate. The measurements will, in turn, allow more reliable calculations to be made of the residual effect on global temperatures of the burning of fossil fuels, an issue of profound importance to society. Furthermore, light radio-isotope records indicate a correlation has existed between global climate and the cosmic ray flux extending back over the present inter-glacial and perhaps earlier. This suggests it may eventually become possible to make long-term (10-1,000 year) predictions of changes in the Earth's climate, provided a deeper understanding can be achieved of the ``geomagnetic climate'' of the Sun and Earth that modulates the cosmic-ray flux.

  1. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences T initiated to test IFE chamber wall materials response to X-rays on the Z facility, and to ions on RHEPP-1 a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber

  2. Study of surface kinetics in PECVD chamber cleaning using remote plasma source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Ju Jin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this research work is to characterize the Transformer Coupled Toroidal Plasma (TCTP); to understand gas phase reactions and surface reactions of neutrals in the cleaning chamber by analyzing the concentration ...

  3. in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract LS-148

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compensation for the Eddy Current Effect in the APS Storage Ring Vacuum Chamber Y. Chung Abstract LS-148 Y. Chung 053090 The amplitude attenuation and the phase shift of the...

  4. Potential applications of the natural design of internal explosion chambers in the bombardier beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Changquan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bombardier Beetle (Carabidae, Brachinus) has a unique form of defense mechanism which involves the explosive mixing of hydroquinones and hydrogen peroxide in its internal explosion chambers and using the resultant high ...

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of electron beam quality conversion factors for several ion chamber types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: Bryan.Muir@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 ColonelBy Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To provide a comprehensive investigation of electron beam reference dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulations of the response of 10 plane-parallel and 18 cylindrical ion chamber types. Specific emphasis is placed on the determination of the optimal shift of the chambers’ effective point of measurement (EPOM) and beam quality conversion factors. Methods: The EGSnrc system is used for calculations of the absorbed dose to gas in ion chamber models and the absorbed dose to water as a function of depth in a water phantom on which cobalt-60 and several electron beam source models are incident. The optimal EPOM shifts of the ion chambers are determined by comparing calculations of R{sub 50} converted from I{sub 50} (calculated using ion chamber simulations in phantom) to R{sub 50} calculated using simulations of the absorbed dose to water vs depth in water. Beam quality conversion factors are determined as the calculated ratio of the absorbed dose to water to the absorbed dose to air in the ion chamber at the reference depth in a cobalt-60 beam to that in electron beams. Results: For most plane-parallel chambers, the optimal EPOM shift is inside of the active cavity but different from the shift determined with water-equivalent scaling of the front window of the chamber. These optimal shifts for plane-parallel chambers also reduce the scatter of beam quality conversion factors, k{sub Q}, as a function of R{sub 50}. The optimal shift of cylindrical chambers is found to be less than the 0.5 r{sub cav} recommended by current dosimetry protocols. In most cases, the values of the optimal shift are close to 0.3 r{sub cav}. Values of k{sub ecal} are calculated and compared to those from the TG-51 protocol and differences are explained using accurate individual correction factors for a subset of ion chambers investigated. High-precision fits to beam quality conversion factors normalized to unity in a beam with R{sub 50} = 7.5 cm (k{sub Q}{sup ?}) are provided. These factors avoid the use of gradient correction factors as used in the TG-51 protocol although a chamber dependent optimal shift in the EPOM is required when using plane-parallel chambers while no shift is needed with cylindrical chambers. The sensitivity of these results to parameters used to model the ion chambers is discussed and the uncertainty related to the practical use of these results is evaluated. Conclusions: These results will prove useful as electron beam reference dosimetry protocols are being updated. The analysis of this work indicates that cylindrical ion chambers may be appropriate for use in low-energy electron beams but measurements are required to characterize their use in these beams.

  6. Towards energy resolution at the statistical limit from a negative ion time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Sorensen; Mike Heffner; Adam Bernstein; Josh Renner; Melinda Sweany

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a proof-of-principle demonstration that improved energy resolution can be obtained in a negative-ion time projection chamber, by individually counting each electron produced by ionizing radiation.

  7. Blood meal host preferences of Culex salinarius Coquillett (Diptera : culicidae) in Chambers County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grieco, John Paul

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on a monthly basis from three field sites in Chambers County, TX. The source of blood contained in each specimen was determined using a modified precipitin test. The results were used to calculate seasonal foraging ratios for mosquito populations...

  8. A sun-tracking environmental chamber for the outdoor quantification of CPV modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faiman, David, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Melnichak, Vladimir, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Bokobza, Dov, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il; Kabalo, Shlomo, E-mail: faiman@bgu.ac.il [Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, 8499000 (Israel)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a sun-tracking environmental chamber and its associated fast electronics, devised for the accurate outdoor characterization of CPV cells, receivers, mono-modules, and modules. Some typical measurement results are presented.

  9. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Moses, “Inertial fusion energy target output and chamberA. J. Schmitt, et al. , “Fusion energy research with lasers,o?s for inertial fusion energy power plants,” presented at

  10. Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    32012 Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber For a Superconducting Undulator S.H. Kim, ASD MD Group 1. Introduction The image-current heating on the...

  11. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  12. Pressemeddelelse: JCI (Junior Chamber International) Danmark uddelte 3 TOYP-priser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Anja C.

    Pressemeddelelse: JCI (Junior Chamber International) Danmark uddelte 3 TOYP-priser lørdag den 7 forståelse og integration mellem forskellige kulturer og folkeslag i Danmark. Outlandish er ydermere gode

  13. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, Gordon T. (Wading River, NY); Jackson, John W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  14. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  15. The design, fabrication, and implications of a solvothermal vapor annealing chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Nathaniel R., Jr

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the design, fabrication, use, and benefits of a prototype aluminum solvothermal vapor annealing chamber which facilitates the self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) on silicon wafers which are then ...

  16. Conceptual Study of Integrated Chamber Core for Laser Fusion with Magnetic Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    pumping, tritium extraction, and chamber coolant coupling to a heat exchanger (to drive the final product plasma cloud. The j x B force on the electrons is thus transferred to the ions which appear to push

  17. Performance of the beam chamber vacuum system of K = 500 cyclotron at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre Kolkata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Gautam, E-mail: gautam.pal@vecc.gov.in; DuttaGupta, Anjan; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, I/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam chamber of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata's K = 500 superconducting cyclotron is pumped by liquid helium cooled cryopanel with liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield. Performance of the vacuum system was evaluated by cooling the cryopanel assembly with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. Direct measurement of beam chamber pressure is quite difficult because of space restrictions and the presence of high magnetic field. Pressure gauges were placed away from the beam chamber. The beam chamber pressure was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation software for vacuum system and compared with measurements. The details of the vacuum system, measurements, and estimation of pressure of the beam chamber are described in this paper.

  18. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  19. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glaser, Don

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  20. NOVEL CHAMBER DESIGN FOR AN IN-VACUUM CRYO-COOLED MINI-GAP UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HU, J.-P.; FOERSTER, C.L.; SKARITKA, J.R.; WATERMAN, D.

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A stainless steel, Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) chamber, featuring a large vertical rectangular port (53''W by 16''H), has been fabricated to house the one-meter magnet assembly of a newly installed undulator insertion device for beamline X-25 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. To achieve UHV, the new chamber is equipped with a differential ion pump, NEG pump, nude ion gauge, residual gas analyzer, and an all metal roughing valve. Temperature of the magnet assembly is maintained below 90 C during vacuum bake. The large rectangular port cover is sealed to the main flange of the chamber using a one-piece flat aluminum gasket and special sealing surfaces developed exclusively by Nor-Cal Products, Inc. The large flange provides easy access to the gap of the installed magnet girders for in situ magnetic measurements and shimming. Special window ports were designed into the cover and chamber for manipulation of optical micrometers external to the chamber to provide precise measurements of the in-vacuum magnet gap. The vacuum chamber assembly features independently vacuum-isolated feedthroughs that can be used for either water-or-cryogenic refrigeration-cooling of the monolithic magnet girders. This would allow for cryogenic-cooled permanent magnet operation and has been successfully tested within temperature range of +100 C to -150 C. Details of the undulator assembly for beamline X-25 is described in the paper.

  1. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain) [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup ?6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  2. Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial New Construction Rebate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motor VFDs, Motors, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Control Sensors, Economizers Active Incentive Yes...

  3. Case Study- Statue of Liberty National Monument

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This energy savings performance contract (ESPC) focuses on improvements to the infrastructure, with the addition of energy-efficient lighting, variable-speed drives, and installation of energy management control systems. The contractor, CES/Way, is investing $1 million, and the utility, Public Service Electric & Gas Company, will provide a rebate of $1.3 million. The potential energy savings resulting from this project are about 4 Billion Btu per year, about 75 percent of which will come from Ellis Island.

  4. Liberty County State of the Community Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkes, Scott; Deng, Sitong; Rojas, Ricardo J. Maga

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ……….………………………………………………….……………………………………………………………….. 12 National Protected Areas ……….………………………………………………….……………………………………….. 13 Natural Hazards ……….………………………………………………….……………………………………………………. 13 Existing Infrastructure ……….………………………………………………….…………………………………………………….. 16 Airports... equipment and facilities. -Proximity to Houston and link to Beaumont -Broaden economic diversity -Agricultural production -Addition of the Grand Parkway Toll Segment creating greater access and connections to surrounding areas. -Natural hazards...

  5. POET Project Liberty, LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreachPNNL AdvancesPNNL: Codes6,

  6. Liberty Green Renewables LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: EnergyTexas:

  7. Liberty Power Corp. | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: EnergyTexas:Hill,

  8. Liberty, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia:

  9. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring Solar forProject DevelopsDepartment of

  10. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next >PresentationsNow LEADER Web Conference 1

  11. Liberty, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow(Redirected fromLiberia-NRELTest Wind

  12. Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnual Financial Report |Programs | Department of

  13. Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnual Financial Report |Programs | Department

  14. Liberty Utilities (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999InspectionsAnnual Financial Report |Programs |

  15. Liberty Power Corp. (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKoreaLaorLeopoldEnergy

  16. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83?wt.?%)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600?°C–1?h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt.?%), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ?10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900?°C–1?h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450?°C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1?h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1?h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e?=?20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1)–Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be as a standard, the peak intensity from chamber (4)—stainless-steel (air-fired) was 7.1× higher, indicating that the surface of stainless-steel had a larger concentration of reactive oxygen and/or water than hydrogen. The (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (3)—Cu (interior Al coating) was 1.55× larger and chamber (2)—alumina(99.8%) was 1.33× higher than Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be. Thus copper–(1.83 wt.?%)beryllium was the best hydriding chamber material studied followed closely by the alumina (99.8 wt.?%) chamber. Gas take-up by Er occluder targets processed in Cu(1.83?wt.?%)Be hydriding chambers (i.e., gas/metal atomic ratios) correlate with the dynamic RGA data.

  17. Front-end Electronics Test for the LHCb Muon Wire Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobrega, R; Carboni, G; Massafferri, A; Santovetti, E

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the apparatus and procedures implemented to test Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) after front-end assembly for the LHCb Muon Detector. Results of measurements of key noise parameters are also described. Given a fully equipped chamber, this system is able to diagnose every channel performing an analysis of front-end output drivers’ response and noise rate versus threshold. Besides, it allows to assess if the noise rate at the experiment threshold region is within appropriate limits. Aiming at an automatic, fast and user-friendly system for mass production tests of MWPC, the project has foreseen as well electronic identification of every chamber and front-end board, and data archiving in such a way to make it available to the Experiment Control System (ECS) while in operation.

  18. Test Facility for Full-Equipped Chambers for the LHCb Muon Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, Rafael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb Muon System is made up by more than 1300 chambers of 20 different types, resulting in more than 120k readout channels. In order to guarantee high-quality performance during the experiment it is of crucial importance to get a complete knowledge of the fully equipped detector functionalities.A complete test system was built and a C++ ROOT software was developed to allow carring out a variety of studies on the many LHCb Muon chambers. Such system provides full control of the frontend, the high-voltage and the acquisition electronics and makes available a number of procedures to study the chambersâ?? performance. It was used for studies and a quality control on the chambers before and during the final positioning on the detector. In this note an overview of the hardware setup and of the software will be given. Results of measurements related to front-end channels characteristics will be presented.

  19. The High Momentum Spectrometer Drift Chambers in Hall C at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vulcan, William; Kross, Brian; Beaufait, Joseph; Baker, O.; Carlini, Roger; Majewski, Stanislaw; Johnson, A.; McCauley, A.; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Cha, Jinseok; Shin, Taeksu; Naing, Win; Danagoulian, Samuel

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mutiwire drift chambers to be used in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have been designed and constructed, and recently employed in initial data-taking runs.These chambers are used to reconstruct scattered charged particle momenta in the HMS using 12C and BeO2 targets for incident electron energies up to 2.2 GeV.Offline analysis of the data indicate that these drift chambers have spatial resolution (per plane) of about 115 mu-m (sigma) in rates approaching a KHz/wire/mm.It is expected that this performance will improve at higher momenta where multiple scattering contributions are smaller.

  20. UCRL-JC-138507 Overview of IFE Chamber and Target Technologies R&D in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    ]) with heavy ion driven, indirect-drive targets, and the other is the gas-protected, dry-wall chamber (e with heavy-ion driven, indirect-drive targets are: a) Chamber Clearing: Can the liquid pocket and beam portUCRL-JC-138507 1 Overview of IFE Chamber and Target Technologies R&D in the U.S. W.R. Meier 1), M

  1. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions Ion Energy Deposition Calculations Electronic stopping power., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions Photon and Ion Attenuation for Ions Based on Given Spectrum and 6.5 m Chamber 0.0E+00 1.0E+13 2.0E+13 3.0E+13 4.0E+13 5.0E+13 6.0E+13

  2. Construction and test of high precision drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Nowak; Oliver Korner; Hubert Kroha; Philipp Schwegler; Federico Sforza

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the upgrade of the ATLAS muon spectrometer in March 2014 new muon tracking chambers (sMDT) with drift-tubes of 15 mm diameter, half of the value of the standard ATLAS Monitored Drift-Tubes (MDT) chambers, and 10~$\\mu$m positioning accuracy of the sense wires have been constructed. The new chambers are designed to be fully compatible with the present ATLAS services but, with respect to the previously installed ATLAS MDT chambers, they are assembled in a more compact geometry and they deploy two additional tube layers that provide redundant rack information. The chambers are composed of 8 layers of in total 624 aluminium drift-tubes. The assembly of a chamber is completed within a week. A semi-automatized production line is used for the assembly of the drift-tubes prior to the chamber assembly. The production procedures and the quality control tests of the single components and of the complete chambers will be discussed. The wire position in the completed chambers have been measured by using a coordinate measuring machine.

