Sample records for handling test prepared

  1. CARRIER PREPARATION BUILDING MATERIALS HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carrier Preparation Building Materials Handling System receives rail and truck shipping casks from the Carrier/Cask Transport System, and inspects and prepares the shipping casks for return to the Carrier/Cask Transport System. Carrier preparation operations for carriers/casks received at the surface repository include performing a radiation survey of the carrier and cask, removing/retracting the personnel barrier, measuring the cask temperature, removing/retracting the impact limiters, removing the cask tie-downs (if any), and installing the cask trunnions (if any). The shipping operations for carriers/casks leaving the surface repository include removing the cask trunnions (if any), installing the cask tie-downs (if any), installing the impact limiters, performing a radiation survey of the cask, and installing the personnel barrier. There are four parallel carrier/cask preparation lines installed in the Carrier Preparation Building with two preparation bays in each line, each of which can accommodate carrier/cask shipping and receiving. The lines are operated concurrently to handle the waste shipping throughputs and to allow system maintenance operations. One remotely operated overhead bridge crane and one remotely operated manipulator is provided for each pair of carrier/cask preparation lines servicing four preparation bays. Remotely operated support equipment includes a manipulator and tooling and fixtures for removing and installing personnel barriers, impact limiters, cask trunnions, and cask tie-downs. Remote handling equipment is designed to facilitate maintenance, dose reduction, and replacement of interchangeable components where appropriate. Semi-automatic, manual, and backup control methods support normal, abnormal, and recovery operations. Laydown areas and equipment are included as required for transportation system components (e.g., personnel barriers and impact limiters), fixtures, and tooling to support abnormal and recovery operations. The Carrier Preparation Building Materials Handling System interfaces with the Cask/Carrier Transport System to move the carriers to and from the system. The Carrier Preparation Building System houses the equipment and provides the facility, utility, safety, communications, and auxiliary systems supporting operations and protecting personnel.

  2. Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

    1992-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  3. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  4. Method of preparing and handling chopped plant materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bransby, David I. (2668 Wire Rd., Auburn, AL 36832)

    2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The method improves efficiency of harvesting, storage, transport, and feeding of dry plant material to animals, and is a more efficient method for harvesting, handling and transporting dry plant material for industrial purposes, such as for production of bioenergy, and composite panels.

  5. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use.

  6. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  7. Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.R.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin, clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge), remove the contents from the canisters and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. This report describes fuel handling development testing performed from May 1, 1997 through the end of August 1997. Testing during this period was mainly focused on performance of a Schilling Robotic Systems` Conan manipulator used to simulate a custom designed version, labeled Konan, being fabricated for K-Basin deployment. In addition to the manipulator, the camera viewing system, process table layout, and fuel handling processes were evaluated. The Conan test manipulator was installed and fully functional for testing in early 1997. Formal testing began May 1. The purposes of fuel handling development testing were to provide proof of concept and criteria, optimize equipment layout, initialize the process definition, and identify special needs/tools and required design changes to support development of the performance specification. The test program was set up to accomplish these objectives through cold (non-radiological) development testing using simulated and prototype equipment.

  9. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior.

  10. Development of an Outdoor Concentrating Photovoltaic Module Testbed, Module Handling and Testing Procedures, and Initial Energy Production Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the various aspects of setting up a CPV testbed and procedures for handling and testing CPV modules.

  11. The Preparative Gas Chromatographic System of the JET Active Gas Handling System ­ Tritium Commissioning and use during and after DTE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Preparative Gas Chromatographic System of the JET Active Gas Handling System ­ Tritium Commissioning and use during and after DTE1

  12. STATISTICS, HANDLE WITH CARE: DETECTING MULTIPLE MODEL COMPONENTS WITH THE LIKELIHOOD RATIO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    STATISTICS, HANDLE WITH CARE: DETECTING MULTIPLE MODEL COMPONENTS WITH THE LIKELIHOOD RATIO TEST Rostislav Protassov and David A. van Dyk Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street-distributions in many statistical tests common in astrophysics, thereby casting many marginal line or source detections

  13. SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W. Burgess, J. B. Chesser, V. B. Graves, and S.L. Schrock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W remote handling techniques and tools for replacing target system components. During the past year and analytical data. These included a welded-tube heat exchanger, an electromagnetic flow meter, a hydraulically

  14. Survey and conceptual flow sheets for coal conversion plant handling-preparation and ash/slag removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zapp, F.C.; Thomas, O.W.; Silverman, M.D.; Dyslin, D.A.; Holmes, J.M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken at the request of the Fossil Fuel Processing Division of the Department of Energy. The report includes a compilation of conceptual flow sheets, including major equipment lists, and the results of an availability survey of potential suppliers of equipment associated with the coal and ash/slag operations that will be required by future large coal conversion plant complexes. Conversion plant flow sheet operations and related equipment requirements were based on two representative bituminous coals - Pittsburgh and Kentucky No. 9 - and on nine coal conversion processes. It appears that almost all coal handling and preparation and ash/slag removal equipment covered by this survey, with the exception of some coal comminution equipment, either is on hand or can readily be fabricated to meet coal conversion plant capacity requirements of up to 50,000 short tons per day. Equipment capable of handling even larger capacities can be developed. This approach appears to be unjustified, however, because in many cases a reasonable or optimum number of trains of equipment must be considered when designing a conversion plant complex. The actual number of trains of equipment selected will be influenced by the total requied capacity of the complex, the minimum on-line capacity that can be tolerated in case of equipment failure, reliability of specific equipment types, and the number of reactors and related feed injection stations needed for the specific conversion process.

  15. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and handling of natural gas hydrate. GSC Bulletin, 544: 263-naturally occurring gas hydrates: the structures of methaneDOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well:

  16. Five years of tritium handling experience at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.V.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a facility designed to develop and demonstrate, in full scale, technologies necessary for safe and efficient operation of tritium systems required for tokamak fusion reactors. TSTA currently consists of systems for evacuating reactor exhaust gas with compound cryopumps; for removing impurities from plasma exhaust gas and recovering the chemically-combined tritium; for separating the isotopes of hydrogen; for transfer pumping; or storage of hydrogen isotopes; for gas analysis; and for assuring safety by the necessary control, monitoring, and tritium removal from effluent streams. TSTA also has several small scale experiments to develop and test new equipment and processes necessary for fusion reactors. In this paper, data on component reliability, failure types and rates, and waste quantities are presented. TSTA has developed a Quality Assurance program for preparing and controlling the documentation of the procedures required for the design, purchase, and operation of the tritium systems. Operational experience under normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions is presented. One unique aspect of operations at TSTA is that the design personnel for the TSTA systems are also part of the operating personnel. This has allowed for the relatively smooth transition from design to operations. TSTA has been operated initially as a research facility. As the system is better defined, operations are proceeding toward production modes. The DOE requirements for the operation of a tritium facility like TSTA include personnel training, emergency preparedness, radiation protection, safety analysis, and preoperational appraisals. The integration of these requirements into TSTA operations is discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Handling Discontinuous Effects in Modeling Spatial Correlation of Wafer-level Analog/RF Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makris, Yiorgos

    to approximate the original test set or predict pass/fail labels from a reduced or alternate low-cost set approach [2] replaces expensive specification tests by low-cost "alternate tests" specifically designed and failing population of devices in a multi-dimensional space of low-cost measurements. Recently

  18. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Advanced Test Reactor Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum TRA010029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Adams; R. P. Grant; P. R. Smith; J. L. Weisgerber

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of one drum containing contact-handled transuranic (TRU) actinide standards generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for storage and subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for final disposal. The drum (i.e., Integrated Waste Tracking System Bar Code Number TRA010029) is currently stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex. The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and applicable sections of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and disposal of this TRU waste generated from ATR. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for this TRU waste originating from ATR.

  19. Preparation of most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL] [ORNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL] [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress Report...Prepare the most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing. M3FT-14OR0310012

  20. Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

  1. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  2. High Sodium Simulant Testing To Support SB8 Sludge Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J. D.

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

  3. MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION April 13, 2004 Prepared for. Wright Street Littleton, CO 80127 #12;MATERIALS HANDLING AND TRANSPORTATION PLAN CSMRI Site Remediation By: Date: Robert Krumberger Project Manager New Horizons Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By

  4. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  5. Development of an Online Expert Rule Based Automated fault Detection and Diagnostic (AFDD) Tool for Air Handling Units: Beta Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruton, K.; Coakley, D.; O'Donovan, P.; Keane, M.; O'Sullivan, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system energy consumption accounts for an average of 40% of an industrial sites energy consumption. Studies have indicated that 20 - 30% energy savings are achievable by recommissioning Air Handling...

  6. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  7. Project Execution Plan for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny Anderson

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of ongoing cleanup activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is proceeding under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (42 USC 9601 et seq. 1980). INL-generated radioactive waste has been disposed of at RWMC since 1952. The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at RWMC accepted the bulk of INL’s contact and remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) for disposal. Disposal of contact-handled LLW and remote-handled LLW ion-exchange resins from the Advanced Test Reactor in the open pit of the SDA ceased September 30, 2008. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at RWMC will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the SDA (approximately at the end of fiscal year FY 2017). The continuing nuclear mission of INL, associated ongoing and planned operations, and Naval spent fuel activities at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) require continued capability to appropriately dispose of contact and remote handled LLW. A programmatic analysis of disposal alternatives for contact and remote-handled LLW generated at INL was conducted by the INL contractor in Fiscal Year 2006; subsequent evaluations were completed in Fiscal Year 2007. The result of these analyses was a recommendation to the Department of Energy (DOE) that all contact-handled LLW generated after September 30, 2008, be disposed offsite, and that DOE proceed with a capital project to establish replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability. An analysis of the alternatives for providing replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability has been performed to support Critical Decision-1. The highest ranked alternative to provide this required capability has been determined to be the development of a new onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility to replace the existing remote-handled LLW disposal vaults at the SDA. Several offsite DOE and commercial disposal options exist for contact-handled LLW; however, offsite disposal options are either not currently available (i.e., commercial disposal facilities), practical, or cost-effective for all remote-handled LLW streams generated at INL. Offsite disposal of all INL and tenant-generated remote-handled waste is further complicated by issues associated with transporting highly radioactive waste in commerce; and infrastructure and processing changes at the generating facilities, specifically NRF, that would be required to support offsite disposal. The INL Remote-Handled LLW Disposal Project will develop a new remote handled LLW disposal facility to meet mission-critical, remote-handled LLW disposal needs. A formal DOE decision to proceed with the project has been made in accordance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (42 USC§ 4321 et seq.). Remote-handled LLW is generated from nuclear programs conducted at INL, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at NRF and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled LLW also will be generated by new INL programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex.

  8. Preparation and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, A. V.; Bass, T.; Burrill, A.; Davis, G. K.; Marhauser, F.; Reece, C. E.; Stirbet, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty new 7-cell, low-loss cell-shaped cavities are required for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade project. In addition to ten pre-production units fabricated at JLab, the full set of commercially-produced cavities have been delivered. An efficient processing routine, which includes a controlled 30 micron electropolish, has been established to transform these cavities into qualified 8-cavity strings. This work began in 2010 and will run through the end of 2011. The realized cavity performance consistently exceeds project requirements and also the maximum useful gradient in CEBAF: 25 MV/m. We will describe the cavity processing and preparation protocols and summarize test results obtained to date.

  9. Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Remote Handling 4 Vacuum vessel functions · Plasma vacuum environment · Primary tritium confinement, incl ports 65 tonnes - Weight of torus shielding 100 tonnes · Coolant - Normal Operation Water, Handling 12 Vessel octant subassembly fab. (3) · Octant-to-octant splice joint requires double wall weld

  10. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  11. Solid waste handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  12. Uranium hexafluoride handling. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Field Office, and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., are co-sponsoring this Second International Conference on Uranium Hexafluoride Handling. The conference is offered as a forum for the exchange of information and concepts regarding the technical and regulatory issues and the safety aspects which relate to the handling of uranium hexafluoride. Through the papers presented here, we attempt not only to share technological advances and lessons learned, but also to demonstrate that we are concerned about the health and safety of our workers and the public, and are good stewards of the environment in which we all work and live. These proceedings are a compilation of the work of many experts in that phase of world-wide industry which comprises the nuclear fuel cycle. Their experience spans the entire range over which uranium hexafluoride is involved in the fuel cycle, from the production of UF{sub 6} from the naturally-occurring oxide to its re-conversion to oxide for reactor fuels. The papers furnish insights into the chemical, physical, and nuclear properties of uranium hexafluoride as they influence its transport, storage, and the design and operation of plant-scale facilities for production, processing, and conversion to oxide. The papers demonstrate, in an industry often cited for its excellent safety record, continuing efforts to further improve safety in all areas of handling uranium hexafluoride. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Test Case Preparation using a Prototype H. Treharne1, J. Draper2 and S. Schneider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    a software development lifecycle which uses the B-Method. Section 3 details the typical testing activity carried out in a software development lifecycle. Section 4 describes the testing process in a formal are also presented. Keywords: Prototype, B-Method, Formal Software Lifecycle. 1 Introduction This paper

  14. Voices of Four Taiwanese College Students' Experiences with the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) Preparation (PREP) Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, To-Yu

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    preparation course at the university in Taiwan. In the middle and again at the end of students’ test preparation process, the researcher conducted and audio-recorded an approximately 30-minute interview with each of the four participants via Skype. Four themes...

  15. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel...

  16. Unvented Drum Handling Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This drum-handling plan proposes a method to deal with unvented transuranic drums encountered during retrieval of drums. Finding unvented drums during retrieval activities was expected, as identified in the Transuranic (TRU) Phase I Retrieval Plan (HNF-4781). However, significant numbers of unvented drums were not expected until excavation of buried drums began. This plan represents accelerated planning for management of unvented drums. A plan is proposed that manages unvented drums differently based on three categories. The first category of drums is any that visually appear to be pressurized. These will be vented immediately, using either the Hanford Fire Department Hazardous Materials (Haz. Mat.) team, if such are encountered before the facilities' capabilities are established, or using internal capabilities, once established. To date, no drums have been retrieved that showed signs of pressurization. The second category consists of drums that contain a minimal amount of Pu isotopes. This minimal amount is typically less than 1 gram of Pu, but may be waste-stream dependent. Drums in this category are assayed to determine if they are low-level waste (LLW). LLW drums are typically disposed of without venting. Any unvented drums that assay as TRU will be staged for a future venting campaign, using appropriate safety precautions in their handling. The third category of drums is those for which records show larger amounts of Pu isotopes (typically greater than or equal to 1 gram of Pu). These are assumed to be TRU and are not assayed at this point, but are staged for a future venting campaign. Any of these drums that do not have a visible venting device will be staged awaiting venting, and will be managed under appropriate controls, including covering the drums to protect from direct solar exposure, minimizing of container movement, and placement of a barrier to restrict vehicle access. There are a number of equipment options available to perform the venting. The preferred option is to use equipment provided by a commercial vendor during the first few years of retrieval and venting. This is based on a number of reasons. First, retrieval funding is uncertain. Using a commercial vendor will allow DOE-RL to avoid the investment and maintenance costs if retrieval is not funded. Second, when funding can be identified, retrieval will likely be performed with minimal initial throughput and intermittent operations. Again, costs can be saved by using contracted vendor services only as needed, rather than supporting Hanford equipment full time. When full-scale retrieval begins and the number of drums requiring venting increases significantly, then use of the Hanford container venting system (CVS) should be considered.

  17. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seglke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Lekin, Timothy P. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  18. Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Packaging

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides specific instructions for packaging and/or repackaging contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) and remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste in a manner consistent with DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual, CH-TRU and RH-TRU waste transportation requirements, and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) programmatic requirements. Does not cancel other directives.

  19. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  20. Voices of Four Taiwanese College Students' Experiences with the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) Preparation (PREP) Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, To-Yu

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ?” The four participating students were selected from 50 college juniors who used the TOEIC PREP software for two semesters in order to prepare for the TOIEC test. All of the students majored in Applied Foreign Languages and were enrolled in a required TOIEC...

  1. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  2. WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

  3. Concentration of remote-handled, transuranic, sodium nitrate-based sludge using agitated thin-film evaporators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Pen, Ben-Li (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to prepared transuranic waste for final disposal. Once operational, this facility will process, package, and certify remote-handled transuranic waste for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. One of the wastes that will be handled at WHIPP is the transuranic sludge currently stored at ORNL in eight 50,000-gal underground tanks. The use of an Agitated Thin-Film Evaporator (ATFE) for concentration of this waste is being investigated. Tests have shown that the ATFE can be used to produce a thick slurry, a powder, or a fused salt. A computer model developed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to simulate the operation of ATFE's on their waste is being modified for use on the ORNL transuranic sludge. This paper summarizes the results of the test with the ATFEs to date, discusses the changes in the SRP model necessary to use this model with the ORNL waste, and compares the results of the model with the actual data taken from the operation of ATFEs at vendors' test facilities. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RHLLW) Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability.

  5. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  6. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  7. Design Package for Fuel Retrieval System Fuel Handling Tool Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  8. Status of ITER neutral beam cell remote handling system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sykes, N; Choi, C-H; Crofts, O; Crowe, R; Damiani, C; Delavalle, S; Meredith, L; Mindham, T; Raimbach, J; Tesini, A; Van Uffelen, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITER neutral beam cell will contain up to three heating neutral beams and one diagnostic neutral beam, and four upper ports. Though manual maintenance work is envisaged within the cell, when containment is breached, or the radiological protection is removed the maintenance must be conducted remotely. This maintenance constitutes the removal and replacement of line replaceable units, and their transport to and from a cask docked to the cell. A design of the remote handling system has been prepared to concept level which this paper describes including the development of a beam line transporter, beam source remote handling equipment, upper port remote handling equipment and equipment for the maintenance of the neutral shield. This equipment has been developed complete the planned maintenance tasks for the components of the neutral beam cell and to have inherent flexibility to enable as yet unforeseen tasks and recovery operations to be performed.

  9. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  10. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  11. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  12. An analysis of repository waste-handling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, A.W.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Cask system design guidance for robotic handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griesmeyer, J.M.; Drotning, W.D.; Morimoto, A.K.; Bennett, P.C.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote automated cask handling has the potential to reduce both the occupational exposure and the time required to process a nuclear waste transport cask at a handling facility. The ongoing Advanced Handling Technologies Project (AHTP) at Sandia National Laboratories is described. AHTP was initiated to explore the use of advanced robotic systems to perform cask handling operations at handling facilities for radioactive waste, and to provide guidance to cask designers regarding the impact of robotic handling on cask design. The proof-of-concept robotic systems developed in AHTP are intended to extrapolate from currently available commercial systems to the systems that will be available by the time that a repository would be open for operation. The project investigates those cask handling operations that would be performed at a nuclear waste repository facility during cask receiving and handling. The ongoing AHTP indicates that design guidance, rather than design specification, is appropriate, since the requirements for robotic handling do not place severe restrictions on cask design but rather focus on attention to detail and design for limited dexterity. The cask system design features that facilitate robotic handling operations are discussed, and results obtained from AHTP design and operation experience are summarized. The application of these design considerations is illustrated by discussion of the robot systems and their operation on cask feature mock-ups used in the AHTP project. 11 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Final Development and test preparation of the first 3.7m long Nb3Sn quadrupole by LARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bocian, D.; Bordini, B.; Bossert, R.; Bottura, L.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; /Fermilab /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /CERN

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The test of the first LARP (LHC Accelerator Research Program) Long Quadrupole is a significant milestone toward the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles for LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Luminosity Upgrades. These 3.7-m long magnets, scaled from the 1-m long Technological Quadrupoles, are used to develop our capabilities to fabricate and assemble Nb{sub 3}Sn coils and structures with lengths comparable to accelerator magnet dimensions. The long quadruples have a target gradient of 200 T/m in a 90-mm aperture. Pre-stress and support are provided by an Al-shell-based structure pre-loaded using bladders and keys. The coils were fabricated at BNL and FNAL, the shell-based structure was designed and assembled at LBNL, the test is performed at FNAL. In this paper we present the final steps of the development of the first model (LQS01), several upgrades to the test facility, the test results of witness cables, and the short sample limit.

