Sample records for halon suppression system

  1. Memorandum, Managed Phase Out of Halon Fixed Fire Suppression Systems- May 5, 1993

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide additional interim departmental criteria on the management of the reduction and potential elimination of Halon fire extinguishing systems within the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum supplements the joint Office of Safety and Quality Assurance/Office of Projects and Facilities Management memorandum of September 27, 1990, in which guidance was provided on the installation of new Halon 1301 fixed fire suppression systems and halon 1211 portable fire extinguishers.

  2. Memorandum, Managed Phase Out of Halon Fixed Fire Suppression...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the management of the reduction and potential elimination of Halon fire extinguishing systems within the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum supplements the joint Office...

  3. Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchenka, Julie A

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

  4. Health effects of Halon 1301 exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; House, R.A. (Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto (Canada))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accidental discharge of a Halon 1301 system is reported. Thirty-one workers were assessed, 22 who were present at the time of the discharge, and 9 who worked the next shift. The incident was complicated by a small Freon-22 leak several hours later. Throat, eye, and nasal irritation and lightheadedness were reported by the majority of workers. Workers present during the halon discharge reported significantly more lightheadedness, headache, voice change, cough, and a fast heartbeat than did those who worked the later shift. These differences were significant even after correcting for confounding factors such as age, sex, and sense of anxiety at the time of the incident. The possible causes for the irritant symptoms include breakdown products of Halon 1301 and Freon-22 or contaminants from the halon discharge system. Although these irritant effects may not be an effect of Halon 1301 alone, they may occur in these discharge situations, and workers should be advised of this possibility. The possible cardiac and central nervous system effects also should be considered. The importance of a clear-cut protocol to deal with such incidents as well as worker education are discussed.

  5. Explosion suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  6. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  7. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  8. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  9. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  10. The development and evaluation of water-mist fire extinguishing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beason, D.G.; Staggs, K.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire protection for underfloor space is primarily provided by Halon 1301 which has proven to be very effective. However, due to the link between halons and the possible depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, plans have been implemented to eventually phase out Halon 1301 and 1211. In September 1987 the Montreal Protocol concerning chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) and halons was signed by the United States, the European Economic Community, and 23 other nations. The Montreal Protocol calls for freezing halon production at 1986 levels. Because the majority of underfloor fire protection at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) sites, is either Halon 1301 or sprinklers, some other means of suppression will have to be developed and verified. The potential loss to facilities housing computer or control rooms damaged by underfloor fires can be extreme. These losses would not only include hardware and software replacement costs, but also lost computing and control capability. Here at LLNL technical research in a facility could be severely affected. Recent studies conducted by the Fire Research Discipline of the Special Projects Division have shown that severe fires fueled by cable insulation can develop within as little as a 6-in-high underfloor space (even with mechanical ventilation shut off). Studies also show that conventional sprinklers may not be effective in preventing this destruction. Therefore, we are investigating the water-mist fire extinguishing system as an alternative to Halon 1301 and sprinklers.

  11. Requirements And Instructions For Shipping Halon To The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Halon Repository

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Disposition of excess Halon 1301 is now done in accordance with Executive Order 13148 — “Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management ”, Section 505 (c). An SF-122 form (or equivalent documentation) should be approved by the DLA prior to shipment.

  12. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  13. Fire Foe: A Glovebox Fire Suppression System | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Envirogel Extinguishing Agent NRTL Qualification Fire Test Proof-of-Concept Testing Seismic Reliability Fire Foe: A Glovebox Fire Suppression System More Documents &...

  14. Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupant Classification System for Automotive Airbag Suppression Michael E. Farmer§ and Anil K@cse.msu.edu Abstract The introduction of airbags into automobiles has significantly improved the safety of the occupants. Unfortunately, airbags can also cause fatal injuries if the occupant is a child smaller (in

  15. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  16. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Nesbitt, Loyd B. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  17. Scanning probe microscopy with inherent disturbance suppression using micromechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Andrew William, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) are affected by disturbances, or mechanical noise, in their environments which can limit their imaging resolution. This thesis introduces a general approach for suppressing out-of-plane ...

  18. Survey of fire-protection systems at LNG facilities. Topical report, July-November 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atallah, S.; Borows, K.A.