  3. Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers as a Time-of-Flight System for the PHENIX Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velkovska, Julia [Vanderbilt University] [Vanderbilt University

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project a Time-of-Flight detector based on multi-gap resistive plate chambers was built and installed for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

  4. Selection of dimensions for the accelerating chamber of a betatron with extraction of an electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakhlov, V.L.; Kashovskii, V.V.; Pushin, V.S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the results of refinement of the dynamics of particles of a beam extracted from a betatron, a refinement which has made it possible to select the main dimensions of the accelerating chamber. Expressions are obtained which make it possible to determine the chamber dimensions and the profile of the extraction window from the distribution of the magnetic field of the betatron. It is shown that proper selection of the dimensions will increase the dose rate at the exit from the magnetic core of the accelerator.

  5. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  6. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and filling it with Nitrogen through an adjustable leak valve, we were able to measure the response of the SEC to beam as a function of gas pressure. Many interesting features of the SEC were revealed in these tests.

  7. A study of the response of a gas ionization chamber to different sources of ionizing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamble?-Die?guez, Filiberto Edmundo

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; is the effective average energy to produce one pair (for values, see Table I). Charged particles produced by ionization lose their energy rather quickly in multiple collisions with the gas molecules and assume the thermal energy distribution of the gas. When... of aluminum extrusion ionization chambers to this kind of radiation was investigated. Also, since the TAMU counter is a prototype (1 in x 7in x 7in) of the chambers installed at CDF (1 in x 84in x 84in), the pad-to-wire signal ratio had to be measured...

  8. Design and performance testing of the read-out boards for the CMS-DT chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández, C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Read-out boards (ROB) are one of the key elements of readout system for CMS barrel muon drift chambers. To insure proper and reliable operation under all detector environmental conditions an exhaustive set of tests have been developed and performed on the 30 pre-series ROB's before production starts. These tests include operation under CMS radiation conditions to detect and estimate SEU rates, validation with real chamber signals and trigger rates, studies of time resolution and linearity, crosstalk analysis, track pattern generation for calibration and on-line tests, and temperature cycling to uncover marginal conditions. We present the status of the ROB and tests results. (5 refs).

  9. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  10. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  11. OPERATIONAL WINDOWS FOR DRY-WALL AND WETTED-WALL IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to iden- tify be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport issue for wetted-wall concepts. KEYWORDS: inertial fusion, fusion technology, IFE chambers *E

  12. Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

  13. Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade V. Rohde, R. Neu, A. Geier, R material is tungsten, which has a high melting point, low erosion rate in cold scrape off layer plasma, where the present ITER-FEAT design uses tungsten. No negative influence on the plasma performance, even

  14. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR ION DEPOSITION AND THERMOMECHANICAL RESPONSE IN DRY WALL LASER IFE CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    . INTRODUCTION In order to permit the design of an economically viable IFE power plant, we require a chamber wall reach the wall. These threats, consisting of x- rays, ions, and neutrons, can lead to wall failure associated with the IFE threats. In some cases, these inertial effects lead to stress waves that can lead

  15. Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production using single-chamber membrane-free microbial electrolysis cells Hongqiang Hu Received in revised form 13 June 2008 Accepted 17 June 2008 Published online - Keywords: Hydrogen Microbial electrohydrogenesis provides a new approach for hydrogen generation from renewable biomass. Membranes were used in all

  16. Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non-precious-metal catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Hydrogen production in single-chamber tubular microbial electrolysis cells using non August 2009 Keywords: Hydrogen production Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) NiMo NiW Cathode catalystMo cathode accomplished a hydrogen production rate of 2.0 m3 /day/m3 at current density of 270 A/m3 (12 A/m2

  17. A high-resolution drift chamber for Alpha-particle position measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Jon Patrick

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A drift chamber module with 5 anode wires covering an active region of 9 cm x 76 cm has been built to locate the vertical position of a-particle trajectories to within 295 mm full-width-half-maximum (FWEM) in isobutane at a pressure of 0.25 atm...

  18. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split hydrocarbons, pollutant emissions reduction hal-01056363,version1-21Aug2014 #12;1. Introduction Solid oxide

  19. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  20. Assessment of the high temperature fission chamber technology for the French fast reactor program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Geslot, B.; Domenech, T.; Normand, S. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature fission chambers are key instruments for the control and protection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. First, the developments of those neutron detectors, which are carried out either in France or abroad are reviewed. Second, the French realizations are assessed with the use of the technology readiness levels in order to identify tracks of improvement. (authors)

  1. Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure Maximum power densities by air-driven microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are considerably influenced by cathode reserved. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell; Air cathode; Diffusion layer; PTFE coating; Coulombic efficiency 1

  2. Neutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    -cooled lithium blanket, a helium-cooled solid breeder blanket, and a dual-coolant lithium lead blanket of the reference blanket. Keywords-Laser fusion; lithium blanket; solid breeder; lithium lead; tritium breedingNeutronics Assessment of Blanket Options for the HAPL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber M

  3. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India) [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India); School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany); Majumdar, Abhijit, E-mail: majuabhijit@gmail.com, E-mail: majumdar@uni-greifswald.de; Hippler, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Felix Hausdroff Str. 6 (Germany); Katiyal, Sumant [School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India)] [School of Electronics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore 452001, MP (India); Shripathi, T. [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium For Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, MP (India)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000?°C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000?ºC with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000?°C from room temperature (?10{sup ?6} mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1?ºC of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20?°C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50?°C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000?°C.

  4. Transient blocking in multi-chamber natural ventilation M. R. Flynn and C. P. Caulfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    , the system must evolve towards a ventilated terminal state in which there is outflow of buoyant fluid (inflowTransient blocking in multi-chamber natural ventilation M. R. Flynn and C. P. Caulfield Dept-energy `natural' ventilation offers an environmental benefit over building ventilation by high

  5. Chamber Technology Goals Used in APEX to Calibrate New Ideas and Measure Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Chamber Technology Goals Used in APEX to Calibrate New Ideas and Measure Progress 1. High Power a subset will be remarkable progress for fusion #12;Innovative concepts proposed by APEX can extend Alloys evaluated: W-alloy selected ·Helium cooling and Li boiling evaluated ·SiC/SiC-LiPb limits

  6. Numerical Analysis of a one dimensional Diffusion Equation for a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensional Diffusion Equation to model oxygen in a single chamber MFC. A rigorous verification of the effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5 Model Application 13 #12;Advanced Numerical Methods Zielke iii 5.1 System Configuration May 5, 2006 #12;Abstract Renewable energy (RE) applications are becoming a popular means of power

  7. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seol, Yongkoo, E-mail: Yongkoo.Seol@netl.doe.gov; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  8. Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers February 17, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers S. H. Kim February 17, 1999 Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients

  9. ForPeerReview A climate-controlled whole-tree chamber system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to impose combinations of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentra- tion, [CO2], and air temperature treatments in the ambient [CO2] chambers was too low to be maintained during winter because of tree dormancy and the high natural increase in [CO2] over winter at high latitudes such as the Flakaliden site. Accurate control over

  10. Geothermally heated Chamber of Commerce offices at Marlin, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an existing, low temperature, geothermal resource to heat the Chamber of Commerce offices in Marlin, Texas is described. A secondary purpose of the project is to attract new industries and businesses to Marlin via this alternate energy show-piece demonstration of a simple and practical application of Texas' low temperature geothermal resource.

  11. THERMO FLUID DYNAMICS AND CHAMBER AEROSOL BEHAVIOR FOR THIN LIQUID WALL UNDER IFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control. In determining the con- ditions of the chamber gas and0or vapor prior to each shot, and condensation to the wall. These issues were analyzed in detail as part of the ARIES-IFE study3 for different formation are discussed. A scoping analysis

  12. Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric for our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy by converting of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell affect the power density produced in the Microbial Fuel Cell

  13. Anode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    on the anode, producing a complex response in fuel cell power output. Under optimized gas compositions and flowAnode-supported thin-film fuel cells operated in a single chamber configuration 2T-I-12 Zongping of anode-supported, thin-film, single chamber fuel cells (SCFCs) have been investigated. Cells, in which Ni

  14. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  16. Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz, Sorina Udroiu, Jean-Paul Viricelle, Christophe Pijolat, Michle Pijolat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nickel based anodes for single chamber solid oxide fuel cells : a catalytic study Geoffroy Gadacz Single chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SCFC) are an alternative concept to traditional SOFC

  17. To do list for laser maintenance 8.28-8.30 1. Clean the turning box and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shvets, Gennady

    and compressor chamber, remove all broken glass piece on bread board and mirror mount all optics in turning box and compressor chamber, replace all optics with damage spots on it, measure the reflectivity of compressor. 4. Check focal spot

  18. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  19. IFE Final Optics and Chamber Dynamics Modeling and Experiments Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Najmabadi; M. S. Tillack

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Our OFES-sponsored research on IFE technology originally focused on studies of grazing-incidence metal mirrors (GIMM's). After the addition of GIMM research to the High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program, our OFES-sponsored research evolved to include laser propagation studies, surface material evolution in IFE wetted-wall chambers, and magnetic intervention. In 2003, the OFES IFE Technology program was terminated. We continued to expend resources on a no-cost extension in order to complete student research projects in an orderly way and to help us explore new research directions. Those explorations led to funding in the field of extreme ultraviolet lithography, which shares many issues in common with inertial fusion chambers, and the field of radiative properties of laser-produced plasma.

  20. Overview of IFE chamber and target technologies R&D in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W R; Abdou, M A; Kulcinski, G L; Moir, R W; Nobile, A; Peterson, P F; Petti, D A; Schultz, K R; Tillack, M S; Yoda, M

    2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES) formed the Virtual Laboratory for Technology (VLT) to develop the technologies needed to support near term fusion experiments and to provide the basis for future magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. The scope of the inertial fusion energy (IFE) element of the VLT includes the fusion chamber, driver/chamber interface, target fabrication and injection, and safety and environmental assessment for IFE. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in conjunction with other laboratories, universities and industry, has written an R&D plan to address the critical issues in these areas over the next 5 years in a coordinated manner. This paper provides an overview of the US. research activities addressing these critical issues.

  1. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  2. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; R. Keisler; S. Kopp; S. Mendoza; M. Proga; Z. Pavlovich; R. Zwaska; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald; M. Diwan; B. Viren

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1 mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well we review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  3. Addendum to the Technical Design Report for the Upgrade of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the addendum to the TDR of the upgrade of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (CERN-LHCC-2013-020 ; ALICE-TDR-016). The key objective of the upgrade is the replacement of the present MWPC-based readout chambers by detectors that allow continuous operation without active ion gating. In the TDR, we propose a solution that employs stacks of four Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) and demonstrate that it fulfills the design specifications, in particular in terms of intrinsic position resolution, energy resolution, and ion backflow. In this document we demonstrate with additional results from both detector R&D and simulations that the technological solution chosen in the TDR has sufficient safety margin for a successful campaign with the upgraded detector in RUN 3 and beyond.

  4. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  5. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, E; Brice, S J; Broemmelsiek, D; Collar, J I; Cooper, P S; Crisler, M; Dahl, C E; Fustin, D; Hall, J; Harnish, C; Levine, I; Lippincott, W H; Moan, T; Nania, T; Neilson, R; Ramberg, E; Robinson, A E; Sonnenschein, A; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Rivera, R A; Uplegger, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have directly measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6+-0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble nucleation theory. This measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  6. MIMAC: MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers for dark matter directional detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, D; Bouly, J L; Bourrion, O; Fourel, Ch; Guillaudin, O; Lamblin, J; Mayet, F; Muraz, J F; Richer, J P; Riffard, Q; Lebreton, L; Maire, D; Busto, J; Brunner, J; Fouchez, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional detection of non-baryonic Dark Matter is a promising search strategy for discriminating WIMP events from neutrons, the ultimate background for dark matter direct detection. This strategy requires both a precise measurement of the energy down to a few keV and 3D reconstruction of tracks down to a few mm. The MIMAC (MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers) collaboration has developed in the last years an original prototype detector based on the direct coupling of large pixelized micromegas with a special developed fast self-triggered electronics showing the feasibility of a new generation of directional detectors. The first bi-chamber prototype has been installed at Modane, underground laboratory in June 2012. The first undergournd background events, the gain stability and calibration are shown. The first spectrum of nuclear recoils showing 3D tracks coming from the radon progeny is presented.

  7. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  8. Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

  9. A Multiwire Proportional Chamber for Precision Studies of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, T M; Filippone, B W; Martin, J W; Plaster, B; Rybka, G; Yuan, J; 10.1016/j.nima.2006.11.026

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron beta decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied.

  10. A Multiwire Proportional Chamber for Precision Studies of Neutron Beta Decay Angular Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Ito; R. Carr; B. W. Filippone; J. W. Martin; B. Plaster; G. Rybka; J. Yuan

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) was designed and constructed for precision studies of neutron beta decay angular correlations. Its design has several novel features, including the use of low pressure neopentane as the MWPC gas and an entrance window made of thin Mylar sheet reinforced with Kevlar fibers. In the initial off-line performance tests, the gas gain of neopentane and the position resolution were studied.

  11. Efficiency determination of resistive plate chambers for fast quasi-monoenergetic neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Röder; Z. Elekes; T. Aumann; D. Bemmerer; K. Boretzky; C. Caesar; T. E. Cowan; J. Hehner; M. Heil; M. Kempe; V. Maroussov; O. Nusair; A. V. Prokofiev; R. Reifarth; M. Sobiella; D. Stach; A. Wagner; D. Yakorev; A. Zilges; K. Zuber

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite detectors made of stainless steel converters and multigap resistive plate chambers have been irradiated with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons with a peak energy of 175MeV. The neutron detection efficiency has been determined using two different methods. The data are in agreement with the output of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations are then extended to study the response of a hypothetical array made of these detectors to energetic neutrons from a radioactive ion beam experiment.

  12. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  13. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechana, A. [Program of Physics and General Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Songkhla Rajabhat University, Songkhla 90000 (Thailand); Thamboon, P. [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Boonyawan, D., E-mail: dheerawan.b@cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  14. Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

  15. Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Randy; Russell, Marion; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations.

  16. A Proposal to Operate the COUPP-60 Bubble Chamber at SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Goetzke, Luke; Riley, Nathan; Schimmelpfennig, Hannes; Szydagis, Matthew; /KICP, Chicago; Behnke, Ed; Hinnefeld, Henry; Levine, Ilan; Palenchar, Andrea; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bubble chambers are promising devices for the detection of WIMP dark matter, due to their easy scalability to large target masses and insensitivity to background {gamma} and {beta} radiation. The COUPP collaboration has constructed small chambers which have achieved competitive sensitivity for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering. A new chamber, COUPP-60, containing 60-kg of CF{sub 3}I target liquid, has been built and is being commissioned at Fermilab. We propose to move this detector to SNOLAB after completing tests in a shallow underground site at Fermilab. At SNOLAB, we expect the sensitivity of the experiment to be determined by the level of {alpha}emitting contamination in the target liquid. If we achieve state-of-the-art levels of {alpha} emitting contamination, we will improve current sensitivity by approximately four orders of magnitude beyond our published limits, to the region of 10{sup -4} pb for a 30 GeV WIMP interacting by spin-dependent couplings to the proton. This will allow a first exploration of the phase space favored by supersymmetric models in this regime.