  15. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  16. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  17. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  18. Laboratory Air Handling Unit System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Y.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    balance and moisture balance are given below for the entire building. iQ G26 + hQ G26 + hgQ G26 = rQ G26 + CQ G26 + eQ G26 + ehQ G26 + envQ G26 (1) Where Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jQQ G26 Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jQQ G26 Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jQQ G26 Ge5 = = 2 1 , j... jQQ G26 Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jQQ G26 Figure 1. Schematic diagram of air handling unit system for base system ehMMMM G26G26G26G26 ++= (2) Where Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jMM G26 Ge5 = = 2 1 , j jMM G26 ehWWWWWW G26G26G26G26...

  19. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. Beesley

    2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this facility description document (FDD) is to establish requirements and associated bases that drive the design of the Canister Handling Facility (CHF), which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This FDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This FDD identifies the requirements and describes the facility design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This FDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This FDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the facility. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The FDD follows the design with regard to the description of the facility. The description provided in this FDD reflects the current results of the design process.

  20. CARRIER/CASK HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives casks on railcars and legal-weight trucks (LWTs) (transporters) that transport loaded casks and empty overpacks to the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) from the Carrier/Cask Transport System. Casks that come to the MGR on heavy-haul trucks (HHTs) are transferred onto railcars before being brought into the Carrier/Cask Handling System. The system is the interfacing system between the railcars and LWTs and the Assembly Transfer System (ATS) and Canister Transfer System (CTS). The Carrier/Cask Handling System removes loaded casks from the cask transporters and transfers the casks to a transfer cart for either the ATS or CTS, as appropriate, based on cask contents. The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives the returned empty casks from the ATS and CTS and mounts the casks back onto the transporters for reshipment. If necessary, the Carrier/Cask Handling System can also mount loaded casks back onto the transporters and remove empty casks from the transporters. The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives overpacks from the ATS loaded with canisters that have been cut open and emptied and mounts the overpacks back onto the transporters for disposal. If necessary, the Carrier/Cask Handling System can also mount empty overpacks back onto the transporters and remove loaded overpacks from them. The Carrier/Cask Handling System is located within the Carrier Bay of the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of cranes, hoists, manipulators, and supporting equipment. The Carrier/Cask Handling System is designed with the tooling and fixtures necessary for handling a variety of casks. The Carrier/Cask Handling System performance and reliability are sufficient to support the shipping and emplacement schedules for the MGR. The Carrier/Cask Handling System interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Transport System, ATS, and CTS as noted above. The Carrier/Cask Handling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for building structures and space allocations. The Carrier/Cask Handling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical System for electrical power.

  1. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study 1 EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol I. Project Overview Title EHS-Net Tomato Handling Study Protocol Summary Few studies have examined in detail the nature Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) special study. EHS- Net is a collaboration involving the Centers

  3. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  4. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  5. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  6. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  7. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  8. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  9. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  10. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  11. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  12. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  13. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  14. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  15. Handling uncertainty in DEX methodology Martin Znidarsic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    URPDM2010 1 Handling uncertainty in DEX methodology Martin Znidarsic Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, martin.znidarsic@ijs.si Marko Bohanec Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, marko

  16. 2004 Biodiesel Handling and Use Guidelines (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a guide for those who blend, distribute, and use biodiesel and biodiesel blends. It is intended to fleets and individual users, blenders, distributors, and those involved in related activities understand procedures for handling and using biodiesel.

  17. Commercial Storage and Handling of Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Charles W.; Moore, Clarence A.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Three areas that provide a cross section of physical and economic conditions under which sorghum grain is produced, handled and stored were selected for study of storage and handling facilities and practices by commercial grain storage...-60. Grain stocks in storage increased even more rapidly. Storage space in 1955 was 71 percent occupied on January 1, whereas the much greater space in 1960 was 82 percent occupied. Grain sorghum increased from less than half to almost three...

  18. Dairy Manure Handling Systems and Equipment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter, Director College Station 8?1446 DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT DAIRY MANURE HANDLING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT John M. Sweeten, Ph....D., P.E.* A manure management system for a modern dairy should be capable of controlling solid or liquid manure and wastewater from the open corrals (manure and rainfall runoff), free stall barn , feeding barn , holding lot or holding shed , milking...

  19. Introduction Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Motivation Preparation Notos' Components Results Conclusions and Future Work Building Problem Description and Motivation Preparation Notation, Passive DNS trends and Anchor Classes Notos Reputation Results Conclusions and Future Work Special thanks to: Damballa Passive DNS data, Malware and BL

  20. Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this reporting period, virtually all of the technical activities and progress was made in the areas of circuit installation and startup operations. Work in these activity areas are described.

  1. RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak...

  2. LM Records Handling System-Fernald Historical Records System...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Historical Records System, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System-Fernald Historical Records System, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling...

  3. Plutonium stabilization and handling (PuSH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses construction of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. The major sections of the project are: site preparation; SPS Procurement, Installation, and Testing; storage vault modification; and characterization equipment additions. The SPS will be procured as part of a Department of Energy nationwide common procurement. Specific design crit1460eria for the SPS have been extracted from that contract and are contained in an appendix to this document.

  4. Alternative configurations for the waste-handling building at the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two alternative configurations of the waste-handling building have been developed for the proposed nuclear waste repository in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One configuration is based on criteria and assumptions used in Case 2 (no monitored retrievable storage facility, no consolidation), and the other configuration is based on criteria and assumptions used in Case 5 (consolidation at the monitored retrievable storage facility) of the Monitored Retrievable Storage System Study for the Repository. Desirable waste-handling design concepts have been selected and are included in these configurations. For each configuration, general arrangement drawings, plot plans, block flow diagrams, and timeline diagrams are prepared.

  5. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Schulthess

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  6. DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance.

  7. Plutonium stabilization and handling quality assurance program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies project quality assurance requirements for all contractors involved in the planning and execution of Hanford Site activities for design, procurement, construction, testing and inspection for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling. The project encompasses procurement and installation of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM.

  8. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Richard J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  9. A Scintillator Purification Plant and Fluid Handling System for SNO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Ford; for the SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A large capacity purification plant and fluid handling system has been constructed for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment, located 6800 feet underground at SNOLAB, Canada. SNO+ is a refurbishment of the SNO detector to fill the acrylic vessel with liquid scintillator based on Linear Alkylbenzene (LAB) and 2 g/L PPO, and also has a phase to load natural tellurium into the scintillator for a double-beta decay experiment with 130Te. The plant includes processes multi-stage dual-stream distillation, column water extraction, steam stripping, and functionalized silica gel adsorption columns. The plant also includes systems for preparing the scintillator with PPO and metal-loading the scintillator for double-beta decay exposure. We review the basis of design, the purification principles, specifications for the plant, and the construction and installations. The construction and commissioning status is updated.

  10. Architecturing Conflict Handling of Pervasive Computing Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Architecturing Conflict Handling of Pervasive Computing Resources Henner Jakob1 , Charles Consel1 to conflict in their usage of shared resources, e.g., controlling doors for security and fire evacuation computing resources. This approach covers the software devel- opment lifecycle and consists of enriching

  11. Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

  12. GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTE The proper management of hazardous waste and regulatory compliance are achieved: 1. Make sure that no hazardous materials are placed into regular solid in the departmental chemical hygiene plan (CHP) before you begin to use hazardous substances. 3. Make sure you know

  13. Waste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    plumbing services, EHS personnel wastewater treatment plant personnel, and the general public canWaste Handling and Disposal Biological Safety General Biosafety Practices (GBP) Why You Should Care on the next experiment. Are you working with r/sNA, biological toxins, human materials, needles, plasticware

  14. Elimination of ``memory`` from sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastgner, P.

    1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a method for preparing the sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer for analysis of a subsequent sample following analysis of a previous sample comprising the flushing of the system interior with supercritical CO{sub 2} and venting the interior. The method eliminates the effect of system ``memory`` on the subsequent analysis, especially following persistent samples such as xenon and krypton.

  15. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Hinman

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

  16. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  17. STUDENT ORGANIZATION FOOD/BEVERAGE HANDLING REQUEST FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    STUDENT ORGANIZATION FOOD/BEVERAGE HANDLING REQUEST FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT APPROVAL Please submit. PLEASE ALLOW AT LEAST 10 working days for approval. Student Organization: ___________________________________________________________ Student Responsible for Event/Food Handling: _______________________________________ Phone Number

  18. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3292012 - G. Hughes & J. BUELT ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by:...

  19. A Semi-automated Commissioning Tool for VAV Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and that faults in HVAC systems are widespread in commercial buildings. There is a lack of skilled people between the data analysis tool and the building energy management and control system (EMCS) is harderA Semi-automated Commissioning Tool for VAV Air Handling Units: Functional Test Analyzer 1 2 3 4 5

  20. SOFTWARE AGENTS IN HANDLING ABNORMAL SITUATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOFTWARE AGENTS IN HANDLING ABNORMAL SITUATIONS IN INDUSTRIAL PLANTS Sami Syrjälä and Seppo Kuikka. The abnormal situation handling in industrial plants is a challenging application area due to the complexity-model, abnormal situation handling, industrial plants 1. Introduction This paper is based on the work made

  1. On Exceptions, Exception Handling, Requirements and Software Lifecycle Alexander Romanovsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    On Exceptions, Exception Handling, Requirements and Software Lifecycle Alexander Romanovsky Notes. 32(2). 2007. [2] R. de Lemos, and A. Romanovsky. Exception handling in the software lifecycle. Castor Filho. Exception handling in the development of dependable component-based systems. Software

  2. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    material, material handling overhead (if applicable), equipment (including capital investments), subcontract cost, disposal cost, transportation cost, treatment cost,...

  3. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J.K.; Lindemann, P.E.

    1982-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are claimed for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  4. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, John K. (San Diego, CA); Lindemann, Paul E. (Escondido, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  5. REM Handling Procedures | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December 11, 2014WD 05-2103 REM Handling

  6. A comparison of sample preparation methodology in the evaluation of geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siebken, J.R. [National Seal Co., Galesburg, IL (United States); Lucas, S. [Albarrie Naue Ltd., Barrie, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of preparing a single needle-punched GCL product for evaluation of hydraulic conductivity in a flexible wall permeameter was examined. The test protocol utilized for this evaluation was GRI Test Method GCL-2 Permeability of GCLs. The GCL product consisted of bentonite clay material supported by a woven and a non-woven geotextile on either side. The method preparation focused on the procedure for separating the test specimen from the larger sample and whether these methods produced difficulty in generating reliable test data. The methods examined included cutting with a razor knife, scissors, and a circular die with the perimeter of the test area under wet and dry conditions. In order to generate as much data as possible, tests were kept brief. Flow was monitored only long enough to determine whether or not preferential flow paths appeared to be present. The results appear to indicate that any of the methods involved will work. Difficulties arose not from the development of preferential flow paths around the edges of the specimens, but from the loss of bentonite from the edges during handling.

  7. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - May 2012 Test - REV2012.05...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5022012 - G. Hughes & W. Riesland ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared...

  8. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Dvoeglazov, Konstantine; Volk, Vladimir; Zagumenov, Vladimir; Zverev, Dmitriy [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation)] [JSC VNIINM, 123060, Moscow, Rogova st., 5a (Russian Federation); Tinin, Vasiliy; Kozyrev, Anatoly; Shamin, Dladimir; Tvilenev, Konstantin [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)] [JSC SCC, 636039,Tomsk oblast, Seversk, Kurchatova street 1 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  9. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE MATERIAL AND PERSONNEL HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Misiak

    1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) provides the results of an evaluation that was conducted on the Material and Personnel Handling System. This TER has been written in accordance with the ''Technical Document Preparation Plan for the Mined Geologic Disposal System Title III Evaluation Reports'' (BA0000000-01717-4600-00005 REV 03). The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Material and Personnel Handling System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications.

  10. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  11. Conceptual Design Report for Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  12. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  13. Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

  14. Primer on tritium safe handling practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

  15. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  16. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FC9510 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  17. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory’s recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy’s ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidebook contains information about EPAct alternative fuels regulations for fleets, flexible fuel vehicles, E85 properties and specifications, and E85 handling and storage guidelines.

  1. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Waste Information SystemWaste Data System (WWISWDS) Data Entry Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU Waste Certification and Waste Information...

  2. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

  3. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping System, Office of Legacy Management, LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping System, Office of Legacy...

  4. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rocky Flats Environmental Records Database, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental Records Database, Office of Legacy...

  5. Biodiesel Handling and Use Guide: Fourth Edition (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intended for those who blend, distribute, and use biodiesel and its blends, this guide contains procedures for handling and using these fuels.

  6. Conceptual design report, plutonium stabilization and handling,project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, encompasses procurement and installation of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) provides conceptual design details for the vault modification, site preparation and site interface with the purchased SPS. Two concepts are described for vault configuration; acceleration of this phase of the project did not allow completion of analysis which would clearly identify a preferred approach.

  7. Food Preparation Unit Preparation Materials and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    brush, potato masher, peeler, strainer, and steamer basket. · Food and kitchen equipment for preparation

  8. EXHIBITION INSTALLATION AND DISMANTLING Item Handling and Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    EXHIBITION INSTALLATION AND DISMANTLING Item Handling and Housing A. For general handling's and Don'ts. B. For examples of housing options and alternatives for paper artifacts, see Housing and Environment Options for Display, Housing and Environment Options for Storage, or consult a conservator. 1. All

  9. Measurement of Exception-Handling Code: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, James

    Measurement of Exception-Handling Code: An Exploratory Study Keith ´O D´ulaigh, James F. Power Dept of exception- handling constructs, and study their change as the systems evolve through several versions the level of exception-related code in a system? · What kinds of graphs are most useful for visualising

  10. MVAPACK: A Complete Data Handling Package for NMR Metabolomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    in MVAPACK span the following general categories: data loading, preprocessing, pretreatment, modelingMVAPACK: A Complete Data Handling Package for NMR Metabolomics Bradley Worley and Robert Powers Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Data handling in the field of NMR metabolomics has historically been reliant

  11. Waxy crude oil handling in Nigeria; Practices, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajienka, J.A.; Ikoku, C.U. (Dept. of Petroleum Engineering, Univ. of Port Harcourt, Choba, Port Harcourt (NG))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With case studies, the practices, problems, and prospects of handling waxy crude oils in Nigeria are discussed. Using a rotational viscometer, the temperature dependence of rheological properties and thixotropy of these crudes were determined. Suggestions are given on how to improve handling practices. These suggestions include adequate screening and ranking of wax inhibitors, taking into account pour-point depression, viscosity, and yield value.

  12. HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH 428 Washington 25, D, C. December 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART TWO HANDLING FRESH FISH By Charles in a series of five on "Refrigeration of Fish." Titles of the other four leaflets are: - 38 - 84 Part 1

  13. Automatic Continuous Commissioning of Measurement Instruments in Air Handling Units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, F.; Wang, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    component analysis (PCA), is adopted and modified to monitor the air handling process. Two PCA models are built corresponding to the heat balance and pressure-flow balance of the air-handling process. Sensor faults can be detected and isolated using the Q...

  14. H dli dHandling and Safety Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    HendershotPam Hendershot Praxair Distribution Inc. Praxair Distribution Inc., Quality Department .Copyright © 2000, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. .Rev. Date 04/24/2006-A 1 #12;Safe Handling Dangers Proper PPEp Proper Handling and Transporting of cryogen liquidscryogen liquids Praxair

  15. Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie Department it difficult to mine error-handling specifications through manual inspection of source code. In this paper, we, without any user in- put. In our framework, we adapt a trace generation technique to distinguish

  16. Siting Study for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Joan Connolly; Lance Peterson; Brennon Orr; Bob Starr

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has identified a mission need for continued disposal capacity for remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An alternatives analysis that was conducted to evaluate strategies to achieve this mission need identified two broad options for disposal of INL generated remote-handled LLW: (1) offsite disposal and (2) onsite disposal. The purpose of this study is to identify candidate sites or locations within INL boundaries for the alternative of an onsite remote handled LLW disposal facility and recommend the highest-ranked locations for consideration in the National Environmental Policy Act process. The study implements an evaluation based on consideration of five key elements: (1) regulations, (2) key assumptions, (3) conceptual design, (4) facility performance, and (5) previous INL siting study criteria, and uses a five-step process to identify, screen, evaluate, score, and rank 34 separate sites located across INL. The result of the evaluation is identification of two recommended alternative locations for siting an onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility. The two alternative locations that best meet the evaluation criteria are (1) near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and (2) west of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility.

  17. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  18. WEAR RESISTANT ALLOYS FOR COAL HANDLING EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, M.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4340 Steels Melted by ESCO Corporation for Jaw Crusher Tests+ 1.5Si steel were cast at ESCO Corporation and the wearMiller Associates, Inc. , ESCO Corporation, and Albany

  19. Design, Development, Pre-Testing and Preparation for Full Scale Cold Testing of a System for Field Remediation of Vertical Pipe Units at the Hanford Site 618-10 Burial Grounds -12495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc. 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, New York, 11716 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford site, in the 1950's and 60's, radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from a number of laboratories were stored in vertical pipe units (VPUs) in what are now the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. Although the current physical condition of the VPUs is unknown, initial R and D studies had shown that in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents was feasible. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities to validate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents, and the design and pre-testing of major plant items and augering systems on full size simulated VPUs. The paper also describes the full size prototype equipment which will be used in full size cold testing of simulated VPUs off the Hanford site, to prove the equipment, develop operating procedures, and train operators prior to deployment on site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. (authors)

  20. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

  1. Studies and research concerning BNFP: cask handling equipment standardization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCreery, Paul N.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the activities of one of the sub-tasks within the Spent LWR Fuel Transportation Receiving, Handling, and Storage program. The sub-task is identified as Cask Handling Equipment Standardization. The objective of the sub-task specifies: investigate and identify opportunities for standardization of cask interface equipment. This study will examine the potential benefits of standardized yokes, decontamination barriers and special tools, and, to the extent feasible, standardized methods and software for handling the variety of casks presently available in the US fleet. The result of the investigations is a compilation of reports that are related by their common goal of reducing cask turnaround time.

  2. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document FumeHoods Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful the maximum safe mark (provided by Facilities Management during annual test) Use secondary containment (a hood without permission from EHS. Call EHS or Facilities Management if a hood is not functioning

  3. Fault detection in an air-handling unit using residual and recursive parameter identification methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, W.Y. [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, C.; Kelly, G.E. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme for detecting faults in an air-handling unit using residual and parameter identification methods is presented. Faults can be detected by comparing the normal or expected operating condition data with the abnormal, measured data using residuals. Faults can also be detected by examining unmeasurable parameter changes in a model of a controlled system using a system parameter identification technique. In this study, autoregressive moving average with exogenous input (ARMAX) and autoregressive with exogenous input (ARX) models with both single-input/single-output (SISO) and multi-input/single-output (MISO) structures are examined. Model parameters are determined using the Kalman filter recursive identification method. This approach is tested using experimental data from a laboratory`s variable-air-volume (VAV) air-handling unit operated with and without faults.

  4. Nondestructive assay and nondestructive examination of remote-handled transuranic waste at the ORNL waste handling and packaging plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Pajarito Scientific Corp. (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine the use of an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) in the performance of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) measurements of remote-handled transuranic wastes. The system will be used to perform waste characterization and certification activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant. The NDA and NDE technologies which were developed for contact-handled wastes are inadequate to perform such measurements on high gamma and neutron dose-rate wastes. A single LINAC will provide the interrogating fluxes required for both NDA and NDE measurements of the wastes. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  5. An Integrated Air Handling Unit System for Large Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, L.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an integrated air handling unit system (OAHU) for large commercial buildings. The system introduces outside air into the interior section and circulates the return air to the exterior section. Detailed analytical models...

