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1

Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Environmental for the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington 99352 Contents 1 . 0 Summary . . 2.0 Purpose of and Need for the Proposed Action . . . . . . 3.0 Proposed Action and Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Onsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Offsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . 3.4 No Action Alternative ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Affected Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Atmospheric Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1.2 Terrestrial Impacts . 5.1.3 Impacts on CERCLA Remedial Actions . 5.1.4 Construction Accidents .

2

EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of...

3

EA-0915: Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to resolve waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and to reduce the risks associated with...

4

HANFORD SITE SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM RICHLAND WASHINGTON - 12464  

SciTech Connect

In support of implementation of Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance, the Hanford Site Sustainability Plan was developed to implement strategies and activities required to achieve the prescribed goals in the EO as well as demonstrate measurable progress in environmental stewardship at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site Sustainability Program was developed to demonstrate progress towards sustainability goals as defined and established in Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance; EO 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy and Transportation Management, and several applicable Energy Acts. Multiple initiatives were undertaken in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 to implement the Program and poise the Hanford Site as a leader in environmental stewardship. In order to implement the Hanford Site Sustainability Program, a Sustainability Plan was developed in conjunction with prime contractors, two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices, and key stakeholders to serve as the framework for measuring progress towards sustainability goals. Based on the review of these metrics and future plans, several activities were initiated to proactively improve performance or provide alternatives for future consideration contingent on available funding. A review of the key metric associated with energy consumption for the Hanford Site in FY 2010 and 2011 indicated an increase over the target reduction of 3 percent annually from a baseline established in FY 2003 as illustrated in Figure 1. This slight increase was attributed primarily from the increased energy demand from the cleanup projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in FY 2010 and 2011. Although it is forecasted that the energy demand will decrease commensurate with the completion of ARRA projects, several major initiatives were launched to improve energy efficiency.

FRITZ LL

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

5

Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOERA-1 11 1 DOERA-1 11 1 Environmental Assessment K Pool 'Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Emrgy Richland, Washington December 1996 DOEEA-1111 ENVIRONMJ3'NTAL ASSESSMENT K POOL 'F'ISH REARING HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND, WASHINGTON December 1996 This page intentionally left blank. DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. 1 ' U.S. Department of Energy summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public h

6

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Updated Site Response Analyses for the Waste Treatment Plant, DOE Hanford, Site, Washington.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the calculations performed to develop updated relative amplification functions for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facility at the DOE Hanford Site, Washington State. The original 2,000-year return period design spectra for the WTP were based on the results of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) performed for the DOE Hanford Site by Geomatrix (1996). Geomatrix (1996) performed the PSHA using empirical soil-site ground motion models based primarily on recordings from California. As part of that study, site response analyses were performed to evaluate ground motions at the Hanford sites and California deep soil sites. As described in Appendix A of Geomatrix (1996), characteristic site profiles and dynamic soil properties representative of conditions at various Hanford sites and California deep soil strong motion recording stations were defined. Relative site responses of the Hanford profiles and California profiles were then compared. Based on the results of those site response analyses, it was concluded that ground motions at the Hanford sites underlain by deep soil deposits are similar in character to those on California deep soil sites and it was judged appropriate to use empirical deep soil site attenuation relationships based primarily on California ground motion data to develop design spectra for the Hanford sites. In a subsequent analysis, Geomatrix (2003) updated the site response analyses of Geomatrix (1996, Appendix A) to incorporate randomization of the California and Hanford profiles. The results of that analysis also led to the conclusion that the response of the Hanford profiles was similar to the response of deep soil sites in California.

Youngs, Robert R.

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

8

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EA-1211: Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

11

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This...

12

Management of Hanford Site non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to provide radiologically, and industrially safe and cost-effective management of the non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site. The proposed action would place the Hanford Site`s non-defense production reactor SNF in a radiologically- and industrially-safe, and passive storage condition pending final disposition. The proposed action would also reduce operational costs associated with storage of the non-defense production reactor SNF through consolidation of the SNF and through use of passive rather than active storage systems. Environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with existing non-defense production reactor SNF storage facilities have been identified. DOE has determined that additional activities are required to consolidate non-defense production reactor SNF management activities at the Hanford Site, including cost-effective and safe interim storage, prior to final disposition, to enable deactivation of facilities where the SNF is now stored. Cost-effectiveness would be realized: through reduced operational costs associated with passive rather than active storage systems; removal of SNF from areas undergoing deactivation as part of the Hanford Site remediation effort; and eliminating the need to duplicate future transloading facilities at the 200 and 400 Areas. Radiologically- and industrially-safe storage would be enhanced through: (1) removal from aging facilities requiring substantial upgrades to continue safe storage; (2) utilization of passive rather than active storage systems for SNF; and (3) removal of SNF from some storage containers which have a limited remaining design life. No substantial increase in Hanford Site environmental impacts would be expected from the proposed action. Environmental impacts from postulated accident scenarios also were evaluated, and indicated that the risks associated with the proposed action would be small.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environmental assessment, K Pool fish rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to respond to a request to lease facilities at the Hanford Site 100-KE and 100-KW filter plant pools (K Pools) for fish rearing activities. These fish rearing activities would be: (1) business ventures with public and private funds and (2) long-term enhancement and supplementation programs for game fish populations in the Columbia River Basin. The proposed action is to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the YIN or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools. The proposed action would include necessary piping, pump, and electrical upgrades of the facility; cleaning and preparation of the pools; water withdrawal from the Columbia River, and any necessary water or wastewater treatment; and introduction, rearing and release of fish. Future commercial operations may be included.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0189-FEIS-Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major emphasis of both laws is to promote public awareness of these actions and provide opportunities for public involvement. Because NEPA and SEPA requirements are similar, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Ecology

16

Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Environmental Assessment Use of Existing Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operates the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The DOE needs to identify and operate onsite locations for a continued supply of raw aggregate materials [approximately 7,600,000 cubic meters (10,000,000 cubic yards) over the next 10 years] for new facility construction, maintenance of existing facilities and transportation corridors, and fill and capping material for remediation and other sites.

N /A

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

L.C. Hulstrom

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

Safe interim storage of Hanford tank wastes, draft environmental impact statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Draft EIS is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Washington State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). DOE and Ecology have identified the need to resolve near-term tank safety issues associated with Watchlist tanks as identified pursuant to Public Law (P.L.) 101-510, Section 3137, ``Safety Measures for Waste Tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation,`` of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1991, while continuing to provide safe storage for other Hanford wastes. This would be an interim action pending other actions that could be taken to convert waste to a more stable form based on decisions resulting from the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) EIS. The purpose for this action is to resolve safety issues concerning the generation of unacceptable levels of hydrogen in two Watchlist tanks, 101-SY and 103-SY. Retrieving waste in dilute form from Tanks 101-SY and 103-SY, hydrogen-generating Watchlist double shell tanks (DSTs) in the 200 West Area, and storage in new tanks is the preferred alternative for resolution of the hydrogen safety issues.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The seismic design basis for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, was established in 1999 based on an extensive probabilistic seismic hazard analysis completed in 1996 by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. In subsequent years, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) staff questioned the some of the assumptions used in developing the seismic design basis, particularly the adequacy of the site geotechnical surveys. Existing site-specific shear wave velocity data were considered insufficient to reliably use California earthquake response data to directly predict ground motions at the Hanford Site. To address this concern, the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed and executed a plan for acquiring site-specific soil data down to approximately 500 feet, and for reanalyzing the effects of deeper layers of sediments interbedded with basalt. New geophysical data were acquired, analyzed, and interpreted with respect to existing geologic information gathered from other Hanford-related projects in the WTP area. Existing data from deep boreholes were assembled and interpreted to produce a model of the deeper rock layers consisting of inter-layered basalts and sedimentary interbeds. These data were analyzed statistically to determine the variability of seismic velocities. The earthquake ground motion response was simulated on a large number of models resulting from a weighted logic tree approach that addressed the geologic and geophysical uncertainties. Weights in the logic tree were chosen by a working group based on the strength or weakness of the available data for each combination of logic tree parameters. Finally, interim design ground motion spectra were developed to envelope the remaining uncertainties. The results of this study demonstrate that the site-specific soil structure (Hanford and Ringold formations) beneath the WTP is thinner than was assumed in the 1996 Hanford Site-wide model. This thinness produces peaks in the response spectra (relative to those in 1996) near 2 Hz and 5 Hz. The soil geophysical properties, shear wave velocity, and nonlinear response to the earthquake ground motions are known sufficiently, and alternative interpretations consistent with this data did not have a strong influence on the results. The structure of the upper four basalt flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt), which are inter-layered with sedimentary interbeds (Ellensburg Formation), produces strong reductions in the earthquake ground motions that propagate through them to reach the surface. Uncertainty in the strength of velocity contrasts between these basalts and interbeds resulted from an absence of measured shear wave velocities (Vs) in the interbeds. For this study, Vs in the interbeds was estimated from older, limited compressional wave (Vp) data using estimated ranges for the ratio of the two velocities (Vp/Vs) based on analogues in similar materials. The Vs for the basalts, where Vp/Vs is well defined, still is limited by the quality and quantity of the Vp data. A range of possible Vs for the interbeds and basalts was included in the logic trees that produced additional uncertainty in the resulting response spectra. The uncertainties in these response spectra were enveloped at approximately the 84. percentile (based on the logic tree) to produce conservative design spectra. This conservatism increased the seismic design basis by up to 40% compared to the 1999 values. Because of the sensitivity of the calculated response spectra to the velocity contrasts between the basalts and interbedded sediments, additional boreholes and direct Vs measurements through these layers are now being planned. The new measurements are expected to reduce the uncertainty in the site response that is caused by the lack of direct knowledge of the Vs contrasts within these layers. (authors)

Rohay, A.C.; Reidel, S.P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A hydrochemical data base for the Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This data package contains a revision of the Site Hydrochemical Data Base for water samples associated with the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). In addition to the detailed chemical analyses, a summary description of the data base format, detailed descriptions of verification procedures used to check data entries, and detailed descriptions of validation procedures used to evaluate data quality are included. 32 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

Early, T.O.; Mitchell, M.D.; Spice, G.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Archaeological survey of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responding to a heavy demand for cultural resource reviews of excavation sites, the Westinghouse Hanford Company contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a comprehensive archaeological resource review for the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington. This was accomplished through literature and records review and an intensive pedestrian survey of all undisturbed portions of the 200 East Area and a stratified random sample of the 200 West Area. The survey, followed the Secretary of the Interior's guidelines for the identification of historic properties. The result of the survey is a model of cultural resource distributions that has been used to create cultural resource zones with differing degrees of sensitivity. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 19,2010 August 19,2010 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) occurred. Accordingly, DOE is issuing the enclosed Preliminary Notice of

25

Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Import Statement, Richland, Washington - Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Link to Main Report Link to Main Report RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: COVER SHEET 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office TITLE: Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286D2) CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (800) 426-4914 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act process,

26

Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Import Statement, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET 1 COVER SHEET 1 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office 2 3 TITLE: 4 Revised Draft Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact 5 Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286D2) 6 7 CONTACT: 8 For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (800) 426-4914 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act process, contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

27

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET COVER SHEET U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office TITLE: Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286F) CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (509) 376-6536 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

28

DOEEA-1178 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Assessment 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 1997 , DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liabili- ty or mponsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, appa- ratus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or s e m ' c e by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

29

Data Summary Report for teh Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This data summary report summarizes the investigation results to evaluate the nature and distribution of Hanford Site-related contaminants present in the Columbia River. As detailed in DOE/RL-2008-11, more than 2,000 environmental samples were collected from the Columbia River between 2008 and 2010. These samples consisted of island soil, sediment, surface water, groundwater upwelling (pore water, surface water, and sediment), and fish tissue.

Hulstrom, L.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

DOE Cites Washington Closure Hanford for Safety Violations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Department of Energy issues a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) for violations of DOE's worker safety and health program regulations in 2009 at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

31

Identifying the sources of subsurface contamination at the Hanford site in Washington using high-precision uranium isotopic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batches Processed Through Hanford Separations Plants, 1944Rev. 0, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA,11) Hartman, M.J. , ed. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring:

Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

National Register of Historic Places multiple property documentation form -- Historic, archaeological, and traditional cultural properties of the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site encompasses an area of 560 square miles on the Columbia River in southeastern Washington. Since 1943, the Hanford Site has existed as a protected area for activities primarily related to the production of radioactive materials for national defense uses. For cultural resources on the Hanford Site, establishment of the nuclear reservation as a high security area, with public access restricted, has resulted in a well-protected status, although no deliberate resource protection measures were in effect to mitigate effects of facilities construction and associated activities. Thus, the Hanford Site contains an extensive record of aboriginal archaeological sites and Native American cultural properties, along with pre-Hanford Euro-American sites (primarily archaeological in nature with the removal of most pre-1943 structures), and a considerable number of Manhattan Project/Cold War era buildings and structures. The recent mission change from production to clean up and disposal of DOE lands created a critical need for development and implementation of new and different cultural resource management strategies. DOE-RL has undertaken a preservation planning effort for the Hanford Site. The intent of this Plan is to enable DOE-RL to organize data and develop goals, objectives, and priorities for the identification, evaluation, registration, protection, preservation, and enhancement of the Site`s historical and cultural properties. Decisions made about the identification, evaluation, registration and treatment of historic properties are most aptly made when relationships between individual properties and other similar properties are considered. The historic context and the multiple property documentation (NTD) process provides DOE-RL the organizational framework for these decisions. Once significant patterns are identified, contexts developed, and expected properties are defined, the NTD process provides the foundation for future decisions concerning the management of significant cultural resources on the Hanford Site.

Nickens, P.R.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Occupational Exposure Evaluation of Complex Vapor Mixtures at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site, Washington Work-site Vapor Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Extensive sampling and analysis has been done over the years to characterize the radioactive and chemical properties of hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington State. The purpose of these analyses was to evaluate safety and environmental concerns related to tank stability. More recently, characterization studies have broadened to evaluate potential health hazards of chemical vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. The extensive sampling done during this campaign evaluated vapor concentrations of more than 100 different chemical at 70 sites in and around one section of the tank farms. Sampling identified only four vapors (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrosodimethylamine, and nitrosomethylethylamine) that were present above occupational exposure limits. These elevated concentrations were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors were measured above 10% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. This suggests that vapor controls can be focused on limited hazard zones around sources. (authors)

Anderson, T. J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, P.O. Box 1000, S7-70, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-West Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-West Area and vicinity. This is the second of two reports that combine to cover the 200 Area Plateau, an area that holds the largest inventory of radionuclide and chemical waste on the Hanford Site.

Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington, Collection of Surface Water, River Sediments, and Island Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in support of the remedial investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River and describes the 2008/2009 data collection efforts. This report documents field activities associated with collection of sediment, river water, and soil in and adjacent to the Columbia River near the Hanford Site and in nearby tributaries.

L. C. Hulstrom

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

39

Archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request for a cultural resources review from Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Action Plan for Characterization of McGee Ranch Soil, Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, located in the northwest portion of the Hanford Site. Staff members covered 8.4 km{sup 2} and recorded 42 cultural resources; 22 sites, and 20 isolated artifacts. Only 2 sites and 3 isolates were attributed to a prehistoric Native American occupation. The historic sites date from the turn of the century to the 1940s and are representative of the settlement patterns that occurred throughout the Columbia Basin. In addition to an archaeological pedestrian survey of the project area, we conducted literature and records searches and examined available aerial photographs. Records kept at HCRL were reviewed to determine if any archaeological survey had been conducted previously within the project area. Although no survey had been conducted, portions of the area adjacent to project boundaries were surveyed in 1988 and 1990. During those surveys, historic and prehistoric cultural resources were observed, increasing the possibility that similar land usage had taken place within the current project boundaries. Literature searches established a general historical sequence for this area. Aerial photographs alerted researchers to homesteads and linear features, such as roads and irrigation ditches, that might not be apparent from ground level.

Gard, H.A.; Poet, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

43

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford River Corridor Contract To Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

44

Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Hanford Site Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations The Pretreatment Facility control room building pad (foreground) and the Low-Activity Waste Facility (background)

45

Transuranic Waste Retrieval from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C Low-Level Burial Grounds, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 Environmental Assessment Transuranic Waste Retrieval from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C Low-Level Burial Grounds, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. March 2002 DOE/EA-1405 U.S. Department of Energy Contents Environmental Assessment C-1 March 2002 CONTENTS PREFACE ....................................................................................................................................P-1 GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................ G-1 SCIENTIFIC NOTATION CONVERSION CHART .................................................................... G-2 METRIC CONVERSION CHART...............................................................................................