  17. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai -400 085 (India)

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  18. Fig. 1. On the right is the Cloud Chamber, on the left is a laptop running the Cloud Catcher software ( Alexis Kirke.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    in real time. A glass cloud chamber was used onstage to make radioactivity visible in bright white tracksFig. 1. On the right is the Cloud Chamber, on the left is a laptop running the Cloud Catcher software (© Alexis Kirke.) CLOUD CHAMBER: A PERFORMANCE WITH REAL TIME TWO-WAY INTERACTION BETWEEN

  19. Wide-field functional imaging of blood flow and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the rodent dorsal window chamber.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. , editors. Anesthesia and Analgesia in LaboratoryPlace the animal in a gas anesthesia chamber filled with 5%much longer than with gas anesthesia. Conversely, using gas

  20. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain)] [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain)] [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)] [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)] [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce significant density corrections, and that effect should be taken into account. This effect is chamber-dependent, indicating that a specific calibration is necessary for each particular chamber. To our knowledge, this correction has not been considered so far for SourceCheck ionization chambers, but its magnitude cannot be neglected in clinical practice. The atmospheric pressure and temperature at which the chamber was calibrated need to be taken into account, and they should be reported in the calibration certificate. In addition, each institution should analyze the particular response of its SourceCheck ionization chamber and compute the adequate correction factors. In the absence of a suitable pressure chamber, a possibility for this assessment is to take measurements at different altitudes, spanning a wide enough air density range.

  1. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  2. Measurement of changes in linear accelerator photon energy through flatness variation using an ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Song; Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rose, Mark; Simon, William E. [Sun Nuclear Corporation, 425-A Pineda Court, Melbourne, Florida 32940 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for determining changes in photon beam energy for a megavoltage linear accelerator. Methods: Energy changes were accomplished by adjusting the bending magnet current by up to {+-}15% in 5% increments away from the value used clinically. Two metrics for flatness, relative flatness in the central 80% of the field (Flat) and average maximum dose along the diagonals normalized by central axis dose (F{sub DN}), were measured using a commercially available planner ionization chamber array. PDD was measured in water at depths of 5 and 10 cm in 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} fields using a cylindrical chamber. Results: PDD was more sensitive to changes in energy when the beam energy was increased than when it was decreased. For the 18-MV beam in particular, PDD was not sensitive to energy reductions below the nominal energy. The value of Flat was found to be more sensitive to decreases in energy than to increases, with little sensitivity to energy increases above the nominal energy for 18-MV beams. F{sub DN} was the only metric that was found to be sensitive to both increases and reductions of energy for both the 6- and 18-MV beams. Conclusions: Flatness based metrics were found to be more sensitive to energy changes than PDD, In particular, F{sub DN} was found to be the most sensitive metric to energy changes for photon beams of 6 and 18 MV. The ionization chamber array allows this metric to be conveniently measured as part of routine accelerator quality assurance.

  3. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  4. Low-NO{sub x} combustion chamber for a power generation gas-turbine unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutnik, M.N.; Tumanovsky, A.G.; Soudarev, A.V.; Vinogradov, E.D.; Zakharov, Y.I.; Lobanov, D.V.; Akulov, V.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of the experimental studies over major operating characteristics of a full-scale combustion chamber (CC) for a new power generation 25 MW gas turbine unit of the AO ``Turbomotorny Zavod'' (Ekaterinburg) production are presented. A technique of the pre-mixed lean combustion with the excess air coefficient being approximately equal to 1.9--2.2 underlies the low NO{sub x} combustor design. Interrelations between the major combustor characteristics and design and duty parameters in parallel with the optimum algorithm of the combustor loading ensuring the minimum toxic exhausts into atmosphere are also shown in the paper.

  5. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arimoto, Y; Igarashi, Y; Iwashita, Y; Ino, T; Katayama, R; Kitahara, R; Kitaguchi, M; Matsumura, H; Mishima, K; Oide, H; Otono, H; Sakakibara, R; Shima, T; Shimizu, H M; Sugino, T; Sumi, N; Sumino, H; Taketani, K; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, T; Yamashita, S; Yokoyama, H; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  6. High-voltage crowbar protection for the large CDF axial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binkley, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Stuermer, W.; Wagner, R.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a big cylindrical drift chamber that provides charged particle tracking for the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment. To protect the COT, the large stored energy in the high voltage system needs to be removed quickly when a problem is sensed. For the high voltage switch, a special-order silicon-controlled-rectifier was chosen over more readily available integrated gate bipolar transistors because of layout and reliability questions. The considerations concerning the high voltage switch, the prototype performance, and the experience of more than two years of running are described.

  7. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  8. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  9. The game and furbearing mammals of Big Thicket National Preserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, William Glenn

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIT /g/S FIH HICKORY CREEK SAVAIIINAH U Hanlk Polk Co nty FHI 4 /g Tele/ Co hey TURKEY CREEK UNIT I FRED NECHES BOTTOM B JACK GORE BAYGAI. L UNIT S /Sg /n 'z l o LOBLOLLY i UNIT d+ PS SARATOGA OUNTZE 5 G 22 G SI LSBEE EVA..., a questionnaire (Figs. 6a and 6b) was mailed to all licensed fur trappers in Hardin, Tyler, Polk, and Liberty counties following the 1979-80 trapping season. A list of these individuals was obtained from TP W. The questionnaire, which was similar...

  10. Effects of discharge chamber length on the negative ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Kyoung-Jae [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bong-Ki; An, YoungHwa; Dang, Jeong-Jeung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a volume-produced negative hydrogen ion source, control of electron temperature is essential due to its close correlation with the generation of highly vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region as well as the generation of negative hydrogen ions by dissociative attachment in the extraction region. In this study, geometric effects of the cylindrical discharge chamber on negative ion generation via electron temperature changes are investigated in two discharge chambers with different lengths of 7.5 cm and 11 cm. Measurements with a radio-frequency-compensated Langmuir probe show that the electron temperature in the heating region is significantly increased by reducing the length of the discharge chamber due to the reduced effective plasma size. A particle balance model which is modified to consider the effects of discharge chamber configuration on the plasma parameters explains the variation of the electron temperature with the chamber geometry and gas pressure quite well. Accordingly, H{sup ?} ion density measurement with laser photo-detachment in the short chamber shows a few times increase compared to the longer one at the same heating power depending on gas pressure. However, the increase drops significantly as operating gas pressure decreases, indicating increased electron temperatures in the extraction region degrade dissociative attachment significantly especially in the low pressure regime. It is concluded that the increase of electron temperature by adjusting the discharge chamber geometry is efficient to increase H{sup ?} ion production as long as low electron temperatures are maintained in the extraction region in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  11. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  12. Progress on an integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability for plasma chamber nuclear components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Ying; M. Abdou; H. Zhang; R. Munipalli; M. Ulrickson; M. Sawan; B. Merrill

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the behavior of a plasma chamber component in the fusion environment requires a simulation technique that is capable of integrating multi-disciplinary computational codes while appropriately treating geometric heterogeneity and complexity. Such a tool should be able to interpret phenomena from mutually dependent scientific disciplines and predict performance with sufficient accuracy and consistency. Integrated multi-physics simulation predictive capability (ISPC) relies upon advanced numerical simulation techniques and is being applied to ITER first wall/shield and Test Blanket Module (TBM) designs. In this paper, progress in ISPC development is described through the presentation of a number of integrated simulations. The simulations cover key physical phenomena encountered in a fusion plasma chamber system, including tritium permeation, fluid dynamics, and structure mechanics. Interface engines were developed in order to pass field data, such as surface deformation or nuclear heating rate, from the structural analysis to the thermo-fluid MHD analysis code for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) velocity profile assessments, or from the neutronics analysis to the thermo-fluid analysis for temperature calculations, respectively. Near-term effort toward further ISPC development is discussed.

  13. Photoelectron track length distributions measured in a negative ion time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prieskorn, Z R; Kaaret, P E; Black, J K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report photoelectron track length distributions between 3 and 8 keV in gas mixtures of Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 (260:80:10 Torr) and CO2+CH3NO2 (197.5: 15 Torr). The measurements were made using a negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). We report the first quantitative analysis of photoelectron track length distributions in a gas. The distribution of track lengths at a given energy is best fit by a lognormal distribution. A powerlaw distribution of the form, f(E)=a(E/Eo)n, is found to fit the relationship between mean track length and energy. We find n=1.29 +/- 0.07 for Ne+CO2+CH3NO2 and n=1.20 +/- 0.09 for CO2+CH3NO2. Understanding the distribution of photoelectron track lengths in proportional counter gases is important for optimizing the pixel size and the dimensions of the active region in electron-drift time projection chambers (TPCs) and NITPC X-ray polarimeters.

  14. Improvement of a portable pressurized ionization chamber with the addition of a microprocessor datalogger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Etten, D.; Olsen, B.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system was necessary to monitor low-level external radiation levels along a boundary section of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. High pressure ionization chambers were selected to monitor the radiation levels caused by a plume of air activation products generated by a linear proton accelerator. The data are used for evaluation of an atmospheric dispersion model and for boundary dose calculations. The model compares the pressure ionization chamber (PIC) data with the predicted values based on meteorological wind data measured by two meteorological towers and source term data from the discharge stack. The PIC monitoring system required continuous remote (no ac power) battery-only operation, reliability, and data processing capability. The data processing capability simplified calibration and provided fine time resolution for comparison with other logged data. The sensor head of a Reuter-Stokes RSS-111 was used as the detector and an improved electronic control package was developed to operate the detector and to process and log the data.

  15. Multinuclear and multidimensional solid-state NMR investigations of combustion chamber deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, J.C. [Texaco Research Center, Beacon, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multinuclear solid-state NMR has been used to study the carbonaceous backbone of combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) generated in both gasoline and diesel engines. The combination of {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization, and dipolar dephasing techniques have been used to {open_quotes}average molecule{close_quotes} parameters for a large number of CCDs. These parameters were correlated with gasoline composition and cylinder cleanliness. Discussion will be presented on deposits from different areas of the chamber - piston top, cylinder head, squish, non-squish, end-gas, non-end gas regions. Deposits from various cylinders in a number of dynamometer engines, fleet car engines will be compared. The use of NMR to observe the effects of bench-test engine modifications on CCD structure will be demonstrated. The macromolecular structure of the deposits was studied by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C spin-exchange experiments which allow one to observe internuclear dipolar interactions between the various carbon functionalities in the deposit. The spatial information on fuel additive - CCD interactions that these experiments provide will be discussed.

  16. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  17. SU-E-T-17: A Mathematical Model for PinPoint Chamber Correction in Measuring Small Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T; Zhang, Y; Li, X; Heron, D.E.; Huq, M.Saiful [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measuring the cone output factor for stereotactic radiosurgery, ion chambers often result in underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of electron equilibrium. The purpose of this work is to develop a mathematical model, specifically for the pinpoint chamber, to calculate the correction factors corresponding to different type of small fields, including single cone-based circular field and non-standard composite fields. Methods: A PTW 0.015cc PinPoint chamber was used in the study. Its response in a certain field was modeled as the total contribution of many small beamlets, each with different response factor depending on the relative strength, radial distance to the chamber axis, and the beam angle. To get these factors, 12 cone-shaped circular fields (5mm,7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm) were irradiated and measured with the PinPoint chamber. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. These readings were then compared with the theoretical doses as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized-least-square optimization algorithm was developed to find out the beamlet response factors. After the parameter fitting, the established mathematical model was validated with the same MC code for other non-circular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the Monte Carlo calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for the PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurement of small fields. The current model is applicable only when the beam axis is perpendicular to the chamber axis. It can be applied to non-standard composite fields. Further validation with other type of detectors is being conducted.

  18. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  19. Construction of a scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials in undergraduate physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrake, Scott M.; Vineyard, Michael F.; Turley, Colin F.; Moore, Robert D.; Johnson, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new scattering chamber for ion-beam analysis of environmental materials with the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator at the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The chamber was constructed from a ten-inch, Conflat, multi-port cross and includes a three-axis target manipulator and target ladder assembly, an eight-inch turbo pump, an Amptek X-ray detector, and multiple charged particle detectors. Recent projects performed by our undergraduate research team include proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses of atmospheric aerosols collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor in Upstate New York. We will describe the construction of the chamber and discuss the results of some commissioning experiments.

  20. June7-8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Completion of Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Option Without Protective Gas,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Wall Option 3 Changing Chamber Radius Affects Photon and Ion Times of Flight and Energy Deposition for Ions Based on Direct Drive Spectra and 6.5 m Chamber Debris Ions Time 10ns 0.2µs 1µs 2.5µs Fast IonsJune7-8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Completion of Assessment of Dry Chamber Wall Option Without

  1. Usiing NovoCOS cleaning equipment in repairing the furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries 4 & 5 at OAO Koks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Protasov; R. Linden; A. Gross [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with a new surface-preparation technology for the ceramic resurfacing of the refractory furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries is described.

  2. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  3. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  4. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  5. The Bonus Detector: A Radial Time Projection Chamber for tracking Spectator Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Fenker

    2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A GEM-based Radial Time Projection Chamber is being developed as a spectator-proton tracker for an experiment at Jefferson Lab. The purpose of the experiment is the study of the structure of nearly free neutrons. Interactions on such neutrons can be identified by the presence of a backward-moving proton in the final state of a beam-deuterium collision. The detector must be of very low mass in order to provide sensitivity to the slowest possible protons. The ionization electron trail left by the protons will drift radially outward to an amplification structure composed of curved GEMs, and the resulting charge will be collected on pads on the outer layer of the detector. Unique design challenges are imposed by the cylindrical geometry and the low mass requirement. The status of the project and results of prototype tests are presented.

  6. Photostructured coating on a voltage degrader for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manaranche, C; Loquet, J L; Serdiouk, V; Scandurra, M; Zucchelli, P

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibreglass-reinforced epoxy (Stesalit) tubes and rods were coated with a photostructured metal layer system of copper, nickel and gold for a voltage degrader built in a particle detector at CERN, Geneva. The metal layers were applied with galvanotechnical processes involving an original photolithographic exposure in three dimensions to produce a complex electrical circuit design able to provide the correct potential to 420 different conductors. The Stesalit substrate material, even after a first layer of electroless copper, is electrically quite resistive, creating problems for the electrodeposition of the subsequent nickel layer. A mathematical simulation of the plating thickness distribution showed that the electrolytic nickel deposition was suitable for short rods but electroless nickel was needed for the long rods. The functional properties of the metallized Stesalit components are satisfactory: no degradation of the gas quality within the Time Projection Chamber is observed; the potential distribution al...