  6. air handling unit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    case of fans, or indirectly, in the case of heat exchangers, which impose loads on the chiller and boiler plant. Air-handling units can comprise a myriad of subsystems (fans,...

  7. air handling units: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    case of fans, or indirectly, in the case of heat exchangers, which impose loads on the chiller and boiler plant. Air-handling units can comprise a myriad of subsystems (fans,...

  8. T-625: Opera Frameset Handling Memory Corruption Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to an error when handling certain frameset constructs during page unloading and can be exploited to corrupt memory via a specially crafted web page.

  9. Microsoft Word - remote handled waste comment extension.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extends public comment period on the Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project Environmental Assessment Jan. 26, 2009 Media contact: Brad Bugger, (208) 526-0833 In response to a...

  10. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely...

  11. HANDLING UNCERTAINTY IN PRODUCTION ACTIVITY CONTROL USING PROACTIVE SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HANDLING UNCERTAINTY IN PRODUCTION ACTIVITY CONTROL USING PROACTIVE SIMULATION Olivier CARDIN, Production Control, Manufacturing Systems, Proactive, Real-time. 1. INTRODUCTION In today's complex of a product. Real-word planning and scheduling problems are generally complex, constrained and multi

  12. Uranium hexafluoride: A manual of good handling practices. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is continuing the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies in sharing with the nuclear industry their experience in the area of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) shipping containers and handling procedures. The USEC has reviewed Revision 6 or ORO-651 and is issuing this new edition to assure that the document includes the most recent information on UF{sub 6} handling procedures and reflects the policies of the USEC. This manual updates the material contained in earlier issues. It covers the essential aspects of UF{sub 6} handling, cylinder filling and emptying, general principles of weighing and sampling, shipping, and the use of protective overpacks. The physical and chemical properties of UF{sub 6} are also described. The procedures and systems described for safe handling of UF{sub 6} presented in this document have been developed and evaluated during more than 40 years of handling vast quantities of UF{sub 6}. With proper consideration for its nuclear properties, UF{sub 6} may be safely handled in essentially the same manner as any other corrosive and/or toxic chemical.

  13. METHODS FOR THE SAFE STORAGE, HANDLING, AND DISPOSAL OF PYROPHORIC LIQUIDS AND SOLIDS IN THE LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F.; Kuntamukkula, M.; Alnajjar, M.; Quigley, D.; Freshwater, D.; Bigger, S.

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrophoric reagents represent an important class of reactants because they can participate in many different types of reactions. They are very useful in organic synthesis and in industrial applications. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) define Pyrophorics as substances that will self-ignite in air at temperatures of 130 F (54.4 C) or less. However, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) uses criteria different from the auto-ignition temperature criterion. The DOT defines a pyrophoric material as a liquid or solid that, even in small quantities and without an external ignition source, can ignite within five minutes after coming in contact with air when tested according to the United Nations Manual of Tests and Criteria. The Environmental Protection Agency has adopted the DOT definition. Regardless of which definition is used, oxidation of the pyrophoric reagents by oxygen or exothermic reactions with moisture in the air (resulting in the generation of a flammable gas such as hydrogen) is so rapid that ignition occurs spontaneously. Due to the inherent nature of pyrophoric substances to ignite spontaneously upon exposure to air, special precautions must be taken to ensure their safe handling and use. Pyrophoric gases (such as diborane, dichloroborane, phosphine, etc.) are typically the easiest class of pyrophoric substances to handle since the gas can be plumbed directly to the application and used remotely. Pyrophoric solids and liquids, however, require the user to physically manipulate them when transferring them from one container to another. Failure to follow proper safety precautions could result in serious injury or unintended consequences to laboratory personnel. Because of this danger, pyrophorics should be handled only by experienced personnel. Users with limited experience must be trained on how to handle pyrophoric reagents and consult with a knowledgeable staff member prior to performing the experimental task. The purpose of this article is three fold: (1) to provide guidelines and general safety precautions to avoid accidents, (2) describe proper techniques on how to successfully handle, store, and dispose of pyrophoric liquids and solids, and (3) illustrate best practices for working with this class of reactants in a laboratory environment.

  14. Qualitative human reliability analysis for spent fuel handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, J. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States); Amico, P. [Science Applications International Corporation (United States); Cooper, S. E. [United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been developed primarily to provide information for use in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) that analyze nuclear power plant (NPP) operations. Given the original emphasis of these methods, it is understandable that many HRAs have not ventured far from NPP control room applications. Despite this historical focus on the control room, there has been growing interest and discussion regarding the application of HRA methods to other NPP activities such as spent fuel handling (SFH) or operations in different types of facilities. One recently developed HRA method, 'A Technique for Human Event Analysis' (ATHEANA) has been proposed as a promising candidate for diverse applications due to its particular approach for systematically uncovering the dynamic, contextual conditions influencing human performance. This paper describes one successful test of this proposition by presenting portions of a recently completed project in which a scoping study was performed to accomplish the following goals: (1) investigate what should be included in a qualitative HRA for spent fuel and cask handling operations; and (2) demonstrate that the ATHEANA HRA technique can be usefully applied to these operations. The preliminary, scoping qualitative HRA examined, in a generic manner, how human performance of SFH and dry cask storage operations (DCSOs) can plausibly lead to radiological consequences that impact the public and the environment. The study involved the performance of typical, qualitative HRA tasks such as collecting relevant information and the preliminary identification of human failure events or unsafe actions, relevant influences (e.g., performance shaping factors, other contextual factors), event scenario development and categorization of human failure event (HFE) scenario groupings. Information from relevant literature sources was augmented with subject matter expert interviews and analysis of an edited video of selected operations. Elements of NUREG-1792, Good Practices for Implementing Human Reliability Analyses (HRA) and NUREG-1624, Rev. 1, Technical Basis and Implementation Guidelines for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) formed critical parts of the technical basis for the preliminary analysis. Mis-loading of spent fuel into a cask and dropping of a loaded cask were the two human failure event groupings of primary interest, although all human performance aspects of DCSOs were considered to some extent. Of important note is that HRA is typically performed in the context of a plant-specific PRA study. This analysis was performed without the benefit of the context provided by a larger PRA study, nor was it plant specific, and so it investigated only generic HRA issues relevant to SFH. However, the improved understanding of human performance issues provided by the study will likely enhance the ability to carry out a detailed qualitative HRA for a specific NPP at some point in the future. Furthermore, support was obtained regarding the potential for applying ATHEANA beyond NPP settings. This paper provides a description of the process followed during the analysis, a description of the HFE scenario groupings, discussion regarding general human performance vulnerabilities, and a detailed examination of one HFE scenario developed in the study. (authors)

  15. Preliminary Dynamic Siol-Structure-Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Wagenblast

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this analysis package is to document a preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation of a simplified design concept of the Wade Handling Building (WHB). Preliminary seismic ground motions and soil data will be used. Loading criteria of the WHB System Design Description will be used. Detail design of structural members will not be performed.. The results of the analysis will be used to determine preliminary sizes of structural concrete and steel members and to determine whether the seismic response of the structure is within an acceptable level for future License Application design of safety related facilities. In order to complete this preliminary dynamic evaluation to meet the Site Recommendation (SR) schedule, the building configuration was ''frozen in time'' as the conceptual design existed in October 1999. Modular design features and dry or wet waste storage features were intentionally excluded from this preliminary dynamic seismic evaluation. The document was prepared in accordance with the Development Plan for the ''Preliminary/Dynamic Soil Structure Interaction Analysis for the Waste Handling Building'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b), which was completed, in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''.

  16. Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Pankaskie, P.J.; Langstaff, D.C.; Gilbert, E.R.; Rising, K.H.; Schreiber, R.E.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

  17. Great Lakes ports coal handling capacity and export coal potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, A.H. Jr.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was developed to determine the competitive position of the Great Lakes Region coal-loading ports in relation to other US coastal ranges. Due to the congestion at some US Atlantic coastal ports US coal producers have indicated a need for alternative export routes, including the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System. The study assesses the regions coal handling capacity and price competitiveness along with the opportunity for increased US flag vessel service. A number of appendices are included showing major coal producers, railroad marketing representatives, US vessel operators, and port handling capacities and throughput. A rate analysis is provided including coal price at the mine, rail rate to port, port handling charges, water transportation rates to western Europe, Great Lakes route versus the US Atlantic Coast ports.

  18. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  19. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  20. Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  1. Evaluation and improvement on external-hazard proof of JSFR fuel handling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, A.; Chikazawa, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, O-arai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1393 (Japan); Uzawa, M. [Mitsubishi FBR Systems Inc. MFBR, 34-17, Jingumae 2-chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responding to the the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (1F-NPP) accident, the earthquake and the tsunami proof of the fuel handling system (FHS) in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is studied. In the earthquake proof estimation, the margin of seismic resistance against the earthquake of the 1F-envelop condition and the sloshing behavior in the EVST is estimated. In terms of the tsunami proof, the scenario to lead fuel subassemblies into the stable cooling state and the potential of the cooling system is introduced in case of loss of the emergency power supply. As a result, it is clear that JSFR FHS originally could already be prepared to have the potential to prevent the release of radioactive material. (authors)

  2. Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

  3. Certification document for newly generated contact-handled transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Box, W.D.; Setaro, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has requested that all national laboratories handling defense waste develop and augment a program whereby all newly generated contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste be contained, stored, and then shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in WIPP-DOE-114. The program described in this report delineates how Oak Ridge National Laboratory intends to comply with these requirements and lists the procedures used by each generator to ensure that their TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP.

  4. EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility The Secretary of Energy recently announced DOE's intent to prepare a...

  5. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare for Upcoming Standards of Learning Tests April 12, 2004 Usage of Jefferson Lab's Science Education website is...

  6. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health related research. Volume 4: Production and materials handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume 4 is to describe record series pertaining to production and materials handling activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of production and materials handling practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to production and materials handling policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records.

  7. Report on PV Test Sites and Test Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai Protocols plus Subtask 11.1 Deliverables 1 and 3 Photovoltaic Systems (corrected) By the Hawai`i Natural

  8. Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

  9. Open test assembly (OTA) shear demonstration testing work/test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiller, S.W.

    1998-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the development testing phase associated with the OTA Shear activity and defines the controls to be in place throughout the testing. The purpose of the OTA Shear Program was to provide equipment that is needed for the processing of 40 foot long, sodium wetted, irradiated core components previously used in the FFTF reactor to monitor fuel and materials tests. There are currently 15 of these OTA test stalks located in the Test Assembly Conditioning Station (TACS) inerted vault. These need to be dispositioned for a shutdown mission to eliminate this highly activated, high dose inventory prior to turnover to the ERC since they must be handled by remote operations. These would also need to be dispositioned for a restart mission to free up the vault they currently reside in. The waste handling and cleaning equipment in the J33M Cell was designed and built for the handling of reactor components up to the standard 12 foot length. This program will provide the equipment to the IEM Cell to remotely section the OTAS into pieces less than 12 feet in length to allow for the necessary handling and cleaning operations required for proper disposition. Due to the complexity of all operations associated with remote handling, the availability of the IEM Cell training facility, and the major difficulty with reworking contaminated equipment, it was determined that preliminary testing of the equipment was desirable, This testing activity would provide the added assurance that the equipment will operate as designed prior to performance of the formal Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) at the IEM Cell, This testing activity will also allow for some operator familiarity and procedure checkout prior to actual installation into the IEM Cell. This development testing will therefore be performed at the conclusion of equipment fabrication and prior to transfer of the equipment to the 400 Area.

  10. Sample handling for kinetics and molecular assembly in flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklar, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). National Flow Cytometry Resource]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Seamer, L.C.; Kuckuck, F.; Prossnitz, E.; Edwards, B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). School of Medicine; Posner, G. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow cytometry discriminates particle associated fluorescence from the fluorescence of the surrounding medium. It permits assemblies of macromolecular complexes on beads or cells to be detected in real-time with precision and specificity. The authors have investigated two types of robust sample handling systems which provide sub-second resolution and high throughput: (1) mixers which use stepper-motor driven syringes to initiate chemical reactions in msec time frames; and (2) flow injection controllers with valves and automated syringes used in chemical process control. In the former system, the authors used fast valves to overcome the disparity between mixing 100 {micro}ls of sample in 100 msecs and delivering sample to a flow cytometer at 1 {micro}l/sec. Particles were detected within 100 msec after mixing, but turbulence was created which lasted for 1 sec after injection of the sample into the flow cytometer. They used optical criteria to discriminate particles which were out of alignment due to the turbulent flow. Complex sample handling protocols involving multiple mixing steps and sample dilution have also been achieved. With the latter system they were able to automate sample handling and delivery with intervals of a few seconds. The authors used a fluidic approach to defeat turbulence caused by sample introduction. By controlling both sheath and sample with individual syringes, the period of turbulence was reduced to {approximately} 200 msecs. Automated sample handling and sub-second resolution should permit broad analytical and diagnostic applications of flow cytometry.

  11. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, R.

    1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

  12. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  13. South Carolina Farm Auditing Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    South Carolina Farm Auditing Program Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices Audit of charts #12;Additional Requirements Signs must be in English and Spanish Good hygiene practices Water Verification Program Jack Dantzler Director of Inspections and Grading South Carolina Department of Agriculture

  14. STABILIZING LINEAR MPC WITH EFFICIENT PRIORITIZED INFEASIBILITY HANDLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    is illustrated on a simulated distillation column, and we present a novel stability result for this infeasibilitySTABILIZING LINEAR MPC WITH EFFICIENT PRIORITIZED INFEASIBILITY HANDLING Jostein Vada Olav predictive controller fails to compute a control input, all practical MPC implementations should havea means

  15. Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

  16. SOLIS Data Handling Christoph Keller, Steve Wampler, Carl Henney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLIS Data Handling Christoph Keller, Steve Wampler, Carl Henney National Solar Observatory #12;May, 2003 FASR Data System Workshop 3 Science What causes the solar cycle? How is energy stored and released in the solar atmosphere? How does the solar radiative and non- radiative output vary? Vector

  17. Office Automation Document Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    .2 Distinctions 1.3 Facilities 1.3.1 Document Preparation 1.3.2 Records Management 1.3.3 Communication 1 organizations contemplating the installation of document-preparation systems. * Administrative managersOffice Automation and Document Preparation for the v' University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  18. International perspectives on coal preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

  19. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  20. Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety Adapted from: Study Guides and Strategies website, Overcoming test anxiety Test taking can be overwhelming and can cause a lot of anxiety. Try these tips to ease your anxiety through the testing process! Before Approach the exam with confidence Be prepared

  1. Handling of Multimedia Files in the Invenio Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oltmanns, Björn; Schiefer, Bernhard

    Handling of multimedia files in the Invenio Software’ is motivated by the need for integration of multimedia files in the open-source, large-scale digital library software Invenio, developed and used at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. In the last years, digital assets like pictures, presentations podcasts and videos became abundant in these systems and digital libraries have grown out of their classic role of only storing bibliographical metadata. The thesis focuses on digital video as a type of multimedia and covers the complete workflow of handling video material in the Invenio software: from the ingestion of digital video material to its processing on to the storage and preservation and finally the streaming and presentation of videos to the user. The potential technologies to realise a video submission workflow are discussed in-depth and evaluated towards system integration with Invenio. The focus is set on open and free technologies, which can be redistributed with the Inve...

  2. Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy invites the public to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment it has prepared, for a proposal to provide a replacement capability for continued disposal of remote-handled low-level radioactive waste that is generated at the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  3. Fiber glass pipe effective for offshore water handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnipseed, S.P. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    1995-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Excellent corrosion resistance, weight savings, ease of construction, and reduced maintenance make fiber glass pipe attractive for water-handling service on offshore platforms. This article covers guidelines for fiber glass pipe installations and presents a number of case histories from the industry and Chevron Corp. Applications include seawater treatment, water injection, sewage and drains, deluge fire water systems, hose reel fire water, seawater cooling, produced water, and potable water. The paper gives usage guidelines.

  4. Health physics considerations in UF{sub 6} handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.C. [Norway Assoicates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium is a radioactive substance that emits alpha particles and very small amounts of gamma radiation. Its daughter products emit beta and gamma radiation. In uranium handling operations these are the radiations one must consider. This presentation will review the characteristics of the radiations, the isotopes from which they originate, the growth and decay of the uranium daughter products, and some specific health physics practices dictated by these factors.

  5. West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. A Smartphone Controlled Handheld Microfluidic Liquid Handling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baichen; Guan, Allan; Dong, Quan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies have made it possible to manipulate small volume liquids with unprecedented resolution, automation and integration. However, most current microfluidic systems still rely on bulky off-chip infrastructures such as compressed pressure sources, syringe pumps and computers to achieve complex liquid manipulation functions. Here, we present a handheld automated microfluidic liquid handling system controlled by a smartphone, which is enabled by combining elastomeric on-chip valves and a compact pneumatic system. As a demonstration, we show that the system can automatically perform all the liquid handling steps of a bead-based sandwich immunoassay on a multi-layer PDMS chip without any human intervention. The footprint of the system is 6 by 10.5 by 16.5cm, and the total weight is 829g including battery. Powered by a 12.8V 1500mAh Li battery, the system consumed 2.2W on average during the immunoassay and lasted for 8.7 hrs. This handheld microfluidic liquid handling platform...

  7. Preparation of acetaldehyde

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Depew, L.S.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of acetaldehyde by the hydrogenation of ketene in the presence of a transition metal hydrogenation catalyst.

  8. Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable oxygen standards and practices for minimum safety requirements. A summary of operational hazards, along with oxygen safety and emergency procedures, are provided.

  9. NFS File Handle Security Avishay Traeger, Abhishek Rai, Charles P. Wright, and Erez Zadok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    a file han- dle. When an NFS client performs an operation, it passes the file handle to the server, which decodes the file han- dle to determine what object the file handle refers to. Since NFS is a stateless

  10. Remote Handled TRU Waste Status and Activities and Challenges at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the Department of Energy's forecast volume of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste will originate from the Hanford Site. The forecasted Hanford RH-TRU waste volume of over 2000 cubic meters may constitute over one-third of the forecast inventory of RH-TRU destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To date, the Hanford TRU waste program has focused on the retrieval, treatment and certification of the contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes. This near-term focus on CH-TRU is consistent with the National TRU Program plans and capabilities. The first shipment of CH-TRU waste from Hanford to the WIPP is scheduled early in Calendar Year 2000. Shipments of RH-TRU from Hanford to the WIPP are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2006 per the National TRU Waste Management Plan. This schedule has been incorporated into milestones within the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). These Tri-Party milestones (designated the ''M-91'' series of milestones) relate to development of project management plans, completion of design efforts, construction and contracting schedules, and initiation of process operations. The milestone allows for modification of an existing facility, construction of a new facility, and/or commercial contracting to provide the capabilities for processing and certification of RH-TRU wastes for disposal at the WIPP. The development of a Project Management Plan (PMP) for TRU waste is the first significant step in the development of a program for disposal of Hanford's RH-TRU waste. This PMP will address the path forward for disposition of waste streams that cannot be prepared for disposal in the Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing facility (a contact-handled, small container facility) or other Site facilities. The PMP development effort has been initiated, and the PMP will be provided to the regulators for their approval by June 30, 2000. This plan will detail the path forward for the Hanford RH-TRU program.

  11. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies the necessary actions for addressing current questions concerning the safe and efficient disposal of remote-handled transuranic wastes that have been generated through Department of Energy activities. In addition, this document presents summaries of existing information and analyses regarding the potential alternatives for disposing of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A further discussion of DOE`s approach for addressing RH-TRU issues is contained in the document, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Strategy, DOE/WIPP-95-1090 (DOE, 1995a). Of this stored and projected inventory, approximately 30% can be characterized with current technology and subsequently certified to meet the waste acceptance criteria for disposal at WIPP; characterization of the remaining 70% will require the use of alternative techniques. At most of the generator sites, characterization equipment and facilities need to be procured in order for the sites to certify waste for shipment either to WIPP or to an interim site. If surface dose rates are too high, the use of non-invasive techniques such as non-destructive examination (NDE) and non-destructive assay (NDA) may be precluded. Characterization methods using NDA can be effectively used on RH-TRU wastes with surface dose rates of less than 1.0 rem/hr (neutron); NDE methods are effective on waste with surface dose rates of less than 10 rem/hr (gamma). The ability to use current NDE technology on waste with surface dose rates above 10 rem/hr will need to be demonstrated. Alternate characterization techniques, such as examination within a hot cell, could be used for the remaining waste; however, such techniques are labor intensive and would require additional effort to gather assay data. Improvements in characterization capabilities are being pursued through future technology development initiatives.