    1991-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the study were to collect and analyze data relating to the types, costs, and operational problems of gas leak and fire detection devices and of fire prevention and suppression systems used at LNG facilities operating in the United States. Data from 39 LNG facilities, which accounted for 45% of the total U.S. storage capacity, were collected. The report provides information relating to equipment manufacturers, site applications, operational problems, initial installation costs, annual operational costs, and equipment lifetime. Equipment of interest included fixed gas leak, fire and cryogenic detection systems, water deluge and barrier systems, thermal radiation walls and protective coatings, and fixed high expansion foam, dry chemical, carbon dioxide and halon fire suppression systems. In addition, internal fire fighting capabilities were reviewed.

  19. Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

  20. Suppression of Quantum Scattering in Strongly Confined Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J. I. [Departamento de Pesquisas, Altanova, R. Silva Teles 712, CEP 03026-000, Bras, Sa(tilde sign)o Paulo, SP, Brasil (Brazil); Melezhik, V. S. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation); Schmelcher, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Theoretische Chemie, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that scattering of particles strongly interacting in three dimensions (3D) can be suppressed at low energies in a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) confinement. The underlying mechanism is the interference of the s- and p-wave scattering contributions with large s- and p-wave 3D scattering lengths being a necessary prerequisite. This low-dimensional quantum scattering effect might be useful in 'interacting' quasi-1D ultracold atomic gases, guided atom interferometry, and impurity scattering in strongly confined quantum wire-based electronic devices.

  1. PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    instabilities will be vital for future fusion facilities such as ITER, the huge international project under construction in France. The original system developed on...

  2. Optimized pulse sequences for suppressing unwanted transitions in quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C. A.; Agarwal, G. S. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St. Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nature of the pulse sequence so that unwanted transitions in quantum systems can be inhibited optimally. For this purpose we show that the sequence of pulses proposed by Uhrig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)] in the context of inhibition of environmental dephasing effects is optimal. We derive exact results for inhibiting the transitions and confirm the results numerically. We posit a very significant improvement by usage of the Uhrig sequence over an equidistant sequence in decoupling a quantum system from unwanted transitions. The physics of inhibition is the destructive interference between transition amplitudes before and after each pulse.

  3. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  4. Generation and Suppression of Decoherence in Artificial Environment for Qubit System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasushi Kondo; Mikio Nakahara; Shogo Tanimura; Sachiko Kitajima; Chikako Uchiyama; Fumiaki Shibata

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that a quantum system with finite degrees of freedom can simulate a composite of a system and an environment if the state of the hypothetical environment is randomized by external manipulation. We show theoretically that any phase decoherence phenomena of a single qubit can be simulated with a two-qubit system and demonstrate experimentally two examples: one is phase decoherence of a single qubit in a transmission line, and the other is that in a quantum memory. We perform NMR experiments employing a two-spin molecule and clearly measure decoherence for both cases. We also prove experimentally that the bang-bang control efficiently suppresses decoherence.

  5. NO.sub.x catalyst and method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer-Millar, Mari Lou (Chillicothe, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL); Panov, Alexander G. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity and durability of a zeolite lean-burn NOx catalyst can be increased by loading metal cations on the outer surface of the zeolite. However, the metal loadings can also oxidize sulfur dioxide to cause sulfate formation in the exhaust. The present invention is a method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system including a NO.sub.x catalyst. The NO.sub.x catalyst includes a zeolite loaded with at least one metal. The metal is selected from among an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, a lanthanide metal, a noble metal, and a transition metal. In order to suppress sulfate formation, at least a portion of the loaded metal is complexed with at least one of sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate.

  6. System and method that suppresses intensity fluctuations for free space high-speed optical communication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Gennady P. (Los Alamos, NM); Bishop, Alan R. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Chernobrod, Boris M. (Santa Fe, NM); Gorshkov, Vacheslav N. (Kiev, UA)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-speed (Gbps), free space optical communication system is based on spectral encoding of radiation from a wide band light source, such as a laser. By using partially coherent laser beams in combination with a relatively slow photosensor, scintillations can be suppressed by orders of magnitude for distances of more than 10 km. To suppress the intensity fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, a source with partial transverse coherence in combination with slow response time photodetector is used. Information is encoded in the spectral domain of a wideband optical source by modulation of spectral amplitudes. A non-coherent light source with wide spectrum (an LED, for example) may be used for high-speed communication over short (less than about a mile) distances.

  7. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. The primary criticality safety concern with automatic fire suppression systems is the increased amount of water that a film adds to the interstitial volume of an array per unit time. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exist that govern water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure, and the characterization of these water films.