  7. Algorithm for Computation of Electromagnetic Fields of An Accelerated Short Bunch Inside a Rectangular Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC; ,

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of an application of an implicit finite-difference approximation to calculate the fields of a relativistic bunch moving with no restriction inside a vacuum chamber. We assume that a bunch trajectory is not straight but is inside a vacuum chamber or its branch. The bunch can be deflected by the fields of bending magnets. The bunch can be short enough to produce coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Accelerator physicists believe that electromagnetic phenomena of charged beams are governed by Maxwell's equations together with Newton's equations for particle dynamics. To understand the behavior of the beams and radiated fields we just need to find a solution to these equations for the case, which can fully describe the real accelerator environment. So, at first we make a model, which contains all the necessary components, but at the same time can be easily 'inserts' into the equations. Sometimes, it is possible to find analytical solutions, but usually they are only work for one-dimensional cases and rarer for two-dimension cases. To find a solution in general we may transform the equations into a equivalent finite-difference form and solve them using computers. We can find a lot of finite-difference schemes, which approximate Maxwell's equations since the first one that was published in 1966. Most of them are so called explicit schemes. That means that the value of the field at the new time step is calculated only by the field values at the previous time step. Stability conditions for these schemes do not allow a time step to be greater than or equal to a space (mesh) step. This limitation brings an additional troublesome effect for short wavelengths compared a mesh step. We state that this effect works like a frequency dispersion media, which is 'hidden' in the finite-difference equation.

  8. Cycles in the chamber homology for GL(3) Anne-Marie Aubert, Samir Hasan and Roger Plymen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, Anne-Marie

    . This chamber is a polysimplex, the product of an n-simplex by a 1-simplex: C = n × 1. To this datum we will attach a homological coefficient system, see [13, p.11]. To each simplex in n we attach by Bushnell-Kutzko. We now specialize to GL(3). In this article, we will explicitly construct representative

  9. ARIES Inertial Fusion Chamber Assessment M. S. Tillack*, F. Najmabadi, L. A. El-Guebaly, D. Goodin, W. R. Meier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -coupled indirect drive and fast ignition. Arguably, inertial fusion looks significantly more credible and more components (i.e., final optics, final focus magnets), chamber physics (particle and radiation transport, gas al., "Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Design Studies: Prometheus Final Report," MDC 92E0008 (DOE

  10. Analyses of Adsorption Kinetics Using a Stirred-Flow Chamber: II. Potassium-Calcium Exchange on Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Analyses of Adsorption Kinetics Using a Stirred-Flow Chamber: II. Potassium-Calcium Exchange to be measuredwith the stirred-flowtech- nique, while exchange rates on vermiculite could be ascertained. Adsorption and comparing different ki- netic methods have not been solved. Kinetics of K adsorption on clay minerals have

  11. Time-course correlation of biofilm properties and electrochemical performance in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    -chamber microbial fuel cells Zhiyong Ren a,c , Ramaraja P. Ramasamy b,1 , Susan Red Cloud-Owen b , Hengjing Yan 2010 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Electricity Biofilm Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy a b s t r in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was analyzed by time-course sampling of parallel single-bottle MFCs operated

  12. Volcano-tectonic modelling of magma chambers, ring-faults, unrest, and eruptions in the Tianchi Volcano, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    this range to AD938-946), produced between 96 and 172 km3 of deposits, or around 30 km3 of dense magma, and is one of the largest eruptions on Earth during the past 1100 years. A 5-km-diameter collapse caldera, indicating that the shallow magma chamber and/or an associated geothermal system beneath the volcano

  13. Nov 5-9, 2006 IAEA meeting, Vienna, Austria Target and Chamber Technologies for Direct-Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    , Austria 2 Electricity Generator Target factory Modular Laser Array · Modular, separable parts: lowers cost costly chambers, better armor survival and lower cost of electricity also will be investigated. c on significant progress in US Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Proposed Work Within Context of High Average

  14. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    and tower flux measurements R. F. Grant Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton tower at a beaver pond in the BOREAS Northern Study Area. Spatial and temporal variation of CH4 effluxes in the model encompassed that measured by surface chambers and the flux tower. Both modeled and measured CH4

  15. 2014 National Small Business Contracting Summit- US Women’s Chamber of Commerce & National Association of Small Business Contractors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Small Business Contractors and the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce present the 2014 National Small Business Federal Contracting Summit. The event will include sessions on securing a fair share of federal contracting, legal issues, trends and opportunities.

  16. Jefferson Orange Hardin Regional Transportation Study 2007 Metropolitan Transportation Plan - 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South East Texas Regional Planning Commission

    2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . Average 4 th Highest Daily Maximum Eight-Hour Ozone Levels Per Three Year Period SETRPC Monitoring Sites TCEQ Monitoring Sites Years Sabine Pass Mauriceville SE Tex. Reg. Airport Port Arthur Beaumont Hamshire West Orange 97-99 0.099 0... construction projects. The successor to ISTEA, the Transportation Equity Act for the 21 st Century (TEA-21) was passed by Congress in 1998. This legislation continued to promote system preservation while increasing funding of transit and other...

  17. Mr. J. Daniel Mahoney '66, President Mr. Bob Hardin '68, President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    . Michael Browder '93, Past President Dr. Paul Stanton, Jr., ETSU President Dr. Richard A. Manahan, ETSU Vice President for University Advancement Mr. Robert M. Plummer '84 '87, Executive Director of ETSU. '60, Planned Giving Committee Chairman Ms. Eleanor E. Yoakum '65 ETSU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD

  18. Mr. J. Daniel Mahoney '66, President Mr. Bob Hardin '68, President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    . Michael Browder '93, Past President Dr. Paul E. Stanton, Jr., ETSU President Dr. Richard A. Manahan, Vice President for University Advancement/President, ETSU Foundation Mr. Robert M. Plummer '84, '87, Associate Vice President for University Advancement/Executive Director of ETSU Alumni Association Mrs. Shirley

  19. Mr. J. Daniel Mahoney '66, President Mr. Bob Hardin '68, President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    . Michael Browder '93, Past President Dr. Paul E. Stanton, Jr., ETSU President Dr. Richard A. Manahan, CPA, Vice President for University Advancement/President, ETSU Foundation Mr. Robert M. Plummer '84, '87, Associate Vice President for University Advancement/Executive Director of ETSU Alumni Association Mrs

  20. Mr. Bob V. Hardin '68, President Ms. Dorothy L. Grisham '74, President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    , Treasurer Mr. J. Daniel Mahoney '66, Past President Dr. Paul E. Stanton, Jr., ETSU President Dr. Richard A. Manahan, Vice President for University Advancement/President, ETSU Foundation Mr. Robert M. Plummer '84, '87, Associate Vice President for University Advancement/Executive Director of ETSU Alumni Association

  1. Mr. J. Daniel Mahoney '66, President Mr. Bob Hardin '68, President-Elect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    . Michael Browder, P.E. '68, Past President Dr. Paul E. Stanton, Jr., ETSU President Dr. Richard A. Manahan, ETSU Vice President for University Advancement Mr. Robert M. Plummer '84, '87, Executive Director of ETSU Alumni Association Mrs. Shirley Berk '72, '74 Mr. Jason Berry '98 ETSUTODAYSPRING2005 Credits: Mr

  2. Paul Hardin Kapp, currently based as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Birmingham, will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    people work and produce goods at an unprecedented level. From 3D printing to software development this new industrial revolution, what is the appropriate built form of the new ideas factory? The historic

  3. Richard A. Hardin and Christoph Beckermann Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    process parameters on sigma () phase formation in duplex stainless steels CD3MN and CD3MWCu on Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels," in Proceedings of the 66th SFSA Technical stainless steels (DSS) exhibit a desirable combination of corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical

  4. Wednesday, 3:30 -4:30 p.m. Hardin Hall First Floor Auditorium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -Omaha Integrating Water Management Research with Land Valuation Modeling Across Nebraska FEBRUARY 7 Williams River Mainstem Reservoir System FEBRUARY 21 Felipe Chavez-Ramirez, Platte River Whooping Crane

  5. G:\Permanent\Hardin\E-Link full text\90448 comb patapp.PDF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451DOE/SC0002390 Technical9'S-0041S-90,448

  6. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Gentile, W.R. Blanchard, T.A. Kozub, M. Aristova, C. McGahan, S. Natta, K. Pagdon, J. Zelenty

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber wall acts as the primary heat exchanger. During removal, gas is pumped through the laser ports by turbo molecular-drag pumps (TM-DP). For the purpose of reducing organic based lubricants and seals, a magnetically levitated TM-DP is being investigated with pump manufacturers. Currently, magnetically levitated turbo molecular pumps are commercially available. The pumps will be exposed to thermal loads and ionizing radiation (tritium, Ar-41, post detonation neutrons). Although the TM-DP's will be subjected to these various radiations, current designs for similar pumping devices have been hardened and have the ability of locating control electronics in remote radiation shielded enclosures4. The radiation hardened TM-DP's will be 5 required to operate with minimal maintenance for periods of up to 18 continuous months. As part of this initial investigation for developing a conceptual engineering strategy for a gas fill solution, commercial suppliers of low pressure gas pumping systems have been contacted and engaged in this evaluation. Current technology in the area of mechanical pumping systems indicates that the development of a robust pumping system to meet the requirements of the FTF gas fill concept is within the limits of COTS equipment3,4.

  7. Inhalation toxicology of red and violet mixtures. Chamber concentration and particle-size distribution report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higuchi, M.A.; Davies, D.W.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inhalation exposure facility was developed at the U.S. EPA, RTP, NC to conduct inhalation exposures of rodents and guinea pigs to dye mixtures used by the U.S. Army in the manufacture of smoke munitions. Initially, an evaluation of the prototype chamber aerosol homogeneity was conducted to determine the uniformity and reproducibility of the concentration and particle size of dye aerosol throughout the breathing zone of the test animals. The three dyes, DR11, SR1, and DB3, were chemically analyzed for purity and optically examined for size and shape. All pure dyes appeared to be stable at room temperature except DB3, which decomposes if not stored at 4 C. The particle size ranges varied for each pure dye and structures were either amorphous (azo dye) or crystalline (anthraquinone dyes). The bulk red and violet dye mixtures were analyzed for composition. The chemical analysis of the relative composition of each dye mixture, collected by cascade impactor sampling, revealed fractionation of the mixtures into component dyes.

  8. A steerable UV laser system for the calibration of liquid argon time projection chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ereditato; I. Kreslo; M. Lüthi; C. Rudolf von Rohr; M. Schenk; T. Strauss; M. Weber; M. Zeller

    2014-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPC's) are being build or are proposed for neutrino experiments on long- and short baseline beams. For these detectors a distortion in the drift field due to geometrical or physics reasons can affect the reconstruction of the events. Depending on the TPC geometry and electric drift field intensity this distortion could be of the same magnitude as the drift field itself. Recently, we presented a method to calibrate the drift field and correct for these possible distortions. While straight cosmic ray muon tracks could be used for calibration, multiple coulomb scattering and momentum uncertainties allow only a limited resolution. A UV laser instead can create straight ionization tracks in liquid argon, and allows one to map the drift field along different paths in the TPC inner volume. Here we present a UV laser feed-through design with a steerable UV mirror immersed in liquid argon that can point the laser beam at many locations through the TPC. The straight ionization paths are sensitive to drift field distortions, a fit of these distortion to the linear optical path allows to extract the drift field, by using these laser tracks along the whole TPC volume one can obtain a 3D drift field map. The UV laser feed-through assembly is a prototype of the system that will be used for the MicroBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL).

  9. 'Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress-Brasilia/DF'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicoli, Ieda Gomes [Escritorio de Brasilia-CNEN Quadra 4 Bl. B Sala 1002 A Setor Comercial Norte CEP 70714-900 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Cardozo, Katia Maria [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear-CNEN Rua Helio de Almeida, 75--Cidade Universitaria-Ilha do Fundao CEP 21941-906-Caixa Postal 68550 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir de [Divisao de Materias Primas e Minerais-DIMAP-CNEN Rua General Severiano, 90-Botafogo CEP 22290-901 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasilia--DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of {sup 222}Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m{sup 3}, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m{sup 3}, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection--ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Braselia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN--RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  10. S$?$RIT: A time-projection chamber for symmetry-energy studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Shane; A. McIntosh; T. Isobe; W. G. Lynch; H. Baba; J. Barney; Z. Chajecki; M. Chartier; J. Estee; M. Famiano; B. Hong; K. Ieki; G. Jhang; R. Lemmon; F. Lu; T. Murakami; N. Nakatsuka; M. Nishimura; R. Olsen; W. Powell; H. Sakurai; A. Taketani; S. Tangwancharoen; M. B. Tsang; T. Usukura; R. Wang; S. J. Yennello; J. Yurkon

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) called the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (S$\\pi$RIT) has recently been constructed at Michigan State University as part of an international effort to constrain the symmetry-energy term in the nuclear Equation of State (EoS). The S$\\pi$RIT TPC will be used in conjunction with the SAMURAI spectrometer at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN to measure yield ratios for pions and other light isospin multiplets produced in central collisions of neutron-rich heavy ions, such as $^{132}$Sn + $^{124}$Sn. The S$\\pi$RIT TPC can function both as a TPC detector and as an active target. It has a vertical drift length of 50 cm, parallel to the magnetic field. Gas multiplication is achieved through the use of a multi-wire anode. Image charges are produced in the 12096 pads, and are read out with the recently developed Generic Electronics for TPCs.

  11. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yewondwossen, Mammo, E-mail: mammo.yewondwossen@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source, dosimetric evaluation k{sub user} factor determined by photon beam of energy of 300 kVp was used. The maximum mean difference between ion chamber array measured and TPS calculated was 3.7%. Comparisons of dose distribution for different test plans have shown agreement with >94.5% for {gamma} {<=}1. Dosimetric QA can be performed with the 2D ion chamber array to confirm primary source strength calibration is properly updated in both the TPS and treatment delivery console computers. The MatriXX Evolution ionization chamber array has been found to be reliable for measurement of both absolute dose and relative dose distributions for the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source.

  12. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K., E-mail: klemens.zink@kmub.thm.de [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany); Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Looe, H. K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg D-26129, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg D-26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen D-37073 (Germany)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the in–out imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The in–out electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  13. Forward Drift Chamber for the GlueX Experiment at the 12 GeV CEBAF Machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pentchev, Lubomir; Zihlmann, Benedikt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GlueX experiment will search for exotic mesons produced by 9 GeV linearly polarized photons from the upgraded CEBAF machine. It is critical to detect and measure the four-momenta of all the charged particles and photons resulting from the decays of the mesons. The solenoid-based detector system includes tracking detectors and calorimeters. The Forward Drift Chamber, FDC, consists of 24 circular planar drift chambers of 1m diameter. Additional cathode readout is required to achieve efficient pattern recognition. The detection of photons by the electromagnetic calorimeters imposes constraints on the amount of material used in the FDC. The specific features of the detector and the readout electronics will be described. Results from the tests of the full scale prototype will be presented, as well.

  14. Forward Drift Chamber for the GlueX experiment at the 12 GeV CEBAF machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubomir Pentchev, Benedikt Zihlmann

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GlueX experiment will search for exotic mesons produced by 9 GeV linearly polarized photons from the upgraded CEBAF machine. It is critical to detect and measure the four-momenta of all the charged particles and photons resulting from the decays of the mesons. The solenoid-based detector system includes tracking detectors and calorimeters. The Forward Drift Chamber, FDC, consists of 24 circular planar drift chambers of 1m diameter. Additional cathode readout is required to achieve efficient pattern recognition. The detection of low energy photons by the electromagnetic calorimeters imposes constraints on the amount of material used in the FDC. The specific features of the detector and the readout electronics will be described. Results from the tests of the full scale prototype will be presented, as well.