  12. Methods and Cost of Handling Texas Citrus, 1946-51.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, H. B.; Baker, C. K.

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and Costs of Handling Texas Citrus TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STAT10 R. D. LEWIS. DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS DIGEST The citrus industry in Texas underwent considerable change during the 1946-51 period. 7 of production dropped... changes during this period although trends in the use of containers for fresh citrus showed the rise in popularity of consumer-size mesh bags. The increase in proportion of these bags was from 2 percent of the total to 13 percent for grapefruit and from...

  13. New Developments in Storage and Handling of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundalli, N.

    NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN STORAGE AND HA~DLING OF BIOMASS Nazmir Bunda1li, P.Eng., B.C. Research Vancouver, B.C., Canada ABSTRACT An extensive research project to derive guidelines for the design of a reliable bin-feeder system for biomass... hog fuel storage bins in pulp mills have been successfully modified, based on the new design. INTRODUCTION An important reqUirement for the use of biomass for ellergy is the need to handl e effi ci ently, large volumes of the material. A cOlill1...

  14. Fusion Potentials for G_k and Handle Squashing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Crescimanno

    1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Chern-Simons gauge theory, we show that the fusion ring of the conformal field theory G_k is isomorphic to P(u)/(\\del V), where V is a polynomial in u and (\\del V) is the ideal generated by the conditions \\del V=0. We also derive a residue-like formula for the correlation functions in the Chern-Simons theory thus providing a RCFT version of the residue formula for the TLG models. An operator that acts like the measure in the residue formula has the ionterpretation of a handle squashing operator and an explicit formula for this operator is given.

  15. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| OpenInformation Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

  17. EXPORT CONTROLS PREPARED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    EXPORT CONTROLS MANUAL PREPARED BY: Office of General Counsel The California State University SEPTEMBER 2012 #12; Export Controls Manual Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 1 II. HISTORY OF EXPORT CONTROLS

  18. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

  19. NDE reliability through round robin testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fong, J.T.; Mordfin, L.; Hedden, O.F.; Bush, S.H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the accuracy of nondestructive testing. Topics considered at the conference included the design of a round robin ultrasonic testing program for piping, new advances in nondestructive evaluation analysis, the statistical handling of the data, the requalification of ultrasonic testing inspectors for the detection of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWR plants, and an overview of round robin testing.

  20. Technical basis for the transportation related handling representative accidents and associated hazards condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the handling and movement of tank farm waste sample containers, and mixed, low-level, and hazardous operational waste containers incidental to onsite vehicle transportation representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. See RPP-14286, Facility Worker Technical Basis Document, for these considerations. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  1. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  2. Test Plan for Evaluating Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not listed

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass preprocessing is a critical operation in the preparation of feedstock for the front-end of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass material into a suitable feedstock for optimum conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Without this operation, the natural size, bulk density, and flowability characteristics of harvested biomass would decrease the capacities and efficiencies of feedstock assembly unit operations and biorefinery conversion processes to the degree that programmatic cost targets could not be met. The preprocessing unit operation produces a bulk flowable material that 1) improves handling and conveying efficiencies throughout the feedstock assembly system and biorefinery 2) increases biomass surface areas for improved pretreatment efficiencies, 3) reduces particle sizes for improved feedstock uniformity and density, and 4) fractionates structural components for improved compositional quality. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with defining the overall efficiency/effectiveness of current commercial hammer and fixed cutter grinding systems and other connecting systems such as harvest and collection, storage, transportation, and handling for a wide variety of feedstock types used in bioethanol or syngas production. This test plan details tasks and activities for two separate full-scale grinding tests: Material Characterization Test and Machine Characterization Test. For the Material Characterization Test, a small amount (~5-7 tons each) of several feedstock varieties will be ground. This test will define the fractionation characteristics of the grinder that affect the bulk density, particle size distribution, and quality of the size reduced biomass resulting from different separation screen sizes. A specific screen size will be selected based on the characteristics of the ground material. The Machine Characterization Test will then use this selected screen to grind several 30-ton batches of different feedstock varieties and moistures. This test will focus on identifying the performance parameters of the grinding system specific to the feed, fractionation, and screen separation components and their affect on machine capacity and efficiency.

  3. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph; DeChellis, Michael; Koo, Michael

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and a processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.

  4. The combustion and handling properties of several heavy bitumen emulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whaley, H.; Wong, J.K.L.; Banks, G.N.; Lee, S.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program was undertaken by ACT/CANMET to compare the combustion and heat transfer characteristics of a number of bitumen-based water emulsions with those of heavy fuel oil. The addition of water gives some advantage in the areas of fuel handling, atomization and emissions. These studies showed that the emulsions burn and transfer heat in a manner similar to commercial heavy fuel oils and make excellent fuels for boiler and process combustors. However, if the heavy bitumen is partially upgraded, the emulsion made from these residues can sometimes give rise to combustion and emissions related concerns. Particular attention must be paid to the burner/atomization system in order to avoid combustion problems resulting in unacceptably high levels of soot deposition and emissions.

  5. Proposal for Construction/Demonstration/Implementation of A Material Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Jnatt

    2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortec Corporation, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) and DOE/Paducah propose to complete the technology demonstration and the implementation of the Material Handling System developed under Contract Number DE-AC21-92MC29120. The demonstration testing and operational implementation will be done at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The scope of work, schedule and cost for the activities are included in this proposal. A description of the facility to be constructed and tested is provided in Exhibit 1, attached. The USEC proposal for implementation at Paducah is presented in Exhibit 2, and the commitment letters from the site are included in Exhibit 3. Under our agreements with USEC, Bechtel Jacobs Corporation and DOE/Paducah, Vortec will be responsible for the construction of the demonstration facility as documented in the engineering design package submitted under Phase 4 of this contract on August 9, 2001. USEC will have responsibility for the demonstration testing and commercial implementation of the plant. The demonstration testing and initial commercial implementation of the technology will be achieved by means of a USEC work authorization task with the Bechtel Jacobs Corporation. The initial processing activities will include the processing of approximately 4,250 drums of LLW. Subsequent processing of LLW and TSCA/LLW will be done under a separate contract or work authorization task. To meet the schedule for commercial implementation, it is important that the execution of the Phase 4 project option for construction of the demonstration system be executed as soon as possible. The schedule we have presented herein assumes initiation of the construction phase by the end of September 2001. Vortec proposes to complete construction of the demonstration test system for an estimated cost of $3,254,422. This price is based on the design submitted to DOE/NETL under the Phase 4 engineering design deliverable (9 august 2001). The cost is subject to the assumptions and conditions identified in Section 6 of this proposal.

  6. Design Package for Fuel Retrieval System Fuel Handling Tool Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This design package documents design, fabrication, and testing of new stinger tool design. Future revisions will document further development of the stinger tool and incorporate various developmental stages, and final test results.

  7. Preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, K.

    1984-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for the preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate. Ethylenediamine dinitrate, a useful explosive, may readily be prepared by solvent extraction of nitrate ion from an acidic aqueous solution thereof using a high-molecular-weight, water-insoluble amine dissolved in an organic solvent, and reacting the resulting oraganic solution with ethylenediamine. The process of the instant invention avoids the use of concentrated nitric acid, as is currently practiced, resulting in a synthesis which is far less hazardous, especially for large quantities of the explosive, and more efficient.

  8. Preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for the preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate. Ethylenediamine dinitrate, a useful explosive, may readily be prepared by solvent extraction of nitrate ion from an acidic aqueous solution thereof using a high-molecular-weight, water-insoluble amine dissolved in an organic solvent, and reacting the resulting organic solution with ethylenediamine. The process of the instant invention avoids the use of concentrated nitric acid, as is currently practiced, resulting in a synthesis which is far less hazardous especially for large quantities of the explosive, and more efficient.

  9. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is the "Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and Science Quiz Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare for Upcoming Standards of Learning Tests April 7,...

  10. LM Records Handling System-Freedom of Information/Privacy Act...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Freedom of InformationPrivacy Act, Office of Legacy management LM Records Handling System-Freedom of InformationPrivacy Act, Office of Legacy management More Documents &...

  11. Exam Preparation & Strategies for Exam Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 Learning Levels & Types of Exam Questions Exams test our ability to use acquired knowledge. Our ability, proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processing and learning objectives on course outlines - Are previous exams available for review and practice? - Listen

  12. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett, T.J. Kneafsey, T.J., H. Liu, W. Winters, R. Boswell, R. Hunter, and T.S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and handling of natural gas hydrate. GSC Bulletin, 544: 263-naturally occurring gas hydrates: the structures of methanefrom the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well,

  13. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  14. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  15. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental set­up und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  16. U-183: ISC BIND DNS Resource Records Handling Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This problem was uncovered while testing with experimental DNS record types. It is possible to add records to BIND with null (zero length) rdata fields.

  17. advanced remote handling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower...

  18. Self-actuating mechanical grapple for lifting and handling objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovis, Gregory L. (North Augusta, SC); Etheredge, Jr., Carl T. (Tuscaloosa, AL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-actuating mechanical grapple for lifting and handling an object includes a support housing with upper and lower portions and defining an internal recess. The lower portion of the housing includes a bottom opening which communicates with the recess. Preferably, two or three grapple jaws are provided, the first end portions of which are connected to the housing and the second end portions thereof remain free for engaging an object. The grapple jaws are pivotable between open and closed positions. An actuator member is slidably positioned in the recess for opening and closing the jaws, and includes a cam portion in operative engagement with the first end portions of the jaws in a manner to pivot the jaws when the actuator member moves axially relative to the housing. The actuator member includes a rotatable member with at least one contact member. A locking member or logic ring includes grooves defining open and closed positions of the jaws and is fixedly mounted to the internal surface of the housing and cooperates with the rotatable member. A plunger member is axially movable in the housing for contacting an object and includes at least one stud member for immovably engaging the contact member.

  19. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Nguyen, Khanh B. (Sunnyvale, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  20. B cell remote-handled waste shipment cask alternatives study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RIDDELLE, J.G.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the 324 Facility B Cell includes the onsite transport of grouted remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Facility to the 200 Areas for disposal. The grouted waste has been transported in the leased ATG Nuclear Services 3-82B Radioactive Waste Shipping Cask (3-82B cask). Because the 3-82B cask is a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified Type B shipping cask, the lease cost is high, and the cask operations in the onsite environment may not be optimal. An alternatives study has been performed to develop cost and schedule information on alternative waste transportation systems to assist in determining which system should be used in the future. Five alternatives were identified for evaluation. These included continued lease of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, development and fabrication of an onsite cask, modification of the existing U.S. Department of Energy-owned cask (OH-142), and the lease of a different commercially available cask. Each alternative was compared to acceptance criteria for use in the B Cell as an initial screening. Only continued leasing of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, and the development and fabrication of an onsite cask were found to meet all of the B Cell acceptance criteria.

  1. Urenco`s experience of UF{sub 6} handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saelmans, F. [Urenco Almelo (Netherlands); Scane, C. [Urenco Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Christofzik, J. [Urenco Gronau (Germany)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Urenco operates enrichment plants at three sites, Almelo (Netherlands), Capenhurst (United Kingdom) and Gronau (Germany). Current installed separative work capacity is 2,500 tSWpa. Since 1971, when the first pilot plants were built, enrichment production has totalled 18,000 tSW. During this last 20 years over 3,500 48 containers of UF{sub 6} have been fed to the plants, over 3,700 30 containers have been filled with product and delivered successfully to Urenco`s customers worldwide and over 3,000 48 containers of depleted tails have been filled and have either been returned to customers or retained for long term storage on site. The paper gives a brief outline of Urenco`s experience in handling UF{sub 6}: the equipment and methods used in receiving, feeding, filling, blending, liquid sampling, storing, moving on site and despatching of UF{sub 6} containers. Some of the difficulties experienced with UF{sub 6} containers are appended.

  2. Missing Data Handling for Meter Data Management System Ru-Sen Jeng1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ling-Jyh

    Applications]: Types of Systems-- Decision support (e.g., MIS) Keywords Missing data, Smart meter, MDMS 1-scale deployments. As a consequence, conventional missing data handling methods are not applicable to smart meterMissing Data Handling for Meter Data Management System Ru-Sen Jeng1 , Chien-Yu Kuo1 , Yao-hua Ho1

  3. From Modelica Models to Fault Diagnosis in Air Handling Units Raymond Sterling1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    From Modelica Models to Fault Diagnosis in Air Handling Units Raymond Sterling1 , Peter Struss2 Handling Unit (AHU). This solution is derived from a general first-principle Modelica model and exploits 4 presents the modelica models and its calibration. In section 5 an example of the complete tool

  4. Towards Architecture-Level Middleware-Enabled Exception Handling of Component-based Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Architecture-Level Middleware-Enabled Exception Handling of Component-based Systems Gang of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China huanggang@sei.pku.edu.cn Abstract Exception handling is a practical and important way to improve the availability and reliability

  5. Agent-based Control for Material Handling Systems in In-House Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agent-based Control for Material Handling Systems in In-House Logistics Towards Cyber-Physical Systems in In-House-Logistics Utilizing Realsize Evaluation of Agent-based Material Handling Technology Werthmann Intelligent Production and Logistics Systems BIBA ­ Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik

  6. GUIDELINES FOR DESIGN AND SAFE HANDLING OF CURVED I-SHAPED STEEL GIRDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-5574-P1 GUIDELINES FOR DESIGN AND SAFE HANDLING OF CURVED I-SHAPED STEEL GIRDERS Authors: Jason FOR DESIGN AND SAFE HANDLING OF CURVED I-SHAPED STEEL GIRDERS PURPOSE: The purpose of this set of guidelines-sixth #12;2 (Eq. 6.10.2.2-2). However, TxDOT's Preferred Practices for Steel Bridge Design, Fabrication

  7. HADEGA: A Novel MPLS-based Mitigation Solution to Handle Network Attacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    in order to evaluate the efficiency of our approach. Results are presented. Index Terms--Network SecurityHADEGA: A Novel MPLS-based Mitigation Solution to Handle Network Attacks Nabil Hachem, Herve Debar are controlled and properly handled inside the core network of service providers. We conducted simulations

  8. Correlation of injury occurrence data with estimated maximal aerobic capacity and body composition in a high frequency manual materials handling task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Brian Nichols

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knowledge in the area of exercise physiology. I would also like to express my appreciation to the management of the manual materials handling company for their untiring assistance and organization. Credit must also be given to the manual materials..., Bicycle, and Step Tests Based on Oxygen Uptake Responses, Medicine and Science in Sports, 3, 149-154. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. (1981). A Work Practices Guide for Manual Lifting, Cincinnati, OH: US Department of Health...

  9. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  10. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  11. Improvement of storage, handling and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this third quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the feedstock coal options at the Chetopa Plant was conducted and mulling characteristics determined to enable a decision to be made regarding the feedstock selection. It was decided that the froth concentrate will be the feedstock wet fine coal used for the project. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement were initiated.

  12. TORIS Data Preparation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guinn, H.; Remson, D.

    1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this manual is to present guidelines and procedures for the preparation of new data for the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) data base. TORIS is an analytical system currently maintained by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bartlesville Project Office. It uses an extensive field- and reservoir-level data base to evaluate the technical and economic recovery potential of specific crude oil reservoirs.

  13. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  14. Sample Preparation and Characterisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    supplied by Corus RD&T. These were from creep tests, and comprised a screw-thread, which was used to hold.49 0.011 0.009 11.15 Mo Ni Nb V W 0.85 0.34 0.01 0.28 0.02 Table 6.2: Composition of creep-tested steel Fracture surface Screw thread Gauge Figure 6.1: Failed creep test specimen. The arrows show the position

  15. Thermal oxidation procedure PREPARATION........................................................................................................................................... 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    procedure - 2 - Preparation. The preparation procedure sets up the power, gas supplies, cooling water, (DI to check all the supplies. Cooling water Gas supplies Routing DI water for wet oxidation We start........................................................................................................................................... 2 Step 1 Turn on the cooling water

  16. Advanced Aerodynamic Devices to Improve the Performance, Economics, Handling, and Safety of Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Englar

    2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is being conducted at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) to develop advanced aerodynamic devices to improve the performance, economics, stability, handling and safety of operation of Heavy Vehicles by using previously-developed and flight-tested pneumatic (blown) aircraft technology. Recent wind-tunnel investigations of a generic Heavy Vehicle model with blowing slots on both the leading and trailing edges of the trailer have been conducted under contract to the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These experimental results show overall aerodynamic drag reductions on the Pneumatic Heavy Vehicle of 50% using only 1 psig blowing pressure in the plenums, and over 80% drag reductions if additional blowing air were available. Additionally, an increase in drag force for braking was confirmed by blowing different slots. Lift coefficient was increased for rolling resistance reduction by blowing only the top slot, while downforce was produced for traction increase by blowing only the bottom. Also, side force and yawing moment were generated on either side of the vehicle, and directional stability was restored by blowing the appropriate side slot. These experimental results and the predicted full-scale payoffs are presented in this paper, as is a discussion of additional applications to conventional commercial autos, buses, motor homes, and Sport Utility Vehicles.

  17. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J. (Yankton, SD); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Perry, W. Lee (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  18. Surface preparation and plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Waldrop, F.B.; Reno, R.W.

    1982-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers electroplating and electroless nickel plating since coatings of this type play an important role in diamond turning technology. Items to be discussed include preparation of substrates prior to coating, plating defects such as pits and nodules and their influence on optics, the influence of stress in coatings, plating details for copper, gold, silver, and electroless nickel, and the importance of additives and their influence on grain size and structure of deposits. Some comments are made on future challenges that could be presented to the plating community to further improve the quality of coatings applied for diamond turning purposes. 60 references, 8 figures, 9 tables.

  19. The preparation and analysis of ammonia base sulfite pulping liquor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honstead, John Frederick

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much better check between results obtained by two different operators testing the same sample, and using the Palm- rose method. In a mill the liquor is test d b? shift men as the liquor is being prepared, and also by technicians in the laboratory...

  20. The Analytical Gas Chromatographic System of the JET Active Gas Handling System ­ Tritium Commissioning and use during DTE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Analytical Gas Chromatographic System of the JET Active Gas Handling System ­ Tritium Commissioning and use during DTE1

  1. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  2. Microsoft Word - preparation_of_2012_congestion_study_Audubon...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the interconnection-level analytics was incapable of handling energy efficiency and demand response in a manner consistent with the handling of generation resources. The...

  3. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Peters, M.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 47 composite data products (CDPs) produced for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment, with data through the fourth quarter of 2013.

  4. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 2 of 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes 47 composite data products (CDPs) produced for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment, with data through the second quarter of 2013.

  5. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment composite data products for data through the fourth quarter of 2012.

  6. ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 2 of 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment composite data products for data through the second quarter of 2012.

  7. A MICROFLUIDIC MAGNETIC HYBRID ACTUATOR FOR ADVANCED HANDLING FUNCTIONS AT CELL RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A MICROFLUIDIC MAGNETIC HYBRID ACTUATOR FOR ADVANCED HANDLING FUNCTIONS-CNRS, Toulouse, FRANCE 2 Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, FRANCE *email : mfouet@laas.fr In microfluidics are usually integrated. Coils were thus integrated to microfluidic chips

  8. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  9. LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LWR NUCLEAR FUEL BUNDLE DATA FOR USE IN FUEL BUNDLE HANDLING TOPICAL REPORT W. 8. Weihermilfer C. S. Allison Septem bet 1979 Work Performed, Under Contract EY-76-C- M - 1 8 3 0...