46

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

47

Evaluation and Screening of Remedial Technologies for Uranium at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is presently conducting a re-evaluation of remedies addressing persistent dissolved uranium concentrations in the upper aquifer under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This work is being conducted as a Phase III feasibility study for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. As part of the feasibility study process, a comprehensive inventory of candidate remedial technologies was conducted by PNNL. This report documents the identification and screening of candidate technologies. The screening evaluation was conducted in accordance with guidance and processes specified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations associated with implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act process.

Nimmons, Michael J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 August 19, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington Closure Hanford, LLC related an Employee Fall at the High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) at the Hanford Site This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by

49

Risk and Performance Analyses Supporting Closure of WMA C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area 0NMA) C as stipulated by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) under federalrequirements and work tasks will be done under the State-approved closure plans and permits. An initial step in meeting the regulatory requirements is to develop a baseline risk assessment representing current conditions based on available characterization data and information collected at the WMA C location. The baseline risk assessment will be supporting a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Field Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) for WMA closure and RCRA corrective action. Complying with the HFFACO conditions also involves developing a long-term closure Performance Assessment (PA) that evaluates human health and environmental impacts resulting from radionuclide inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks and ancillary equipment. This PAis being developed to meet the requirements necessary for closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act. To meet the HFFACO conditions, the long-term closure risk analysis will include an evaluation of human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories along with other performance Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Appropriate and Applicable Requirements (CERCLA ARARs) in residualwastes left in WMA C facilities after retrieval and removal. This closure risk analysis is needed to needed to comply with the requirements for permitted closure. Progress to date in developing a baseline risk assessment of WMA C has involved aspects of an evaluation of soil characterization and groundwater monitoring data collected as a part of the RFI/CMS and RCRA monitoring. Developing the long-term performance assessment aspects has involved the construction of detailed numericalmodels of WMA C using the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP(C)) computer code, the development of a technical approach for abstraction of a range of representative STOMP(C) simulations into a system-level modelbased on the GoldSim0 system-levelmodelsoftware. The STOMP(C)-based models will be used to evaluate local-scale impacts and closed facility performance over a sufficient range of simulations to allow for development of the system-level model of the WMA C. The GoldSim0-based system-level model will be used to evaluate overall sensitivity of modeled parameters and the estimate the uncertainty in potentialfuture impacts from a closed WMA C facility.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Kemp, Christopher J.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 14168  

SciTech Connect

A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the aboveground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms.

Eberlein, Susan J.; Parker, Danny L.; Tabor, Cynthia L.; Holm, Melissa J.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes environmental information for the Hanford Site in Washington State for the calendar year 2001.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Confirmatory radiological survey for the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility decommissioning at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An independent assessment of remedial action activities at the 190-C Main Pumphouse Facility at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington has been accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Assessments Group. The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with DOE applicable guidelines and provide independent measurements of the activity levels in the 190-C trenches and 105-C process water tunnels. The assessment included reviews of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Plan and data provided in the pre- and post-remedial action surveys. An on-site independent verification survey of the facility was conducted during the period of November 19--21, 1996. The independent verification survey included beta and gamma scans, smears for removable contamination, and direct measurements for beta-gamma activity in the trenches and tunnels. The same measurements and scans, with the addition of alpha measurements, were performed on the floor in the filter repair confinement area. The facility was also spot-checked for direct alpha and beta-gamma activity.

Coleman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Forbes, G.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Technology Section

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

55

A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

57

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSW HSW EIS January 2004 1.6 Figure 1.2. States with Radioactive Waste Disposal Activities Final HSW EIS January 2004 1.12 Figure 1.3. Relationship of the HSW EIS to Other Hanford Cleanup Operations, Material Management Activities, and Key Environmental Reviews 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.34 Figure 2.18. Typical Liner System Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.36

58

Environmental assessment for the relocation and storage of isotopic heat sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

As part of a bilateral agreement between the Federal Minister for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed processes for the treatment and immobilization of high-level radioactive waste. One element of this bilateral agreement was the production of sealed isotopic heat sources. During the mid-1980s, 30 sealed isotopic heat sources were manufactured. The sources contain a total of approximately 8.3 million curies consisting predominantly of cesium-137 and strontium-90 with trace amounts of transuranic contamination. Currently, the sources are stored in A-Cell of the 324 Building. Intense radiation fields from the sources are causing the cell windows and equipment to deteriorate. Originally, it was not intended to store the isotopic heat sources for this length of time in A-cell. The 34 isotopic heat sources are classified as remote handled transuranic wastes. Thirty-one of the isotopic heat sources are sealed, and seals on the three remaining isotopic heat sources have not been verified. However, a decision has been made to place the remaining three isotopic heat sources in the CASTOR cask(s). The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has concurred that isotopic heat sources with verified seals or those placed into CASTOR cask(s) can be considered sealed (no potential to emit radioactive air emissions) and are exempt from WAC Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

60

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours June 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. RICHLAND, Wash. - It is harvest season for cherries, raspberries and rhubarb in Washington state. But employees at the Hanford site are helping grow the young minds of the nation's future science, technology,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Site sustainable development initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the economic vitality of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is completed, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

63

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

65

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Concentrations of dissolved methane (CH sub 4 ) and nitrogen (N sub 2 ) in groundwaters from the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This document reports all available dissolved gas concentration data for groundwaters from the Hanford Site as of June 1985. Details of the computational procedures required to reduce data obtained from the field measurements made by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project are provided in the appendix. Most measured values for methane concentration from reference repository boreholes are in the range of from 350 to 700 mg/L for the Cohassett flow top. Because of the uncertainties associated with these measurements, it is currently recommended that a conservative methane concentration of 1200 mg/L (methane saturated) in groundwater be considered the most reasonable upper-bounding value. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Early, T.O.

1986-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

68

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington...

69

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site August 2001 Washington, DC 20585 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE HANFORD SITE VOLUME III Table of Contents Acronyms .....................................................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results ...................................................................................................................................................................3 3.0 Conclusions............................................................................................................................................

70

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluation of fall chinook salmon spawning adjacent to the In-Situ Redox Manipulation treatability test site, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) experiment is being evaluated as a potential method to remove contaminants from groundwater adjacent to the Columbia River near the 100-D Area. The ISRM experiment involves using sodium dithionate (Na{sub 2}O{sub 6}S{sub 2}) to precipitate chromate from the groundwater. The treatment will likely create anoxic conditions in the groundwater down-gradient of the ISRM treatability test site; however, the spatial extent of this anoxic plume is not exactly known. Surveys were conducted in November 1997, following the peak spawning of fall chinook salmon. Aerial surveys documented 210 redds (spawning nests) near the downstream island in locations consistent with previous surveys. Neither aerial nor underwater surveys documented fall chinook spawning in the vicinity of the ISRM treatability test site. Based on measurements of depth, velocity, and substrate, less than 1% of the study area contained suitable fall chinook salmon spawning habitat, indicating low potential for fall chinook salmon to spawn in the vicinity of the ISRM experiment.

Mueller, R.P.; Geist, D.R.

1998-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the siteÆs history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

73

PILOT-SCALE TEST RESULTS OF A THIN FILM EVAPORATOR SYSTEM FOR MANAGEMENT OF LIQUID HIGH-LEVEL WASTES AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA -11364  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modular, transportable evaporator system, using thin film evaporative technology, is planned for deployment at the Hanford radioactive waste storage tank complex. This technology, herein referred to as a wiped film evaporator (WFE), will be located at grade level above an underground storage tank to receive pumped liquids, concentrate the liquid stream from 1.1 specific gravity to approximately 1.4 and then return the concentrated solution back into the tank. Water is removed by evaporation at an internal heated drum surface exposed to high vacuum. The condensed water stream will be shipped to the site effluent treatment facility for final disposal. This operation provides significant risk mitigation to failure of the aging 242-A Evaporator facility; the only operating evaporative system at Hanford maximizing waste storage. This technology is being implemented through a development and deployment project by the tank farm operating contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), for the Office of River Protection/Department of Energy (ORPIDOE), through Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. (Columbia Energy). The project will finalize technology maturity and install a system at one of the double-shell tank farms. This paper summarizes results of a pilot-scale test program conducted during calendar year 2010 as part of the ongoing technology maturation development scope for the WFE.

CORBETT JE; TEDESCH AR; WILSON RA; BECK TH; LARKIN J

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the Gravity Group at the Department of Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY POSTDOCTORAL POSITION FOR WORK AT LIGO HANFORD, WA Applications characterization for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) at the Hanford site characterization at the LIGO Hanford observatory. Familiarity with data analysis pipelines for searching

Collins, Gary S.

75

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be welded. Some Tri-Party Agreement milestones completed in 2002 were related to work on Hanford tanks. #12 paragraphs. Solid waste may originate from work on the Hanford Site or from sources offsite, with contributions from CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.; S.M. Stoller Corporation; Fluor Hanford, Inc. and its

76

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Environmental assessment for the resiting, construction, and operation of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) presents estimated environmental impacts from the resiting, construction, and operation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is proposed to be constructed and operated on land near the south boundary of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The EMSL, if constructed, would be a modern research facility in which experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques can be focused on environmental restoration problems, such as the chemical and transport behavior of complex mixtures of contaminants in the environment. The EMSL design includes approximately 18,500 square meters (200,000 square feet) of floor space on a 12-hectare (30-acre) site. The proposed new site is located within the city limits of Richland in north Richland, at the south end of DOE`s 300 Area, on land to be deeded to the US by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Approximately 200 persons are expected to be employed in the EMSL and approximately 60 visiting scientists may be working in the EMSL at any given time. State-of-the-art equipment is expected to be installed and used in the EMSL. Small amounts of hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) are expected to be used in experimental work in the EMSL.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Check out this epic demolition video from the Hanford Site in Washington state. But its more than just great footage -- this represents important progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of one of America's most famous scientific undertakings -- the Manhattan Project.

79

Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

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81

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, 4: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

82

Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Addendum (Final Environmental Impact Statement)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE`s responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milestones completed in 2003 were related to work on Hanford waste storage tanks. During 2003, there were 36Summary of the HANFORD SITE Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 EDITORS R.W. HANF L Northwest National Laboratory under contract DE-AC06-76RL01830, with contributions from Bechtel Hanford, Inc

84

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

RESULTS FROM RECENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY INVESTIGATIONS TARGETING CHROMIUM IN THE 100D AREA HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA  

SciTech Connect

Sodium dichromate was used in Hanford's 100D Area during the reactor operations period of 1950 to 1964 to retard corrosion in the reactor cooling systems. Some of the sodium dichromate was released to the environment by spills and/or leaks from pipelines used to deliver the chemical to water treatment plants in the area. As a result, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has migrated through the vadose zone to the groundwater and contaminated nearly 1 km{sup 2} of groundwater to above the drinking water standard of 48 {micro}g/L. Three technology tests have recently been completed in this area to characterize the source area of the plumes and evaluate alternative methods to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. These are (1) refine the source area of the southern plume; (2) test electrocoagulation as an alternative groundwater treatment technology; and (3) test the ability to repair a permeable reactive barrier by injecting micron or nanometer-size zero-valent iron (ZVI). The projects were funded by the US Department of Energy as part of a program to interject new technologies and accelerate active cleanup. Groundwater monitoring over the past 10 years has shown that Cr(VI) concentrations in the southern plume have not significantly diminished, strongly indicating a continuing source. Eleven groundwater wells were installed in 2007 and 2008 near a suspected source area and monitored for Cr(VI) and groundwater levels. Interpretation of these data has led to refinement of the source area location to an area of less than 1 hectare (ha, 2.5 acres). Vadose zone soil samples collected during drilling did not discover significant concentrations of Cr(VI), indicating the source is localized, with a narrow wetted path from the surface to the water table. Electrocoagulation was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. Over 8 million liters of groundwater were treated to Cr(VI) concentrations of {le}20 {micro}g/L. The test determined that this technology has the potential to treat Cr(VI) to these low levels, but system reliability and operational complexity rendered electrocoagulation less cost effective than the baseline technology of ion exchange. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to evaluate the practicality of injecting ZVI into the aquifer to increase the lifespan and effectiveness of an existing permeable reactive barrier. From a database of 30 ZVI materials, 6 were chosen and tested in the laboratory to determine their geochemical and physical performance under simulated 100D aquifer conditions. The best-performing ZVI was injected into the aquifer and met the primary goals of communicating the iron at least 7 meters from the injection point and reducing the aquifer to transform mobile Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium Cr(III), which is effectively immobile in the aquifer.

PETERSEN SW; THOMPSON KM; TONKIN MJ

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Fiscal Year 2006 Washington Closure Hanford Science & Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Washington Closure Hanford science and technology (S&T) plan documents the activities associated with providing S&T support to the River Corridor Closure Project for fiscal year 2006.

K.J. Kroegler, M. Truex, D.J. McBride

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Report Audit Report Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site OAS-L-12-09 August 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OFFICE OF RIVER PROTECTION FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Tank Waste Feed Delivery System Readiness at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest cleanup task involves the treatment, immobilization and disposal of 56 million gallons of hazardous and highly radioactive waste at the Hanford Site, located in Southeastern Washington State. As part of this effort, the Department is constructing

88

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Land The Hanford Site is one of the largest remaining land mega-sites available in the United States. * The 586-square-mile Hanford Site includes 39,000 acres designated for industrial use (9,000 acres for R&D). * The Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement allows for a planning process

89

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

90

MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

GERBER MS

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

92

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

93

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

94

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

SPECIAL SECTION: HANFORD SITE Hanford Site Vadose Zone Studies: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sparsely populated area in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, adjacent to the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State (Fig. 1). The Hanford Site was set aside in the early 1940s by the U.S. Government to perform a top-secret mission, the Manhattan Project, for production of plutonium for atomic weapons used to end World War II and later to support the Cold War with the Soviet Union. Starting in 1943– 1945, Hanford employed thousands of workers on the largest construction project in the world at that time. The workers built a series of nuclear reactors along with large monolithic concrete buildings used to reprocess wastes. Plutonium production continued at Hanford for over 40 yr. During the late 1980s, in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, plutonium production was suspended at Hanford (Gephart, 2003). Since then, efforts at

G. W. Gee; M. Oostrom; M. D. Freshley; M. L. Rockhold; J. M. Zachara

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Historical Photographs: Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Image 1. A facility at Hanford for treating persons injured by embedded radioactive particles (circa 1967). In this shielded operating cell, a mock patient is flanked by a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of River Protection (ORP) #12;#12;PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford. and funded by DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington

102

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, 78: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1178: 300 Area Steam Plant Replacement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for a proposed energy conservation measure for a number of buildings in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The proposed action includes replacing the centralized heating system with heating units for individual buildings or groups of buildings, constructing new natural gas pipelines to provide a source for many of these units and constructing a central control building to operate and maintain the system. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 12, 1997 EA-1178: Finding of No Significant Impact

104

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

105

DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce July 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl..doe.gov 509-376-4171 The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services acquisition at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Draft RFP is one step in the process toward awarding a contract and provides an opportunity for companies, Hanford stakeholders, and the site's workforce to provide input on the Draft RFP. DOE will provide

106

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007" (PNNL-17603), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLOID AND COLLOID-FACILITATED RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AT THE SEMI-ARID HANFORD SITE By ZIRU LIU Hanford project. Unfortunately, he just passed away this January and could not see the completion-ARID HANFORD SITE Abstract by Ziru Liu, Ph.D. Washington State University May 2013 Chair: Markus Flury

Flury, Markus

110

EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford 245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington EIS-0245: Management of Spent Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site - Supplement Analysis, Richland, Washington Overview Overview to be provided. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 2001 EIS-0245-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

111

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

113

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

114

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule The Hanford Site...

115

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary More Documents & Publications Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary -...

116

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

117

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

118

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

119

DETECTION OF HISTORICAL PIPELINE LEAK PLUMES USING NON-INTRUSIVE SURFACE-BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE WASHINGTON USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records from the Department of Energy Hanford Nuclear Reservation (in eastern WA) indicate that ruptures in buried waste transfer pipelines were common between the 1940s and 1980s, which resulted in unplanned releases (UPRs) of tank: waste at numerous locations. A number of methods are commercially available for the detection of active or recent leaks, however, there are no methods available for the detection of leaks that occurred many years ago. Over the decades, leaks from the Hanford pipelines were detected by visual observation of fluid on the surface, mass balance calculations (where flow volumes were monitored), and incidental encounters with waste during excavation or drilling. Since these detection methods for historic leaks are so limited in resolution and effectiveness, it is likely that a significant number of pipeline leaks have not been detected. Therefore, a technology was needed to detect the specific location of unknown pipeline leaks so that characterization technologies can be used to identify any risks to groundwater caused by waste released into the vadose zone. A proof-of-concept electromagnetic geophysical survey was conducted at an UPR in order to image a historical leak from a waste transfer pipeline. The survey was designed to test an innovative electromagnetic geophysical technique that could be used to rapidly map the extent of historical leaks from pipelines within the Hanford Site complex. This proof-of-concept test included comprehensive testing and analysis of the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) and made use of supporting and confirmatory geophysical methods including ground penetrating radar, magnetics, and electrical resistivity characterization (ERC). The results for this initial proof-of-concept test were successful and greatly exceeded the expectations of the project team by providing excellent discrimination of soils contaminated with leaked waste despite the interference from an electrically conductive pipe.