  15. SU-E-T-172: Evaluation of the Exradin A26 Ion Chamber in Megavoltage Photon Beams as a Reference Class Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The Exradin A26 is a new design of micro-ionization ion chamber that externally resembles the Exradin A16 model but has significant internal changes to address measurement issues reported in the literature for the A16. This project involved the characterization of two versions of the A26 chamber in high energy x-rays with particular reference to the performance specification laid out in the imminent Addendum to TG-51. Methods: The Exradin A26 was investigated in a range of megavoltage photon beams (6–25 MV). Investigations looked at chamber settling, ion recombination and polarity. Since it has been previously shown that non-ideal performance is most easily identified through ion recombination measurements, the focus was on the determination of Pion. Results: i) Chamber settling - the chamber response stabilizes very quickly (within 3 minutes), even after a large change in the polarizing voltage.ii) The polarity correction was found to be small (within 0.2% of unity)iii) The chamber showed linear behavior for a Jaffe plot (1/reading vs 1/polarizing voltage) for applied voltages ? 200 V.iv) The recombination correction showed a linear variation with the doseper- pulse, was not significantly dependent on the polarity of the collecting voltage and was consistent with the chamber dimensions (i.e. agreed with Boag theory). Conclusion: An initial investigation of the Exradin A26 micro chamber suggests that although its performance exceeds the AAPM specification for a reference-class ion chamber for use in megavoltage photon beams it is a significant improvement over the previous A16 design. Further work is required to evaluate long-term stability and determine kQ factors.

  16. The earliest history of the Skaergaard magma chamber: a textural and geochemical study of the Cambridge Drill Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holness, Marian B.; Tegner, Christian; Namur, Olivier; Pilbeam, Llewellyn

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilbeam, Llewellyn; University of Cambridge, Dept of Earth Sciences Keyword: Skaergaard, magma chamber, intrusion, cumulate, gabbro, geochemistry, layered igneous rock, mineral chemistry http://www.petrology.oupjournals.org/ Manuscript submitted... and olivines (Nwe, 1975; 1976), plagioclase (Maaløe, 1976; Humphreys, 2009; Namur et al., 2014), rhythmic layering (Maaløe, 1978; 1987) and uranium content (Henderson, 1975). Maaløe’s detailed 1976 study of plagioclase in the drill core outlines the cryptic...

  17. Scintillation counter and wire chamber front end modules for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldin, Boris; DalMonte, Lou; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes two front-end modules developed for the proposed MIPP upgrade (P-960) experiment at Fermilab. The scintillation counter module was developed for the Plastic Ball detector time and charge measurements. The module has eight LEMO 00 input connectors terminated with 50 ohms and accepts negative photomultiplier signals in the range 0.25...1000 pC with the maximum input voltage of 4.0 V. Each input has a passive splitter with integration and differentiation times of {approx}20 ns. The integrated portion of the signal is digitized at 26.55 MHz by Analog Devices AD9229 12-bit pipelined 4-channel ADC. The differentiated signal is discriminated for time measurement and sent to one of the four TMC304 inputs. The 4-channel TMC304 chip allows high precision time measurement of rising and falling edges with {approx}100 ps resolution and has internal digital pipeline. The ADC data is also pipelined which allows deadtime-less operation with trigger decision times of {approx}4 {micro}s. The wire chamber module was developed for MIPP EMCal detector charge measurements. The 32-channel digitizer accepts differential analog signals from four 8-channel integrating wire amplifiers. The connection between wire amplifier and digitizer is provided via 26-wire twist-n-flat cable. The wire amplifier integrates input wire current and has sensitivity of 275 mV/pC and the noise level of {approx}0.013 pC. The digitizer uses the same 12-bit AD9229 ADC chip as the scintillator counter module. The wire amplifier has a built-in test pulser with a mask register to provide testing of the individual channels. Both modules are implemented as a 6Ux220 mm VME size board with 48-pin power connector. A custom europack (VME) 21-slot crate is developed for housing these front-end modules.

  18. EDDY CURRENT EFFECT OF THE BNL-AGS VACUUM CHAMBER ON THE OPTICS OF THE BNL-AGS SYNCHROTRON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TSOUPAS,N.; AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.A.; GLENN,J.W.; GARDNER,K.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the acceleration cycle of the AGS synchrotron, eddy currents are generated within the walls of the vacuum chambers of the AGS main magnets. The vacuum chambers have elliptical cross section, are made of inconel material with a wall thickness of 2 mm and are placed within the gap of the combined-function main magnets of the AGS synchrotron. The generation of the eddy currents in the walls of the vacuum chambers, creates various magnetic multipoles, which affect the optics of the AGS machine. In this report these magnetic multipoles are calculated for various time interval starting at the acceleration cycle, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is {approx}0.1 T, and ending before the beam extraction process, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is almost constant at {approx}1.1 T. The calculations show that the magnetic multipoles generated by the eddy-currents affect the optics of the AGS synchrotron during the acceleration cycle and in particular at low magnetic fields of the main magnet. Their effect is too weak to affect the optics of the AGS machine during beam extraction at the nominal energies.

  19. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  20. SU-E-T-118: Dose Verification for Accuboost Applicators Using TLD, Ion Chamber and Gafchromic Film Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisela, W; Yao, R; Dorbu, G [Columbus Regional Healthcare, Columbus, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To verify dose delivered with HDR Accuboost applicators using TLD, ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements and to examine applicator leakage. Methods: A microSelectron HDR unit was used to deliver a dose of 50cGy to the mid-plane of a 62mm thick solid water phantom using dwell times from Monte Carlo pre-calculated nomograms for a 60mm, 70mm Round and 60mm Skin-Dose Optimized (SDO) applicators respectively. GafChromic EBT3+ film was embedded in the phantom midplane horizontally to measure dose distribution. Absolute dose was also measured with TLDs and an ADCL calibrated parallel-plate ion chamber placed in the film plane at field center for each applicator. The film was calibrated using 6MV x-ray beam. TLDs were calibrated in a Cs-137 source at UW-Madison calibration laboratory. Radiation leakage through the tungsten alloy shell was measured with a film wrapped around outside surface of a 60mm Round applicator. Results: Measured maximum doses at field center are consistently lower than predicated by 5.8% for TLD, 8.8% for ion chamber, and 2.6% for EBT3+ film on average, with measurement uncertainties of 2.2%, 0.3%, and 2.9% for TLD, chamber, film respectively. The total standard uncertainties for ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurement are 4.9% and 4.6% respectively[1]. The area defined by the applicator aperture was covered by 80% of maximum dose for 62mm compression thickness. When 100cGy is delivered to mid-plane with a 60mm Round applicator, surface dose ranges from 60cGy to a maximum of 145cGy, which occurs at source entrance to the applicator. Conclusion: Measured doses by all three techniques are consistently lower than predicted in our measurements. For a compression thickness of 62 mm, the field size defined by the applicator is only covered by 80% of prescribed dose. Radiation leakage of up to 145cGy was found at the source entrance of applicators.

  1. SU?C?105?05: Reference Dosimetry of High?Energy Electron Beams with a Farmer?Type Ionization Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B; Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate gradient effects and provide Monte Carlo calculated beam quality conversion factors to characterize the Farmer?type NE2571 ion chamber for high?energy reference dosimetry of clinical electron beams. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose to water and to the gas in a fully modeled NE2571 chamber as a function of depth in a water phantom. Electron beams incident on the surface of the phantom are modeled using realistic BEAMnrc accelerator simulations and electron beam spectra. Beam quality conversion factors are determined using calculated doses to water and to air in the chamber in high?energy electron beams and in a cobalt?60 reference field. Calculated water?to?air stopping power ratios are employed for investigation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor. Results: An upstream shift of 0.3–0.4 multiplied by the chamber radius, r-cav, both minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber perturbation factor with depth and reduces the difference between the beam quality specifier (R{sub 5} {sub 0}) calculated using ion chamber simulations and that obtained with simulations of dose?to?water in the phantom. Beam quality conversion factors are obtained at the reference depth and gradient effects are optimized using a shift of 0.2r-cav. The photon?electron conversion factor, k-ecal, amounts to 0.906 when gradient effects are minimized using the shift established here and 0.903 if no shift of the data is used. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are investigated and amount to between 0.4 to 1.1% depending on assumptions used. Conclusion: The calculations obtained in this work characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of high?energy electron beams. These results will be useful as the AAPM continues to review their reference dosimetry protocols.

  2. A vertical drift chamber as a high resolution focal plane detector for heavy ion spectroscopy with the Enge split-pole spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Kenneth Warren

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67 71 74 79 V DESIGN OF A HYBRID FOCAL PLANE DETECTOR SYSTEM FOR HEAVY ION PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION 86 A. Particle Identification with the Hybrid Detector B. The Vertical Drift Chamber 1. Function and Design 2. Construction C. The Ionization.... 1. General Procedure to Identify and Remove Incorrect Drift Times 2. Results D. Determining the Origin of Major Drift Time Errors 139 144 152 152 156 166 D. PULSE FORMATION IN AN IONIZATION CHAMBER 170 VITA 174 LIST OF TABLES Page...

  3. Trends in Support for Civil Liberties Tom W. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Matthew

    with elections and letting the military run the country," and "a Muslim clergyman who preaches hatred indicates that allowing a Muslim extremist to speak was favored by 41% in 2008 and 2010, teaching by 29 from first to 2010 was +16.0 points and from low to high was +19.0 points. For a Muslim extremist

  4. Case Study - Statue of Liberty National Monument | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    focuses on improvements to the infrastructure, with the addition of energy-efficient lighting, variable-speed drives, and installation of energy management control systems. The...

  5. POET-DSM: Project Liberty | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreachPNNL AdvancesPNNL:

  6. Liberty County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: Energy Resources

  7. Liberty County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: Energy ResourcesGeorgia:

  8. Liberty County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: Energy

  9. Liberty County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: EnergyTexas: Energy

  10. Liberty Hill, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana:NewJumpLiberia: EnergyTexas:Hill, Texas:

  11. City of West Liberty, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCity of Spencer,CityWaterville,City ofWells,City

  12. Liberty Power Corp. (District of Columbia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow(Redirected fromLiberia-NREL

  13. Liberty Turbine Test Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow(Redirected fromLiberia-NRELTest Wind Farm

  14. City of Liberty, Texas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCityCity ofCityCityCity ofCity

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTable ofArizonaBuffaloJohns HopkinsLa PointeLattyLeland-

  16. National Park Service Statue of Liberty National Monument | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDSEnergy 1Department ofNationalEnergy Park

  17. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)] [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan); Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Kawamura, Shinji [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Miyazaki University Hospital, 5200 Kihara Ohaza Kiyotake-Machi, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol. Due to the simple but accurate assembly, the sandwich measurement method is useful for daily dose management of {sup 192}Ir sources.

  18. Determination of astrophysical thermonuclear rates with a bubble chamber: The {sup 12}C(??){sup 16}O reaction case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 (United States); Grames, J.; Meekins, D.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Robinson, A.; Ugalde, C., E-mail: cugalde@uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sonnenschein, A. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The {sup 12}C(??){sup 16}O reaction rate is considered one of the most important unknown parameters in the physics of structure and evolution of massive stars. While extensive experimental campaigns have been performed trying to improve the quality of the measurements, the rate still holds very large uncertainties. Here we discuss a new experimantal scheme to measure the cross section of this reaction with a bubble chamber and a bremsstrahlung beam. The main advantage of the technique is a gain in the luminosity of several orders of magnitude when compared to other ongoing experiments.

  19. Integration of a broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manova, D.; Bergmann, A.; Maendl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e. V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, the integration of a low energy, linearly variable ion beam current density, mechanically in situ adjustable broad beam ion source with a high-temperature x-ray diffraction (XRD) vacuum chamber is reported. This allows in situ XRD investigation of phase formation and evolution processes induced by low energy ion implantation. Special care has been taken to an independent adjustment of the ion beam for geometrical directing towards the substrate, a 15 mm small ion source exit aperture to avoid a secondary sputter process of the chamber walls, linearly variable ion current density by using a pulse length modulation (PLM) for the accelerating voltages without changing the ion beam density profile, nearly homogeneous ion beam distribution over the x-ray footprint, together with easily replaceable Kapton{sup Registered-Sign} windows for x-rays entry and exit. By combining a position sensitive x-ray detector with this PLM-modulated ion beam, a fast and efficient time resolved investigation of low energy implantation processes is obtained in a compact experimental setup.

  20. Characterization of a two-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovic, Miljenko, E-mail: markovic@livemail.uthscsa.edu; Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Jurkovic, Ines-Ana; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to investigate the characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled ion chamber detector array, which is used for the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans that use small field sizes of up to 10 × 10 cm. Methods: The device used in this study was Octavius 1000 SRS model (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Its 2D array of detectors consists of 977 liquid-filled ion chambers arranged over an area of 11 × 11 cm. The size of the detectors is 2.3 × 2.3 × 0.5 mm (volume of 0.003 cm{sup 3}) and their spacing in the inner area of 5.5 × 5.5 cm is 2.5 mm center-to-center, whereas in the outer area it is 5 mm center-to-center. The detector reproducibility, dose linearity, and sensitivity to positional changes of the collimator were tested. Also, the output factors of field sizes ranging from 0.5 × 0.5 to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} both for open and wedged fields have been measured and compared against those measured by a pin-point ionization chamber, liquid filled microchamber, SRS diode, and EDR2 film. Results: Its short-term reproducibility was within 0.2% and its medium and long-term reproducibility was within 0.5% (verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements), which is an excellent result taking into account the daily fluctuation of the linear accelerator and the errors in the device setup reproducibility. The dose linearity and dose rate dependence were measured in the range of 0.5–85 Gy and 0.5–10 Gy?min{sup ?1}, respectively, and were verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements was within 3%. The measurements of the sensitivity showed that the 2D Array could detect millimetric collimator positional changes. The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 0.3% with the pinpoint chamber and microliquid filled chamber for the field sizes between 3 × 3 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. For field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, the agreement with SRS diode and microliquid filled chamber is better than 2%. The measurements of open and wedge-modulated field profiles were compared to the film and ionization chamber in water measurements. Conclusions: The Octavius Detector 1000 SRS is an accurate, precise, and reliable detector, very useful for the daily performance of the patient specific quality assurance of radiotherapy treatment plans.