  10. Handling Coordination in a Tree Adjoining Anoop Sarkar and Aravind Joshi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Anoop

    Handling Coordination in a Tree Adjoining Grammar Anoop Sarkar and Aravind Joshi Department,joshig@linc.cis.upenn.edu Draft of August 19, 1997 Longer version of (Sarkar and Joshi, 1996) Abstract In this paper we show

  11. Pin-Count-Aware Online Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Pin-Count-Aware Online Testing of Digital Microfluidic Biochips Yang Zhao and Krishnendu, and bioassay malfunctions in microfluidic biochips. To reduce product cost for disposable biochips, testing microfluidics is an emerging technology that pro- vides fluid-handling capability on a chip [1]. By reducing

  12. NEUTRON ACTIVATION COOLDOWN OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved the safe handling and processing about 100g of tritium. This resulted in manageable long concrete Test Cell showing the relative locations of the vessel, neutral beam injection systems, the vacuum. INTRODUCTION The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) began high power deuterium­tritium (D­T) fueled operations

  13. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value.

  14. Test-Theory Correlation Study for an Ultra High Temperature Thrust Magnetic Bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desireddy, Vijesh R.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic bearings have been researched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for a very long time to be used in wide applications. This research was to assemble and test an axial thrust electromagnetic bearing, which can handle...

  15. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  16. Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PrePre Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R 44 Union B44 Union 80228 Telephone: (303) 980-0540 Fax: (303) 985-2080 www.golder.com OFFICES ACROSS AFRICA, ASIA, AUSTRALIA, EUROPE, NORTH AMERICA AND SOUTH AMERICA TAILINGS CELL DESIGN REPORT PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE

  17. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system being evaluated. This can be the system manufacturer, a system user, or a third party organization such as a government agency. b. The term Vendor (or Vendor’s) System replaces the name of the specific SCADA/EMS being tested.

  18. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  19. CITIZENSHIP NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    CITIZENSHIP NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK #12;washington oregon nevada idaho montananorthdakota to offer targeted programs--Si Se Puede!, a joint education initiative between CUNY and the Consulate NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK #12;T he City University of New York is the nation's largest urban

  20. POISON RESISTANT CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels Field Test Unit (AFFTU) is a portable laboratory designed specifically to provide on-site evaluation of potential feedstocks for processes that produce alternative fuels from indigenous raw materials such as coal, natural gas or environmentally disadvantaged carbonaceous feedstocks. Since conversion of these raw materials into feed gas streams can produce a variety of bulk gas compositions, which furthermore can contain a myriad of trace components, it is necessary to evaluate each new feedstock on an individual basis. While it is possible to prepare blended gas mixtures to simulate the bulk composition of a known feedstock, it is neither possible nor cost-effective to simulate adequately the variety of trace chemicals present in that feedstock--some of which may not even be detected by routine analysis. Additionally, the transient composition of the gas during upsets or routine process changes may have an impact on the proposed process that is not foreseen in standard design. To address these concerns, the AFFTU was constructed with the following experimental capabilities: (1) A state-of-the-art gas chromatograph system to perform semi-continuous monitoring of both bulk composition and the concentration of key trace poisons down to one part per billion (ppb). (2) A 30-mL reactor system that can accept up to two feed streams from the customer, allowing a true life test with the actual gas projected for use in the proposed facility. (3) A manifold of four adsorbent beds, located upstream of the reactor, which permits the testing of adsorbents for the removal of contaminants from the feed stream. The effectiveness of these adsorbents may be evaluated either by analysis of the gas upstream and downstream of the bed (or at an intermediate point within the bed) or by observing the impact of the presence or absence of that bed on the actual stability of the catalyst activity. To achieve portability, the AFFTU was constructed in a commercial 48-foot trailer. Roughly half of the trailer is dedicated as ''office'' space, and it contains three personal computers that serve as an interface to the process control and handles data acquisition and analysis. The other half houses the laboratory, which is highly automated and designed for unattended operation. When not in use at a customer's site, the AFFTU is located at Air Products' Iron Run research facility, where it becomes an effective extension of the Alternative Fuels research laboratories.

  1. Preparation of thorium-uranium gel spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Haas, P.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic oxide spheres with diameters of 15 to 1500 ..mu..m are being evaluated for fabrication of power reactor fuel rods. (Th,U)O/sub 2/ spheres can be prepared by internal or external chemical gelation of nitrate solutions or oxide sols. Two established external gelation techniques were tested but proved to be unsatisfactory for the intended application. Established internal gelation techniques for UO/sub 2/ spheres were applied with minor modifications to make 75% ThO/sub 2/-25% UO/sub 2/ spheres that sinter to diameters of 200 to 1400 ..mu..m (99% T.D.).

  2. Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

  3. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysics Lab PPPL recognized forPRODUCTION6 -83 -45

  4. Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 Garfield County, Colorado September, 1995 Report Prepared for Mud Hammer Development Project Partners Mobil Oil...

  5. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  6. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  7. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  8. 18 years experience on UF{sub 6} handling at Japanese nuclear fuel manufacturer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujinaga, H.; Yamazaki, N.; Takebe, N. [Japan Nucelar Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the spring of 1991, a leading nuclear fuel manufacturing company in Japan, celebrated its 18th anniversary. Since 1973, the company has produced over 5000 metric ton of ceramic grade UO{sub 2} powder to supply to Japanese fabricators, without major accident/incident and especially with a successful safety record on UF{sub 6} handling. The company`s 18 years experience on nuclear fuel manufacturing reveals that key factors for the safe handling of UF{sub 6} are (1) installing adequate facilities, equipped with safety devices, (2) providing UF{sub 6} handling manuals and executing them strictly, and (3) repeating on and off the job training for operators. In this paper, equipment and the operation mode for UF{sub 6} processing at their facility are discussed.

  9. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  10. Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips Adapted from: The Academic Skills Center At California Polytechnic State University Tips Before, During, and After the Test Here are some tips you can implement to help you through tests. Try implementing these techniques to make the grade! Before Start to prepare

  11. Analysis of postharvest handling and marketing systems for vegetable production in East and Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vamosy, Margaret Laurain

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    happens to the produce that you sort out [on the farm]?" 94 19 Responses to question 223, "What happens to the produce that you don't sell by the time you leave the market7" 96 20 Means Of transporting produce from fields to post harvest handling... of produce storage after handling procedures are completed and before departure for market. 104 25 Market arrival times. 105 26 Responses to question 220, "How long do you wait at the market before you get a stall or start selling?" 106 27 Responses...

  12. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  13. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Prepares for Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – The historic underground test area known as Yucca Flat is the focus of an upcoming independent peer review. In preparation, groundwater specialists working for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) groundwater program have scheduled a week-long dry run in February.

  14. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  15. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  16. Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85, July 2010, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Clean Cities (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidebook contains information about EPAct alternative fuels regulations for fleets, flexible fuel vehicles, E85 properties and specifications, and E85 handling and storage guidelines.

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance in the Key Early Markets of Material Handling Equipment and Backup Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes the results of NREL's analysis of hydrogen fuel cell performance in the key early markets of material handling equipment (MHE) and backup power.

  18. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kury, John W. (Danville, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA)

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  19. Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten Trioxide Cyclic Trimers on FeO(111)Pt(111). Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

  20. Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Have a plan in place in case a natural disaster or other...

  1. Project Plan 7930 Cell G PaR Remote Handling System Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Kathryn A [ORNL

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 40 years the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have made Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) available for a wide range of industries including medical, nuclear fuels, mining, military and national security. The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) located within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) processes irradiated production targets from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operations in Building 7930, Cell G provide over 70% of the world's demand for {sup 252}Cf. Building 7930 was constructed and equipped in the mid-1960s. Current operations for {sup 252}Cf processing in Building 7930, Cell G require use of through-the-wall manipulators and the PaR Remote Handling System. Maintenance and repairs for the manipulators is readily accomplished by removal of the manipulator and relocation to a repair shop where hands-on work can be performed in glove boxes. Contamination inside cell G does not currently allow manned entry and no provisions were created for a maintenance area inside the cell. There has been no maintenance of the PaR system or upgrades, leaving operations vulnerable should the system have a catastrophic failure. The Cell G PaR system is currently being operated in a run to failure mode. As the manipulator is now 40+ years old there is significant risk in this method of operation. In 2006 an assessment was completed that resulted in recommendations for replacing the manipulator operator control and power centers which are used to control and power the PaR manipulator in Cell G. In mid-2008 the chain for the bridge drive failed and subsequent examinations indicated several damaged links (see Figure 1). To continue operations the PaR manipulator arm is being used to push and pull the bridge as a workaround. A retrieval tool was fabricated, tested and staged inside Cell G that will allow positioning of the bridge and manipulator arm for removal from the cell should the PaR system completely fail. A fully functioning and reliable Par manipulator arm is necessary for uninterrupted {sup 252}Cf operations; a fully-functioning bridge is needed for the system to function as intended.

  2. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  3. DIMENSIONS: Why do we need a new Data Handling architecture for Sensor Networks?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Deepak

    DIMENSIONS: Why do we need a new Data Handling architecture for Sensor Networks? Deepak Ganesan incorporate their ex- treme resource constraints - energy, storage and processing - and spatio-temporal interpretation of the physical world in the design, cost model, and metrics of evaluation. We describe DIMENSIONS

  4. Handles Revisited: Optimising Performance and Memory Costs in a Real-Time Collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Handles Revisited: Optimising Performance and Memory Costs in a Real-Time Collector Tomas Kalibera garbage collectors must update all references to ob- jects they move. Updating is a lengthy operation references have been updated which, in a real-time collector, must be done incrementally. One solution

  5. Power Generation Loading Optimization using a Multi-Objective Constraint-Handling Method via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaodong

    power industry. A major objective for the coal-fired power generation loading optimization results of the power generation loading optimization based on a coal-fired power plant demonstratesPower Generation Loading Optimization using a Multi-Objective Constraint-Handling Method via PSO

  6. LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility If a study fish is found dead, preserve it and return it to the lab for DRILL recording. If you are going to DCL shortly after finding the fish: 1. Put it in a plastic bag and bring it to DCL. 2. Put

  7. November 28, 2006 Seismologists get handle on heat flow deep in earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    November 28, 2006 Seismologists get handle on heat flow deep in earth Earth's interior placid inner Earth as a dynamic environment filled with exotic materials and substances roiling under that has an impact on what happens on our planet's surface. The latest evidence of this dynamic inner Earth

  8. Guidelines for Laundering Laboratory Personal Protective Equipment Handling Potentially Contaminated Laundry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    or radiological materials. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on how to handle your personal, chemical, radiological or mixed). Follow department specific procedures when available. Use minimal to be placed into a red bag. In-house laundry facility If your department does not utilize a vendor to clean

  9. Optimization of Trajectories for the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System in Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro,Isabel

    May 2011 Optimization of Trajectories for the Cask and Plug Remote Handling System in Tokamak ­ Trajectories of the Rescue Casks · Task 4 ­ Parking in HCB Cask trajectories in level B1 of Tokamak Building System in Tokamak Building and Hot Cell o Grant Objectives · Trajectories optimization for nominal

  10. Challenges and Innovative Technologies On Fuel Handling Systems for Future Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , AREVA, and EDF have an extensive experience and significant expertise in sodium-cooled fast reactorsChallenges and Innovative Technologies On Fuel Handling Systems for Future Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors Mathieu CHASSIGNET1;Ã , Sebastien DUMAS1 , Christophe PENIGOT1 , Ge´rard PRELE2 , Alain CAPITAINE2

  11. HAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS IN CLINICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    containers, pickup hazardous drug waste and provide chemo spill kits to appropriate areas. The OfficeHAZARDOUS DRUG SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HANDLING ANTINEOPLASTIC AND OTHER HAZARDOUS DRUGS, administration and disposal of drug residues. Drugs are classified as hazardous if studies in animals and

  12. RIS0-M-2294 HANDLING OF DEUTERIUM PELLETS FOR PLASMA REFUELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RIS0-M-2294 HANDLING OF DEUTERIUM PELLETS FOR PLASMA REFUELLING P.s. Jensen and V. Andersen Association Euratom - Ris0 National Laboratory Abstract. The use of a guide tube technique to inject pellets in pellet-plasma experiments guide tube on the mass and (v ~ 150 m/s) is negligible. jectories

  13. HANDLING ARABIDOPSIS PLANTS AND SEEDS Methods used by the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Iris

    . These procedures are designed to generate healthy plants that give maximum set of pure seeds and to preserveHANDLING ARABIDOPSIS PLANTS AND SEEDS Methods used by the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center GROWTH OF PLANTS Growth of plants in sterile conditions Growth of plants on soil · Planting on soil

  14. LPV/H controller for vehicle handling and stability enhancement M. DOUMIATI 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LPV/H controller for vehicle handling and stability enhancement M. DOUMIATI 1 , O. SENAME 1 , J Laboratory, Computer and Automation Research Institute, Budapest, HUNGARY, e-mail: {gaspar, szabo, bokor with steering/braking coordination task, for automotive vehicle yaw control scheme. Because of the tire

  15. Linear MPC with Optimal Prioritized Infeasibility Handling: Application, Computational Issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    . The usefulness of the method is illustrated on a simulated distillation column. Moreover, we present a novelLinear MPC with Optimal Prioritized Infeasibility Handling: Application, Computational Issues Cybernetics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. All practical MPC

  16. Cooling output optimization of an air handling unit Andrew Kusiak *, Mingyang Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    supply temperature and supply air temperature in response to the dynamic cooling load and changingCooling output optimization of an air handling unit Andrew Kusiak *, Mingyang Li Department mining Neural network Multi-objective optimization Evolutionary computation Dynamic modeling Cooling

  17. Dynamical Handling of Straddle Carriers Activities on a Container Terminal in Uncertain Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dynamical Handling of Straddle Carriers Activities on a Container Terminal in Uncertain precisely straddle carriers in a container terminal. The information given by such a tool makes an optimization possible. In fact, a box terminal is an open system subject to dynamics, in which many events can

  18. Automated control for coal handling operations at Bethlehem Steel, Burns Harbor Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zendzian, T.N. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Chesterton, IN (United States). Burns Harbor Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Burns Harbor coal handling operation processes 7,200 tons of coal per day to supply two 82 oven, six meter batteries. The operations in coal handling are subdivided into three separate sections: the coal field and stacker reclaimer operation, the crushing and storage of coal, and the coal blending operation. In 1996 a supervisory system was developed and installed to fully automate all the operations and equipment in the coal handling unit, add additional instrumentation and logic controls to prevent coal contamination, and improve data collection and logging. The supervisory system is operated from a computer based workstation and is based on a distributed control philosophy utilizing programmable logic controllers, set point controllers, and man-machine interface displays. The previous control system for the coal handling operation consisted of a switchboard from which an operator controller the set up and running of the conveyor systems and equipment to stack, reclaim, and blend coal. The new supervisory system was installed in parallel with the original control system to safeguard continued operation during the system installation and commissioning. The original system still exists and can be operated in even of failure of the supervisory system.

  19. Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

  20. Handling QoS in MDA: a discussion on availability and dynamic reconfiguration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    Handling QoS in MDA: a discussion on availability and dynamic reconfiguration 1 João Paulo Almeidaa-Driven Architecture (MDA) approach. In order to illustrate our discussion, we consider the introduction-Driven Architecture (MDA) approach [9]. The concept of platform-independence plays a central role in MDA development

  1. Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units introduce outside air directly into the cooling duct and use two variable speed devices to independently maintain the static pressure of the hot and the cold air ducts. Analytical models have been developed...

  2. Static Detection of API Error-Handling Bugs via Mining Source Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Static Detection of API Error-Handling Bugs via Mining Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie error specifi- cations automatically from software package repositories, without requiring any user inter-procedurally scattered and not always correctly coded by the programmers, manually inferring

  3. COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999 Document Number University of Colorado Campus Box 593 Boulder, Colorado 80309 #12;REVISIONS Letter ECO No. Description Check. Wilkinson 11-30-99 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping

  4. 3.1.1.2 Feed Processing and Handling DL2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Wend, Christopher F.

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report is the deliverable for our Feed Processing and Handling project. It includes results of wet biomass feedstock analysis, slurry pumping information, fungal processing to produce a lignin-rich biorefinery residue and two subcontracted efforts to quantify the amount of wet biomass feedstocks currently available within the corn processing and paper processing industries.

  5. Operational test report for LERF Basin 242AL-44 integrity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galioto, T.M.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report documents the results of LERF operational testing per operational test procedure (OTP) TFPE-WP-0231, ``LERF Basin Integrity Testing.`` The primary purpose of the OTP was to resolve test exceptions generated as a result of TFPE-WP-0184. The TOP was prepared and performed in accordance with WHC-SD-534-OTP-002, ``Operational Test Plan for the 242-A Evaporator Upgrades and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility.`` WHC-S-086, ``Specification for Operational Testing of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, Basin Integrity Testing,`` identified the test requirements and acceptance criteria. The completed, signed-off test procedure is contained in Appendix A. The test log is contained in Appendix B. Section 2.1 describes all the test exceptions written during performance of the Operational Test Procedure. The test revisions generated during the testing are discussed in Section 2.2. The dispositioned test exception forms are contained in Appendix C.

  6. An internship in postharvest handling of vegetables and fruits at Valley Onions, McAllen, Texas: and an analysis of the postharvest handling system of onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Ramos, Jose Ignacio

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , McALLW, TEXAS ~ AN ANALYSIS OF THE POSTHARVEST HANDLING SYSTEM OF ONIONS A Professional Paper by Jose Ignacio Sanchez-Eamon Approved as to style and content by: Leonard M. Pike (Hort) Chairman, Advisory Committee James Benton Storey (Hort.... Am. Econ. Rev. 50:908-17. 19. Zusman, P. and A. Amiad. 1965. Simulation: A tool for farm planing under conditions of uncertainty. J. Farm. Econ. 47:574-95. 31 VITA NAME PERMANENT ADDRESS TELEPHONE Jose Ignacio Sanchez~os. Callejon de la Rosa...

  7. Fuel Retrieval Sub (FRS) Project Decapping Station Performance Test Data Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to provide the test data report for Decapping Station Performance Testing. These performance tests were full scale and viewed as a continuation of development testing performed earlier (SNF-2710). A prototype decapping station confinement box was tested, along with some special tools required for the process, providing assurance that the fuel handling equipment will operate as designed, allowing for release of the FRS equipment for installation.

  8. Efficient Path Delay Test Generation with Boolean Satisfiability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bian, Kun

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    delay test generator CodGen. A mixed structural-functional approach was implemented in CodGen where longest paths were detected using the K Longest Path Per Gate (KLPG) algorithm and path justification and dynamic compaction were handled with the SAT...

  9. Gain-scheduled LPV/H controller based on direct yaw moment and active steering for vehicle handling improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in vehicle handling and stability. I. INTRODUCTION A close examination of accident data reveals that losing the vehicle control is responsible for a huge proportion of car accidents. Under critical driving, and dangerous accidents could happen. To ensure vehicle stability and handling, many advanced active chassis

  10. Comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; VanDerSchal, W.H.; Leather, G.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus ccalyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photo bacterium phosphoreum - Microtox test, and a mixture of bacterial species - the polytox test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriadaphnta dubia), green algae (Setenastrum capricarnutum), fathead minnows (Pimephalespromelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC5O/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  11. A comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, M.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Shedd, T.R. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States); Schalie, W.H. van der [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Leather, G.R. [Hood Coll., Frederick, MD (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus calyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photobacterium phosphoreum--Microtox{reg_sign} test, and a mixture of bacterial species--the Polytox{reg_sign} test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC50/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  12. (Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams, in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of coal from the effluent stream samples will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of raw coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the combustible matter. The process parameters will be modified so that this technology can be applied to preparation plant effluents in order to recover a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal that is, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal currently produced from the preparation plant. The main activities during this period were setting up the static tube test unit to conduct the experimental work as outlined in the project work plan. The first of four effluent slurry samples collected from four operating Illinois preparation plants was tested at Michigan Technological University. The first batch of tests resulted in a clean coal containing 7.5% ash at 94.5% combustible matter recovery. Another test aimed at lowering the ash further analyzed at 3.0% ash and 0.92% total sulfur. In addition, analyses of particle size distribution and sink-float testing of the +200 mesh material were undertaken as a part of the effluent characterization work. 5 tabs.