SKORSKA MB; FINK JB; RUCKER DF; LEVITT MT

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

120

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. Lead acid batteries are collected at the Hanford Centralized Consolidation/Recycling Center. Other items recycled at Hanford include aerosol products, aluminum cans and foil, audio tapes, boxes, cell phones, chemicals and computers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. Lead acid batteries are collected at the Hanford Centralized Consolidation/Recycling Center. Other items recycled at Hanford include aerosol products, aluminum cans and foil, audio tapes, boxes, cell phones, chemicals and computers.

122

Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies.

SONNICHSEN, J.C.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. ; and Webber, W. D.. Hanford Site Groundwater MonitoringGeochemistry at the Hanford Site. PNNL-17031. 2007. (13)contamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-

Christensen, John N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Notes from 24- 25 February 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment Input Meeting Attendees: Representatives from Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP), DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), met at the Ecology offices in Richland, Washington on 24 & 25 February 2009. EPA Region X staff participated on 25 February 2009 via teleconference. Discussion: DOE is pursuing closure of Waste Management Area C (WMA-C) located at the Hanford Site. At some point in the future, DOE and NRC will consult on waste determinations for these tank closures; additionally these tanks will be closed in coordination with EPA and

128

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

130

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the Acquisition of a Natural Gas Pipeline and Natural Gas Utility Service at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Natural Gas Pipeline or NGP EIS), and initiate a 30-day public scoping period.

131

Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Results from ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zone infiltration rate at Hanford, Washington, inferred fromcontamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-fluvial sediments cored at the Hanford site in south central

DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus, Jerry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress September 24, 2013 - 6:45pm Addthis An Update on the Hanford Site and Cleanup Progress Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? For 40 years, the Hanford Site in Washington state was involved in the production of plutonium as part of our national defense efforts. Legacy cleanup progress at the Hanford site has been significant, including 100 percent of the site's spent fuel having been removed from areas around the Columbia River and placed in safe, secure dry storage. But there is more work to do. A new Framework will aid discussions with the state of Washington as the Energy Department works to resolve concerns about completion of the

133

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Red Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Richland, Washington U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Lion Hotel Richland Hanford House Richland, Washington U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange April 13 - 14, 2010 Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange 1 Welcome Dear Participant, On behalf of the Department of Energy and the Savannah River National Laboratory, we welcome you to the Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange. Each of you bring a wealth of experience from a variety of different perspectives that will be essential for the effective and compliant imple- mentation of performance and risk assessments in support of tank closure, site operations, and area completion projects. The Performance Assess-

136

Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Contaminant desorption during long-term leaching of hydroxide-weathered Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

137 in sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington. Environ.during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks. Appl.subsurface sediments from the Hanford site, USA. Geochim.

Thompson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Short History of Waste Management at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The world’s first full-scale nuclear reactors and chemical reprocessing plants built at the Hanford Site in the desert of eastern Washington State produced two-thirds of the plutonium generated in the United States for nuclear weapons. Operating these facilities also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste, some of which was released into the environment exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Hanford now contains the largest accumulation of nuclear waste in the Western Hemisphere. Hanford’s last reactor shut down in 1987 followed by closure of the last reprocessing plant in 1990. Today, Hanford’s only mission is cleanup. Most onsite radioactive waste and nuclear material lingers inside underground tanks or storage facilities. About half of the chemical waste remains in tanks while the rest persists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Six million dollars each day, or nearly two billion dollars each year, are spent on waste management and cleanup activities. There is significant uncertainty in how long cleanup will take, how much it will cost, and what risks will remain for future generations. This paper summarizes portions of the waste management history of the Hanford Site published in the book “Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup.”(1) "

Gephart, Roy E.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Cleanup Site The Hanford Site mission focuses on environmental restoration, waste management, related scientific and environmental research and development of radioactive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1878, Rev. 0 1878, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 5 - 7 May 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV14800 EDT/EON: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 15 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

142

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3622, Rev. 0 3622, Rev. 0 Summary Notes from 1 - 3 September 2009 Office of River Protection Waste Management Area C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Input Meeting MP Connelly Washington River Protection Solutions LLC Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC27-08RV1 4800 EDT/ECN: DRF UC: Cost Center: Charge Code: B&R Code: Total Pages: 13 Key Words: Waste Management Area C, Performance Assessment, tank closure, waste inventory Abstract: Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Waste Management Area C performance assessment TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

143

Hanford site technical baseline data dictionary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Data Dictionary is to provide information concerning the structure and information contained in the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database (HSTD).

Baynes, P.A. [Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Working Session (7) ChangeRelease Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulatorsstakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C...

146

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

148

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

149

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

150

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

151

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

152

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

153

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

154

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

155

Accelerated Closure of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is currently planned to take until 2046 and another approximately $SOB. In the summer of 1999, Fluor Hanford initiated an ''Accelerated Closure Team'' to evaluate opportunities to reduce this long schedule and high cost for the parts of the Hanford Site which they manage. To-date, this breakthrough team has developed two approaches which will move > 50 million curies away from the Columbia River sooner than planned and at a significantly reduced cost. The approaches successfully applied so far are presently being applied to other opportunities at Hanford.

WILDE, R.T.

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - September 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site - September 2006 Hanford Site - September 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - September 2006 September 2006 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project (WSD) during August and September 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. EM senior managers demonstrated that they clearly understand their safety management roles and responsibilities, and are engaged in making safety

157

Hanford Site Videos on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

For more than forty years, reactors located at Hanford produced plutonium for America's defense program. The process of making plutonium is extremely inefficient in that a massive amount of liquid and solid waste is generated while only a small amount of plutonium is produced. Additionally, all of the facilities and structures that were associated with Hanford's defense mission must also be deactivated, decommissioned, decontaminated, and demolished. That environmental cleanup project is the work that approximately 11,000 Hanford employees are involved with today [copied from http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/HanfordsPresentMission]. Snapshots of the work, the issues, and the cleanup successes can be seen on the Hanford Site's YouTube channel. Short clips illustrate demolition projects, installtion of components such as a liner for the landfill, events such as the site fire in 2007 and Secretary of Energy Chu's visit in 2010. Recovery Act Work is highlighted as well.

158

Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to Small Business Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site Awards $99M Contract to Small Business Small businesses are the backbone of our economy, employing half of all workers in America and creating two out of every three new jobs in the U.S. The Office of Environmental Management's Hanford Site awarded a $99 million contract (approximate value) to a minority-owned, women-owned, certified small business. The HPM Corporation of Kennewick, Washington, will provide Occupational Medical Services for the nearly 8,000 employees who work for Hanford Site contractors, Energy Department Offices, and others working at the Hanford Site. HPM Corporation, founded in 2001, will be responsible for operating and

159

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup September...

160

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summary for...

162

Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

PROTECTING GROUNDWATER & THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Along the remote shores of the Columbia River in southeast Washington state, a race is on. Fluor Hanford, a prime cleanup contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site, is managing a massive, multi-faceted project to remove contaminants from the groundwater before they can reach the Columbia. Despite the daunting nature and size of the problem--about 80 square miles of aquifer under the site contains long-lived radionuclides and hazardous chemicals--significant progress is being made. Many groups are watching, speaking out, and helping. A large. passionate, diverse, and geographically dispersed community is united in its desire to protect the Columbia River--the eighth largest in the world--and have a voice in Hanford's future. Fluor Hanford and the DOE, along with the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) interact with all the stakeholders to make the best decisions. Together, they have made some remarkable strides in the battle against groundwater contamination under the site.

GERBER, M.S.

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

HANFORD SITE WELDING PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY PROVIDING A SINGLE SITE FUNCTION FOR USE BY MULTIPLE CONTRACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) recently restructured its Hanford work scope, awarding two new contracts over the past several months for a total of three contracts to manage the sites cleanup efforts. DOE-RL met with key contractor personnel prior to and during contract transition to ensure site welding activities had appropriate oversight and maintained code compliance. The transition also provided an opportunity to establish a single site-wide function that would provide welding and materials engineering services to the Hanford site contractors: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC); Mission Support Alliance (MSA); Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS); and Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Over the years, multiple and separate welding programs (amongst the several contractors) existed at the Hanford site leading to inefficiencies resulting from duplication of administrative efforts, maintenance of welding procedures, welder performance certifications, etc. The new, single program eliminates these inefficiencies. The new program, co-managed by two of the sites' new contractors, the CHPRC ('owner' of the program and responsible for construction welding services) and the MSA (provides maintenance welding services), provides more than just the traditional construction and maintenance welding services. Also provided, are welding engineering, specialty welding development/qualification for the closure of radioactive materials containers and materials evaluation/failure analysis. The following describes the new Hanford site welding program.

CANNELL GR

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Borehole Data Package for RCRA Well 299-W22-47 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX in fiscal year (FY) 2005 to fulfill commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for the new well, well 299-W22-47, was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/ Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, spectral gamma ray logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, aquifer testing, and sample collection/analysis activities. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets, the Well Construction Summary Report, the geologist's Borehole Log, well development and pump installation records, and well survey results. Appendix B contains analytical results from groundwater samples collected during drilling. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma ray logs and borehole deviation surveys.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment The Meeting Summaries for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment cover informal discussions between representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and involvement with Tribal Nations, State of Oregon, and the Hanford Advisory Board to support DOE's preparation of a new performance assessment (PA) for the Hanford Site C Tank Farm (CTF). These discussions will include the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and modeling approaches to be taken in

168

Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MR-0132. Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland WA. Bretz,in recharge at the Hanford Site. Northwest Science. 66:237-M.J. , ed. 2000. Hanford Site groundwater Monitoring

Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program June 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS x Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program | i Abbreviations iii Executive Summary v 1 Introduction 1 2 Management and Oversight 3 3 Findings Requiring Corrective Action 14 4 Conclusions and Cross-Cutting Opportunities for Improvement 17 Appendix A - Supplemental Information 23 Appendix B - Background Information 26 Appendix C - AdvanceMed Hanford Beryllium Medical Support Program 32 Appendix D - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company 48 Appendix E - Mission Support Alliance 57 Appendix F - Washington Closure Hanford 71

170

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford Agencies Decide to Dig Up Contaminated Soil at Hanford Site - Federal and state agencies determine cleanup plans for four areas near central Hanford October 7, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Emerald Laija, EPA Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov 509-376-4919 Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov 509-372-7954 RICHLAND, Wash. -The Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the Washington Department of Ecology, have made plans for remediating contaminated soil at four locations in the center of the Hanford Site. The agencies have chosen

171

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Iodine-129 in forage and deer on the Hanford site and other Pacific Northwest locations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of surface soil, litter, forage, and deer (rumen content, muscle, liver, and thyroid gland) were collected from Bend, Oregon; Centralia, Washington; Wenatchee, Washington; the Wooten Game Range near Dayton, Washington; and on or near the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The concentrations of /sup 129/I and /sup 127/I were determined using neturon activation techniques. The purpose of the study was to establish the current levels of /sup 129/I in the environs of the Hanford Site prior to the proposed restart of fuel reprocessing at the PUREX plant. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the longevity of /sup 129/I in the biosphere following gaseous release from a nuclear facility. Analyses of thyroid glands showed that deer living within 160 km (Wooten Game Range) of Hanford had elevated levels of /sup 129/I when compared to the more distant Pacific Northwest locations (Centralia, or Bend). Levels of /sup 129/I in deer thyroid from Bend, or Centralia, (15 fCi/g wet weight), were about five times higher than values reported for the central United States, while, Hanford samples were about 2,700 times higher. The average concentration of /sup 129/I in deer thyroids collected at Hanford in 1978 was similar to samples collected 14 years earlier. The concentrations of /sup 129/I in soil, litter, forage, and other deer samples generally decrease in the order: Hanford > Wooten > Wenatchee > Centralia approx. = Bend. This corresponds to an increase in distance from the Hanford Site.

Price, K.R.; Cadwell, L.L.; Schreckhise, R.G.; Brauer, F.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

PREVETTE, S.S.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

177

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark DOI Designates B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site as a National Historic Landmark August 25, 2008 - 3:20pm Addthis DOE to offer regular public tours in 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Deputy Secretary Lynn Scarlett and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Acting Deputy Secretary Jeffrey F. Kupfer today announced the designation of DOE's B Reactor as a National Historic Landmark and unveiled DOE's plan for a new public access program to enable American citizens to visit B Reactor during the 2009 tourist season. The B Reactor at DOE's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State was the world's first industrial-scale nuclear reactor and produced plutonium for the atomic weapon that was dropped on Nagasaki,

178

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

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181

DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medical Services Contract Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned small business. This is a two-year hybrid contract with four-one-year option periods that includes firm-fixed price with award fee, cost reimbursement, and Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) components. As the Occupational Medical Services Contractor, HPM Corporation will: Provide occupational medical services to approximately 8,000

182

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP AT DOE HANFORD SITE - 12575  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeast Washington and consists of 1,518 square kilometers (586 square miles) of land. Established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford workers produced plutonium for our nation's nuclear defense program until the mid 1980's. Since then, the site has been in cleanup mode that is being accomplished in phases. As we achieve remedial objectives and complete active cleanup, DOE will manage Hanford land under the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program until completion of cleanup and the site becomes ready for transfer to the post cleanup landlord - currently planned for DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM). We define Hanford's LTS Program in the ''Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan,'' (DOE/RL-201 0-35)[1], which describes the scope including the relationship between the cleanup projects and the LTS Program. DOE designed the LTS Program to manage and provide surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of institutional controls and associated monitoring of closed waste sites to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. DOE's Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and Hanford cleanup and operations contractors collaboratively developed this program over several years. The program's scope also includes 15 key activities that are identified in the DOE Program Plan (DOE/RL-2010-35). The LTS Program will transition 14 land segments through 2016. The combined land mass is approximately 570 square kilometers (220 square miles), with over 1,300 active and inactive waste sites and 3,363 wells. Land segments vary from buffer zone property with no known contamination to cocooned reactor buildings, demolished support facilities, and remediated cribs and trenches. DOE-RL will transition land management responsibilities from cleanup contractors to the Mission Support Contract (MSC), who will then administer the LTS Program for DOE-RL. This process requires an environment of cooperation between the contractors and DOE-RL. Information Management (IM) is a key part of the LTS program. The IM Program identifies, locates, stores, protects and makes accessible Hanford LTS records and data to support the transfer of property ultimately to LM. As such, DOE-RL manages the Hanford LTS Program in a manner consistent with LM's goals, policies, and procedures.

MOREN RJ; GRINDSTAFF KD

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Hanford COlTlpany Richland, Washington 99352  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Hanford COlTlpany Richland, Washington 99352 Hanford Operations and Engineering Contractor for the U S . Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-87RL10930 Approved for Public Release o-vrrorr 91: WHC-MR-0293 Revision 2 _-- Legend and Legacy: Fifty Years of Defense Production at the Hanford Site M. S. Gerber Date Published September 1992 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Manage men t 3 e f e r e n c e WHC-c: INFORMATION RELEASE REEUEST IN 0 Y 3s % - a - - Referencas Available to I n t e n d e d Audience T r a n s m i t to 00E-HQIOffice o f Scienofic and Tacnnical l n f o r m a a o n x u AurhorlRsquestor (PnnredlSignarure) $ & rnS*G&Gec #/L+ f2 lntenaed Audience u a Internal Sponsor s x t e r n

185

Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness.

Jaquish, R.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hanford Site Pollution Prevention Plan Progress report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report tracks progress against the goals stated in the Hanford Site 5-year Pollution Prevention Plan. The executive summary of the plan was submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in September 1992. The plan, executive summary, and the progress reports are elements of a pollution prevention planning program that is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307 for all hazardous substance users and/or all hazardous waste generators regulated by Ecology. These regulations implement Chapter 70.95C, Revised Code of Washington, an act relating to hazardous waste reduction. The act encourages voluntary efforts to redesign industrial processes to help reduce or eliminate hazardous substances and hazardous waste byproducts, and to maximize the inprocess reuse or reclamation of valuable spent material. Although the Hanford Site is exempt, it is voluntarily complying with this state regulatory-mandated program. This is the first year the Hanford Site is submitting a progress report. It covers calendar year 1993 plus the last quarter of 1992. What is reported, in accordance with WAC 173-307, are reductions in hazardous substance use and hazardous waste generated. A system of Process Waste Assessments (PWA) was chosen to meet the requirements of the program. The PWAs were organized by a physical facility or company organization. Each waste-generating facility/organization performed PWAs to identify, screen, and analyze their own reduction options. Each completed PWA identified any number of reduction opportunities, that are listed individually in the plan and summarized by category in the executive summary. These opportunities were to be implemented or evaluated further over the duration of the 5-year plan. The basis of this progress report is to track action taken on these PWA reduction opportunities in relationship to achieving the goals stated in the Pollution Prevention Plan.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described.

Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Kenoyer, J.L. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bat Surveys of Retired Facilitiies Scheduled for Demolition by Washington Closure Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate buildings and facilities remaining in the Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition schedule for bat roost sites. The project began in spring of 2009 and was concluded in spring of 2011. A total of 196 buildings and facilities were evaluated for the presence of bat roosting sites. The schedule for the project was prioritized to accommodate the demolition schedule. As the surveys were completed, the results were provided to the project managers to facilitate planning and project completion. The surveys took place in the 300 Area, 400 Area, 100-H, 100-D, 100-N, and 100-B/C Area. This report is the culmination of all the bat surveys and summarizes the findings by area and includes recommended mitigation actions where bat roosts were found.

Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.; Lindsey, C. T.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cooperative fish-rearing programs in Hanford Site excess facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In, 1993, two successful fish-rearing pilot projects were conducted in Hanford Site 100 K Area water treatment pools (K Pools) that are excess to the US Department of Energy needs. Beginning this spring, two larger cooperative fish programs will be undertaken in the K Pools. One program will involve the Yakama Indian Nation, which will rear, acclimate, and release 500,000 fall chinook salmon. The other program involves the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, which will rear warm-water specie (walleye and channel catfish) for planting in state lakes. Renewed economic vitality is the goal expected from these and follow-on fish programs.

Herborn, D.I.; Anderson, B.N.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Strategic plan for Hanford site information management  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site missions are to clean up the Site, to provide scientific knowledge and technology to meet global needs, and to partner in the economic diversification of the region. To achieve these long-term missions and increase confidence in the quality of the Site`s decision making process, a dramatically different information management culture is required, consistent with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates on increased safety, productivity, and openness at its sites. This plan presents a vision and six strategies that will move the Site toward an information management culture that will support the Site missions and address the mandates of DOE.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Expanded public notice: Washington State notice of intent for corrective action management unit, Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal  

SciTech Connect

This document is to serve notice of the intent to operate an Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), adjacent to the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington, as a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 264.552. The ERDF CAMU will serve as a management unit for the majority of waste (primarily soil) excavated during remediation of waste management sites on the Hanford Facility. Only waste that originates from the Hanford Facility can be accepted in this ERDF CAMU. The waste is expected to consist of dangerous waste, radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Mixed waste contains radioactive and dangerous components. The primary features of the ERDF could include the following: one or more trenches, rail and tractor/trailer container handling capability, railroads, an inventory control system, a decontamination building, and operational offices.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that includes one of the six (6) cocooned reactors on site. These accomplishments relied upon the transparency between DOE cleanup programs and their contractors working together to successfully transition the land while addressing the challenges that arise. All parties, the three different DOE Programs and their respective prime contractors are dedicated to working together and continuing the progress of transitioning land to LTS, in alignment with the Program Plan and compliant with contractual requirements. This paper highlights the accomplishments and collaborative efforts to address the challenges faced as work progresses from the cleanup to transitioning of land parcels to LTS Program.

Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

DOELEA-1211 Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOELEA-1211 DOELEA-1211 - Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington June 1997 DOE/EA-1211 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE RELOCATION AND STORAGE OF ISOTOPIC HEAT SOURCES HANFORD SITE RICHLAND, WASHINGTON JUNE 1997 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NCHLAND, WASHINGTON Portions of this document may be iiIegiile in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original dornmeut DOWEA- 1 2 1 1 U.S. Department of Energy Preface PREFACE This environmental assessment (EA) has been prep- to assess potentia environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action: Relocation and storage of the isotopic heat sources.

196

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at...

197

TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL LESSONS LEARNED AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60% of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring the waste to the DST system since 1997 as part of the interim stabilization program. Retrieval of SST saltcake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. This paper presents lessons learned from retrieval of tank waste at the Hanford Site and discusses how this information is used to optimize retrieval system efficiency, improve overall cost effectiveness of retrieval operations, and ensure that HFFACO requirements are met.

DODD, R.A.

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evaluation of the Potential for Agricultural Development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animal and fish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The area known as the Hanford Site has all the components that favor successful irrigated farming. Constraints to agricultural development of the Hanford Site are political and social, not economic or technical. Obtaining adequate water rights for any irrigated development will be a major issue. Numerous anticipated future advances in irrigation and resource conservation techniques such as precision agriculture techniques, improved irrigation systems, and irrigation system controls will greatly minimize the negative environmental impacts of agricultural activities.

Evans, Robert G.; Hattendorf, Mary J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA 7: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA EIS-0467: Hanford Site Natural Gas Pipeline, Richland, WA Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a contract with a licensed natural gas supplier in Washington State to construct, operate, and maintain a natural gas pipeline. The pipeline would deliver natural gas to support the Waste Treatment Plant and the 242-A Evaporator operations in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Douglas Chapin, NEPA Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550, MSIN A5-11 Richland, WA 99352 Documents Available for Download January 23, 2012 EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

Software configuration management plan for the Hanford site technical database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Technical Database (HSTD) is used as the repository/source for the technical requirements baseline and programmatic data input via the Hanford Site and major Hanford Project Systems Engineering (SE) activities. The Hanford Site SE effort has created an integrated technical baseline for the Hanford Site that supports SE processes at the Site and project levels which is captured in the HSTD. The HSTD has been implemented in Ascent Logic Corporation (ALC) Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) package referred to as the Requirements Driven Design (RDD) software. This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides a process and means to control and manage software upgrades to the HSTD system.

GRAVES, N.J.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Historical Time Line and Information About the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Historical time line of the Hanford Site spanning from 1940 through 1997, including photographs and other information regarding the town sites and living conditions.

Briggs Jr, David

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford Hanford The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR), Nez Perce Tribe, and Yakama Nation are important stakeholders with Treaty rights and interests at the Hanford Site. DOE environmental cleanup activities have the potential to impact natural and cultural resources and to interfere with American Indian religious practices. Through cooperative agreements, tribal staff and consultants of the Yakama, Nez Perce, and CTUIR are engaged on a daily basis with DOE and its contractors. The principle activities by tribes include reviewing and commenting on plans and documents, participating in meetings at the request of DOE, monitoring cultural resource sites, participating in site surveys, and identifying

206

Hanford as a site for large accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The Ramsey Panel recommended that two very large accelerators be constructed during the next few years to meet urgent U. S. needs in high energy physics. Two studies have been made. The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley has studied a 200 to 300 BeV accelerator, while the Brooknaven National Laboratory on Long Island has made an analysis of a still larger accelerator--600 to 800 BeV. This special report is in response to a request for information on the suitability of the Atomic Energy Commission' s Hanford Project as a site for a large accelerator. Using criteria recommended by Lawrence and Brookhaven, the Hanford site offers significant economic advantages both in original installed cost and in annual operating expense. These advantages are: (1) Land--Hanford has available more than 150 square miles of govermnentowned land that readily meets topographic, geologic, and seismic criteria; (2) Power--- Hanford has surplus electrical capacity already installed to meet the demands of the largest accelerator--- at the lowest rates in the U. S. This alone offers an annual savings of several million dollars over any other location; (3) Water--- the Columbia River offers the largest supply of pure, cold water in the U. S.; there are excellent surplus reactor water plants available; (4) Transportation---four major railroads have direct connections to the Hanford Project rail system; multi- 1000-ton barge service is also available; (5) manpower---a high level of scientific and technical personnel as well as construction and craft labor is already in residence; (6) Services---complete support-type services, such as industrial shops, bus transportation, radiation protection, and plant security, are immediately available; and (7) Community--the area has an exceptionally high educational level, equal to the outstanding areas of the U. S. At the present time, the Hanford location has some disadvantages according to the cited criteria. These are: (1) lack of proximity to a university; (2) lack of a major jet airport; and (3) relative isolation from a major metropolitan area. The first two are even now under vigorous study and action by both state and local bodies. The third, though often a disadvantage, appears to have considerable appeal to many. In total, the many tangible assets of the Hanford Project offer tremendous potential dollar savings to the Government. The shutdown of preduction reactors makes many millions of dollars worth of excellent support facilities and manpower readily available. The minor disadvantages can be met almost entirely by the state and community. (auth)

Leonard, B.R. Jr.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System. Waste management 1993 symposium papers and viewgraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 25, 1994 February 25, 1994 EA-0915: Final Environmental Assessment Waste Tank Safety Program Hanford Site, Richland, Washington January 1, 1994 EIS-0194: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, Washington September 16, 1993 EIS-0119: Record of Decision Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington December 1, 1992 EIS-0119: Final Environmental Impact Statement Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1, 1992 EA-0429: Final Environmental Assessment Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 10, 1992 EA-0881: Finding of No Significant Impact Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting

209

Technitium Management at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford tank waste contains -26,000 Ci of technetium-99 (Tc-99), the majority of which is in the supernate fraction. Tc-99 is a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of -212,000 years and, in its predominant pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}) fonn, is highly soluble and very mobile in the vadose zone and ultimately the groundwater. Tc-99 is identified as the major dose contributor (in groundwater) by past Hanford site performance assessments and therefore considered a key radionuclide of concern at Hanford. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) River Protection Project's (RPP) long-term Tc-99 management strategy is to immobitize the Tc-99 in a waste fonn that will retain the Tc-99 for many thousands of years. To achieve this, the RPP flowsheet will immobilize the majority of the Tc-99 as a vitrified low-activity waste product that will be ultimately disposed on site in the Integrated Disposal Facility. The Tc-99 will be released gradually from the glass at very low rates such that the groundwater concentrations at any point in time would be substantially below regulatory limits.The liquid secondary waste will be immobilized in a low-temperature matrix (cast stone) and the solid secondary waste will be stabilized using grout. Although the Tc-99 that is immobilized in glass will meet the release rate for disposal in IDF, a proportion is driven into the secondary waste stream that will not be vitrified and therefore presents a disposal risk. If a portion of the Tc-99 were to be removed from the Hanford waste inventory and disposed off-site, (e.g., as HLW), it could lessen a major constraint on LAW waste form performance, i.e., the requirement to retain Tc-99 over thousands of years and have a positive impact on the IDF Performance Assessment. There are several technologies available at various stages of technical maturity that can be employed for Tc-99 removal. The choice of technology and the associated efficacy of the technology are dependent on the chemical fonn of the technetium in the waste, the removal location in the tlowsheet. and the ultimate disposition path chosen for the technetium product. This paper will discuss the current plans for the management of the technetium present in the Hanford tank waste. It will present the risks associated with processing technetium in the current treatment tlowsheet and present potential mitigation opportunities, the status of available technetium removal technologies, the chemical speciation of technetium in the tank waste, and the available disposition paths and waste fonns for technetium containing streams.

Robbins, Rebecca A.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 April 2004 Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and Occupational Medicine Program Allegations at the Hanford Site At the direction of the Secretary of Energy, the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an investigation of selected aspects of worker safety and health systems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in February-April 2004. In February 2004, the Secretary of Energy directed OA to evaluate recent allegations of deficient safety and medical practices and to assess past practices and current operations to determine whether additional actions are needed to ensure a safe work environment at the Hanford Site.

211

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Rhoads, K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

214

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually to satisfy the requirements of DOE Orders. The report provides an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during 2002 and demonstrates the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies; and to summarize environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The purpose of the report is to provide useful summary information to members of the public, public officials, regulators, Hanford contractors, and elected representatives.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Hanford site tank waste remediation system technical strategy  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, has the most diverse and largest amount of radioactive tank the United States. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 230,000 m{sup 3} (61 Mgal) of caustic liquids, slurries, saltcakes, and sludges have accumulated in 177 tanks. In addition, significant amounts of {sup 90}S and {sup 137}Cs were removed from the tank waste, converted to salts, doubly encapsulated in metal containers, and stored in water basins. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program was established by the US DOE Energy in 1991 to safely manage and immobilize these wastes for permanent disposal of the high-level waste fraction in a geologic repository. The technical strategy to manage and dispose of these wastes has been revised and successfully negotiated with the regulatory agencies.

Wodrich, D.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Soil structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Hanford Site contractors address future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks, built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice guidelines for soil modeling are suitable as preliminary design tools, future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current code based structural capabilities. For example, waste removal may include cutting a large hole in a tank. This report addresses both spring modeling of site soils and finite-element modeling of soils. Additionally seismic dynamic modeling of Hanford Site soils is also included. Of new and special interest is Section 2.2 that Professor Robert D. Holtz of the University of Washington wrote on plane strain soil testing versus triaxial testing with Hanford Site application to large buried waste tanks.

Moore, C.J.; Holtz, R.D.; Wagenblast, G.R.; Weiner, E.D.; Marlow, R.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 1995 November 9, 1995 EA-1123: Final Environmental Assessment Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 1, 1995 EIS-0212: Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 1, 1995 EIS-0173: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project October 1, 1995 EIS-0245: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1995 EA-0984: Finding of No Significant Impact Deactivation of the N Reactor Facilities, Richland, Washington May 1, 1995 EA-0984: Final Environmental Assessment Deactivation of the N Reactor Facilities, Richland, Washington

218

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 2011 RICHLAND, Wash. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford site continues with several projects intended to reduce the Cold War cleanup foot-...

220

Stewardship of the Hanford Site Now and Into the Future  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Into the Future Bob Suyama Vice-Chair Hanford Advisory Board Stewardship Roundtable Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting April 29, 2010...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IH Industrial Hygiene IHT Industrial Hygiene Technician JHA Job Hazard Analysis LIBS Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Abbreviations Used in This Report iv | Hanford Site...

222

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the...

223

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

224

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and...

225

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The U....

226

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The...

227

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project 1 Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality 1.0...

228

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hanford Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations at the Hanford Site. The following sections: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status in 1992 of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss public dose estimates from 1992 Hanford activities; present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, and discuss activities to ensure quality.

Woodruff, R.K.; Hanf, R.W.; Lundgren, R.E. [eds.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site, June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site, June 1992 is an update to the series of reports that document the configuration of the water table in the unconsolidated sediments beneath the Hanford Site (Figure 1). Water level measurements for these reports are collected from site groundwater monitoring wells each June and December. The groundwater data are portrayed on a series of maps to illustrate the hydrologic conditions at the Hanford Site and are also tabulated in an appendix. The purpose of this report series is to document the changes in the groundwater level at Hanford as the site transitions from a nuclear material production role to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data in support of the site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs on the Hanford Site. Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site are prepared for the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, by the Hanford Site Operations and Engineering Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC).

Kasza, G.L.; Hartman, M.J.; Hodges, F.N.; Weekes, D.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Groundwater maps of the Hanford site, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site, June 1995 is a continuation of a series of reports (see Serkowski et al. 1995) that document the configuration of the water table aquifer beneath the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This series presents the results of the semiannual water level measurement program and the water table maps generated from these measurements. The reports document the changes in the groundwater level at the Hanford Site during the transition from nuclear material production to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data to support the various site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs currently in progress on the Hanford Site. Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Hanford Site Operations and Engineering Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This document fulfills reporting requirements specified in WHC-CM-7-5, Section 8.0 ``Water Quality`` and described in the environmental monitoring plan for the Hanford Site. (DOE-RL 1993a) This document highlights the three major operations areas (the 100, 200 and 300/1100 Areas) where wastes were discharged to the soil. Each area includes a summary discussion of the data, a well index map, and a contoured map of the water table surface. Appendix A contains all of the data collected for this program.

Sweeney, M.D.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 June 2005 Review of Worker Vapor Exposures and Occupational Medicine Program at the Hanford Site, June 2005 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a follow-up review in May-June 2005 of its 2004 investigation of allegations of deficiencies in worker protection and medical practices at the DOE Hanford Site. The purpose of this OA follow-up review was to assess the status of the corrective actions for selected findings identified by OA during its 2004 investigation. This OA review did not result in any new findings. Recommendations for continued improvement and enhancements to ongoing initiatives are provided

235

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 February 2009 Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) during October through November 2008. HSS reports directly to the Office of the Secretary of Energy, and the ES&H inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. BNI has made significant improvements in nuclear safety processes, in part,

236

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - September 2013 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site - September 2013 Hanford Site - September 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - September 2013 September 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) and the various Hanford Site contractors to deal with severe natural phenomena events (NPE). The review was conducted April - May 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities

237

Facility preparations for the initial International Atomic Energy Agency Inpsection of Hanford Site excess material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1993 President Clinton offered to place excess US nuclear materials under IAEA safeguards. In January 1994, the Hanford Site was identified as the second site in the US to be prepared for placement on the eligibility list for LAEA safeguards selection. Planning and preparation started at Hanford in February 1994. The PFP mission is to provide safe storage of Category 1 and 2 special nuclear material (SNM) and laboratory support to the Hanford Site. The mission includes the stabilizing and packaging of SNM for temporary storage sufficient to support the deactivation and cleanup function of the facility. The storage of Category 1 and 2 SNM at this facility indirectly supports national security interests, and safe storage is accomplished in a manner that ensures the health and safety of the public and employees are not compromised. The PFP is located in the approximate center of the Hanford Site inside the 200 West Area. The PFP is within a designated protected area (PA) and is located approximately 10.5 km from the Columbia River and 34 km northwest of the Richland city limits. The, Hanford Site is located in Southeastern Washington and has been associated with plutonium production since the mid 1940s. Excess plutonium oxide has been placed under IAEA safeguards in a phased approach at the PFP`s Plutonium Storage Vault. This paper is an overview and summary of the many tasks required to meet IAEA safeguards requirements.