  1. 14/03/06 TTF2 Seminar: Re-design considerations for the vacuum chamber layout BC2 at the VUV-FEL Christopher Gerth Re-design considerations for vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14/03/06 TTF2 Seminar: Re-design considerations for the vacuum chamber layout BC2 at the VUV-FEL Christopher Gerth Re-design considerations for vacuum chamber layout of BC2 at the VUV-FEL Christopher Gerth #12;14/03/06 TTF2 Seminar: Re-design considerations for the vacuum chamber layout BC2 at the VUV-FEL

  2. Development and validation of compressible mixture viscous fluid algorithm applied to predict the evolution of inertial fusion energy chamber gas and the impact of gas on direct-drive target survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Robert Scott

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and technologies for fusion energy with lasers and direct-direct drive inertial fusion energy targets. Report 06-02,Improved Inertial Fusion Energy Chamber Inter-Shot

  3. Levitation and collection of diamond fine particles in the rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, S.; Shimizu, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jacob, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the levitation of diamond fine particles in a H{sub 2} rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament and heated electrodes. The levitation conditions should be carefully chosen to compensate the strong thermophoretic forces caused by the filament and the electrodes. This levitation technique with the existence of a hot filament can be applied, e.g., for the efficient growth of diamond layers on seed particles injected and levitated in an rf plasma with reactive gases, e.g., CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}. Additionally, the method for direct capture of levitated particles on a planar substrate was established, which is useful if it is necessary to analyze the particles after the levitation.

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma chamber studies using a network analyzer as a loaded cavity probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toivanen, V.; Tarvainen, O.; Kauppinen, J.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae 40500 (Finland); Lyneis, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and first results utilizing a network analyzer as a loaded cavity probe to study the resonance properties of a plasma filled electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma chamber are presented. The loaded cavity measurements have been performed using a dual port technique, in which two separate waveguides were used simultaneously. One port was used to ignite and sustain the plasma with a microwave source operating around 11 GHz and the other was used to probe the cavity properties with the network analyzer using a frequency range around 14 GHz. The first results obtained with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS demonstrate that the presence of plasma has significant effects on the resonance properties of the cavity. With plasma the frequency dependent behavior is strongly damped and this trend strengthens with increasing microwave power.

  5. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital (L5-113), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Davis, Stephen [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  6. Fission-chamber-compensated self-powered detector for in-core flux measurement and reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neissel, J.P.

    1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for in-core flux measurement and nuclear reactor control consisting of: a self-powered rhodium neutron detector for producing an output signal corresponding to reactor power level; first amplifier means having an input for receiving the neutron detector output signal, and the first amplifier means producing a corresponding first amplifier output signal (V/sub 1/); a fission chamber for producing an output signal corresponding to reactor power level; second amplifier means having an input for receiving the fission chamber output signal, the second amplifier means producing a corresponding second amplifier output signal; first differentiating means coupled to the output of the second amplifier means including a resistor and a capacitor coupled to provide a time constant T/sub 1//1n 2 where T/sub 1/ is the half-life of the ground state of Rh/sup 104/; third amplifier means having an input for receiving the second amplifier means output signal, the third amplifier means having a voltage gain of (1-c)/c; second differentiating means coupled to the output of the third amplifying means and including a capacitor and resistor providing a time constant T/sub 2//1n 2 where T/sub 2/ is the half-life of the isomeric state of Rh/sup 104/; and fourth amplifier means including corresponding inputs for receiving the output of the first amplifier means, a processed output from the first differentiating circuit, and a processed output from the second differentiating circuit, and for producing a corresponding summed output signal.

  7. In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Liaoyuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the major mid-rapidity tracking devices of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) plays an important role in measuring trajectory and energy of high energy charged particles...

  8. In-Jet Tracking Efficiency Analysis for the STAR Time Projection Chamber in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 200GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo, Liaoyuan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the major mid-rapidity tracking devices of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) plays an important role in measuring trajectory and energy of high energy charged particles...

  9. Study of the single cluster response of a helium-isobutane drift chamber prototype using 8 keV X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cavoto; S. Dabagov; D. Hampai; G. Piredda; F. Renga; E. Ripiccini; C. Voena

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of single clusters in the electronic signals produced by ionizing particles within a drift chamber is expected to significantly improve the performances of this kind of detectors in terms of particle identification capabilities and space resolution. In order to develop refined cluster recognition algorithms, it is essential to measure the response of the chamber and its electronics to single ionization clusters. This can be done by irradiating the chamber with X-rays. We report here on the studies performed on a drift chamber prototype for the MEG-II experiment at the X-ray facility of the INFN Frascati's National Laboratories "XLab Frascati". The prototype is operated with a helium-isobutane mixture and instrumented with high bandwidth custom pre-amplifiers. The results of this study have been used to develop an innovative method for cluster recognition, based on the Wiener filter technique. As a side measurement, we also performed a study of the gas gain in a configuration which is similar to that of the MEG-II experiment.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of anode-supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cell based on La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -CGO cathode 1. Introduction Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) have received many attentionsFabrication and characterization of anode-supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cell based-supported solid oxide fuel cells consisting of nickel-gadolinium doped ceria (NiO-CGO, 60:40 wt%) anode

  11. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers containing low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13) be considered for air-kerma calibrations for reference dosimetry in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams.

  12. Evaluation of the accuracy of 3DVH software estimates of dose to virtual ion chamber and film in composite IMRT QA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olch, Arthur J. [University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Radiation Oncology Program, Los Angeles, California 90027 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) QA system, 3DVH software and mapcheck 2, purports to be able to use diode array-measured beam doses and the patient's DICOM RT plan, structure set, and dose files to predict the delivered 3D dose distribution in the patient for comparison to the treatment planning system (TPS) calculated doses. In this study, the composite dose to an ion chamber and film in phantom predicted by the 3DVH and mapcheck 2 system is compared to the actual measured chamber and film doses. If validated in this context, then 3DVH can be used to perform an equivalent dose analysis as that obtained with film dosimetry and ion chamber-based composite IMRT QA. This is important for those losing their ability to perform film dosimetry for true composite IMRT QA and provides a measure of confidence in the accuracy of 3DVH 3D dose calculations which may replace phantom-based IMRT QA. Methods: The dosimetric results from 15 consecutive patient-specific IMRT QA tests performed by composite field irradiation of ion chamber and EDR2 film in a solid water phantom were compared to the predicted doses for those virtual detectors based on the calculated 3D dose by the 3DVH software using mapcheck 2 measured doses of each beam within each plan. For each of the 15 cases, immediately after performing the ion chamber plus film measurements, the mapcheck 2 was used to measure the dose for each beam of the plan. The dose to the volume of the virtual ion chamber and the dose distribution in the plane of the virtual film calculated by the 3DVH software was extracted. The ratio of the measured to 3DVH or eclipse-predicted ion chamber doses was calculated. The same plane in the phantom measured using film and calculated with eclipse was exported from 3DVH and the 2D gamma metric was used to compare the relationship between the film doses and the eclipse or 3DVH predicted planar doses. Also, the 3D gamma value was calculated in the 3DVH software which compares the eclipse dose to the 3DVH predicted dose distribution. For the 2D and 3D gamma metrics, 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) were used. In addition, a simple dose difference was performed using either a 2% or 3% dose difference tolerance. Results: The mean ratio {+-} standard deviation of the measured vs 3DVH or vs eclipse-predicted dose to the ion chamber was 1.013 {+-} 0.015 and 1.003 {+-} 0.012, respectively. For 3DVH vs eclipse, the mean percentage of pixels failing the 3D gamma metric was 1.2% {+-} 1.4% while the failure rate for the 2D gamma metric was 1.1% {+-} 0.9%. When either 3DVH or eclipse was compared to EDR2 film, the gamma failure rate was 2.3% {+-} 2.0% and 1.6% {+-} 1.7%, respectively. Mean dose difference failures were 9%-27% {+-} 5%-15% for 2 or 3% dose difference tolerances, depending on the combination of systems tested. No statistically significant differences were found for any of the planar dosimetric comparisons. Conclusions: 3DVH + mapcheck 2 predicts the same absolute dose, the percent of pixels failing the gamma metric, and the percent of pixels failing 2% or 3% dose difference tolerance tests as one would have obtained had one made measurements in solid water phantom using an ion chamber and coronal film instead of a diode array. This is also a necessary although not sufficient condition for validation of the accuracy of 3DVH predictions of the 3D dose using beam-by-beam measurements.

  13. Analysis of the energy transport and deposition within the reaction chamber of the prometheus inertial fusion energy reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggleston, J.E.; Abdou, M.A.; Tillack, M.S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the parameters affecting the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) devices is the number of shots per unit time, i.e. the repetition rate. The repetition rate limits the achievable power that can be obtained from the reactor. To obtain an estimate of the allowable time between shots, a code named RECON was developed to model the response of the reaction chamber to the pellet explosion. This paper discusses how the code treats the thermodynamic response of the cavity gas and models the condensation/evaporation of this vapor to and from the first wall. A large amount of energy from the pellet microexplosion is carried by the pellet debris and the x-rays generated in the fusion reaction. Models of x-ray attenuation and ion slowing down are used to estimate the fraction of the pellet energy that is absorbed in the vapor. A large amount of energy is absorbed into the cavity gas, which causes it to become partially ionized. The ionization complicates the calculation of the temperature, pressure, and the radiative heat transfer from the gas to the first wall. To treat this problem, methods developed by Zel`dovich and Raizer are used in modeling the internal energy and the radiative heat flux. RECON was developed to run with a relatively short computational time, yet accurate enough for conceptual reactor design calculations.

  14. Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (PART 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilov, M; Kvaratskheliia, T; Laptin, L; Tichomirov, I; Titov, M L; Zaitsev, Yu; Gilitsky, Yu.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance $R$ from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradi...

  15. Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (PART 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Danilov; Yu. Gilitsky; T. Kvaratschellia; L. Laptin; I. Tichomirov; M. Titov; Yu. Zaitsev

    2001-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance $R$ from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiation. The possible application of these results to the construction of a large area gaseous detectors for operation in high rate environments is presented.

  16. Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Danilov; Yu. Gilitsky; T. Kvaratschellia; L. Laptin; I. Tichomirov; M. Titov; Yu. Zaitsev

    2001-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance R from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiation. The possible application of these results to the construction of a large area gaseous detectors for operation in high rate environments is presented.

  17. Aging Studies of Large Area Proportional Chambers under High-Rate Irradiation with $CF_4$-based Mixtures (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilov, M; Kvaratskheliia, T; Laptin, L; Tichomirov, I; Titov, M L; Zaitsev, Yu; Gilitsky, Yu.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental conditions at the HERA-B experiment impose very strong requirements for gaseous detectors. The charged particle fluxes through the HERA-B tracking system, varying with the radial distance R from the beam line, are about $2 \\times 10^{7}/R^{2}$ particles per second, and comparable to those that will be encountered by LHC experiments. The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum charge deposit on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm per year. We report recent results of aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (74:20:6), $Ar/CF_4/CH_4$ (67:30:3), $Ar/CF_4/CO_2$ (65:30:5), $Ar/CF_4$ (70:30), $CF_4/CH_4$ (90:10), $CF_4/CH_4$ (80:20) mixtures in a three different experimental setups. The size of the irradiation zone varied in the tests from 1 cm up to 500 cm. Our experience shows that the aging rate depends not only on the total collected charge, but, in addition, on the mode of operation and area of irradiat...

  18. First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Behnke, J.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Broemmelsiek, D.; /Fermilab; Collar, J.I.; /Chicago U., EFI; Conner, A.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, P.S.; /Fermilab; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Dahl, C.E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Fustin, D.; /Chicago U., EFI; Grace, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2} and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

  19. 2010; doi: 10.1101/pdb.prot5543Cold Spring Harb Protoc Timothy Walston and Jeff Hardin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jeff

    . elegans embryo is to use laser ablation of individual cells. Laser abla- tion can be used to kill one the contact. This protocol describes laser ablation of embryos mounted on an agar mount. RELATED INFORMATION Caenorhabditis elegansLaser Killing of Blastomeres in Service Email Alerting click here.Receive free email alerts

  20. The experimental feature on the data of the primary proton identification in stratospheric X-ray emulsion chambers at energies >10 TeV (RUNJOB experiment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. S. Zayarnaya

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The RUNJOB balloon-born emulsion chamber experiments have been carried out for investigating the composition and energy spectra of primary cosmic rays at energies 10-1000 TeV/nucleon. On the data of the treatment of RUNJOB` X-ray emulsion chambers exposed since 1995 to 1999 year about 50 % proton tracks were identified. In remained half of the events from proton group the one charged primary tracks were not found in the search area determined with high accuracy by the triangulation method using the several background heavy tracks. Considered methodical reasons in this paper could not explain this experimental result. The one from the probable physical reasons that is the neutrons in cosmic ray flux does not explain it too.

  1. A Multi-Chamber System for Analyzing the Outgassing, Deposition,and Associated Optical Degradation Properties of Materials in a Vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, Jack; Schindler, Rafe; Chang, Chihway; Czodrowski, Patrick; Kim, Peter; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the Camera Materials Test Chamber, a multi-vessel apparatus which analyzes the outgassing consequences of candidate materials for use in the vacuum cryostat of a new telescope camera. The system measures the outgassing products and rates of samples of materials at different temperatures, and collects films of outgassing products to measure the effects on light transmission in six optical bands. The design of the apparatus minimizes potential measurement errors introduced by background contamination.

  2. Fusion Chamber Technology Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    1. Abdou, M.A., The APEX Team, Ying, A., Morley, N., Gulec, K., Smolentsev, S., Kotschenreuther, M-248, 2001. 2. Mohamed Abdou and the APEX Team, Exploring novel high power density concepts for attractive fusion systems, Fusion Engineering and Design, vol. 45, pp. 145-167, 1999. 3. Abdou, M. A., Ying, A., Lu

  3. NIOSH tests refuge chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A NIOSH report questions the viability of the shelters already certified by West Virginia. 1 tab., 6 photos.

  4. Scott Chambers | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    realm Scientists are studying strontium titanate to turn sunlight into fuel through solar hydrolysis, splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen molecules with visible light....

  5. Brain Slice Chamber System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Unit MA1 64-1525 Publication 5407-001-REV-D #12;EU Directives WEEE and RoHS To Our Valued Customers: We on product recycling (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment, WEEE) and the second limiting the use into place, recycling will be offered for our products which are within the scope of the WEEE Directive

  6. BNL | ATF Experimental Chambers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jet system. Dedicated 300 ls turbopump system with an auxiliary port for one 200 ls turbo pump. Operates in the 10-6 Torr range with rapid one hour turn-around time. Vacuum...

  7. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Stevenson, Andrew W. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Victoria 3169 (Australia); Hall, Christopher J. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Lye, Jessica E. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Nordstroem, Terese [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-100 44 (Sweden); Midgley, Stewart M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lewis, Robert A. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation curve on the IMBL using a simple experimental method, namely, HVL measurements. The HVL measurements strongly supports the x-ray beam spectrum, which in turn has a profound effect on x-ray dosimetry.