  13. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF SYSTEMS FOR THE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING OF REMOTE-HANDLED SLUDGE FROM HANFORD K-WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAYMOND RE

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011, significant progress was made in developing and deploying technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 105-K West Fuel Storage Basin on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The sludge in the 105-K West Basin is an accumulation of degraded spent nuclear fuel and other debris that collected during long-term underwater storage of the spent fuel. In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was used to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from 10 submerged temporary storage containers in the K West Basin. In 2011, a full-scale prototype facility was completed for use in technology development, design qualification testing, and operator training on systems used to retrieve, transport, and store highly radioactive K Basin sludge. In this facility, three separate systems for characterizing, retrieving, pretreating, and processing remote-handled sludge were developed. Two of these systems were successfully deployed in 2011. One of these systems was used to pretreat knockout pot sludge as part of the 105-K West Basin cleanup. Knockout pot sludge contains pieces of degraded uranium fuel ranging in size from 600 {mu}m to 6350 {mu}m mixed with pieces of inert material, such as aluminum wire and graphite, in the same size range. The 2011 pretreatment campaign successfully removed most of the inert material from the sludge stream and significantly reduced the remaining volume of knockout pot product material. Removing the inert material significantly minimized the waste stream and reduced costs by reducing the number of transportation and storage containers. Removing the inert material also improved worker safety by reducing the number of remote-handled shipments. Also in 2011, technology development and final design were completed on the system to remove knockout pot material from the basin and transport the material to an onsite facility for interim storage. This system is scheduled for deployment in 2012. The prototype facility also was used to develop technology for systems to retrieve remote-handled transuranic sludge smaller than 6350 {mu}m being stored in underwater containers. After retrieving the sludge, the system will be used to load and transport the sludge for interim storage. During 2011, full-scale prototype systems were developed and tested to a Technology Readiness Level 6 as defined by U.S. Department of Energy standards. This system is scheduled for deployment in 2013. Operations also are scheduled for completion in 2014.

  14. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated.

  15. US Demo test blankets in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waganer, L.M.; Lee, V.D [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MO (United States); Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.Y. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hua, T.; Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dagher, M.A. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the current status of the Demo blanket test systems and how the ITER reactor design and operations are being accommodated. The US blanket program is planning to develop a liquid metal breeder and a solid breeder blanket for testing and evaluation. The test blanket modules will have prototypical components, materials, and coolants representative of power reactor systems. The modules are to be located in the ITER horizontal test ports and installed/removed with special remote handling equipment. Adjacent ITER blanket neutronic and temperature conditions suggest the use of an isolation frame surrounding the test blanket modules or submodules. This frame will also provide additional shielding to protect the adjacent vacuum vessel. The frame and blanket module are attached to the surrounding backplate to transfer static and dynamic loads. All coolants and tritium-bearing fluids will be routed out of the midplane port to special heat exchangers and tritium separation systems. Special remote handling equipment is being designed to install and extract the test blanket modules. Dedicated transporters will be used to move the blanket and shielding modules to dedicated hot cells. Special facility areas will be provided immediately outside the port areas for the heat exchangers, pumps, and tritium-separation systems. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  16. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  17. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - TEPP Planning Brochure DOE Efforts in Preparing and Improving First Response Capabilities and Performance through Drills and Exercises TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document...

  18. Making coal burnable: preparation and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper offers several different views on the tools available to boost the burnability of coal. One view of making coal burnable and for better emissions control lies in the combustion process. One approach is fluidized bed combustion and the two choices within this technology are atmospheric (AFBC) and pressurized (PFBC). Several tests are being conducted to develop the slagging combustor technology for direct conversion from oil to coal. Some advantages listed for this method are a simple retrofit, low particulate, NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ emissions, no modification for burning pulverized coal or coal/water slurry, no ash and no moving parts. Another method discussed is coal blending. The industrial and utility coal burning demand, combined with vacillating regulatory situations, reveals a need for coal users to be ever more alert to fuel price and availability. Technologies in the three areas of application -- coal preparation/cleaning, combustion, and emissions control -- offer an endless array of combinations.

  19. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Maxime DESCOTEAUX Adviser Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Reviewers Peter Basser NICHD, USA Ayache INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Habib Benali INSERM / Pitié-Salpêtrière, France Denis Le Bihan

  20. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Wassermann Advisor Dr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia-Antipolis, France Reviewers Dr. Cyril Poupon CEA Neuro l' INRIA Sophia Antipolis et present´ee ´a l' Universit´e de Nice-Sophia Antipolis ´Ecole Doctorale

  1. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Val´erie Perrier University of Grenoble, France Dr. Fabrice Wallois;UNIVERSIT ´E NICE-SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS - UFR Sciences ´Ecole Doctorale STIC (Sciences et Technologies de l

  2. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Voronoi Diagrams and Applications Camille WORMSER Advisors Pr. Jean-Daniel Boissonnat INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Mariette Yvinec INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Reviewers Pr. Aurenhammer Technische

  3. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia NUNDLOLL Defense date: 30 March 2010. Jury Members Jean Luc GOUZ� INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Advisor Frédéric GROGNARD INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Co-advisor Ludovic MAILLERET INRA Sophia Antipolis, France

  4. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Pr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Olivier Faugeras INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France-Fredrik Westin Harvard University, USA Examiners Pr. Nicholas Ayache INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Dr. Maher

  5. Preparation of gas selective membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Funk, E.W.

    1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

  6. Preparation of gas selective membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulprathipanja, Santi (Hoffman Estates, IL); Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

  7. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  8. JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    JISC/OSI JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Report Prepared by Key Perspectives Ltd 48 Old Coach Road, Playing behind its development 4 2.2 Models and definitions of open access 8 2.2.1 Open access journals 8 2 4.1 Respondent profiles 18 4.2 Awareness of open access journals 18 4.2.1 Extent and longevity

  9. Prepared by: Environmental Design & Research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Kwang W.

    Architecture and Engineering, P.C. (edr) 217 Montgomery St., Suite 1000 Syracuse, New York 13202 P. 315 Broadway Albany, New York 12246 Contact: Ms. Peggy McSorley Phone: (518) 320-3200 Prepared By: edr Companies (edr) 217 Montgomery Street, Suite 1000 Syracuse, New York 13202 Contact: Patrick Heaton Phone

  10. Photochemical preparation of plutonium pentafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabideau, Sherman W. (Los Alamos, NM); Campbell, George M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel compound plutonium pentafluoride may be prepared by the photodissociation of gaseous plutonium hexafluoride. It is a white solid of low vapor pressure, which consists predominantly of a face-centered cubic structure with a.sub.o =4.2709.+-.0.0005 .ANG..

  11. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  12. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  13. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  14. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  15. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  16. Handling and archiving of magnetic fusion data at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanderLaan, J.F.; Miller, S.; McHarg, B.B. Jr.; Henline, P.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent modifications to the computer network at DIII-D enhance the collection and distribution of newly acquired and archived experimental data. Linked clients and servers route new data from diagnostic computers to centralized mass storage and distribute data on demand to local and remote workstations and computers. Capacity for data handling exceeds the upper limit of DIII-D Tokamak data production of about 4 GBytes per day. Network users have fast access to new data stored on line. An interactive program handles requests for restoration of data archived off line. Disk management procedures retain selected data on line in preference to other data. Redundancy of all components on the archiving path from the network to magnetic media has prevented loss of data. Older data are rearchived as dictated by limited media life.

  17. Gridley Ethanol Demonstration Project Utilizing Biomass Gasification Technology: Pilot Plant Gasifier and Syngas Conversion Testing; August 2002 -- June 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of an overall evaluation of using a modified Pearson Pilot Plant for processing rice straw into syngas and ethanol and the application of the Pearson technology for building a Demonstration Plant at Gridley. This report also includes information on the feedstock preparation, feedstock handling, feedstock performance, catalyst performance, ethanol yields and potential problems identified from the pilot scale experiments.

  18. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  19. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  20. Remote Handling Equipment for a High-Level Waste Waste Package Closure System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin M. Croft; Scott M. Allen; Mark W. Borland

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste will be placed in sealed waste packages inside a shielded closure cell. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has designed a system for closing the waste packages including all cell interior equipment and support systems. This paper discusses the material handling aspects of the equipment used and operations that will take place as part of the waste package closure operations. Prior to construction, the cell and support system will be assembled in a full-scale mockup at INL.

  1. Using Product Specific Simulation Models in a Tool for Manual Commissioning of Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USING PRODUCT SPECIFIC SIMULATION MODELS IN A TOOL FOR MANUAL COMMISSIONING OF AIR HANDLING UNITS J?RGEN ERIKSSON ?F-INSTALLATION AB GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN ABSTRACT This short paper describes an outline of a tool for manual commissioning.... Cetetherm IQHeat. Cetetherm. Ronneby. Sweden. 3. Portland Energy Conservation Inc. Methods for automated and continuous commissioning of build- ings. Air-Conditioning and refrigeraration technol- ogy institute, Arlington, Virginia. 4. T. Haasl, D...

  2. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP Project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  3. Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

  4. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, E V

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  5. preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioremediation Of Uranium In; Shallow Alluvial Aquifers; Shallow Alluvial Aquifers; S. B. Yabusaki; Y. Fang; S. R. Waichler; P. E. Long

    Uranium can be removed from groundwater by adding an electron donor to the subsurface that stimulates growth of native bacteria, generating conditions that result in precipitation of uranium. The long-term efficacy of this technology is unproven. Numerical modeling results for uranium bioremediation in a shallow, alluvial aquifer are provided to establish a broad framework for understanding processes associated with bioremediation of uranium and to bound conditions under which bioremediation could succeed in the long-term and conditions under which it is likely to fail. The models are benchmarked against experiments conducted at the Rifle, Colorado site. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters were conducted, examining: alternatives to the acetate electron donor (lactate and ethanol), oxygen and nitrate terminal electron acceptors, multiphase flow, density and gas entrapment processes, and hypothetical flood events. Sensitivity of simulated aqueous U(VI) concentrations to process model parameters suggest that groundwater flow rate, uranium bioreduction rate, and sulfate bioreduction parameters exert the most impact on bioremediation effectiveness. The simulated scenarios are used to assess potential performance issues for site conditions and other bioremediation approaches.

  6. Prepared

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:orPOST-REMEDIAL

  7. Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. P. Mendiratta; D. K. Ploetz

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste pro-cessing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999.

  8. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  9. APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. ­ EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT DECEMBER 2006 E-1 #12; #12;Project No Test Report #12;Prepared for: Mr. Ken Partymiller, Ph.D. Environmental Chemist Tetra Tech EM, Inc. 5326.0 Summary of Test Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.0 Test

  10. A component test facility based on the spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Fogarty, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Burgess, Thomas W [ORNL; Strickler, Dennis J [ORNL; Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Tsai, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments (Synakowski et al 2004 Nucl. Fusion 43 1648, Lloyd et al 2004 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46 13477) on the Spherical Tokamak (or Spherical Torus, ST) (Peng 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1681) have discovered robust plasma conditions, easing shaping, stability limits, energy confinement, self-driven current and sustainment. This progress has encouraged an update of the plasma conditions and engineering of a Component Test Facility (CTF), (Cheng 1998 Fusion Eng. Des. 38 219) which is a very valuable step in the development of practical fusion energy. The testing conditions in a CTF are characterized by high fusion neutron fluxes Gamma(n) approximate to 8.8 x 10(13) n s(-1) cm(-2) ('wall loading' W-L approximate to 2 MW m(-2)), over size-scale > 10(5) cm(2) and depth-scale > 50 cm, delivering > 3 accumulated displacement per atom per year ('neutron fluence' > 0.3 MW yr(-1) m(-2)) (Abdou et al 1999 Fusion Technol. 29 1). Such conditions are estimated to be achievable in a CTF with R-0 = 1.2 m, A = 1.5, elongation similar to 3, I-p similar to 12 MA, B-T similar to 2.5 T, producing a driven fusion burn using 47 MW of combined neutral beam and RF heating power. A design concept that allows straight-line access via remote handling to all activated fusion core components is developed and presented. The ST CTF will test the lifetime of single-turn, copper alloy centre leg for the toroidal field coil without an induction solenoid and neutron shielding and require physics data on solenoid-free plasma current initiation, ramp-up to and sustainment at multiple megaampere level. A systems code that combines the key required plasma and engineering science conditions of CTF has been prepared and utilized as part of this study. The results show high potential for a family of relatively low cost CTF devices to suit a range of fusion engineering and technology test missions.

  11. Preparation of waste oil for analysis to determine hazardous metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, D.R.; Huff, E.A.; Fox, I.M.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods for preparing waste-oil samples to permit measurement of their metals content were evaluated. For this evaluation, metals-in-oil standard reference materials were prepared by each method and the resulting solutions were analyzed for 20 metals, including those (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag) regulated as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. One preparation method involved combustion of the waste oil under oxygen at 25 atm pressure, as described in the American Society for Testing and Materials test method E926-88. As we applied it, this method gave recoveries well under 90% for most of the metals that we examined and, hence, proved unsatisfactory for routine application to waste-oil analysis. With the other method, nitric acid decomposition in a sealed vessel heated with microwave energy (analogous to US Environmental Protection Agency Method 3051), recoveries of all 20 metal contaminants were within 90 to 110% of the certified values. This microwave digestion procedure was also more efficient since it allowed six samples to be prepared together, whereas the oxygen combustion approach allowed processing of only one sample at a time.

  12. Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering the coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of carbonaceous material from the effluent streams will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process in conjunction with pyrite depressants. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the Btu value. The process parameters will be modified to accept preparation plant effluents in order to produce a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal product that at a minimum is compatible with the quality requirements of the plant clean coal. This report covers the first quarter of the project. The main activities during this period were the drafting of a project work plan and the collection of four coal preparation plant effluent samples for testing. Effluent slurry samples were collected from four operating preparation plants in Illinois and shipped to Michigan Technological University for experimental work.

  13. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  14. NEUTRON ACTIVATION COOL-DOWN OF THE TOKAMAK FUSION TEST REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    involved the safe handling and processing about 100g of tritium. This resulted in manageable long concrete Test Cell showing the relative locations of the vessel, neutral beam injection systems, the vacuum. INTRODUCTION The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) began high power deuterium-tritium (D-T) fueled operations

  15. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  16. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  17. Preparation of high purity vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, O.N.; Burkholder, H.R.; Martsching, G.A.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the various reduction and refining methods that have been used to prepare vanadium metal. Earlier work on metallothermic and carbothermic reduction processes is discussed. Recent work on improving the scaling up the aluminothermic reduction process is described in detail. Iron and silicon are first removed from commercial V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ by an ion exchange separation technique and the purified oxide is then exothermically reduced with aluminum metal. The resulting V-Al ingot is heated in a vacuum to 1700/sup 0/C to remove the aluminum and dissolved oxygen, and the sponge is then electron-beam melted to remove residual volatile impurities to yield vanadium metal of 99.98% purity. Precautions taken during each processing stage to minimize carbon, nitrogen and oxygen contamination are described. Metal containing < 50 ppmw each of C, N and O, < 20 ppmw Si, and < 10 ppmw of Fe and Al has been prepared in kilogram quantities by this method. The hardness of the beam melted is 60 to 70 DPH. Experiments designed to scale up the reduction process and to increase the efficiency of the separation and melting steps are described. Various refining techniques that have been applied to the preparation of high purity vanadium are described and comparisons made between the quality of metal obtained by each.

  18. Raw material preparation for ultra high production rate sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany); Cappel, F.; Weisel, H.; Richter, G. [LURGI AG, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An R and D program in pot grate sintering showed, that an intensive preparation of ores, additives and coke breeze improves the sintering capacity. The tests were conducted using an ore mixture composed of typical ores imported to Europe. The highest capacities were attained up to 63.8 t/m{sup 2} {times} 24 h maximum for a sinter which well fulfills the high requirements on chemical, physical and metallurgical properties.

  19. Health assessment for Malta Rocket Test Site, Saratoga County, Malta, New York, Region 2. CERCLIS No. NYD980535124. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malta Rocket Fuel Test Station is listed by the USEPA on the National Priorities List. The General Electric Company tested operations at the site as a contractor to the U.S. Government. Beginning in December 1974, and continuing until December 1979, Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. conducted operations at a building on the site. During the course of its operations, Exxon handled several hazardous chemicals including methylethyl ketone, acetone, tetrachloroethene, and toluene. Various site inspections, investigations and engineering studies have been conducted at the site. Ground water collected from monitoring wells on-site is contaminated with chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene. In April 1985, sampling of ground water supplies serving the site demonstrated significant drinking-water contamination with concentrations of carbon tetrachloride up to 220 micro g/L, chloroform up to 25 micro g/L, PCBs up to 1.3 micro g/L, trichlorethene up to 120 micro g/L, and boron up to 140 micro g/L. The site has been the subject of several investigations, however, none have been comprehensive. The site should be the subject of a complete remedial investigation/feasibility study before a full health assessment can be prepared.

  20. Excavation and Repackaging of Retrievably-Stored, Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, R. [US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bolling, D. [Washington Safety Management Solutions, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turner, D. [Visionary Solutions, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1972 and 1981, remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were retrievably stored through shallow land burial in a series of 22 earthen trenches in the northern portion of Solid Waste Storage Area 5 in ORNL's Melton Valley. A Dispute Resolution Agreement signed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and DOE specified removal of the buried (stored) waste to allow for repackaging, processing, and offsite disposal at an appropriate facility. A total of 204 concrete casks were successfully retrieved and over-packed from the 22-trench area between November 2004 and June 2006. Wastes originally stored in boxes, drums or placed without packaging was also recovered and repackaged. The repackaged wastes were transported to a nearby temporary storage facility at ORNL pending processing at DOE's Transuranic Waste Processing Center. In summary: The objective of the MVTRU Waste Retrieval Project was to satisfy conditions of the Dispute Resolution Agreement. This remedial action consisted of removal of all buried waste containers and loose items from the 22-trench area. The TRU waste casks were placed in steel overpacks, while other waste boxes, drums, and loose items were placed in steel drums or boxes. The over-packed waste was placed in an approved staging area until it can be accepted for treatment at the ORNL TRU Waste Processing Facility and ultimately disposed. A total of 204 casks were indicated by historical records to have been buried in the 22-Trench area, and 204 casks were found and over-packed during the retrieval operations. The historical records also indicated that some 18 steel or wood boxes, 12 steel drums, and approximately 15 m{sup 3} of loose waste were buried in the trenches. The contents of approximately 12 boxes, 3 drums, and approximately the expected 15 m{sup 3} quantity of loose waste were retrieved and over-packed. One significant deviation from the actions described in the Dispute Resolution Agreement occurred during the excavation of Trench 13. Pyrophoric material was encountered and a reaction occurred, causing a brief flame in the excavator bucket. No personnel contamination or radioactive material release occurred. The waste buried in Trench 13, consisting of approximately eight 208-liter (55-gal) drums and one 114-liter (30-gal) drum, was stabilized in-place due to risks associated with the retrieval and handling of this pyrophoric material. The Dispute Resolution Agreement completion date was revised to allow this material to remain stabilized in place as interim storage until a disposition path is established. The baseline schedule called for site mobilization and preparation to begin in November 2003, soil excavation and waste retrieval to be completed by March 2006, and site restoration and demobilization to be complete by April 2006, with the draft letter of completion submitted in May 2006. Soil excavation and waste retrieval were completed in March 2006 as planned, and no significant deviations to the baseline schedule were encountered. (authors)

  1. Method of surface preparation of niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY); Schill, John F. (Ridge, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a method of preparing a surface of niobium. The preparation method includes polishing, cleaning, baking and irradiating the niobium surface whereby the resulting niobium surface has a high quantum efficiency.