Johnson, W.C. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Scott, D.D.; Bartlett, W.D.; Delegard, C.H.; McRae, L.P.; Six, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Amacker, O.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with regulatory requirements. The report provides an overview of activities at the Hanford Site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2009 information is included where appropriate.

Poston, Ted M.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with regulatory requirements. The report provides an overview of activities at the Hanford Site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2010 information is included where appropriate.

Poston, Ted M.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Jump to: navigation, search Name Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council Short Name EFSEC Place Olympia, Washington Zip 98504 Website http://www.efsec.wa.gov/defaul References EFSEC: Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Washington State Energy Facility Siting Council (EFSEC) oversees the siting process for major energy facilities in the State of Washington. EFSEC coordinates all evaluation and licensing steps for siting certain energy facilities. References ↑ "EFSEC: Energy Facility Siting Evaluation Council" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Washington_State_Energy_Facility_Site_Evaluation_Council&oldid=694902

242

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4941 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 02/25/2010 4941 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 02/25/2010 (4) Document Type: ElDigital Image [] Hard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DIRF) or 20 SPDF Video number of digital images (5) Release Type New El Cancel I E Page Change El Complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Working Session on Soils Inventory (7) Change/Release Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C performance assessment on soil inventory. (8) Change N/A Justification: (9) Associated (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number: Structure, System, N/NA and Component N/NA (SSC) and Building (b) System Designator: (d) Equipment ID Number (EIN): Number: N/A N/A (10) Impacted (a) Document Type (b) Document Number (c) Document Revision

243

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM ! I (1) Document Number: RPP-47375 . NUMber· 0 I (3) Effective Date: 08/11/2010 i (4) Document Type: o Digital Image o Hard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DRF) or 21 I ~PDF o Video I number of digital images (5) Release Type ~ New o Cancel o Page Change o Complete Revision i (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Engineered Systems #2 Working Session - Steel Corrosion; i ConcretelGrout Degradation I(7) Change/Release ..- - . Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C performance assessment on Engineered Systems #2 - Steel Corrosion; Concrete/Grout Degradation I(8) Change N/A Justification: (9) Associated (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number:

244

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 35 51 35 (2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 03/03/2010 (4) Document Typo: [I Digital Image ElHard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DRF) or 18 JE PDF Vie number of digital Images (5) Release Type Z New 1: Cancel 1E: Page Change Complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes for the WMA C PA Engineering System #1 Working Session (7) ChangelReleese Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulators/stakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C performance assessment on Engineering System #1. (5) Change N/A Justification: (9) Associated (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number: Structure, System, and Component N/NA (SSC) and Building (b) System Designator: (d) Equipment ID Number (EIN):. Number: (10) Impacted (a) Document Type (b) Document Number (c) Document Revision

245

Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria  

SciTech Connect

Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

Ellefson, M.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy (Washington...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Seattle - Sustainable Buildings and Sites Policy (Washington) This is the approved revision...

247

Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear sense of direction toward achieving environmental protection, cleanup, and research.

BETSCH, M.D.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with regulatory requirements. The report provides an overview of activities at the Hanford Site; demonstrates the status of the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2011 information is included where appropriate.

Poston, Ted M.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

DEVELOPMENT OF A GEOCHEMICAL MODEL FOR URANIUM TRANSPORT IN THE UNSATURATED AND SATURATED SEDIMENTS AT THE 200 WEST AREA OF THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON (SEPTEMBER 2004)  

SciTech Connect

Final Deliverable under GWP-HQ-LMT-02 contract for Hanford Sci. & Tech. Gp. to BHI. The scope of work covered laboratory analyses and gephysical logging for 299-W19-43 near the 200 West U Plant. Other isotopic analyses were conducted for holes around 216-U-1&2, including U-236.

ADAMS SC; PETERSEN SW

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Ben Harp, center, manager of Hanford’s Waste Treatment Plant Start-up and Commissioning Integration, discusses the advantages of ORP's Cold Test Facility to a group of congressional and state legislative staffers during a recent tour. Ben Harp, center, manager of Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant Start-up and Commissioning Integration, discusses the advantages of ORP's Cold Test Facility to a group of congressional and state legislative staffers during a recent tour. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection (ORP) recently hosted a group of congressional and state legislative staffers on a tour of the

251

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary analytical data that (1) provide an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during calendar year 2005; (2) demonstrate the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) policies and directives; (3) characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance; and (4) highlight significant environmental programs.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary analytical data that (1) provide an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during calendar year 2003; (2) demonstrate the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) policies and directives; (3) characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance; and (4) highlight significant environmental programs.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tank Waste Retrieval Lessons Learned at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60 percent of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring this waste to the DST system. Retrieval of SST salt-cake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. Regulatory requirements for SST waste retrieval and tank farm closure are established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), better known as the Tri- Party Agreement, or TPA. The HFFACO was signed by the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and requires retrieval of as much waste as technically possible, with waste residues not to exceed 360 ft{sup 3} in 530,000 gallon or larger tanks; 30 ft{sup 3} in 55,000 gallon or smaller tanks; or the limit of waste retrieval technology, whichever is less. If residual waste volume requirements cannot be achieved, then HFFACO Appendix H provisions can be invoked to request Ecology and EPA approval of an exception to the waste retrieval criteria for a specific tank. Tank waste retrieval has been conducted at the Hanford Site over the last few decades using a method referred to as Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing. Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing employs large volumes of DST supernatant and water to dislodge, dissolve, mobilize, and retrieve tank waste. Concern over the leak integrity of SSTs resulted in the need for tank waste retrieval methods capable of using smaller volumes of liquid in a more controlled manner. Retrieval of SST waste in accordance with HFFACO requirements was initiated at the Hanford Site in April 2003. New and innovative tank waste retrieval methods that minimize and control the use of liquids are being implemented for the first time. These tank waste retrieval methods replace Past Practice Hydraulic Sluicing and employ modified sluicing, vacuum retrieval, and in-tank vehicle techniques. Waste retrieval has been completed in seven Hanford Site SSTs (C-106, C-103, C-201, C-202, C-203, C-204, and S-112) in accordance with HFFACO requirements. Three additional tanks are currently in the process of being retrieved (C-108, C-109 and S-102) Preparation for retrieval of two additional SSTs (C-104 and C-110) is ongoing with retrieval operations forecasted to start in calendar year 2008. Tank C-106 was retrieved to a residual waste volume of 470 ft{sup 3} using oxalic acid dissolution and modified sluicing. An Appendix H exception request for Tank C-106 is undergoing review. Tank C-103 was retrieved to a residual volume of 351 ft{sup 3} using a modified sluicing technology. This approach was successful at reaching the TPA limits for this tank of less than 360 ft{sup 3}and the limits of the technology. Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204 are smaller (55,000 gallon) tanks and waste removal was completed in accordance with HFFACO requirements using a vacuum retrieval system. Residual waste volumes in each of these four tanks were less than 25 ft{sup 3}. Tank S-112 retrieval was completed February 28, 2007, meeting the TPA Limits of less than

Dodd, R.A. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., Richland, Washington (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared to investigate the rate and extent of aquifer contamination beneath Waste Management Area TX-TY on the Hanford Site in Washington State. This plan is an update of a draft plan issued in February 1999, which guided work performed in fiscal year 2000.

Hodges, Floyd N.; Chou, Charissa J.

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

256

Population estimates for the areas within a 50-mile radius of four reference points on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report presents population distributions within a 50-mile radius of four locations on the Hanford Site. The results are based on the US Bureau of Census 1980 population counts for Washington and Oregon. These results are documented in Tables 2 to 13 and 15 to 18 of this report.

Sommer, D.J.; Rau, R.G.; Robinson, D.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Characterization of the Hanford Site and environs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to site, construct, and operate a new production reactor (NPR) intended to produce materials for the US nuclear weapons program. The DOE has determined that this proposed action constitutes an action that may significantly affect the quality of the human environment; therefore, the DOE is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the potential impacts of the proposed action and reasonable alternatives on the human and natural environment. The NPR-EIS is being prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented in regulations (40 CFR 1500--1508) promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Information on the potentially affected environment at the Hanford Site and its environs was provided to ANL by PNL in various submissions during CY-1989, and some of that information was consolidated into this report, which is considered to be supporting documentation for the NPR-EIS. 93 refs., 35 figs., 46 tabs.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County DOE Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County December 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Salony, DOE 509-376-0402, Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to the Benton County Sheriff's Office in Kennewick, Wash., to provide law enforcement services at the DOE Hanford Site. The contract has a five-year period of performance, consisting of a one-year base period, with four one-year option periods and an approximate total value of $5 million. As the law enforcement contractor, the sheriff's office will: Ensure site employees obey traffic laws Investigate suspected or reported violations of law Apprehend and arrest those suspected of committing violations of law

259

Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Multiple missions: The 300 Area in Hanford Site history  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an historical overview of the role of the 300 Area buildings at the Hanford Reservation. Topics covered are: Early fuel fabrication at the Hanford site (313 and 314 Buildings); N reactor fuel fabrication in the 300 Area; 305 test pile was Hanford`s first operating reactor; Early process improvement chemical research (321 and 3706 Buildings); Major 1952 and 1953 expansions in the 300 area (325 and 329 Buildings); Early 300 area facilities constructed to support reactor development (326 and 327 Buildings); Hanford site ventures with the peaceful atom (309, 308 and 318 Buildings); Modern 300 Area Buildings; Significant miscellaneous buildings in the 300 area; 300 Area process waste handling and disposal.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S&T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford`s highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S&T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ``problem owners`` (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S&T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Outcome-Based Planning-Hanford's Shift Towards Closure and Shrinking the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Over the past two years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has formulated a focused, outcomes-based vision for accelerated cleanup of the Hanford Site. The primary elements, or outcomes, of this vision are to (1) accelerate restoration of the Columbia River Corridor, (2) transition the Central Plateau to long-term waste management, thereby shrinking the footprint of active site cleanup and operations, and (3) prepare for the future. The third outcome includes operation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a key element of the foundation for Hanford's future; leveraging DOE's assets; and working with the community to understand their vision and reflect it as appropriate in the execution of the Hanford 2012 Vision. The purpose of these three outcomes is to provide a near term focus, aimed at achieving definitive end points over the next decade, while not precluding any long-term end-state associated with the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) mission at Hanford. The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make the Hanford Site arguably the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. Current projections are that it will cost over $80 billion and take over four decades to complete the cleanup at Hanford. Accelerated cleanup of the River Corridor portion of the Site will allow the remediation effort to focus on specific, near-term outcomes. Hanford's success in achieving these outcomes will reduce urgent risk, shrink the Site, remove contamination and wastes from the proximity of the river, and consolidate waste management activities on the Central Plateau. Hanford has begun implementation of this vision. Performance-based contracts are being realigned to reflect the outcome orientation, including issuing a new River Corridor closure contract. This paper summarizes the outcome-based planning approach for other sites and interested parties. A brief introduction to the Hanford Site, along with detailed descriptions of the three outcomes is provided. This paper also summarizes the analyses and resulting products that were prepared in shifting to an outcome-based approach for closing the Hanford Site.

Ballard, W. W.; Holten, R.; Johnson, W.; Reichmuth, B.; White, M.; Wood, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7  

SciTech Connect

This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.] ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others] and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

268

Uncertainty Analysis Framework - Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) embarked on a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of the predictions being made with a site-wide groundwater flow and transport model at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. In FY 2000, the focus of the initiative was on the characterization of major uncertainties in the current conceptual model that would affect model predictions. The long-term goals of the initiative are the development and implementation of an uncertainty estimation methodology in future assessments and analyses using the site-wide model. This report focuses on the development and implementation of an uncertainty analysis framework.

Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Rogers, Phillip M.

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company- November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes

270

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - June 2010 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2010 June 2010 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - June 2010 June 2010 Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an inspection of the beryllium program at the Hanford Site during March and April 2010. The inspection was performed by the Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations at the request of the DOE Headquarters Office of Environmental Management (EM) and focused on the Hanford Site's implementation of its recently developed sitewide chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP). After the onsite portion of the HSS team inspection, RL and ORP reacted

271

Department of Energy Announces Intent to Extend Hanford Site Contract |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Announces Intent to Extend Hanford Site Department of Energy Announces Intent to Extend Hanford Site Contract Department of Energy Announces Intent to Extend Hanford Site Contract April 25, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to extend CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's contract for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site by another five years. In 2008, following a competitive bid, DOE awarded CH2M HILL a cost-plus, award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years, including a five-year base period with the option to extend the contract for another five years. DOE evaluated whether or not extending the contract was in the best interest of the government.

272

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

273

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9  

SciTech Connect

This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J. [and others] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hanford Site existing irradiated fuel storage facilities description  

SciTech Connect

This document describes facilities at the Hanford Site which are currently storing spent nuclear fuels. The descriptions provide a basis for the no-action alternatives of ongoing and planned National Environmental Protection Act reviews.

Willis, W.L.

1995-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

275

Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives, Railcars With the help of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Hanford Site is preserving the history of its locomotives and railcars as workers clean up the legacy of the Cold War. In the recently completed railcar project – a $5.5 million effort funded by the Recovery Act – the Richland Operations Office and its contractors moved two locomotives and two cask cars onto reclaimed track at the B Reactor for permanent public display. Designated a National Historic Landmark in August 2008, the B Reactor is slated to become part of the national park system commemorating the Manhattan Project and is open for

276

Audit Report on "Hanford Site Radiation and Hazardous Waste Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in radiation andor hazardous waste that was not required. Audit Report on "Hanford Site Radiation and Hazardous Waste Training", WR-B-00-06 More Documents & Publications Audit...

277

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Notice of Revised Scope for the Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8:45 am BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Revised Scope for the Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement,...

280

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8  

SciTech Connect

This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. It also highlights environmental programs and efforts. It is written to meet reporting requirements and guidelines of DOE and to meet the needs of the public. Individual sections are designed to describe the Hanford Site and its mission, summarize the status in 1995 of compliance, describe the environmental programs, discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1995 Hanford activities, present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance (including ground- water protection and monitoring), and discuss activities to ensure quality.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [eds.; Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report of the Hanford Reservation is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The following sections: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status in 1991 of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; present information on environmental surveillance and the ground-water protection and monitoring program; and discuss activities to ensure quality.

Woodruff, R.K.; Hanf, R.W.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford Site -- calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emission from the Hanford Site in 1997, and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the MEI. The report has been prepared in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. This report has also been prepared in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The effective dose equivalent to the MEI from the Hanford Site`s 1997 point source emissions was 1.2 E-03 mrem (1.2 E-05 mSv), which is well below the 40 CFR 61 Subpart H regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr. Radon and thoron emissions, exempted from 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, resulted in an effective dose equivalent to the MEI of 2.5 E-03 mrem (2.5 E-05 mSv). The effective dose equivalent to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive emissions was 2.2 E-02 mrem (2.2 E-04 mSv). The total effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions was 2.6 E-02 mrem (2.6 E-04 mSv). The effective dose equivalent from all of the Hanford Site`s air emissions is well below the Washington Administrative Code, Chapter 246-247, regulatory limit of 10 mrem/yr.

Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

1998-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

INNOVATIVE ALARA TOOLS AND WORK PRACTICES USED AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation occupies an area of 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state. The site was created as part of the World War II Manhattan Project to produce weapons grade plutonium. A multitude of old reactor plants, processing facilities, underground tank farms, contaminated soil and ground water remain and are part of an on-going environmental cleanup mission of the site. The Columbia River bisects Hanford, and the concern is that the river will become contaminated if the sources of contamination are not removed. Currently facilities are being removed, the ground water is being treated, and contaminated soil is being transferred to an approved burial ground about 15 miles away from the River located in the center of the Hanford Site The remaining facilities and adjacent structures are undergoing D&D (decontaminate and demolish) and to date, significant progress has been made. During this presentation, I will discuss how we are using innovative tools and work practices to D&D these Hanford Site facilities.