  8. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P [UniversityMinnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (? 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  9. Improved Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Proton Interactions from a Two Liter CF{sub 3}I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; Behnke, J.; Hinnefeld, J. H.; Levine, I.; Shepherd, T. [Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, Indiana (United States); Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Hu, M.; Ramberg, E.; Sonnenschein, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois (United States); Collar, J. I.; Dahl, C. E.; Fustin, D.; Szydagis, M. [Enrico Fermi Institute, KICP and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the operation of a bubble chamber filled with 3.5 kg of CF{sub 3}I in a shallow underground site are reported. An analysis of ultrasound signals accompanying bubble nucleations confirms that alpha decays generate a significantly louder acoustic emission than single nuclear recoils, leading to an efficient background discrimination. Three dark matter candidate events were observed during an effective exposure of 28.1 kg day, consistent with a neutron background. This observation provides strong direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Characteristics of a radon diffusion chamber with electrical collection using plastic nuclear track detectors. Open file report 31 August 1982-30 November 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.V.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable radon diffusion chamber was tested with electrical collection of radon daughter nuclei for enhancement of sensitivity. The detector was small enough to be worn suspended from a belt. With a battery-supplied high voltage, the sensitivity was found to be 1.43 tracks/sq cm per pCi-h/lambda of ambient radon at 50% relative humidity. The track densities on the surfaces of the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors were found to be nonuniform, making the determination of average densities with high accuracy difficult. The fabrication of electrets for use in the detector was investigated in accordance with published techniques with negative results.

  11. The plasma properties and electron emission characteristics of near-zero differential resistance of hollow cathode-based plasma contactors with a discharge chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Kan, E-mail: xiekan@bit.edu.cn [School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Farnell, Casey C.; Williams, John D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80524 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of electron emission-bias voltage (I-V) characteristics of near-zero differential resistance in the cathodic plasma contactor for bare electrodynamic tether applications, based on a hollow cathode embedded in a ring-cusp ionization stage, is studied. The existence of such an I-V regime is important to achieve low impedance performance without being affected by the space plasma properties for a cathodic plasma contactor. Experimental data on the plasma structure and properties downstream from the ionization stage are presented as functions of the xenon flow rate and the electron emission current. The electrons were emitted from the cathode to the cylindrical vacuum chamber wall (r?=?0.9?m) under ?10{sup ?5?}Torr of vacuum pressure. The ring-cusp configuration selected for the plasma contactor created a 125-Gauss axial field near the cathode orifice, along with a large-volume 50-Gauss magnitude pocket in the stage. A baseline ion energy cost of ?300?eV/ion was measured in the ionization stage when no electrons were emitted to the vacuum chamber wall. In addition, the anode fall growth limited the maximum propellant unitization to below ?75% in the discharge loss curves for this ion stage. Detailed measurements on the plasma properties were carried out for the no-electron emission and 3?A emission conditions. The experimental data are compared with 1-D models, and the effectiveness of the model is discussed. The four key issues that played important roles in the process of building the near-zero different resistance I-V regime are: a significant amount of ionization by the emission electrons, a decrease in the number of reflected electrons in the plume, the electron-temperature increment, and low initial ion energy at the source outlet.

  12. 9/19/13 11:37 AMLanguage skills key to export success says The British Chambers of Commerce Page 1 of 2http://www.growthbusiness.co.uk/news-and-market-deals/business-news/2098113/language-skills-key-to-export-success-says-bcc.thtml

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    9/19/13 11:37 AMLanguage skills key to export success says The British Chambers of Commerce Page 1 of 2http://www.growthbusiness.co.uk/news-and-market-deals/business-news/2098113/language-skills-key-to-export Language skills key to export success says BCC The British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) is calling on UK

  13. SU-D-BRE-04: Evaluating the Dose Accuracy of a 2D Ion Chamber Array in High Dose Rate Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perles, L; Mascia, A; Piskulich, F; Lepage, R; Zhang, Y; Giebeler, A; Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the absolute dose accuracy of the PTW Octavius 729 XDR 2D ion chamber array at a high dose rate pencil beam scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: A set of 18 plans were created in our treatment planning system, each of which comprising a unique combination of field sizes (FS), length of spread out of Bragg peaks (SOBP) and depths. The parameters used were: FS of 5×5cm{sup 2}, 10×10cm{sup 2} and 15×15cm{sup 2}; flat SOBP of 5cm and 10cm; and isocenter depths of 10cm, 15cm and 20cm, which coincides with the center of the SOBP. The 2D array detector was positioned at the machine isocenter and the appropriate amount of solid water was used to match the planned depths of 10, 15 and 20 cm water equivalent depth. Subsequently, we measured the absolute dose at isocenter using a CC04 ion chamber in a 1D water tank. Both 2D array and CC04 were previously cross calibrated. We also collected the MU rates used by our proton machine from the log files. Results: The relative differences between the CC04 and the 2D array can be summarized into two groups, one with 5 cm SOBP and another with 10 cm SOBP. Plotting these datasets against FS shows that the 2D array response for high dose rate fields (FS of 5×5cm{sup 2} and 5cm SOBP) can be up to 2% lower. Similarly, plotting them against isocenter depths reveals the detector's response can be up to 2% lower for higher energy beams (about 200MeV nominal). The MU rate found in the machine log files for 5cm SOBP's were as high as twice the MU rate for the 10cm SOBP. Conclusion: The 2D array dose response showed a dose rate effect in scanning pencil beam delivery, which needs to be corrected to achieve a better dose accuracy.

  14. Relative ozone forming potential of methanol-fueled vehicle emissions and gasoline-fueled vehicle emissions in outdoor smog chambers. Interim report, 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental program compares the relative NO oxidation and O3 forming capabilities of surrogate VOC mixtures that are representative of urban air, emissions from vehicles using methanol fuels, and emissions from vehicles using industry-average gasoline. The experiments used a dual side-by-side outdoor chamber with initial NOx of 330 ppb and hydrocarbon-to-NOx ratios 4.5, 6, and 9:1. The urban VOC mixture was based upon ambient air analyses conducted by EPA for 6-9 AM in 41 cities over the period 1984-1988. The automotive VOC mixtures were based upon exhaust, evaporative, and running loss measurements made in the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program and upon the application of EPA's MOBILE4 emissions model applied in a model scenario in Dallas/Fort Worth in the year 2005. Each of the VOC mixtures had about 55 individual species in which about 45 species were surrogates for the remaining measured carbon. In addition to testing the relative reactivity of each VOC mixture against the other mixtures, the majority of the experiments used mixtures in which 50% of the carbon was from the urban mix and 50% of the carbon was from industry-average gasoline vehicle emissions or 50% of the carbon was from the methanol-fueled vehicle emissions. Some experiments were also conducted with higher fractions of formaldehyde (HCHO) in either the urban mix or in the methanol mix.

  15. High rate resistive plate chambers: An inexpensive, fast, large area detector of energetic charged particles for accelerator and non-accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuest, C.R.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R.M.; Clamp, O.; Haro, M.; Mauger, G.J.; Miller, K.; Olson, H.; Ramsey, P.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive Plate Chambers, or RPCs, have been used until recently as large detectors of cosmic ray muons. They are now finding use as fast large-area trigger and muon detection systems for different high energy physics detectors such the L3 Detector at LEP and future detectors to be built at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. RPC systems at these accelerators must operate with high efficiency, providing nanosecond timing resolution in particle fluences up to a few tens of kHz/cm{sup 2} -- with thousands of square meters of active area. RPCs are simple and cheap to construct. The authors report here recent work on RPCs using new materials that exhibit a combination of desirable RPC features such as low bulk resistivity, high dielectric strength, low mass, and low cost. These new materials were originally developed for use in electronics assembly areas and other applications, where static electric charge buildup can damage sensitive electrical systems.

  16. 4 Liberty Lane West, Hampton, NH 03842 (917) 445-1143 davidqiu0115@gmail.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (WTE) Versus Coal Electricity in Their Environmental Impacts Conducted waste management research and coal electricity industry in Shanghai Energy & Environmental Dept, BAOSTEEL GROUP CO. Summer Intern, Solid and Hazardous Waste Management, Catalytic Emission Control, Air Pollution Prevention and Control

  17. Liberty, Restriction, and the Remaking of Italians and Eastern European Jews, 1882-1965

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinari, Maddalena

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    was not really over whether the quota system would become law, but rather over the most 'scientific' criteria to adopt to exclude and restrict prospective immigrants. The adoption of the 1924 Immigration Act represented the climax of a long battle over... another effect on Italian Americans' response to immigration restriction. In addition to complicating Italian Americans' strategy to oppose the quota system, the Italian government also worked hard to keep alive the ties the community had with Italy...

  18. A review of "Milton and the Terms of Liberty." by Graham Parry and Joad Raymond, eds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Egan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the meanings of the language of kingship and tyranny. By 1654, Milton?s earlier (1649-51) ambivalence and anxiety over nominal versus material definitions of ?king? ?had shifted wholesale onto Cromwell? (94). In ?The Politics of Martial Metaphors in Post...?s Eikonoklastes pro- 32 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS vides a plain, aggressive republican antidote to the royalist rheto- ric of stealth and passive resistance. ?Self-representation and Anxiety in Milton?s Defences,? by Stephen M. Fallon, measures the growing...

  19. A New Birth of Liberty: The Role of Thurgood Marshall's Civil Rights Contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Margaret Bush; Ridley, Diane

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the political system of feudalism dominated by aristocraticcontrol. 8 Under feudalism there had been private propertyparts of the world where feudalism developed, the ownership

  20. Geology of the Shiloh School-Liberty Church area, West Burleson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Raymond Leon

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ ~ ~ so ~ ~ see I"e7' Cn44en City foraaticua a~ines lignitic ssn4h4y silva snt elk/S eoeeeeeeeee ' %s Tba fernatiens beeess progressively yeeager te44ard ths sonthaast fros tha Ch4een city fernatien en ths north44sst te the crockett fernatien on Q... iparta contact~ and at the Sparta 'ecljsa const, , ;esistant beds in the Sparta and jIjecj;ss formations form isolated~ rounded hills as outliors on the !aches and, . ueen City formations (Pigur? 16)~ Sose rolling hills aro found on the Sparta...

  1. Mead-Liberty 345-kV Transmission Line Access Road Maintenance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas, and other water sources that are vital in a region); and X (vii) Tundra, coral reefs, or rain forests.; or X (5) Involve genetically engineered organisms, synthetic...

  2. Geology of the Shiloh School-Liberty Church area, West Burleson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Raymond Leon

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by sroaion and area thereforea frequently hard to recognisea but they form the maJor tope Crapjcic features in the area The cuesta fronts are gentle due to ths so t, beds formica& them ?nd are found at. ths Crockot~tons Gity contacts at tjjs S~~ City...

  3. 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghachem, Malick

    This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is ...

  4. Warrantless Wiretapping, FISA Reform, and the Lessons of Public Liberty: A Comment on Holmes' Jorde Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Paul M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    it can be used to authorize the FBI to engage in electronichad revealed abuses by the NSA, FBI, and other governmentthe United States, while the FBI maintained watch lists of

  5. Liberty but not License: Publicity, Academic Freedom, and the Professionalization of the Professoriate, 1890-1929

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberler, Zachary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wrote a lengthy article entitled “Academic Freedom,” thatAlbion Small’s article entitled “Academic Freedom. I. LimitsJ. Abbot wrote an article on academic freedom that appeared

  6. Microsoft Word - Rev1_Attachment_I_Liberty_CNTA_Final June08.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site May 2013 LMS/TUB/S0021309DOE-LM/1612 Task

  7. Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use Corn Waste

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 BudgetGoals and Requirements GoalsLoggingas a Feedstock |

  8. Grand Opening for Project LIBERTY: Nation's First Plant to Use Corn Waste

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo forDepartment ofGrandGrandas a

  9. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  10. Los Alamos ChamberFest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5LetLooking down the road aheadchange

  11. Kathy Chambers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999 InspectionVolunteersKaren Patterson - EMAB BoardKathryn

  12. DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY 136,430-445 (1989) Local Shifts in Position and Polarized Motility Drive Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Jeff

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cl-induced exogastrulae (Hardin and Cheng, 1986), and in embryos in which secondary mesenchyme cells have been ablated with a laser microbeam (Hardin, 1988). Thus archenteron elongation must presumably involve active rearrange

  13. 17.01J / 24.04J Justice, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joshua, 1951-

    This course explores three broad questions about the values of liberty and equality and their place in a just society: • Which liberties must a just society protect? Freedom of expression? Sexual liberty? Economic liberty? ...

  14. 625 E. Liberty St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (734) 615-8230 graham.umich.edu November 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    of the pitfalls encountered in other states. The project recognizes that natural gas extraction pressures, water supply, local land use, energy security, economic growth, tourism, and natural resource protection, and decreased usage of coal. 2. Who developed the idea for the project? The idea for conducting an Integrated

  15. SWORDS INTO PLOUGHSHARES: The Struggle to Build an Ordered Community of Liberty on the southeast Kansas Frontier 1867-1876

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John N.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a study of the settlement of southeast Kansas in the years immediately following the Civil War. It begins with the first settlers who arrived in 1867 and concludes with the triumph of the settlers in ...

  16. Design of subsea energy storage chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenlee, Alison S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy generated from offshore resources is not reliable over short periods of time. Although wind and wave energy is fairly consistent in the long run, their short term capacity fluctuations prohibit these resources from ...

  17. Dual Chamber Laser Ion Source at Lisol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. Kudryavtsev; T. E. Cocolios; J. Gentens; M. Huyse; O. Ivanov; D. Pauwels; T. Sonoda; P. Van den Bergh; P. Van Duppen

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of the gas cell for the resonance ionization laser ion source at the Leuven Isotope Separator On Line (LISOL) has been developed and tested at off-line and on-line conditions. Two-step selective laser ionization is applied to produce purified beams of radioactive isotopes. The selectivity of the ion source has been increased by more than one order of magnitude by separation of the stopping and laser ionization regions. This allows to use electrical fields for further ion purification.

  18. Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouba, C.

    Maintenance Mechanic), Rick Ragsdale (Fluor), Joyce Finkle (PC), Denis P Humphreys (Fluoroproducts), Jack Hemmert, Charlie Brown 10/20/2010 2 Steam trap failures are nothing new Steam trap programs are nothing new WHAT makes this program have such a huge... impact and How is it sustainable HOW we went about finding a solution What do you have learn from this 10/20/2010 3 Six Sigma Methodology was KEY to success Savings: $1MM annualized in only 6 months! 10/20/2010 4Define: Project CTQ?s Customer...

  19. Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouba, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    automatically within SAP ? Survey performed and work orders created ? Surveyor/Team Leader coordinates repair work ? Use backlog of work to justify number of mechanics ? Prioritize work for mechanics ? Repair Mechanics work across the site ? SAP Work Order... history updated for individual traps ? Surveyor updates excel spreadsheet with repair history ? Monthly reports sent to area and site management 10/20/2010 11Piloted Solution Key Learnings ? SAP Cumbersome and slows repair process ? Use SAP...