  2. Impact of Preparation and Handling on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Zn4O(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)3 (MOF-5)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory, General Motors Corporation, Warren, Michigan 48090, College of Engineering, Purdue Uni of the resulting material was generally somewhat

  3. A test program for the evaluation of oilfield thread protectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, B.A.; Moyer, M.C.; Sampson, T.W.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation, handling, and corrosion damage to the threads of oilfield tubulars cost the industry millions of dollars each year. This problem has intensified with the increased use of proprietary connections, which represent a significant percentage of the total tubular cost. The thread protector is the primary means of protecting the threads from impact and corrosion damage. A test program has been designed and a test facility built. To evaluate the performance of oilfield protectors, a wide variety of thread protectors were tested, including metal, plastic, and composite (metal-elastomer) designs. This paper discusses this testing and outlines a guide for the selection of oilfield thread protectors for various service conditions.

  4. Preparing for Project Implementation Assigning Accountability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assigning Accountability for Each Project (April 14, 2010) More Documents & Publications Preparing for Project Implementation after an Energy Assessment...

  5. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by: Environment, Health, Safety, and Security .....................................................16 3.0 Potential Sources of Pollution

  6. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION, AND APPORTIONMENT ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES Administrative Management Records...

  7. Prepared by Heather Wilcox Feb. 22, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worden, Alexandra Z.

    in an autoclaved glass bottle (we pre- autoclave the bottle). Aliquots of SUCROSE LYSIS BUFFER can be prepared

  8. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  9. Analytical models to evaluate system performance measures for vehicle based material-handling systems under various dispatching policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Moonsu

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    -route material-handling systems from two different perspectives: the workcenters?? point of view and the transporters?? point of view. The state-dependent nature of the transportation time is considered here for more accurate analytical approximation models...

  10. PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind and solar integration study May 2010 Prepared for NREL by GE Energy 1 River Road Schenectady, New York 12345PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy PREPARED BY: GE Energy MAY 2010 WESTERNWIND AND SOLAR INTEGRATION STUDY #12;#12;Western

  11. Laboratory robotics -- An automated tool for preparing ion chromatography calibration standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, J.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of a laboratory robot as an automated tool for preparing multi-level calibration standards for On-Line Ion Chromatography (IC) Systems. The robot is designed for preparation of up to six levels of standards, with each level containing up to eleven ionic species in aqueous solution. The robot is required to add the standards` constituents as both a liquid and solid additions and to keep a record of exactly what goes into making up every standard. Utilizing a laboratory robot to prepare calibration standards provides significant benefits to the testing environment. These benefits include: accurate and precise calibration standards in individually capped containers with preparation traceability; automated and unattended multi-specie preparation for both anion and cation analytical channels; the ability to free up a test operator from a repetitive routine and re-apply those efforts to test operations; The robot uses a single channel IC to analyze each prepared standard for specie content and concentration. Those results are later used as a measure of quality control. System requirements and configurations, robotic operations, manpower requirements, analytical verification, accuracy and precision of prepared solutions, and robotic downtime are discussed in detail.

  12. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  13. East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

    1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

  14. Oak Ridge National Laboratory contact-handled Transuranic Waste Certification Program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.H.; Smith, M.A.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is required by Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A to package its transuranic (TRU) waste to comply with waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TRU wastes are defined in DOE Order 5820.A as those radioactive wastes that are contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides having half-lives greater than 20 years and concentrations greater than 100 nCi/g at the time of the assay. In addition, ORNL handles U{sup 233}, Cm{sup 244}, and Cf{sup 252} as TRU waste radionuclides. The ORNL Transuranic Waste Certification Program was established to ensure that all TRU waste at ORNL is packaged to meet the required transportation and storage criteria for shipping to and storage at the WIPP. The objective of this document is to describe the methods that will be used at ORNL to package contact handled-transuranic (CH-TRU) waste to meet the criteria set forth in the WIPP certification requirements documents. This document addresses newly generated (NG) CH-TRU waste. Stored CH-TRU will be repackaged. This document is organized to provide a brief overview of waste generation operations at ORNL, along with details on data management for CH-TRU waste. The methods used to implement this plan are discussed briefly along with the responsibilities and authorities of applicable organizations. Techniques used for waste data collection, records control, and data archiving are defined. Procedures for the procurement and handling of waste containers are also described along with related quality control methods. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  15. How to Prepare Your Abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / TexasA4. U.S. to Prepare

  16. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  17. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  18. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

  19. Preliminary Project Execution Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary project execution plan (PEP) defines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project objectives, roles and responsibilities of project participants, project organization, and controls to effectively manage acquisition of capital funds for construction of a proposed remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The plan addresses the policies, requirements, and critical decision (CD) responsibilities identified in DOE Order 413.3B, 'Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.' This plan is intended to be a 'living document' that will be periodically updated as the project progresses through the CD process to construction and turnover for operation.

  20. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  1. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  2. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  3. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  4. National Coal Council Presentation/Prepared Remarks | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks More Documents &...

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

  6. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Chirstensen

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  7. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Chirstensen

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  8. A Globally Distributed System for Job, Data, and Information Handling for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computing infrastructures of the modern high energy physics experiments need to address an unprecedented set of requirements. The collaborations consist of hundreds of members from dozens of institutions around the world and the computing power necessary to analyze the data produced surpasses already the capabilities of any single computing center. A software infrastructure capable of seamlessly integrating dozens of computing centers around the world, enabling computing for a large and dynamical group of users, is of fundamental importance for the production of scientific results. Such a computing infrastructure is called a computational grid. The SAM-Grid offers a solution to these problems for CDF and DZero, two of the largest high energy physics experiments in the world, running at Fermilab. The SAM-Grid integrates standard grid middleware, such as Condor-G and the Globus Toolkit, with software developed at Fermilab, organizing the system in three major components: data handling, job handling, and information management. This dissertation presents the challenges and the solutions provided in such a computing infrastructure.

  9. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  10. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  11. Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

  12. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  13. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  14. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  15. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  16. Preparation for upgrading western subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, R.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Sheesley, D.C.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to establish the physical and chemical characteristics of western coal and determine the best preparation technologies for upgrading this resource. Western coal was characterized as an abundant, easily mineable, clean, low-sulfur coal with low heating value, high moisture, susceptibility to spontaneous ignition, and considerable transit distances from major markets. Project support was provided by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The research was conducted by the Western Research Institute, (WRI) in Laramie, Wyoming. The project scope of work required the completion of four tasks: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches and verbal contacts with consumers and producers of western coal, (3) selection of the best technologies to upgrade western coal, and (4) identification of research needed to develop the best technologies for upgrading western coals. The results of this research suggest that thermal drying is the best technology for upgrading western coals. There is a significant need for further research in areas involving physical and chemical stabilization of the dried coal product. Excessive particle-size degradation and resulting dustiness, moisture reabsorption, and high susceptibility to spontaneous combustion are key areas requiring further research. Improved testing methods for the determination of equilibrium moisture and susceptibility to spontaneous ignition under various ambient conditions are recommended.

  17. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system, thus substantially reducing the number of cables required to power the sensors. The high gradient capacity of the 1.3 GHz cavities required a revision of the radiation shielding and interlocks. The cave was updated as per the recommendations of the radiation safety committee. The high pressure rinse system was updated with new adapters to assist the rinsing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities. Finally, a proposal for cold testing 1.3 GHz single cell cavities at A0 north cave was made to the small experiments approval committee, radiation safety committee and the Tevatron cryogenic safety sub-committee for an operational readiness clearance and the same was approved. The project was classified under research and development of single cell cavities (project 18) and was allocated a budget of $200,000 in FY 2007.

  18. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Engineering Analysis, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  19. PREPARING FOR A SUCCESSFUL EVMS CERTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE SL; BASCHE AD

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The client, a government agency, requires its contractor to obtain an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification that meets the intent of ANSI/EIA-748-B, Earned Value Management Systems. The contractor has extensive experience with certification preparation, having completed two certifications within two years. Information from a previous EVMS certification and internal system surveillances are used to prepare for client-based EVMS certifications and bi-annual surveillances. The contractor also sent members of its group to assist other companies preparing for surveillances and certifications to perform 'Black Hat Reviews.' This paper is a lessons learned on preparing a team for EVMS certification. The information is also applicable for surveillances, since the contractor prepares its team for the surveillance in the same manner as the initial certification. Some of the areas covered include required documents, tracing the data through the systems, Control Account Manager (CAM) preparation, and system verification.

  20. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veis, Libor, E-mail: libor.veis@jh-inst.cas.cz; Pittner, Ji?í, E-mail: jiri.pittner@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  1. Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

  2. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  3. National Institute for prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    /jb #12;Readying a Prototype SDLC Interface for CID Beta Testing Meeting Industry Standards for the way in which electronic devices are connected. The current link protocol calls for an SDLC. The SDLC project will add support to a controller type (NEMA TS2, type 1) that is currently not supported

  4. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oil shale,"April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGIpressi ve b strength, MPa this cement in moist environments.

  5. Methods for preparation of cyclopentadienyliron (II) arenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keipert, S.J.

    1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two improved methods for preparation of compounds with the structure shown in the equation, [(Cp)--Fe--(Ar)][sup +][sub b]X[sup b[minus

  6. Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition This second edition of the "Green Book" was issued by DOE to assist preparers and reviewers of NEPA documents, with the...

  7. MA 159 Final Exam Memo/Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen Davis

    2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 159 Final Exam Memo/Preparation. Monday, December 10 – 10:20 AM (2 hour exam). In Lambert Fieldhouse. **Note the early time and have double and ...

  8. Remote preparation of an atomic quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjamin Rosenfeld; Stefan Berner; Juergen Volz; Markus Weber; Harald Weinfurter

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and quantum communication. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped 87Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  9. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION, AND APPORTIONMENT Budget and apportionment records include the various files accumulated in the course of formulating the budget for...

  10. Preparation of Samples for Compositional Analysis: Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the analysis. Procedures are listed that are suitable for the preparation of biomass feedstocks and a variety of biomass-derived materials. Representative sampling of biomass...

  11. Document prepared by APIC Bioterrorism Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ATTACHMENT Document prepared by APIC Bioterrorism Task Force Judith F. English, Mae Y. Cundiff of civilian populations not recommended. 3. Infection Control Practices for Patient Management Symptomatic

  12. Temporally propagated optical pulses, and what they reveal about dispersion handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinsler, Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I derive a temporally propagated uni-directional optical pulse equation valid in the few cycle limit. Temporal propagation is advantageous because it naturally preserves causality, unlike the competing spatially propagated models. The approach generates exact coupled bi-directional equations, which can be efficiently approximated down to a uni-directional form in cases where an optical pulse changes little over one optical cycle. It also also allows a direct term-to-term comparison of an exact bi-directional theory with an approximate uni-directional theory. Notably, temporal propagation handles dispersion in a different way, and this difference serves to highlight existing approximations inherent in spatially propagated treatments of dispersion. Accordingly, I emphasise the need for future work in clarifying the limitations of the dispersion conversion required by these types of approaches; since the only alternative in the few cycle limit may be to resort to the much more computationally intensive full Maxw...

  13. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  14. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  15. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA; , Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Swansiger, Rosalind W. (Livermore, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  16. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

  17. Guidelines for Manuscript Preparation Purdue University Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Guidelines for Manuscript Preparation Purdue University Press The editing of your book or essay will be considerably faster and less costly if you follow a few guidelines for manuscript preparation. Double-space all the space bar to indent paragraphs. Do not type anything in all caps. Do include page numbers in your

  18. Energy Audit Procedures Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Audit Procedures Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery Subtask 3.5.1: Residential Energy Efficiency Deliverable 1 Prepared by The University of Hawai or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Project Report 1: Energy Audit

  19. Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processingSee over Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning When you are preparing for an exam, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. Understanding these levels and the types of exam questions

  20. PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by GE Energy 1 River Road Schenectady, New York 12345 Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Acker, Karin Wadsack, Carson Pete, Jason Kemper and Mark Bielecki State University of New YorkPREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department

  1. NOTICE OF PREPARATION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sze, Lawrence

    NOTICE OF PREPARATION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT DATE: September 25, 2013 TO: Responsible (Trustees) will be the lead agency for the preparation of an environmental impact report (EIR to: CSU Board of Trustees c/o Nicole Carter, Senior Planner SWCA Environmental Consultants 1422

  2. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  3. A Bulk Tungsten Tile for JET: Derivation of Power-Handling Performance and Validation of the Thermal Model, in the MARION Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Bulk Tungsten Tile for JET: Derivation of Power-Handling Performance and Validation of the Thermal Model, in the MARION Facility

  4. String Tests of 3S1P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    String Tests of 3S1P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications Prepared for the U.2 Deliverable 2 Report on Results of Storage Tests Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanPConfigurationsfor ElectricEnergyStorageApplications Matthieu Dubarry and Bor Yann Liaw Hawaii Natural Energy

  5. Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Gas Cylinder Storage and Handling Serious accidents can result from the misuse, abuse, or mishandling of compressed gas cylinders. Safe procedures for their use are as follows: · All compressed gas combustible material. · Keep cylinders out of the direct sun and do not allow them to be overheated. · Gas

  6. U.S. Department of Energy-Funded Performance Validation of Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This webinar presentation to the UK Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association summarizes how the U.S. Department of Energy is enabling early fuel cell markets; describes objectives of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center; and presents performance status of fuel cell material handling equipment.

  7. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed. (CBS)

  8. SIGNIFICANT EVENTS IN THE HISTORY OF LNG 1914 First (U.S.) patent awarded for LNG handling/shipping.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIGNIFICANT EVENTS IN THE HISTORY OF LNG 1914 First (U.S.) patent awarded for LNG handling/shipping. 1917 First commercial natural gas liquefaction plant built in West Virginia. 1944 At an LNG peak-shaving plant in Cleveland, an LNG storage tank with a low nickel- steel content (only 3.5%) fails. LNG spills

  9. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  10. ver the past fifty years, thousands of workers in the United States have handled plutonium. Of those workers, only about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    O ver the past fifty years, thousands of workers in the United States have handled plutonium. Of those workers, only about fifty, all from the nuclear-weapons complex, have been exposed to plutonium direct informa- tion about the risk of plutonium in man. This leads to the ironic situa- tion

  11. Cold Dissolved Saltcake Waste Simulant Development, Preparation, and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission. Bulk vitrification, containerized grout, and steam reforming are three technologies under consideration for treatment of the radioactive saltcake wastes in 68 single-shell tanks. To support development and testing of these technologies, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with developing a cold dissolved saltcake simulant formulation to be representative of an actual saltcake waste stream, preparing 25- and 100-L batches of the simulant, and analyzing the composition of the batches to ensure conformance to formulation targets. Lacking a defined composition for dissolved actual saltcake waste, PNNL used available tank waste composition information and an equilibrium chemistry model (Environmental Simulation Program [ESP{trademark}]) to predict the concentrations of analytes in solution. Observations of insoluble solids in initial laboratory preparations for the model-predicted formulation prompted reductions in the concentration of phosphate and silicon in the final simulant formulation. The analytical results for the 25- and 100-L simulant batches, prepared by an outside vendor to PNNL specifications, agree within the expected measurement accuracy ({approx}10%) of the target concentrations and are highly consistent for replicate measurements, with a few minor exceptions. In parallel with the production of the 2nd simulant batch (100-L), a 1-L laboratory control sample of the same formulation was carefully prepared at PNNL to serve as an analytical standard. The instrumental analyses indicate that the vendor prepared batches of solution adequately reflect the as-formulated simulant composition. In parallel with the simulant development effort, a nominal 5-M (molar) sodium actual waste solution was prepared at the Hanford Site from a limited number of tank waste samples. Because this actual waste solution w as also to be used for testing the supplemental treatment technologies, the modeled simulant formulation was predicated on the composite of waste samples used to prepare it. Subsequently, the actual waste solution was filtered and pretreated to remove radioactive cesium at PNNL and then analyzed using the same instrumentation and procedures applied to the simulant samples. The overall agreement of measured simulant and actual waste solution compositions is better than {+-}10% for the most concentrated species including sodium, nitrate, hydroxide, carbonate, and nitrite. While the magnitude of the relative difference in the simulant and actual waste composition is large (>20% difference) for a few analytes (aluminum, chromium, fluoride, potassium, and total organic carbon), the absolute differences in concentration are in general not appreciable. Our evaluation is that these differences in simulant and actual waste solutions should have a negligible impact on bulk vitrification and containerized grout process testing, while the impact of the low aluminum concentration on steam reforming is yet to be determined.

  12. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  13. Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

  14. Hazard Classification of the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is constructing a new facility to replace remote-handled low-level radioactive waste disposal capability for INL and Naval Reactors Facility operations. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) will continue until the facility is full or closed for remediation (estimated at approximately fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility is the highest ranked alternative and will provide RH-LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate RH-LLW for the foreseeable future. As a part of establishing a safety basis for facility operations, the facility will be categorized according to DOE-STD-1027-92. This classification is important in determining the scope of analyses performed in the safety basis and will also dictate operational requirements of the completed facility. This paper discusses the issues affecting hazard classification in this nuclear facility and impacts of the final hazard categorization.

  15. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  16. Dangerous Waste Characteristics of Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed Wastes from the Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Bryan, Garry H.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing analytical data from samples taken from the Hanford tanks designated as potentially containing transuranic mixed process wastes. Process knowledge of the wastes transferred to these tanks has been reviewed to determine whether the dangerous waste characteristics now assigned to all Hanford underground storage tanks are applicable to these particular wastes. Supplemental technologies are being examined to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission and accomplish waste treatment safely and efficiently. To date, 11 Hanford waste tanks have been designated as potentially containing contact-handled (CH) transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes. The CH-TRUM wastes are found in single-shell tanks B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-104, T-110, and T-111. Methods and equipment to solidify and package the CH-TRUM wastes are part of the supplemental technologies being evaluated. The resulting packages and wastes must be acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The dangerous waste characteristics being considered include ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity arising from the presence of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol at levels above the dangerous waste threshold. The analytical data reviewed include concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, cyanide, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, total organic carbon, and oxalate; the composition of the tank headspace, pH, and mercury. Differential scanning calorimetry results were used to determine the energetics of the wastes as a function of temperature.

  17. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  18. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  19. Test of Two NB Superstructure Prototypes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekutowicz, J.

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative layout of the TESLA linear collider [1], based on weakly coupled multi-cell superconducting structures (superstructures), significantly reduces investment cost due to a simplification in the RF system of the main accelerator. In January 1999, preparation of the beam test of the superstructure began in order to prove the feasibility of this layout. Progress in the preparation was reported frequently in Proceedings of TESLA Collaboration Meetings. Last year, two superstructures were installed in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY to experimentally verify: methods to balance the accelerating gradient in a weakly coupled system, the stability of the energy gain for the entire train of bunches in macro-pulses and the damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). We present results of the first cold and beam test of these two Nb prototypes.

  20. Preparing for Hurricane Irene: Follow Local Direction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hurricane Irene is heading towards the East Coast, and while the extent of its impact is not yet known, those who may be effected (even inland areas), should get prepared and follow the direction...

  1. Is Your Plant Prepared for a Hurricane?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program BestPractices fact sheet lists resources for manufacturers and steps they can take to prepare for the devastating winds and floods caused by hurricanes.

  2. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    october 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Proposed______________________________________________C-131 Green Buildings_____________________________________ C-138 Industrya amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California

  3. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST Date: Dept: Preparer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Karoui, Noureddine

    INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST Date: Dept: Preparer: UC Employee Student Vendor Other: Name: Emp/Stu/Ven ID: Address: City/ST/Zip: E-Mail: Phone: US Citizen/Permanent Resident? Yes No Fax

  4. International Particle Accelerator Community Prepares for May...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Particle Accelerator Community Prepares for May 3-8 Gathering in Richmond NEWPORT NEWS, VA - April 29, 2015 - Scientists, engineers and students from across U.S. and...