  8. Geant4 Model Validation of Compton Suppressed System for Process monitoring of Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Sarah; Unlu, Kenan; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear material accountancy is of continuous concern for the regulatory, safeguards, and verification communities. In particular, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities pose one of the most difficult accountancy challenges: monitoring highly radioactive, fluid sample streams in near real-time. The Multi-Isotope Process monitor will allow for near-real-time indication of process alterations using passive gamma-ray detection coupled with multivariate analysis techniques to guard against potential material diversion or to enhance domestic process monitoring. The Compton continuum from the dominant 661.7 keV 137Cs fission product peak obscures lower energy lines which could be used for spectral and multivariate analysis. Compton suppression may be able to mitigate the challenges posed by the high continuum caused by scattering. A Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4 toolkit is being developed to predict the expected suppressed spectrum from spent fuel samples to estimate the reduction in the Compton continuum. Despite the lack of timing information between decay events in the particle management of Geant4, encouraging results were recorded utilizing only the information within individual decays without accounting for accidental coincidences. The model has been validated with single and cascade decay emitters in two steps: as an unsuppressed system and with suppression activated. Results of the Geant4 model validation will be presented.

  9. Effectiveness of two spraying systems for bollworm suppression, canopy penetration, and drift reduction in the Rolling Plains of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John Robert Calvert

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO SPRAYING SYSTEMS FOR BOLLWORM SUPPRESSION, CANOPY PENETRATION, AND DRIFT REDUCTION IN THE ROLLING PLAINS OF TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT CALVERT ROBINSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8B University... in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Entomology EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO SPRAYING SYSTEMS FOR BOLLWORM SUPPRESSION, CANOPY PENETRATION, AND DRIFT REDUCTION IN THE ROLLING PLAINS OF TEXAS A...

  10. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exists that governs water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure and the characterization of these water films.

  11. Improvement of extraction system geometry with suppression of possible Penning discharge ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delferrière, O., E-mail: olivier.delferriere@cea.fr; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Nyckees, S.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)] [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past two years, a new ECR 2.45 GHz type ion source has been developed especially dedicated to intense light ion injector project like IPHI (Injecteur Proton Haute Intensité), IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility), to reduce beam emittance at RFQ entrance by shortening the length of the LEBT. This new ALISES concept (Advanced Light Ion Source Extraction System) is based on the use of an additional LEBT short length solenoid very close to the extraction aperture. The fringe field of this new solenoid produces the needed magnetic field to create the ECR resonance in the plasma chamber. Such geometry allows first putting the solenoid at ground potential, while saving space in front of the extraction to move the first LEBT solenoid closer and focus earlier the intense extracted beam. During the commissioning of the source in 2011–2012, ALISES has produced about 20 mA extracted from a 6 mm diameter plasma extraction hole at 23 kV. But the magnetic configuration combined to the new extraction system geometry led to important Penning discharge conditions in the accelerator column. Lots of them have been eliminated by inserting glass pieces between electrodes to modify equipotential lines with unfavorable ExB vacuum zones where particles were produced and trapped. To study Penning discharge location, several 3D calculations have been performed with OPERA-3D/TOSCA code to simulate the possible production and trapping of electrons in the extraction system. The results obtained on different sources already built have shown very good agreement with sparks location observed experimentally on electrodes. The simulations results as well as experimental measurements are presented and solutions to prevent possible Penning discharge in future source geometries are established.

  12. Ventilation and Suppression Systems in Road Tunnels: Some Issues regarding their Appropriate Use in a Fire Emergency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    Two important tunnel safety technologies are addressed. The majority of long road tunnels have ventilation systems. In the event of a fire in a tunnel, such systems will influence fire development in a number of different ...