  20. Recent Advances in Chamber Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Trapping, etc. - Tokamak Experiments: Liquid Lithium in Actual Plasma Devices #12;Potential Benefits if we stress and erosion as limiting factors in the first wall and divertor - Results in smaller and lower cost

  1. IFE Chamber Development -To ETF and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (~1000 MWe) Engineering Test Facility (100-300 MWe) Power Technologies for Demo Funded by NNSA · NIF and ignition program · Program on advanced target concepts on other NNSA facilities (W, Nike, Z) Advanced is funded by the Office of Fusion Energy Science while High Average Power Lasers (HAPL) are funded by NNSA

  2. Ionization Chambers in the FLASH Dump Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 7, 2010FLASH Seminar, Dec. 7, 2010 BPM 13DUMP Dump Line Upgrade 2009Dump Line Upgrade 2009 BPM 9DUMP BPM 5DUMP Toroid 9DUMP OTR screen 9DUMP BLM 14DUMP BLM 13.1DUMP 13.2DUMP BLM 9DUMP BLM 6DUMP BLM 1.1DUMP 1.2DUMP BPM 10DUMP BPM 16DUMP 8 x BHM 16DUMP BLM 14R.DUMP 14L.DUMP 14U.DUMP 14D.DUMP Ionization

  3. A spark chamber for cosmic ray research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelinek, Al Vincent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are Elkonite 10W$ high-conductivity hard tungsten-copper alloy. They were chosen for the spark gap because they resist surface erosion in heavy electrical discharges. Six 20-KV, 500-picofarad "door knob capacitors" form the discharge capacitor bank. Figure... formed by the incident particle in each gap (typically 60 ion pairs) are sufficient to initiate a spark. This critical value + of the clearing is 45-5volts for the Geiger detection system and a pure argon gas filling. D. The Time Delay The total time...

  4. Anechoic Chamber o Echoless Room, existing equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Amusement Park Physics o Explain engineering behind roller coasters etc. Cool ways to cook food with science o Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream o Cook steak with a laser Angular momentum o Have people stand with a bar that doesn't allow the blocks to fall off will simulate gravity Alternative Energy o Solar #12;o

  5. Vacuum Chamber - Facilities - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps to Predict4VacancyVacancy-Induced

  6. Auditing Focus Matthew Chambers (Michigan Technological University)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational ManagementDemand66 Audit Report:4

  7. Georges Charpak, Particle Detectors, and Multiwire Chambers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options GaryandEnergy,science, and technologyGeorges Charpak,

  8. Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powerful new technique simultaneously determines nanomaterials' chemical makeup, topography By Angela Hardin * December 2, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - A team of...

  9. Alex Martinson | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contact Angela Hardin at (630) 252-5501 or media@anl.gov. Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel...

  10. Improved understanding of protein complex offers insight into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved understanding of protein complex offers insight into DNA replication initiation mechanism basics By Angela Hardin * March 18, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Argonne, Ill. - A...

  11. Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Discovery sheds light on nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event By Angela Hardin * November 20, 2014 Tweet...

  12. Movements and habitat use of lesser snow geese wintering on the upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Donna Gail

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Panicum (Hobaugh et al. 1989). Most of the GULF OF Msc/CO Aussn r APC WR 8 ~ Colorado Walter Hanis 8 I 8 I I Houston I Liberty Chambers ANWR Jefferson JOMWMA SRSP Whsrton Fort Bend Bratcnia G veston Galveston Bay I I I I... for this study; ANWR=Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge; APCNWR=Attwater's Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge; BBNWR=Big Boggy National Wildlife Refuge; BNWR=Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge; MFNWR=McFaddin National Wildlife Refuge; TPNWR=Texas Point...

  13. Blogs Are Echo Chambers: Blogs Are Echo Chambers Eric Gilbert, Tony Bergstrom and Karrie Karahalios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karahalios, Karrie G.

    on a life of their own. One of the blog posts in our sample, a short essay about the press and Barack Obama records shown on 60 Minutes, leading to the resignation of its anchorman Dan Rather. While the prominence

  14. Degree Services Registrar's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberties (3) _____ SS/FW3760 Human Dimensions of Natural Resources (3) _____ SS3800 Energy Technology

  15. Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley, CO Thomas Blum*, Kasper van Wijk and Lee Liberty, Boise State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley, CO Thomas Blum*, Kasper van a geothermal system in the Mt. Princeton area. We conclude that a shallow orthogonal fault system in this area appears to be responsible for the local geothermal signature at and near the surface. The extent to which

  16. DOE/EA-1628: Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC. (September 2008)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev. 0Program Final

  17. Coal-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustion chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gall, Robert L. (Morgantown, WV)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a fuel-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustor. In accordance with the present invention a perforated conveyor belt is utilized in place of the fixed grid normally disposed at the lower end of the fluidized bed combustion zone. The conveyor belt is fed with fuel, e.g. coal, at one end thereof so that the air passing through the perforations dislodges the coal from the belt and feeds the coal into the fluidized zone in a substantially uniform manner.

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    drenaje. El equipo podr?a da?arlo. Costo estimado El costo de instalaci?n fluct?a entre $3.000 y $6.000, seg?n el tipo de suelo, el tama?o de la casa y otros factores. Los costos de mantenimiento del tanque s?ptico son m?s o menos $75 al a?o, si lo bombea... cada 3 a?os. Si se lleva a cabo un mantenimiento m?s frecuente el costo aumentar?. La serie de publicaciones, Sistemas individuales para el tratamiento de aguas negras, es resultado de la colaboraci?n de varias agencias, organizaciones y fuentes de...

  19. Proceedings of the Workshop on Radiation Damage to Wire Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadyk, J.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of steel tubes ( fig. 11a) and PVC hoses (figs. llb,c). Thespecimens from tests using PVC hoses, in particular the oneabout polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing as a contaminating

  20. A Characterization of a Dual Chambered, Two Phase Separator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Casey

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , many industries like the coal, petroleum, nuclear, and space industries employ vortex separators. Some of these separators specialize in the separation of dust particles from a gas stream, whereas others focus on separation of liquid and gas... Phenomenon (ITP) laboratory at Texas A&M University (TAMU) is of this type and will be described further below. Each type of separator offers advantages and disadvantages. In general, rotary separators are recognized as the most versatile classification...

  1. anterior chamber flare: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ones (X9) are selected as representative of the flaring Sun. The emission measure distribution vs. temperature, EM(T), of the flaring regions is derived from YohkohSXT...

  2. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  3. acoustic spark chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 10 Sources of Wind Turbine Sound Massachusetts at Amherst, University of First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6...

  4. Performance Evaluation of Reverberant Chamber Background Noise Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi, Sankaranarayana

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ,? range? hoods? etc.? ? Federal? qu alification? programs? like? ENERGY? STAR? (Ventilating? Fans? Key? Product? ? Criteria? 2009)? ? require? these? air? movement? devices?not?only?to?be?energy?efficient?but?also?to ?operate...

  5. The Laser of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Renault; B. S. Nielsen; J. Westergaard; J. J. GaardhØJe

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The large TPC ($95 \\mathrm{m}^3$) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the $266 \\mathrm{nm}$ lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.

  6. Combining Spatial and Semantic Label Analysis Chris Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwig, Martin

    this was already tried in the SLATE approach [6]. However, SLATE only transforms labels and dimensions and does not identify errors. Moreover, the fact that SLATE is a stand-alone spreadsheet system that cannot

  7. Jo Sexton, President, Cambridge Area Chamber of Commerce Panel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce Development o K-12 and Career Technical School partnerships (welding program wPioneer Pipe) o Manufacturing Institute o Colleges and Universities o Land...

  8. Properties of a Moscow Glass Gas Microstrip Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Moscow glass with bulk resistivity ae = 3 \\Delta 10 12\\Omega \\Delta cm is presented. The ageing of the detector in an argon dimethyl ether gas mixture is found to be independent of the rate of irradiation (LHC) [2]. However, when MSGCs are exposed for an extended period of time to a high radiation flux

  9. atmosphere simulation chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to WIMP-nucleon interactions down to a level of (1 - 3) x 10-8 pb in a 10 kg detector. M. J. Carson; J. C. Davies; E. Daw; R. J. Hollingworth; J. A. Kirkpatrick; V. A....

  10. argon imaging chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    By exploiting structural differences between electromagnetic and hadronic showers in a multivariate analysis we present an efficient Electron-Hadron discrimination algorithm for...

  11. Engineering design of a hypobaric plant growth chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purswell, Joseph Lawrence

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to model plant response to changes in component gas concentrations under hypobaric conditions. A primary objective in the design of the low-pressure vessels was the minimization of the number and rate of leaks into the system. A three...

  12. The Meditation Chamber : A Debriefing A. Fleming Seay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Chris

    the environment, shaping the user's experience. Subjective and Objective Results A t-test showed that self report and a collection of biometric sensors. The three phases included an initial relaxation phase, a progressive muscle-nine of the 411 participants reported equal or lower levels of relaxation following the experience, with 18

  13. automated chamber system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ioannou A, utomatic is todesign and test avehicle control system in order toachieve full vehicle automation in the longitudinal vehicle following isan important feature of a fully...

  14. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of a propane- air mixture, used in our studies,in Figure 1, in propane-air mixtures of different ratios andcase does the 10% propane-air mixture lead to the highest

  15. Harvesting Energy from Wastewater in a 2-Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The microorganisms oxidize the organic food matter, and transfer the electrons to the anode. The electrons travel wastewater treatment plants utilize aerobic bacteria. Organic material in wastewater contains energy that can a microbial fuel cell (MFC), it takes a source of bacteria, food, no oxygen, and two electrodes

  16. atmospheric exposure chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dominick 16 atmospheres CiteSeer Summary: (Manuscript received in final form October 29, 2006) AbstractIn this work the theoretical relationship between the clear-sky...

  17. March 2008 8 At the Council Chamber, Whitehall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;March 2008 9 "the Academic Board" means the Academic Board of the University constituted in accordance with the Articles; "the Instrument" means the Instrument of Government of the Corporation; "the Articles" means the Articles of Government in accordance with which the University is conducted; "the Clerk" means the person

  18. Bursts detected and NOT detected by EGRET imaging spark chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, Brenda L. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Catelli, Jennifer R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop-Grummann, MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    EGRET has detected the highest energy emission from gamma-ray bursts. Only a few bursts have been detected either coincident or just following the BATSE detected emission. These bursts are among the brightest bursts detected by BATSE. The EGRET fluxes, including upper limits, are consistent with extrapolations for all the burst spectra measured with Comptel.

  19. The design, construction, and testing of an experimental reverberation chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smahlik, Henry Joseph

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oscilla- *ions jn a gaseous, liquid, or solid body. The sound- ing body may vibrate transversely, longitudinally, or perform torsional vibrations around an axis. Consequent- ly, a medium must be acted upon by a vibration to induce sound, Of the three...

  20. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Leaching Chambers (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Enciso, Juan

    2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fosa s?ptica de dos compartimientos C?mara de percolaci?n Campo de absorci?n L-5342S 8-00 Figura 1: Los sistemas de c?mara de percolaci?n pueden tener campos de drenaje m?s peque?os que los de sistemas convencionales. Sistemas individuales para el... tratamiento de aguas negras C?maras de percolaci?n Bruce Lesikar, Juan Enciso y Russell Persyn Promotores Especialistas de Ingenier?a Agr?cola, Promotor Adjunto de Conservaci?n del Agua El Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Un sistema de c?mara de percola- ci...

  1. Microfluidic cell culture chambers with nanoporous walls for chemical communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zhifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals that so far only a tiny fraction of microbial diversity has been cultured in the laboratory. One major reason behind this "unculturability" is ...

  2. anechoic chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To validate this concept we sent Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 8 Emulating an Anechoic Environment in a Wave-Diffusive Medium through an Extended Computer Technologies and...

  3. Abort interlock diagnostic for protection of APS vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) vacuum system has been designed to be passively safe from bending magnet radiation heating at positron beam currents up to 30 mA. Above this value, certain components may be damaged from vertical beam missteering, although work is proceeding to raise the safe current threshold. Because of this, a system for preventing the misalignment of high power density beams is required. This report details a system for protection from dipole radiation only. Work on a system for ID radiation is continuing.

  4. Abort interlock diagnostic for protection of APS vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, G.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) vacuum system has been designed to be passively safe from bending magnet radiation heating at positron beam currents up to 30 mA. Above this value, certain components may be damaged from vertical beam missteering, although work is proceeding to raise the safe current threshold. Because of this, a system for preventing the misalignment of high power density beams is required. This report details a system for protection from dipole radiation only. Work on a system for ID radiation is continuing.

  5. argon ionization chambers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    described in detail, since it enables calibration that may also prove useful in dark matter direct detection experiments. An internally placed Fe-55 x-ray source simultaneously...

  6. argon ionization chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    described in detail, since it enables calibration that may also prove useful in dark matter direct detection experiments. An internally placed Fe-55 x-ray source simultaneously...

  7. STATUS OF COLDDIAG: A COLD VACUUM CHAMBER FOR DIAGNOSTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    . The values of the beam heat load due to synchrotron radiation and resistive wall heating have been calculated. The disagreement between beam heat load measured and calculated is not understood [1, 2, 3]. Studies performed devices is the understanding of the beam heat load. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold

  8. atlas vacuum chamber: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the beam heat load mechanisms, a cold vacuum Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) 12 Final Test at...

  9. Readout of TPC Tracking Chambers with GEMs and Pixel Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    insulating spacers are of Lucite or G10. Dimensions are inspacers. This package was mounted inside a cylindrical stainless steel test vessel (TV) with approximate inside dimensions

  10. Vapor-Wall Deposition in Chambers: Theoretical Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McVay, Renee C; Cappa, Christopher D; Seinfeld, John H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aerosol size distribution changes continuously as particles grow by condensation and are lost by coagulation

  11. Polarization Selectivity for Pulsed Fields in a Reverberation Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -power microwaves (HPM) effects [2]. Unfortunately in this case, it is not simply the level of the field that counts a strong limitation of RCs for HPM testing when -100 -50 0 50 100 -1 -0.8 -0.6 -0.4 -0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0

  12. The specification and patterning of the Drosophila egg chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Lan

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of cell polarity through the localization of specific mRNAs and proteins to discrete subcellular sites is fundamental to asymmetric cell division, tissue morphogenesis, cell migration, and most other ...

  13. www.ornl.gov Environmental Chambers at ORNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    -air HVAC system, heat pump water heaters, a dehumidifying water heater, solid-state lighting, hybrid solar for testing appliances such as residential water heaters and refrigerators. · Two large two-room, side temperature cycles to test heat pump/AC equipment under quasi- field conditions. #12;www.ornl.gov Water Heater

  14. -We sampled three replicated chambers with floating collars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    , such as nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2). - Constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS 2003, Holland et al. 1999). Trace gas fluxes from The Tres Rios Wetlands Project in Phoenix, AZ Introduction Site Description Jorge Ramos Jr.1, Eric J. Chapman1, Nicholas A. Weller2, Dan L. Childers2 Wetland

  15. Chambers County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI Jump to:CerionChagrin Falls,Alabama:

  16. Chambers County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey asWest,CEI Jump to:CerionChagrin Falls,Alabama:Texas:

  17. NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.govSecurityMaintaining theSan Jose-San|NGSI Safeguards by Design

  18. Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry (FICCI) | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6AwardsScorecard forDepartmentof

  19. Saku Chamber of Commers Indsutry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:Energysource History ViewJumpSaint Lucia:Saku

  20. China New Energy Chamber of Commerce CNECC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd:Information China