WAGGONER LO

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with regulatory requirements. The report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights signifi cant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2008 information is included where appropriate.

Poston, Ted M.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System siren testing report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the test was to determine the effective coverage of the proposed upgrades to the existing Hanford Site Emergency Alerting System (HSEAS). The upgrades are to enhance the existing HSEAS along the Columbia River from the Vernita Bridge to the White Bluffs Boat Launch as well as install a new alerting system in the 400 Area on the Hanford Site. Five siren sites along the Columbia River and two sites in the 400 Area were tested to determine the site locations that will provide the desired coverage.

Weidner, L.B.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area collected from the Hanford 300 Area in south-central Washington State, United States. A calibration method and riparian quality in many locations, most notably at the Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Nevada Test

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

293

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the twelfth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the thirteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomic, occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environment assessment or environmental impact statement.

Neitzel, Duane A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Antonio, Ernest J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fosmire, Christian J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fowler, Richard A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Glantz, Clifford S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Goodwin, Shannon M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Harvey, David W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hendrickson, Paul L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Horton, Duane G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poston, Ted M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rohay, Alan C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thorne, Paul D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Mona K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

U.S. Federal Facility Compliance Agreement for the Hanford Site, February 7, 1994 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Radionuclide for Radionuclide NESHAP State Washington Agreement Type Federal Facility Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) CAA Scope Summary Bring DOE's Hanford site into compliance with CAA Parties EPA; DOE; Richland Operations Office (RL) Date 02/07/1994 SCOPE * Bring DOE's Hanford site into compliance with CAA. This Compliance Plan contains a schedule for DOE to evaluate the monitoring systems associated with Designated Stacks to ensure that these systems conform to the standards for continuous monitoring systems in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * Beginning 30 days after the effective date of this Agreement, DOE shall submit quarterly progress reports to EPA until the requirements contained in Amendment A

295

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site Workers Complete Retrieval of 11th Single-Shell Tank at EM's Hanford Site November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. A composite image comprised of dozens of photos taken inside C-110 provides a rare panoramic view of the tank interior. Portions of the tank floor and the FoldTrack waste-retrieval system are clearly visible. Operators use multiple technologies to remove waste from underground storage tank RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection and its tank farm contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), recently

296

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 27, 1998 August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 27, 1998 EA-1260: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of 1100 Area, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 13, 1998 EIS-0229: Notice of Availability of the Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials August 1, 1998 EIS-0245-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1998 EIS-0189: Supplement Analysis Tank Waste Remediation System July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site,

297

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops November 28, 2012 - 12:23pm Addthis *Editor's Note: This article was originally posted in the Office of Environmental Management's EM Update, Volume 4, Issue 11, November 2012. RICHLAND, Wash. - Each November, in honor of Native American Heritage Month, the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site offers educational programs on local Native American topics for federal and contractor employees. The Energy Department interacts and consults with three federally recognized tribes affected by Hanford operations, including the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes

298

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The review, which was performed June 10-14, 2013, was the latest in a series of ongoing quarterly assessments of construction quality performed by Independent Oversight at the WTP construction site. The scope of this quarterly assessment of construction quality review

299

Borehole Data Package for Two RCRA Wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46 at Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) groundwater monitoring and assessment well was installed at single-shell tank Waste Management Area (WMA) T in calendar year 2005 in partial fulfillment of commitments for well installations proposed in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-24-57 (2004). The need for increased monitoring capability at this WMA was identified during a data quality objectives process for establishing a RCRA/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)/Atomic Energy Act (AEA) integrated 200 West and 200 East Area Groundwater Monitoring Network. The initial borehole, 299-W11-25B, was located about 20 ft from existing downgradient well 299 W11-39. The specific objective for the borehole was to determine the vertical distribution of contaminants in the unconfined aquifer at the northeast corner of WMA T. The permanent casing in borehole 299-W11-25B was damaged beyond repair during well construction and replacement borehole, 299-W11-46, was drilled about 10 ft from borehole 299-W11-25B (Figure 1). Borehole 299-W11-46 was completed as a RCRA monitoring well. This document provides a compilation of all available geologic data, geophysical logs, hydrogeologic data and well information obtained during drilling, well construction, well development, pump installation, groundwater sampling and analysis activities, and preliminary results of slug tests associated with wells 299-W11-25B and 299-W11-46. Appendix A contains geologists logs, Well Construction Summary Reports, Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), and Well Development and Testing Data sheets. Appendix B contains the results of chemical analysis of groundwater samples. Appendix C contains complete spectral gamma-ray logs and borehole deviation surveys and Appendix D contains initial results of slug tests. The non-conformance report for borehole 299-W11-46 is provided in Appendix E.

Horton, Duane G.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the environmental status of the Hanford Site in 1989. It includes descriptions of the Site and its mission, the status of compliance with environmental regulations, planning and activities to accomplish compliance, environmental protection and restoration activities, and environmental monitoring. 97 refs., 67 figs., 14 tabs.

Jaquish, R.E.; Bryce, R.W. (eds.)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 February 2009 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - February 2009 February 2009 Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) during October through November 2008. HSS reports directly to the Office of the Secretary of Energy, and the ES&H inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. BNI has made significant improvements in nuclear safety processes, in part,

302

Audit Report: Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site, OAS-RA-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 9, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (Richland) awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to remediate select portions of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau. As part of the American Recovery and

303

External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Monica C. Regalbuto Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM Kevin G. Brown Vanderbilt University and CRESP David W. DePaoli Oak Ridge National Laboratory Candido Pereira Argonne National Laboratory John R. Shultz Office of Waste Processing DOE/EM External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process September 2009 Acknowledgements The Review Team thanks Mr. Glyn Trenchard, Team Lead for Planning and Coordination Waste Disposition Project, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of River Protection, Mr. Paul Rutland, RPP System Planning Manager for Washington River Protection Solutions, and Mr. Ernie Lee,

304

Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Perkins, C.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Strategic plan for Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Information Management  

SciTech Connect

This strategic plan addresses information management for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Hanford Site. This Program leads the cleanup of the Hanford Site`s soil, groundwater, buried waste, and the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities. The vision that drives this strategic plan is to ensure that quality information is available to the people who need it, when they need it, at a convenient location, in a usable form, and at an acceptable cost. Although investments are being made in managing the vast amounts of information, which include data, records and documents associated with the Hanford Site`s production history and new cleanup mission, it is widely recognized that efforts to date have not accomplished the vision. Effective information management involves more than the compilation of massive amounts of electronic and non-electronic information. It also involves integrating information management into business processes that support user`s needs and decisionmaking. Only then can information management complement and enable environmental restoration priorities and practices, help identify environmental restoration requirements, and enable communication within the Environmental Restoration Program and between the Program and its stakeholders. Successfully accomplishing the Hanford Site mission requires an integrated approach to information management that crosses organizational boundaries, streamlines existing systems, and builds new systems that support the needs of the future. This plan outlines that approach.

Cowley, P.J.; Beck, J.E.; Gephart, R.E. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

1995 Report on Hanford site land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-26-01E. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The U.S. Department of Energy, its predecessors, and contractors at the Hanford Site were involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials from the early 1940s to the late 1980s. These production activities have generated large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste. This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and Atomic Energy Act of 1954. This report covers mixed waste only. The Washington State Department of Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDRs) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for radioactive mixed waste. This report is the fifth update of the plan first issued in 1990. Tri-Party Agreement negotiations completed in 1993 and approved in January 1994 changed and added many new milestones. Most of the changes were related to the Tank Waste Remediation System and these changes are incorporated into this report.

Black, D.G.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations, October 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORP-2011-10-26 ORP-2011-10-26 Site: Hanford (Office of River Protection) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene Program Strategy and Implementation of the Hanford Concerns Council Recommendations Dates of Activity : 08/16-25/2011 (Field) Final Report 10/26/2011 Report Preparer: Jim Lockridge, Certified Industrial Hygienist Activity Description/Purpose: Staff from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), in coordination with the Office of River Protection (ORP), reviewed the status and programmatic health

309

Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. (ed.) [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect

This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

Cushing, C.E. [ed.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the eleventh revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the 12th revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA; SEPA and CERCLA documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomic; occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100,200,300, and other Areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) is essentially a definitive NEPA Chapter 6.0, which describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. People preparing environmental assessments and EISs should also be cognizant of the document entitled ''Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements'' published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Site contractors. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. The following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through June 1999: Climate and Meteorology; Ecology; Cultural, Archaeological, and Historical Resources; Socioeconomics; and All of Chapter 6.

Rohay, A.C.; Fosmire, C.J.; Neitzel, D.A.; Hoitink, D.J.; Harvey, D.W.; Antonio, E.J.; Wright, M.K.; Thorne, P.D.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Goodwin, S.M.; Poston, T.M.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption and transport of iodine species in sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, where anthropogenic 129 I from

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

314

Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This small booklet provides highlights of the environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during 2005. It is a summary of the information contained in the larger report: Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring for Calendar Year 2005.

Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

315

Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency...

316

Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect

This data package was originally prepared to support a 2004 composite analysis (CA) of low-level waste disposal at the Hanford Site. The Technical Scope and Approach for the 2004 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal at the Hanford Site (Kincaid et. al. 2004) identified the requirements for that analysis and served as the basis for initial preparation of this data package. Completion of the 2004 CA was later deferred, with the 2004 Annual Status Report for the Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site (DOE 2005) indicating that a comprehensive update to the CA was in preparation and would be submitted in 2006. However, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recently decided to further defer the CA update and will use the cumulative assessment currently under preparation for the environmental impact statement (EIS) being prepared for tank closure and other site decisions as the updated CA. Submittal of the draft EIS is currently planned for FY 2008. This data package describes the facility-specific parameters (e.g. location, operational dates, etc.) used to numerically simulate contaminant flow and transport in large-scale Hanford assessments. Kincaid et al. (2004) indicated that the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Kincaid et al. 2000; Bryce et al. 2002; Eslinger 2002a, 2002b) would be used to analyze over a thousand different waste sites. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site/facility, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future). This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for large-scale Hanford assessments.

Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

HANFORD SITE LOW EXPOSURE PIPELINE REPAIR USING A NON-METALLIC COMPOSITE SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Hanford site in eastern Washington, a 350 mm (14 inch) diameter high density polyethylene (HDPE) pump recirculation pipeline failed at a bonded joint adjacent to a radiologically and chemically contaminated groundwater storage basin. The responsible DOE-RL contractor, CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company, applied a fiberglass reinforced plastic (composite) field repair system to the failed joint. The system was devised specifically for the HDPE pipe repair at the Hanford site, and had not been used on this type of plastic piping previously. This paper introduces the pipe failure scenario, describes the options considered for repair and discusses the ultimate resolution of the problem. The failed pipeline was successfully returned to service with minimal impact on waste water treatment plant operating capacity. Additionally, radiological and chemical exposures to facility personnel were maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The repair is considered a success for the near term, and future monitoring will prove whether the repair can be considered for long term service and as a viable alternative for similar piping failures at the Hanford site.

HUTH RJ

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2003 March 10, 2003 EIS-0330: Record of Decision Wallula-McNary Transmission Line Project and Wallula Power Project March 7, 2003 EA-1454: Finding of No Significant Impact Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and 100-N Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington March 6, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-128: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 3, 2003 EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington March 3, 2003 EIS-0286: Revised Draft Environmental Import Statement Richland Operations Office, Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington March 3, 2003 EA-1454: Final Environmental Assessment Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and

319

History of the Hanford Site: 1943-1990  

SciTech Connect

This booklet was developed to highlight the national and international historical events that occurred in association with the development of the Hanford Site. The purpose of the booklet is to increase the awareness Hanford Site employees have of the historical significance of the Site's contributions and missions during the Manhattan Project (1943-1946) and Cold War era (1946-1990). By increasing knowledge and understanding of the Site's unique heritage, it is hoped this publication will help generate an appreciation of the Site's historic buildings and structures, and, thus, instill a sense of ''ownership'' in these buildings. One cannot appreciate the historic significance of a place or building without first knowing its story.

D.W. Harvey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

History of the Hanford Site: 1943-1990  

SciTech Connect

This booklet was developed to highlight the national and international historical events that occurred in association with the development of the Hanford Site. The purpose of the booklet is to increase the awareness Hanford Site employees have of the historical significance of the Site's contributions and missions during the Manhattan Project (1943-1946) and Cold War era (1946-1990). By increasing knowledge and understanding of the Site's unique heritage, it is hoped this publication will help generate an appreciation of the Site's historic buildings and structures, and, thus, instill a sense of ''ownership'' in these buildings. One cannot appreciate the historic significance of a place or building without first knowing its story.

D.W. Harvey

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Conceptual design analyses for Hanford Site deployable remote spectroscopy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies potential remote, NIR spectroscopic waste surface moisture monitoring system design alternatives to be operated inside one of the Hanford Site, high level, nuclear waste storage tanks. Potential tank waste moisture data impacts from the remote NIR signal transfer through high humidity vapor space is evaluated.

Philipp, B.L.; Reich, F.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Designation of facility usage categories for Hanford Site facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Hanford Site methodology used to ensure facility compliance with the natural phenomena design criteria set forth in the US Department of Energy Orders and guidance. The current Hanford Site methodology for Usage Category designation is based on an engineered feature's safety function and on the feature's assigned Safety Class. At the Hanford Site, Safety Class assignments are deterministic in nature and are based on teh consequences of failure, without regard to the likelihood of occurrence. The report also proposes a risk-based approach to Usage Category designation, which is being considered for future application at the Hanford Site. To establish a proper Usage Category designation, the safety analysis and engineering design processes must be coupled. This union produces a common understanding of the safety function(s) to be accomplished by the design feature(s) and a sound basis for the assignment of Usage Categories to the appropriate systems, structures, and components. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Woodrich, D.D.; Ellingson, D.R.; Scott, M.A.; Schade, A.R.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 1

324

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 1

325

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in I998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR SI), Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, Radiation Protection--Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H; require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv), which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.5 E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent ofthe 10 mrem/yr standard.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements regarding significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the eighteen revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the nineteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. Two chapters are included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6), numbered to correspond to chapters typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. When possible, subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, for the 100, 200, 300 and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 can be adapted and supplemented with specific information covering statutory and regulatory requirements for use in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should consult Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional direction and guidance on the preparation of DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Individuals seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Hanford Site contractors with the best available information through May 2007. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. For this 2007 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology – Seismicity section only Hydrology – Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology – Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Thorne, Paul D.

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

327

EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, 9: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, are jointly preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest Service. BPA's Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0425) addressed the overall coho restoration program, with 11 acclimation sites. Some of these sites proved infeasible, so the Yakama Nation is proposing a new site at Eightmile Ranch. Young coho would be held

328

The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site - 14189  

SciTech Connect

Hanford?s Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office?s (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area―the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another ?first,? the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford?s LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM?s Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program?s records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford?s LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site - 14189  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford?s Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office?s (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area?the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another ?first,? the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford?s LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM?s Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program?s records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford?s LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

330

Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

ROKKAN, D.J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

1993 report on Hanford Site land disposal restrictions for mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1940s, the contractors at the Hanford Site have been involved in the production and purification of nuclear defense materials. These production activities have resulted in the generation of large quantities of liquid and solid radioactive mixed waste (RMW). This waste is subject to regulation under authority of both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976{sup 2}(RCRA) and Atomic Energy Act{sup 3}. This report covers mixed waste only. Hazardous waste that is not contaminated with radionuclides is not addressed in this report. The Washington State Department of Ecology, US Environmental Protection Agency, and US Department of Energy have entered into an agreement, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order{sup 1} (commonly referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement) to bring the Hanford Site operations into compliance with dangerous waste regulations. The Tri-Party Agreement required development of the original land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan and its annual updates to comply with LDR requirements for RMW. This report is the third update of the plan first issued in 1990. The Tri-Party Agreement requires, and the baseline plan and annual update reports provide, the information that follows: Waste characterization information; storage data; treatment information; waste reduction information; schedule; and progress.

Black, D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items. The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items. Columbia Basin News ran a photo of President Dwight Eisenhower waving at the dedication of nearby McNary Dam in 1954. Columbia Basin News ran a photo of President Dwight Eisenhower waving at the dedication of nearby McNary Dam in 1954. The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items.

335

Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site Coffee Can Time Capsule Found at Hanford Site April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items. The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items. Columbia Basin News ran a photo of President Dwight Eisenhower waving at the dedication of nearby McNary Dam in 1954. Columbia Basin News ran a photo of President Dwight Eisenhower waving at the dedication of nearby McNary Dam in 1954. The time capsule and its contents will be brought before a DOE Hanford artifact committee that determines what to do with historic Hanford items.