  5. Numerically Efficient Parallel Algorithms Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation using High Performance Computing Prepared by New Mexico Tech New Mexico Institute of Mining agency thereof. #12;Final Report for Task One Project: Application of High Performance Computing

  6. Process for the preparation of organoclays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing organoclays from smectites for use as rheological control agents and in the preparation of nanocomposites. Typically, the clay is dispersed in water, and a substantially monomolecular layer of a water soluble polymer is applied to the surfaces of the clay. A surfactant is also applied to the clay to modify the surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of the clay, and the organoclay is separated out for subsequent use.

  7. Process for the preparation of organoclays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing organoclays for use as rheological control agents and in the preparation of nanocomposites. Typically, the clay is dispersed in water, and a specific amount of polymeric hydrotrope, ranging from 0.1 to 15 weight percent relative to the weight of the clay, is adsorbed onto the clay surface. Quaternary amine exchange is also performed on the clay to modify the surface hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of the clay.

  8. Remote State Preparation for Quantum Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Ber; Erez Zohar

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote state preparation is generation of a desired state by a remote observer. In spite of causality, it is well known, according to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem, that it is possible for relativistic quantum field theories, and a "physical" process achieving this task, involving superoscillatory functions, has recently been introduced. In this work we deal with non-relativistic fields, and show that remote state preparation is also possible for them, hence generalizing the Reeh-Schlieder theorem.

  9. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  11. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

  12. Simulation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Impact with Cask and MCO During Insertion into the Transfer Pit (FDT-137)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZINET, G.D.

    2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The K-Basin Cask and Transportation System will be used for safely packaging and transporting approximately 2,100 metric tons of unprocessed, spent nuclear fuel from the 105 K East and K West Basins to the 200 E Area Canister Storage Building (CSB). Portions of the system will also be used for drying the spent fuel under cold vacuum conditions prior to placement in interim storage. The spent nuclear fuel is currently stored underwater in the two K-Basins. The K-Basins loadout pit is the area selected for loading spent nuclear fuel into the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) which in turn is located within the transportation cask. This Cask/MCO unit is secured.in the pit with a pail load out structure whose primary function is lo suspend and support the Cask/MCO unit at.the desired elevations and to protect the unit from the contaminated K-Basin water. The fuel elements will be placed in special baskets and stacked in the MCO that have been previously placed in the cask. The casks will be removed from the K Basin load out areas and taken to the cold vacuum drying station. Then the cask will be prepared for transportation to the CSB. The shipments will occur exclusively on the Hanford Site between K-Basins and the CSB. Travel will be by road with one cask per trailer. At the CSB receiving area the cask will be removed from the trailer. A gantry crane will then move the cask over to the transfer pit and load the cask into the transfer pit. From the transfer pit the MCO will be removed from the cask by the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). The MHM will move the MCO from the transfer pit to a canister storage tube in the CSB. MCOs will be piled two high in each canister Storage tube.

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MEDIA IN THE PREPARATION OF TAMRA BHASMA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO TAMAKA SVASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Wadodkar; K. U. Pillai; H. S. Sarma

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Three types of tamra bhasmas separately prepared by using the media of mercury, Solanum xanthocarpum and sulphur were tested in patients of tamaka svasa. Results suggest that the process of making tamra bhasma with sulphur is superior to others due to several reasons.

  14. A Method for the Preparation of NIST Traceable Fossil Fuel Standards with Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at NIST with high accuracy and precision by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry and quality control test samples. Unlike calibrants prepared from high purity components, this method enables Abbreviations M bar Calculated concentration of mixture EDXRF Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence n number

  15. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.   

  16. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  17. Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our driving skills in cold weather. Watch for"black ice", areas of the road with a thin, almost invisible coating of ice weather. Mother Nature's road test. Know before you go. ShiftIntoWinter.ca | DriveBC.ca This information

  18. High Power Testing of RF Cavities for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Schwarz, H.; /SLAC

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the process of conditioning and high-power testing of RF cavities for PEP-II. Procedures for vacuum assembly, bakeout and automated processing are described. Interlocks and safety precautions for protection of equipment and personnel are discussed and performance data of tested cavity assemblies are reported. Performance of ancillary components such as windows, couplers and tuners is also discussed. Comments are included on handling, alignment, installation and commissioning issues where appropriate.

  19. Copyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    to explore plasticity related concepts. The tests are on dry sand to ensure drained behaviour. Eight testsCopyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, Texas, 3­6 May 1999. This paper was selected

  20. Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

  1. Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software Implemented in Function in implementing safety critical systems such as nuclear reactor protection systems. We have defined new structural- ing a case study using test cases prepared by domain experts for reactor protection system software

  2. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source documents from the U.S. Nuclear RegulatoryCommission (NRC) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) for acomprehensive and detailed listing of the requirements.This CH-WAC does not address the subject of waste characterization relating to adetermination of whether the waste is hazardous; rather, the sites are referred to theWaste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit fordetails of the sampling and analysis protocols to be used in determining compliance withthe required physical and chemical properties of the waste. Requirements andassociated criteria pertaining to a determination of the radiological properties of thewaste, however, are addressed in appendix A of this document. The collectiveinformation obtained from waste characterization records and acceptable knowledge(AK) serves as the basis for sites to certify that their CH-TRU waste satisfies the WIPPwaste acceptance criteria listed herein.

  3. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

  4. A Gaussian process-based approach for handling uncertainty in vehicle dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, K.; Madsen, J.; Anitescu, M.; Negrut, D.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in vehicle modeling and simulation in recent years have led to designs that are safer, easier to handle, and less sensitive to external factors. Yet, the potential of simulation is adversely impacted by its limited ability to predict vehicle dynamics in the presence of uncertainty. A commonly occurring source of uncertainty in vehicle dynamics is the road-tire friction interaction, typically represented through a spatially distributed stochastic friction coefficient. The importance of its variation becomes apparent on roads with ice patches, where if the stochastic attributes of the friction coefficient are correctly factored into real time dynamics simulation, robust control strategies could be designed to improve transportation safety. This work concentrates on correctly accounting in the nonlinear dynamics of a car model for the inherent uncertainty in friction coefficient distribution at the road/tire interface. The outcome of this effort is the ability to quantify the effect of input uncertainty on a vehicle's trajectory and the associated escalation of risk in driving. By using a space-dependent Gaussian process, the statistical representation of the friction coefficient allows for consistent space dependence of randomness. The approach proposed allows for the incorporation of noise in the observed data and a nonzero mean for inhomogeneous distribution of the friction coefficient. Based on the statistical model considered, consistent friction coefficient sample distributions are generated over large spatial domains of interest. These samples are subsequently used to compute and characterize the statistics associated with the dynamics of a nonlinear vehicle model. The information concerning the state of the road and thus the friction coefficient is assumed available (measured) at a limited number of points by some sensing device that has a relatively homogeneous noise field (satellite picture or ground sensors, for instance). The methodology proposed can be modified to incorporate information that is sensed by each individual car as it advances along its trajectory.

  5. Safe handling of TBP and nitrates in the nuclear process industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory and literature study was made of the reactions of tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) with nitric acid and nitrates. Its goal was to establish safe conditions for solvent extraction processes involving these chemicals. The damaging explosions at the Tomsk-7 PUREX plant in Russia graphically illustrated the potential hazard involved in such operations. The study has involved a review of prior and contemporary experiments, and new experiments to answer particular questions about these reactions. TBP extracts nitric acid and some metal nitrates from aqueous solutions. The resulting liquid contains both oxidant and reductant, and can react exothermically if heated sufficiently. Safe handling of these potentially reactive materials involves not only limiting the heat generated by the chemical reaction, but also providing adequate heat removal and venting. Specifically, the following recommendations are made to ensure safety: (1) tanks in which TBP-nitrate complexes are or may be present should be adequately vented to avoid pressurization. Data are supplied as a basis for adequacy; (2) chemically degraded TBP, or TBP that has sat a long time in the presence of acids or radiation, should be purified before use in solvent extraction; (3) evaporators in which TBP might be introduced should be operated at a controlled temperature, and their TBP content should be limited; (4) evaporator bottoms that may contain TBP should be cooled under conditions that ensure heat removal. Finally, process design should consider the potential for such reactions, and operators should be made aware of this potential, so that it is considered during training and process operation.

  6. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Independent Review of Seismic Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The following separate reports and correspondence pertains to the independent review of the seismic analysis. The original analysis was performed by GEC-Alsthom Engineering Systems Limited (GEC-ESL) under subcontract to Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWEC) who was the prime integration contractor to the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). The original analysis was performed to the Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) response spectra using 5% damping as required in specification, HNF-S-0468 for the 90% Design Report in June 1997. The independent review was performed by Fluor-Daniel (Irvine) under a separate task from their scope as Architect-Engineer of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in 1997. The comments were issued in April 1998. Later in 1997, the response spectra of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) was revised according to a new soil-structure interaction analysis and accordingly revised the response spectra for the MHM and utilized 7% damping in accordance with American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) NOG-1, ''Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Multiple Girder).'' The analysis was re-performed to check critical areas but because manufacturing was underway, designs were not altered unless necessary. FWEC responded to SNF Project correspondence on the review comments in two separate letters enclosed. The dispositions were reviewed and accepted. Attached are supplier source surveillance reports on the procedures and process by the engineering group performing the analysis and structural design. All calculation and analysis results are contained in the MHM Final Design Report which is part of the Vendor Information File 50100. Subsequent to the MHM supplier engineering analysis, there was a separate analyses for nuclear safety accident concerns that used the electronic input data files provided by FWEC/GEC-ESL and are contained in document SNF-6248, ''Evaluation of MHM Uplift Restraint for Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations,'' (EDT-629126 and EDT-629132).

  7. Upgrade plans to handle 30 to 40 Mbytes of data for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henline, P.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy funds the DIII-D tokamak program which carries out plasma physics and fusion energy research experiments. The machine began operations in February 1986; at that time, approximately 7 Mbytes of data was collected for each shot. Since that time, the shot size has steadily increased to a maximum of over 30 Mbytes. The average shot size is now about 25 Mbytes and over 1 Gigabyte of data has been collected during some operation day. The computer systems were designed to handle a maximum shot size of 25 Mbytes. In order to meet the increased demands, changes to hardware and software are being made and each experiment reviewed before being added to a shot. The area of data transfer now increasing the most is data transferred from small diagnostic DEC VAX systems to the main VAX cluster. Plans in this area include upgrading the VAX which receives data (possibly to a VAX 6310) to have both more CPU power and a faster interface to the Network Systems Hyperchannel which transfers data to the VAX. The new machine will be more easily upgraded with additional CPU's, communication devices and storage devices. Software changes are being incorporated on diagnostic VAXes so that subsets of data, or calculated results are included with the shot data file, rather than the often large (6 to 20 Mbytes) amount of data collected locally. More careful examination is being given to all experiments added to the tokamak, and only necessary and useful data is being added to the system for permanent storage. 4 refs.

  8. New Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergencies New Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergencies April 21, 2015 - 11:26am...

  9. Student Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal Student Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero...

  10. apatite powders prepared: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , and thermal properties of Nafion powders prepared by high-energy ball milling of pellets is given. Nafion powders prepared in this manner exhibit thermal behavior similar...

  11. Secretary Steven Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University Secretary Steven Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the Polytechnic Institute...

  12. EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and...

  13. EIS-0496: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0496: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement DOE's Western Area Power Administration...

  14. EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy...

  15. EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

  16. EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    81: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High...

  17. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

  18. Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs April 11, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis...

  19. President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts of Climate Change; Tribal Leaders to Serve on Task Force President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the...

  20. EIS-0394: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0394: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Implementation of the...

  1. EM's Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing its Highest-Risk Facility for Demolition EM's Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing its Highest-Risk...

  2. Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

  3. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  5. Seismic Characterization of Basalt Topography at Two Candidate Sites for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Sondrup; Gail Heath; Trent Armstrong; Annette Shafer; Jesse Bennett; Clark Scott

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the seismic refraction results from the depth to bed rock surveys for two areas being considered for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH-LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first area (Site 5) surveyed is located southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the second (Site 34) is located west of Lincoln Boulevard near the southwest corner of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). At Site 5, large area and smaller-scale detailed surveys were performed. At Site 34, a large area survey was performed. The purpose of the surveys was to define the topography of the interface between the surficial alluvium and underlying basalt. Seismic data were first collected and processed using seismic refraction tomographic inversion. Three-dimensional images for both sites were rendered from the data to image the depth and velocities of the subsurface layers. Based on the interpreted top of basalt data at Site 5, a more detailed survey was conducted to refine depth to basalt. This report briefly covers relevant issues in the collection, processing and inversion of the seismic refraction data and in the imaging process. Included are the parameters for inversion and result rendering and visualization such as the inclusion of physical features. Results from the processing effort presented in this report include fence diagrams of the earth model, for the large area surveys and iso-velocity surfaces and cross sections from the detailed survey.

  6. Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. Remote state preparation of spatial qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Solís-Prosser; L. Neves

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum communication protocol of remote state preparation (RSP) for pure states of qubits encoded in single photons transmitted through a double slit, the so-called spatial qubits. Two measurement strategies that one can adopt to remotely prepare the states are discussed. The first strategy is the well-known spatial postselection, where a single-pixel detector measures the transverse position of the photon between the focal and the image plane of a lens. The second strategy, proposed by ourselves, is a generalized measurement divided into two steps: the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measurement (POVM) followed by the spatial postselection at the focal plane of the lens by a two-pixel detector in each output of the POVM. In both cases we analyze the effects of the finite spatial resolution of the detectors over three figures of merit of the protocol, namely, the probability of preparation, the fidelity and purity of the remotely prepared states. It is shown that our strategy improves these figures compared with spatial postselection, at the expense of increasing the classical communication cost as well as the required experimental resources. In addition, we present a modified version of our strategy for RSP of spatial qudits which is able to prepare arbitrary pure states, unlike spatial postselection alone. We expect that our study may also be extended for RSP of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field as an alternative for quantum teleportation which requires very inefficient nonlinear interactions.

  8. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  9. Nanocrystalline Complex Oxides Prepared by Mechanochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepelak, V. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); On leave from the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, 04353 Kosice (Slovakia); Bergmann, I. [VOLKSWAGEN AG, 38436 Wolfsburg (Germany); Indris, S. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Subrt, J. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Heitjans, P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 3-3A, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Becker, K.-D. [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Braunschweig University of Technology, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The preparation of complex oxides by the conventional solid-state (ceramic) route requires a number of stages, including homogenization of the powder precursors, compaction of the reactants, and finally prolonged heat treatment at considerably elevated temperatures under controlled oxygen fugacity. One goal of modern materials research and development has been to identify simpler processing schemes that do not rely upon high-temperature treatments for inducing solid-state reactions. At present, mechanochemical methods become widely used for the preparation of nanocrystalline materials due to their relative simplicity and availability. In this work, selected examples of the preparation of nanoscale complex oxides via single-step mechanochemical routes are presented. Nuclear spectroscopic methods are employed to follow the mechanically induced formation of nanooxides and to characterize the nonequilibrium structural state of the resulting nanophases at the atomic level.

  10. Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

  11. RMOTC offers unique test facility to oil industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opsal, C.M. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR-CUW, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing laboratory developed new tools and techniques in actual field conditions before commercialization has long been a significant problem. Working lab models may fail in the first field applications because of handling, incompatibility with existing equipment, or natural elements such as wind, humidity, or temperature. Further, the risk of damage to the operators wellbore, production, or other operations can be costly and embarrassing. As research dollars are becoming harder to obtain, a neutral, non-competitive, and user friendly test site is needed. This type of facility has been developed at the US Department of Energy`s Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), near Casper, Wyoming, through the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). New technologies and processes field tested at this facility include those related to drilling production/lifting costs, P and A methods, and environmental control and remediation.

  12. Audit Report on "Waste Processing and Recovery Act Acceleration Efforts for Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Hanford Site"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management's (EM), Richland Operations Office (Richland), is responsible for disposing of the Hanford Site's (Hanford) transuranic (TRU) waste, including nearly 12,000 cubic meters of radioactive contact-handled TRU wastes. Prior to disposing of this waste at the Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Richland must certify that it meets WIPP's waste acceptance criteria. To be certified, the waste must be characterized, screened for prohibited items, treated (if necessary) and placed into a satisfactory disposal container. In a February 2008 amendment to an existing Record of Decision (Decision), the Department announced its plan to ship up to 8,764 cubic meters of contact-handled TRU waste from Hanford and other waste generator sites to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) at Idaho's National Laboratory (INL) for processing and certification prior to disposal at WIPP. The Department decided to maximize the use of the AMWTP's automated waste processing capabilities to compact and, thereby, reduce the volume of contact-handled TRU waste. Compaction reduces the number of shipments and permits WIPP to more efficiently use its limited TRU waste disposal capacity. The Decision noted that the use of AMWTP would avoid the time and expense of establishing a processing capability at other sites. In May 2009, EM allocated $229 million of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) funds to support Hanford's Solid Waste Program, including Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Besides providing jobs, these funds were intended to accelerate cleanup in the short term. We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department was effectively using Recovery Act funds to accelerate processing of Hanford's contact-handled TRU waste. Relying on the availability of Recovery Act funds, the Department changed course and approved an alternative plan that could increase costs by about $25 million by processing Hanford TRU-waste on-site rather than at AMWTP. Further, under the newly adopted alternative approach, the Department would fail to achieve the previously anticipated reductions in volume associated with the use of existing AMWTP waste compaction capabilities.

  13. NO. REV. MO. _ ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NO. REV. MO. ATM 1050 _ ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results PAGE 1 OF 10 DATE 19 August 1971 The results of the ALSEP/LCRU EMC test are reported in this ATM. C~.·--~ s--·~e'Jn~,__')!).Prepared by:__~~~"f--.;;.~-------- Approved by: ~JM.MD. ithian #12;NO. RIV. NO. ATM 1050 ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results 2 10PAGE OF Aall

  14. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

  15. Method of preparing meso-haloalkylporphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. Also disclosed is a process for the preparation of meso-halocarbyl-porphyrins which comprises contacting a halocarbyl dipyrromethane with a halocarbyl-substituted aldehyde in the presence of an acid granular solid catalyst. Also disclosed is a process for the preparation of meso-halocarbyl-porphyrins which comprises contacting a halocarbyl dipyrromethane with a halocarbyl-substituted aldehyde in the presence of an acid granular solic catalyst.

  16. Characterization of gels prepared from silicon ethoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Su-Jin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by heating to a high temperature, with low heating rates. Tg and Tc were correlated to water gt alcohol contents in presence of HCI or HF. Aerogels were found to have high pore volume, low bulk density, large pore size, and weak mechanical strength.... Structures of dried gels 2. 3, Densification 13 14 15 19 19 CHAPTER III 3. 1. Raw materials 3. 2. Xerogel preparation 3. 3. Aerogel preparation 3. 4. Characterization of dried gels 3, 4. 1. Mercury porosimetry 3. 4. 2. BET analysis 3. 4, 3...

  17. Characterization of gels prepared from silicon ethoxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Su-Jin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by heating to a high temperature, with low heating rates. Tg and Tc were correlated to water gt alcohol contents in presence of HCI or HF. Aerogels were found to have high pore volume, low bulk density, large pore size, and weak mechanical strength.... Structures of dried gels 2. 3, Densification 13 14 15 19 19 CHAPTER III 3. 1. Raw materials 3. 2. Xerogel preparation 3. 3. Aerogel preparation 3. 4. Characterization of dried gels 3, 4. 1. Mercury porosimetry 3. 4. 2. BET analysis 3. 4, 3...

  18. Past Test One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MA 366: Introduction to Di?'erential Equations. Fall 2001, Test One. Instructor: Yip o This test booklet has FIVE QUESTIONS, totaling 50 points for the whole test.

  19. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Test Battery Electric Vehicle Fast Charge Test Battery Energy Storage Performance Test For DC Fast Charge Demand Reduction...

  20. PREPARATION AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF THREE NEW ACTINIDE (IV) BOROHYDRIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Rodney Howard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium tetrakis-borohydrides were prepared by a different reaction which involves the actinide tetrafluoride