336

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K1) K1) Document Number: RPP-50002 Vdo(2) Revision Number: 0 (3) Effective Date: 06/20/2011 ()Document Type: E Digital Image E] Hard copy (a) Number of pages (including the DRIF) or 17 Z PDFVideonumber of digital images (5) Release Type Z New El Cancel Ifl Page Change E] Complete Revision (6) Document Title: Meeting Minutes Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment Ecological Risk Working Session held at Washington State Department of Ecology Offices 3100 Port of Benton Boulevard Richland, WA 99352 on May 17 through May 18, 2011 (7) Change/Release Initial release Description: (8) Change Justification: N/A (9) Associated Structure, (a) Structure Location: (c) Building Number: (a) Project Number: System, andN/NANA Component (SSC) and N/I/ / Building Number: (b) System Designator: (d) Equipment ID Number (EIN):

337

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RPP-48144, Rev. 0 RPP-48144, Rev. 0 Page 1 of 15 Meeting Minutes Waste Management Area C Performance Assessment Exposure Scenarios Working Session held at Washington State Department of Ecology Offices 3100 Port of Benton Boulevard Richland, WA 99352 on September 28 through September 30, 2010 LIST OF TERMS Abbreviations and Acronyms CA Composite Analysis CEES Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc. CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (Public Law 111-88, 123 Stat. 2924, 42 USC 9607 et seq.) CHPRC CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CRESP Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation CTUIR Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation DOE U.S. Department of Energy DOE-EM U.S. Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management

338

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DOE Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County DOE Awards Hanford Site Law Enforcement Contract to Benton County December 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Salony, DOE 509-376-0402, Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a contract to the Benton County Sheriff's Office in Kennewick, Wash., to provide law enforcement services at the DOE Hanford Site. The contract has a five-year period of performance, consisting of a one-year base period, with four one-year option periods and an approximate total value of $5 million. As the law enforcement contractor, the sheriff's office will: Ensure site employees obey traffic laws Investigate suspected or reported violations of law Apprehend and arrest those suspected of committing violations of law

340

Human factors in environmental management: New directions from the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental management is the general term given to modern attempts to seek technological solutions to certain constrained environmental problems. it involves developing and applying new technologies that respond to changes in environmental policy. It does not eliminate the need for environmental ethics'' in society. Nor does it substitute for the fundamental changes in political and social structures that are needed for dealing with large-scale environmental issues. The scope of these issues can be illustrated by looking at the Hanford Site. Since 1943, the 560-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state has been the production source of much of the nuclear weapons-grade radioactive materials for the United States. The legacy of 50 years of producing fissile materials has been an environmental cleanup problem of impressive proportions. In 1989, with the Cold War winding down, Secretary of Energy James Watkins established a new vision for Hanford as the flagship for waste management research.'' As plans and preparations for cleanup work proceed at the Hanford Site and around the world, the need for well-orchestrated environmental management methodologies has become increasingly apparent. In 1990, a Human Factors Engineering Group was established in the Technology Planning and Analysis Center at PNL to provide appropriate support for the Laboratory's research efforts. At an ever-increasing rate, these research efforts require integrating human performance into complex environmental technology systems. The endeavor of responding to the Laboratory's research needs has provided innovative opportunities for the application of the concept of Human Factors. Discussed are some of the major applications of Human Factors to environmental management.

Wise, J.A.; Savage, S.F.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations originated on the Hanford Site between 1961 and 1972  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has declared that all Hanford plutonium production- and operations-related information generated between 1944 and 1972 is declassified. Any documents found and deemed useful for meeting Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) objectives may be declassified with or without deletions in accordance with DOE guidance by Authorized Derivative Declassifiers. The September 1992, letter report, Declassifications Requested by the Technical Steering Panel of Hanford Documents Produced 1944--1960, (PNWD-2024 HEDR UC-707), provides an important milestone toward achieving a complete listing of documents that may be useful to the HEDR Project. The attached listing of approximately 7,000 currently classified Hanford-originated documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations between 1961 and 1972 fulfills TSP Directive 89-3. This list does not include such titles as the Irradiation Processing Department, Chemical Processing Department, and Hanford Laboratory Operations monthly reports generated after 1960 which have been previously declassified with minor deletions and made publicly available. Also Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) Document Control determined that no KEH documents generated between January 1, 1961 and December 31, 1972 are currently classified. Titles which address work for others have not been included because Hanford Site contractors currently having custodial responsibility for these documents do not have the authority to determine whether other than their own staff have on file an appropriate need-to-know. Furthermore, these documents do not normally contain information relative to Hanford Site operations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

345

Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.  

SciTech Connect

During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Configuration management program plan for Hanford site systems engineering  

SciTech Connect

This plan establishes the integrated configuration management program for the evolving technical baseline developed through the systems engineering process. This configuration management program aligns with the criteria identified in the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-1073-93. Included are specific requirements for control of the systems engineering RDD-100 database, and electronic data incorporated in the database that establishes the Hanford site technical baseline.

Hoffman, A.G.

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W. [eds.] [eds.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site May 29, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has been selected as the tank operations contractor to store, retrieve and treat Hanford tank waste and close the tank farms at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $7.1 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with options to extend it for up to five years). WRPS is a limited liability company comprised of Washington Group

349

DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site DOE Selects Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC for Tank Operations Contract at Hanford Site May 29, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), LLC has been selected as the tank operations contractor to store, retrieve and treat Hanford tank waste and close the tank farms at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $7.1 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with options to extend it for up to five years). WRPS is a limited liability company comprised of Washington Group

350

Plutonium and tritium produced in the Hanford Site production reactors  

SciTech Connect

In a news release on December 7, 1993, the Secretary of Energy announced declassification action that included totals for plutonium and tritium production in the Hanford Site production reactors. This information was reported as being preliminary because it was not fully supported by documentation. Subsequently, production data were made available from the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) records that indicated an increase of about one and one-half metric tons in total plutonium production. The Westinghouse Hanford Company was tasked by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office to substantiate production figures and DOE-HQ data and to provide a defensible report of weapons- (6 wt% {sup 240}Pu) and nonweapons- (fuels-)grade (nominally 9 wt% or higher {sup 240}Pu) plutonium and tritium production in the Hanford Site production reactors. The task was divided into three parts. The first part was to determine plutonium and tritium production based on available reported accountability records. The second part was to determine plutonium production independently by calculational checks based on reactor thermal power generation and plutonium conversion factors representing the various reactor fuels. The third part was to resolve differences, if they occurred, in the reported and calculational results. In summary, the DOE-HQ-reported accountability records of plutonium and tritium production were determined to be the most defensible record of Hanford Site reactor production. The DOE-HQ records were consistently supported by the independent calculational checks and the records of operational data. Total production quantities are 67.4 MT total plutonium, which includes 12.9 MT of nonweapons-grade plutonium. The total tritium production was 10.6 kg.

Roblyer, S.P.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

352

DOE/EA-1660: Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Land's Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, WA (07/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 July 2009 DOE/EA-1660F Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final Environmental Assessment July 2009 Sum-1 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. Purpose and Need. To meet long-term federal agency missions, DOE needs to reduce indirect costs and

353

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 26, 2011 July 26, 2011 Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. July 25, 2011 CX-006290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cardwell-Cowlitz 2011 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/25/2011 Location(s): Cowlitz County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2011 CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington

354

1997 evaluation of tritium removal and mitigation technologies for Hanford Site wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a biennial assessment of tritium separation technology and tritium nitration techniques for control of tritium bearing wastewaters at the Hanford Site. Tritium in wastewaters at Hanford have resulted from plutonium production, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling operations since 1944. this assessment was conducted in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Jeppson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Duncan, J.B.; Flyckt, D.L.; Mohondro, P.C.; Sinton, G.L.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hanford - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

356

Distribution of microbial biomass and the potential for anaerobic respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area subsurface sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52 m deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9-17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold Formation (17.7-18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold Formation (18.3-52m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid) ranged from 7-974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase had an abundance of 5-17% relative to total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum sp.. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Peacock, Aaron D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

358

Investigation of anatomical anomalies in Hanford Site mule deer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), common residents of the Hanford Site, are an important part of the shrub-steppe ecosystem as well as being valued for aesthetics and hunting. Because mule deer have been protected from hunting on the Site for 50 years, the herd has developed unique population characteristics, including a large number of old animals and males with either large or atypically developed antlers, in contrast to other herds in the semi-arid regions of the Northwest. Hanford Site mule deer have been studied since 1991 because of the herd`s unique nature and high degree of public interest. A special study of the mule deer herd was initiated in 1993 after observations were made of a relatively large number of male deer with atypical, velvet-covered antlers. This report specifically describes our analyses of adult male deer found on the Site with atypical antlers. The report includes estimates of population densities and composition; home ranges, habitat uses, and dietary habits; natural and human-induced causes of mortality; and the herd`s overall health and reproductive status.

Tiller, B.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Poston, T.M. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effects of the Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previous assessment of the effects of a Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site made in 1967 was updated so that the potential adverse effects may be better understood in light of existing operations, current environmental and safety standards, and proposed facilities and operations. The major effects would probably arise from flooding of portions of the site by the reservoir associated with the dam and by the raising of the ground water table under the site. A preliminary analysis of the effects of the dam is presented, and a number of studies are recommended in order to fully evaluate and understand these potential impacts. The following seven tasks are identified and discussed: groundwater - hydrology analysis; soil liquefaction analysis; hydrostatic uplift and soil effects on structures; assessment of the potential for landsliding and sloughing; facility decommissioning; hydrothermal analysis; and, meteorological effects. Four other aspects commented upon in this report are: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, socioeconomic effects, and public interaction. Possible effects on ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D are also noted. To the extent possible, cost estimates are developed for corrective actions which must be taken on the Hanford Site to accommodate the dam. Where this was not possible, appropriate courses of action leading to cost estimates are presented.

Harty, H.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Identification of radionuclides of concern in Hanford Site environmental cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to consider which radionuclides should be included in conducting environmental surveys relative to site remediation at Hanford. During the operation of the Hanford site, the fission product radionuclides and a large number of activation products including the transuranic radionuclides were formed. The reactor operations and subsequent chemical processing and metallurgical operations resulted in the environmental release of gaseous and liquid effluents containing some radionuclides; however, the majority of the radionuclides were stored in waste tanks or disposed to trenches and cribs. Since some contamination of both soils and subsurface waters occurred, one must decide which radionuclides still remain in sufficient amounts to be of concern at the time when site remediation is to be complete. Many of the radionuclides which have constituted the principal hazard during site operation have half-lives on the order of a year or less; therefore, they will have decayed to insignificant amounts by the year 2030, a possible date for completion of the remediation process.

Perkins, R.W.; Jenquin, U.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT FOR THE RETRIEVAL & STABILIZATION & ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE SLUDGE AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This poster presentation describes and illustrates some of the equipment and tools that Fluor Hanford and BNG America have developed and designed to remove, transport, stabilize and encapsulate radioactive sludge from the K Basins at the Hanford nuclear site in Washington State, U.S.A. K Basins were built in the early 1950s to temporarily store irradiated nuclear fuel prior to chemical processing to remove plutonium for nuclear weapons. The sludge is the result of corrosion of these fuel elements and its removal is the final stage before the basin water can be drained and the basins decommissioned. The sludge is hydrogen-generating because of its uranium metal content and account has to be taken also of its heat generating capacity and criticality potential as it is moved from one containment to another. The paper describes all stages of sludge treatment from the use of vacuum wands to suck up the sludge, through consolidating the sludge in temporary underwater containers, transporting it though flexible, temporary pipe systems, acceleration of the corrosion of uranium to reduce hydrogen generation, measuring the fissile content and finally encapsulation in a cement grout. Emphasis is placed on the use of existing, transportable and temporary equipment. This not only saves initial costs but it also reduces the total amount of equipment needed to be disposed of as radioactive waste at the end of the job. The processes, equipment and tools described potentially have a broad applicability to nuclear site decommissioning and cleanup worldwide.

ROOSENDAAL, G.D.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

362

Radiological status of the ground water beneath the Hanford Site, January-December 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1981, 299 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radionuclide chemical contaminants. This report is one of a series prepared annually to document and evaluate the status of ground water at the Hanford Site. Two substances, tritium and nonradioactive nitrate, are easily transported in ground water; therefore, these substances are used as primary tracers to monitor the movement of contaminated ground water. Data collected during 1981 describe the movement of tritium and the nonradioactive nitrate plumes as well as their response to the influences of ground-water flow, ionic dispersion, and radioactive decay. The gross beta (/sup 106/Ru) levels have become so low that it will no longer be considered a major radionuclide contaminant. The tritium plume continues to show increasing concentrations near the Columbia River. While it is mapped as having reached the Columbia River, its contribution to the river has not been distinguished from other sources at this time. This plume shows much the same configuration as in 1977, 1978, 1979, and 1980. The size of the nitrate plume appears stable. Concentrations of nitrate in the vicinity of the 100-H Area continue to be high as a result of past leaks from the evaporation facility. The overall quality of the ground water at the Hanford Site is generally comparable to that of other ground waters in eastern Washington. Any exceptions to this statement will be noted in this report.

Eddy, P.A.; Cline, C.S.; Prater, L.S.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Radionuclide air emissions report for the Hanford site calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1995, and the resulting effective dose equivalent (FDE) to the maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the `MEI.` The report has been prepared and will be submitted in accordance with reporting requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, `National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants,` Subpart H, `National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities.` This report has also been prepared for and will be submitted in accordance with the reporting requirements of the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246-247, `Radiation Protection-Air Emissions.`

Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

Registration Starts Soon for 2013 Hanford Site Public Tours | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration Starts Soon for 2013 Hanford Site Public Tours Registration Starts Soon for 2013 Hanford Site Public Tours Registration Starts Soon for 2013 Hanford Site Public Tours February 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will open online registration on March 4 at 6 p.m. for tours of the Hanford Site in 2013. This driving tour of the site includes stops at the B Reactor National Historic Landmark, Cold Test Facility, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility and the Plutonium Finishing Plant. All tour slots are filled on a first-come first served basis through the online registration system found on the Hanford website http://www5.hanford.gov/publictours/. Tour participants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age.

366

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manager E-mail: Susan_C_Johnson@orp.doe.gov Web Site: www.hanford.gov/orp Janice Bartram Small Business

367

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

general goals. CHPRC is the prime contractor for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site, including remediation of the Central Plateau and groundwater across the...

368

Colloid and Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport at the Semi-Arid Hanford Site .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Considerable amount of radioactive waste has been released to vadose zone sediments at the Hanford site. Colloids can facilitate the movement of radionuclides through the… (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Infrastructure Improvements at the Hanford Site, OAS-B-03-03...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site was established in 1943 to support the production of plutonium for the Manhattan Project. Occupying about 560 square miles along the Columbia River in...

370

Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Follow-up Review of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program February 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

371

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington September 15, 1999 EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility September 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 16, 1999 EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site

372

1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. A number of DOE sites participate in the Epidemiologic Surveillance Program. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Hanford Site from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at Hanford and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The information in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site, and the appendices provides additional detail. The report also contains an expanded Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories which gives examples of health conditions in each of the diagnostic categories.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

Good, D.E.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Hanford Site, March 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy March 2002 ISM OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 1 2.0 STATUS AND RESULTS ...................................................................................... 3 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ...................................................................................................... 7 4.0 RATINGS ................................................................................................................... 9 APPENDIX A - SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ....................................... 10 APPENDIX B - SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS .......................................................

375

Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2009 information is included where appropriate.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights significant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2010 information is included where appropriate.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

This summary booklet summarizes the "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007." The Hanford Site environmental report, published annually since 1958, includes information and summary data that provide an overview of activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site environmental report provides an overview of activities at the site; demonstrates the status of the site’s compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies and directives; and summarizes environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The report also highlights signifi cant environmental and public protection programs and efforts. Some historical and early 2008 information is included where appropriate.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as patt of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification. with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single­ shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: · 1) DST space utilization, optimization, and closure 2) Waste Feed Qualification 3) Cementitious Waste Forms Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be used to meet current challenges and to minimize the impact of future challenges. This paper provides an overview of the exchanges held, but predominately focuses on the team development and actions leading from the workshops.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 26, 1997 February 26, 1997 EIS-0189: Record of Decision Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, WA December 1, 1996 EA-1111: Final Environmental Assessment K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants August 1, 1996 EIS-0189: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 1, 1996 EIS-0244: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Cruiser, Ohio Class, Los Angeles and Class Naval Reactor Plants April 1, 1996 EIS-0259: Final Environmental Impact Statement

380

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2011 0, 2011 CX-006068: Categorical Exclusion Determination Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office June 14, 2011 Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size swimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition. June 14, 2011 CX-006253: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Bonneville-Ross #1 230-Kilovolt, North Bonneville-Troutdale #2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hanford site washington" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

National Environmental Policy Act source guide for the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Source Guide will assist those working with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 to become more familiar with the environmental assessments (EA) and environmental impact statements (EIS) that apply to specific activities and facilities on the Hanford Site. This document should help answer questions concerning NEPA coverage, history, processes, and the status of many of the buildings and units on and related to the Hanford Site. This document summarizes relevant EAs and EISs by briefly outlining the proposed action of each document and the decision made by the US Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The summary includes the proposed action alternatives and current status of the proposed action. If a decision officially was stated by the DOE, as in a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) or a record of decision (ROD), and the decision was located, a summary is provided. Not all federal decisions, such as FONSIs and RODS, can be found in the Federal Register (FR). For example, although significant large-action FONSIs can be found in the FR, some low-interest FONSIs might have been published elsewhere (i.e., local newspapers).

Jansky, M.T.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Resolution of the Hanford site ferrocyanide safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site was officially resolved in December 1996. This paper summarizes the key activities that led to final resolution of this safety hazard, a process that began in 1990 after it and other safety concerns were identified for the underground high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. At the time little was known about ferrocyanide-nitrate/nitrite reactions and their potential to cause offsite releases of radioactivity. The ferrocyanide hazard was a perceived problem, but it took six years of intense studies and analyses of tank samples to prove that the problem no longer exists. The issue revolved around the fact that ferrocyanide and nitrate mixtures can be made to explode violently if concentrated, dry, and heated to temperatures of at least 250 {degrees}C. The studies conducted over the last six years have shown that the combined effects of temperature, radiation, and pH during 40 or more years of storage have destroyed almost all of the ferrocyanide originally added to tanks. This was shown in laboratory experiments using simulant wastes and confirmed by actual samples taken from the ferrocyanide tanks. The tank waste sludges are now too dilute to support a sustained exothermic reaction, even if dried out and heated to high temperatures. 2 tabs., 18 refs.

Cash, R.J.; Lilga, M.A.; Babad, H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

383

Resolving the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable data have been obtained on the chemical and physical properties of ferrocyanide waste stored in Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). Theoretical analyses and ferrocyanide waste simulant studies have led to the development of fuel, moisture, and temperature criteria that define continued safe storage. Developing the criteria provides the technical basis for closing the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). Using the safety criteria, the ferrocyanide tanks have been ranked into one of three safety categories: Safe, Conditionally Safe, and Unsafe. All the ferrocyanide tanks are currently ranked in either the Safe or Conditionally Safe categories. Analyses of core samples taken from three ferrocyanide tanks have shown cyanide concentrations about a factor of ten lower than predicted by the original flowsheets. Hydrolytic and radiolytic destruction (aging) of the ferrocyanide matrix has occurred during the 35 plus years the waste has been stored at the Hanford Site. Because of waste aging, it is possible that all of the ferrocyanide tanks may now contain less than the 8 wt % sodium nickel ferrocyanide specified in the fuel criterion for the Safe category. Ferrocyanide tanks that remain in the Conditionally Safe category may require monitoring and surveillance to verify that the waste remains in an unreactive state. Further characterization of the tanks by core sampling and analyses should lead to resolution of the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue by September 1997.

Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Babad, H.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HANFORD SITE PURSUANT TO THE NUCLEAR WASTE POLICY ACT OF 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step-by-step process by which the President, Congress, affected individual states and Indian tribes, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and other Federal agencies can work together in the siting, construction, and operation of a high-level nuclear waste repository. The DOE is required by Section 116(a) of the Act to identify states having potentially acceptable sites for a waste repository. A potentially acceptable site is defined by the Act as...any site at which, after geologic studies and field mapping but before detailed geologic data gathering, the Department undertakes preliminary drilling and geophysical testing for the definition of the site location. " By letter dated February 2, 1983, the Secretary of the DOE notified the Governor and Legislature of the State of Washington that the Hanford Site, near

Public Law; Public Law; Ooe-richland Wa Foreword

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

1997 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The baseline land disposal restrictions (LDR) plan was prepared in 1990 in accordance with the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (commonly referred to as the Tn-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-00 (Ecology et al, 1989). The text of this milestone is below. ''LDR requirements include limitations on storage of specified hazardous wastes (including mixed wastes). In accordance with approved plans and schedules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shall develop and implement technologies necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements for mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. LDR plans and schedules shall be developed with consideration of other action plan milestones and will not become effective until approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (or Washington State Department of Ecology [Ecology]) upon authorization to administer LDRs pursuant to Section 3006 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). Disposal of LDR wastes at any time is prohibited except in accordance with applicable LDR requirements for nonradioactive wastes at all times. The plan will include, but not be limited to, the following: Waste characterization plan; Storage report; Treatment report; Treatment plan; Waste minimization plan; A schedule depicting the events necessary to achieve full compliance with LDR requirements; and A process for establishing interim milestones.

Black, D.G.

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, November 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

387

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 2

388

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, November 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

389

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

390

Audit of the Use of Hanford Site Railroad System, WR-B-97-04...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Railroad System, WR-B-97-04 Audit of the Use of Hanford Site Railroad System, WR-B-97-04 Audit of the Use of Hanford Site Railroad System, WR-B-97-04 More Documents & Publications...

391

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality, March 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality May 2011 March 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope .................................................................................................................................................... 1

392

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 25, 2010 January 25, 2010 EIS-0391: Updated Notice of Public Hearings Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA January 13, 2010 CX-000471: Categorical Exclusion Determination Limited Prescribed Burning on the Hanford Site During October, November, and December of 2010 to Maintain Critical Fire Breaks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/13/2010 Location(s): Benton County, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office January 8, 2010 EIS-0391: Notice of Public Hearings Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA January 1, 2010 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan December 18, 2009 EIS-0391: Notice of Modification of Preferred Alternatives

393

Hanford Site Rare Plant Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Two patches of Columbian yellowcress on the Hanford Reach were visited in both 2011 and 2012 to compare ramet counts between years: near Allerd Pumphouse (Rkm 615.4) and near White Bluffs Boat Launch (Rkm 593.3) (Figure 3). In 2012, the population near Allerd Pumphouse had 45 ramets present within a 5x3 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 60 ramets. In 2012, the population near White Bluffs Boat Launch had 105 ramets in a 2x2 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 100 ramets. This data shows that while annual variability does exist, ramet counts were relatively similar from 2011 to 2012. This is likely due to the similar flow regimes of 2011 and 2012, which both had above average snowpack, high flows, and extended spring flooding seasons. A total of 19.6 miles (31.5 km) of the Hanford shoreline were surveyed in 2012, with ten patches identified and approximately 1,250 ramets counted. It is not known how many individual plants this count represents due to the rhizomatous nature of the species. Two of these sites were identified previously in the WNHP database, and the remaining eight were newly identified locations. Eleven of the ramets had flowers and/or buds in the patches located during 2012, but no fruits were found

Salstrom, D; Easterly, R; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Legend and legacy: Fifty years of defense production at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Today, the Hanford Site is engaged in the largest waste cleanup effort ever undertaken in human history. That in itself makes the endeavor historic and unique. The Hanford Site has been designated the ``flagship`` of Department of Energy (DOE) waste remediation endeavors. And, just as the wartime Hanford Project remains unmatched in history, no counterpart exists for the current waste cleanup enterprise. This report provides a summary of the extensive historical record, however, which does give a partial road map. The science of environmental monitoring pioneered at the Hanford Site, and records of this type are the most complete of any in the world, from private companies or public agencies, for the early years of Site operations. The Hanford Site was unique for establishing a detailed, scientific, and multi-faceted environmental monitoring program.

Gerber, M.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hanford's Robust Safety Culture Gains One More Site-Wide Safety Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robust Safety Culture Gains One More Site-Wide Safety Robust Safety Culture Gains One More Site-Wide Safety Standard Hanford's Robust Safety Culture Gains One More Site-Wide Safety Standard August 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Michael Turner, MSA Michael_J_Turner@rl.gov 509-376-2872 Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 RICHLAND, Wash. - The safety of the Hanford Site workforce has been bolstered with another program added to the list of Site-wide Safety Standards. The latest Site-wide Safety Standard covers Fall Protection. The innovative Hanford Site-wide Safety Standards program combines the once diverse programs of the various site contractors, and streamlines them into a single safety program. Designed to improve the safety of Hanford's mobile workforce, the Site-wide Safety Standards effort has incorporated the best practices from

396

Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C  

SciTech Connect

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

CURN, B.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mitigation of the most hazardous tank at the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various tanks at the Hanford Site have been declared to be unresolved safety problems. This means that the tank has the potential to be beyond the limits covered by the current safety documentation. Tank 241-SY-101 poses the greatest hazard. The waste stored in this tank has periodically released hydrogen gas which exceeds the lower flammable limits. A mixer pump was installed in this tank to stir the waste. Stirring the waste would allow the hydrogen to be released slowly in a controlled manner and mitigate the hazard associated with this tank. The testing of this mixer pump is reported in this document. The mixer pump has been successful in controlling the hydrogen concentration in the tank dome to below the flammable limit which has mitigated the hazardous gas releases.

Reynolds, D.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Approach for tank safety characterization of Hanford site waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall approach and associated technical basis for characterizing Hanford Site waste to help identify and resolve Waste Tank Safety Program safety issues has been summarized. The safety issues include flammable gas, noxious vapors, organic solvents, condensed-phase exothermic reactions (ferrocyanide and organic complexants), criticality, high heat, and safety screening. For the safety issues involving chemical reactions (i.e., flammable gas, organic solvents, ferrocyanide, and organic complexants), the approach to safety characterization is based on the fact that rapid exothermic reactions cannot occur if either fuel, oxidizer, or temperature (initiators) is not sufficient or controlled. The approach to characterization has been influenced by the progress made since mid-1993: (1) completion of safety analyses on ferrocyanide, criticality, organic solvent in tank 241-C-103, and sludge dryout. (2) successful mitigation of tank 241-SY-101; (3) demonstration of waste aging in laboratory experiments and from waste sampling, and (4) increased understanding of the information that can be obtained from headspace sampling. Headspace vapor sampling is being used to confirm that flammable gas does not accumulate in the single-shell tanks, and to determine whether organic solvents are present. The headspaces of tanks that may contain significant quantities of flammable gas will be monitored continuously using standard hydrogen monitors. For the noxious vapors safety issue, characterization will consist of headspace vapor sampling of most of the Hanford Site waste tanks. Sampling specifically for criticality is not required to confirm interim safe storage; however, analyses for fissile material will be conducted as waste samples are obtained for other reasons. High-heat tanks will be identified through temperature monitoring coupled with thermal analyses.

Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Eberlein, S.J.; Hamilton, D.W.; Johnson, G.D.; Osborne, J.W.; Payne, M.A.; Sherwood, D.J. [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Washington , DC 20585 September 20, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF CONTRACTING ACTIVITY AND PROCUREMENT DIRECTORS FROM : SUBJECT: PAULBOSCO~~ - SENIOR PROCUhM~ OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOSEPH F. WADDELL SENIOR PROCUREMENT NNSA OFFICE OF ACQ SITION MANAGEMENT Acquisition Savings Reporting Template Guidance The Department is continuing to make progress in its efforts to support the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Acquisition Savings Initiative, as well as the Department's Strategic Sourcing Program. After using our current reporting template for the past year, it was a good time to review the process and make adjustments where necessary. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has also noted in an audit that

400

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 22, 2011 CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 18, 2011 EA-1728: Draft Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

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401

First Chapter of Hanford Story Released | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter of Hanford Story Released Chapter of Hanford Story Released First Chapter of Hanford Story Released April 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoff_Tyree@rl.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the first chapter of "The Hanford Story" to the public. The Hanford Story is a multimedia presentation that provides an overview of the Hanford Site-its history, today's cleanup activities, and a glimpse into the possibilities of future uses of the 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. The 17-minute video has been posted to the site's YouTube Channel on www.youtube.com/hanfordsite, as well as the Department of Energy's Hanford website on www.hanford.gov. The Hanford Story will be delivered in a series of video-based chapters

402

C^ DECOMMISSIONING OF EIGHT SURPLUS PRODUCTION REACTORS AT THE HANFORD SITE,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To request copies of the draft environmental impact statement, contact Ms. WheeLess at the above address. e.`? ABSTRACT: The purpose of this Draft Envirormental Impact Statement ( DEIS) is to provide environmental information to assist the U.S. Department of Energy ( DOE) in the selection of a decomaissioning alternative for the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Five alternatives are considered in this DEIS: 1) No Action, in which the reactors are left in place and the present maintenance and surveillance programs are continued; 2) Immediate One-Piece Removal, in which the reactor buildings are demolished and the reactor blocks are transported in one piece on a tractor-transporter across the Site along a predetermined route to an onsite low-Level ^* ( waste burial area; 3) Safe Storage Followed by Deferred One-Piece Removal, in which the reactors are temporarily stored in a safe, secure status for 75 years, after which the reactor buildings are demolished and the reactor blocks are transported in one piece on a tractor-transporter across the Site along a predetermined route to an onsite low-LeveL waste-buriat area; 4) Safe Storage Followed by Deferred Dismantlement, in which the reactors are temporarily stored in a safe, secure status for

Karen J. Wheeless

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

Sarah Roberts

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure on the already limited (and declining) arable land base. In addition there will be pressure to produce crops that can help reduce the world's dependence on petroleum and be used for chemical plant feedstock. These external, formidable pressures will necessitate increasing investments in irrigation infi-a-structures in many areas of the world to increase productivity. Intensive greenhouse culture and aqua-culture also will be greatly expanded. There will be large economic and social pressures to expand production in areas such as the Pacific Northwest. Agricultural exports will continue to be important The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Both of these are potentially highly productive area: for producing food and export capital. The environmental concerns will be large however, the favorable growing conditions, high-quality (low-salinity) abundant water supplies and minimal problems with salivation of soils make the Pacific Northwest a very desirable region for economically sustainable expansion from a world perspective.

RG Evans; MJ Hattendorf; CT Kincaid

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

1996 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-26-OIF. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal-restricted mixed waste management at the Hanford Site.

Black, D.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

408

Hanford Site cleanup and transition: Risk data needs for decision making (Hanford risk data gap analysis decision guide)  

SciTech Connect

Given the broad array of environmental problems, technical alternatives, and outcomes desired by different stakeholders at Hanford, DOE will have to make difficult resource allocations over the next few decades. Although some of these allocations will be driven purely by legal requirements, almost all of the major objectives of the cleanup and economic transition missions involve choices among alternative pathways. This study examined the following questions: what risk information is needed to make good decisions at Hanford; how do those data needs compare to the set(s) of risk data that will be generated by regulatory compliance activities and various non-compliance studies that are also concerned with risk? This analysis examined the Hanford Site missions, the Hanford Strategic Plan, known stakeholder values, and the most important decisions that have to be made at Hanford to determine a minimum domain of risk information required to make good decisions that will withstand legal, political, and technical scrutiny. The primary risk categories include (1) public health, (2) occupational health and safety, (3) ecological integrity, (4) cultural-religious welfare, and (5) socio-economic welfare.

Gajewski, S.; Glantz, C.; Harper, B.; Bilyard, G.; Miller, P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA  

SciTech Connect

Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Embassy of Cuba in Washington, DC: Image, Site, Program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis postulates the design of an official Embassy of Cuba in Washington, DC, following the resumption of diplomatic relations between the two countries. An… (more)

Fishman, Ian C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Retrospective assessment of personnel neutron dosimetry for workers at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to examine the specific issue of the potential for unrecorded neutron dose for Hanford workers, particularly in comparison with the recorded whole body (neutron plus photon) dose. During the past several years, historical personnel dosimetry practices at Hanford have been documented in several technical reports. This documentation provides a detailed history of the technology, radiation fields, and administrative practices used to measure and record dose for Hanford workers. Importantly, documentation has been prepared by personnel whose collective experience spans nearly the entire history of Hanford operations beginning in the mid-1940s. Evaluations of selected Hanford radiation dose records have been conducted along with statistical profiles of the recorded dose data. The history of Hanford personnel dosimetry is complex, spanning substantial evolution in radiation protection technology, concepts, and standards. Epidemiologic assessments of Hanford worker mortality and radiation dose data were initiated in the early 1960s. In recent years, Hanford data have been included in combined analyses of worker cohorts from several Department of Energy (DOE) sites and from several countries through the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Hanford data have also been included in the DOE Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR). In the analysis of Hanford, and other site data, the question of comparability of recorded dose through time and across the respective sites has arisen. DOE formed a dosimetry working group composed of dosimetrists and epidemiologists to evaluate data and documentation requirements of CEDR. This working group included in its recommendations the high priority for documentation of site-specific radiation dosimetry practices used to measure and record worker dose by the respective DOE sites.

Fix, J.J.; Wilson, R.H.; Baumgartner, W.B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z