  13. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  14. Suppression of pool fires with HRC-125 in a simulated engine nacelle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, David R. (INS, Inc., Lexington Park, MD); Hewson, John C.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CFD simulations are conducted to predict the distribution of fire suppressant in an engine nacelle and to predict the suppression of pool fires by the application of this suppressant. In the baseline configuration, which is based on an installed system, suppressant is injected through four nozzles at a rate fast enough to suppress all simulated pool fires. Variations that reduce the mass of the suppression system (reducing the impact of the suppression system on meeting mission needs) are considered, including a reduction in the rate of suppressant injection, a reduction in the mass of suppressant and a reduction in the number of nozzles. In general, these variations should work to reduce the effectiveness of the suppression system, but the CFD results point out certain changes that have negligible impact, at least for the range of phenomena considered here. The results are compared with measurements where available. Comparisons with suppressant measurements are reasonable. A series of twenty-three fire suppression tests were conducted to check the predictions. The pre-test predictions were generally successful in identifying the range of successful suppression tests. In two separate cases, each where one nozzle of the suppression system was capped, the simulation results did indicate a failure to suppress for a condition where the tests indicated successful suppression. When the test-suppressant discharge rate was reduced by roughly 25%, the tests were in agreement with the predictions. That is, the simulations predict a failure to suppress slightly before observed in these cases.

  15. Methods and apparatus of suppressing tube waves within a bore hole and seismic surveying systems incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Haefner, Daryl

    2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for attenuating waves in a bore hole, and seismic surveying systems incorporating the same. In one embodiment, an attenuating device includes a soft compliant bladder coupled to a pressurized gas source. A pressure regulating system reduces the pressure of the gas from the gas source prior to entering the bladder and operates in conjunction with the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in a bore hole to maintain the pressure of the bladder at a specified pressure relative to the surrounding bore hole pressure. Once the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid exceeds that of the gas source, bore hole fluid may be admitted into a vessel of the gas source to further compress and displace the gas contained therein. In another embodiment, a water-reactive material may be used to provide gas to the bladder wherein the amount of gas generated by the water-reactive material may depend on the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid.

  16. Methods and apparatus of suppressing tube waves within a bore hole and seismic surveying systems incorporating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.; Haefner, Daryl

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for attenuating waves in a bore hole, and seismic surveying systems incorporating the same. In one embodiment, an attenuating device includes a soft compliant bladder coupled to a pressurized gas source. A pressure regulating system reduces the pressure of the gas from the gas source prior to entering the bladder and operates in conjunction with the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in a bore hole to maintain the pressure of the bladder at a specified pressure relative to the surrounding bore hole pressure. Once the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid exceeds that of the gas source, bore hole fluid may be admitted into a vessel of the gas source to further compress and displace the gas contained therein. In another embodiment, a water-reactive material may be used to provide gas to the bladder wherein the amount of gas generated by the water-reactive material may depend on the hydrostatic pressure of the bore hole fluid.

  17. Optimal control of quantum gates and suppression of decoherence in a system of interacting two-level particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Grace; Constantin Brif; Herschel Rabitz; Ian A. Walmsley; Robert L. Kosut; Daniel A. Lidar

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of optimal control are applied to a model system of interacting two-level particles (e.g., spin-half atomic nuclei or electrons or two-level atoms) to produce high-fidelity quantum gates while simultaneously negating the detrimental effect of decoherence. One set of particles functions as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit unitary gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and under physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a novel state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the feasibility of precisely guiding the quantum evolution via optimal control, even when the system complexity is exacerbated by environmental coupling. It is found that the gate duration has an important effect on the control mechanism and resulting fidelity. An analysis of the sensitivity of the gate performance to random variations in the system parameters reveals a significant degree of robustness attained by the optimal control solutions.

  18. Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Water Mist Suppression in Conjunction with Displacement Ventilation By Benjamin Piers Hume-2758 #12;#12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 i A man of genius makes Water Mist System Masters of Fire Engineering Thesis 2003 ii #12;Displacement Water Mist System Masters

  19. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, R A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the nRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during the dark period associated with shelving.

  20. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A Mould

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the qRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they not only describe the dark period during shelving, but they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during that time.

  1. Multi-band OFDM UWB receiver with narrowband interference suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelleci, Burak

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) compatible ultra wideband (UWB) receiver with narrowband interference (NBI) suppression capability is presented. The average transmit power of UWB system ...

  2. Selection of hydrate suppression methods for gas streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, S.D.; Covington, K.K.; Collie, J.T. III

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss and compare the methods used to suppress hydrate formation in natural gas streams. Included in the comparison will be regenerated systems using ethylene glycol and non-regenerated systems using methanol. A comparison will be made between the quantities of methanol and ethylene glycol required to achieve a given a suppression. A discussion of BTEX emissions resulting from the ethylene glycol regenerator along with the effect or process variables on these emissions is also given.

  3. A formula for charmonium suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, C., E-mail: pena@ift.uni.wroc.pl; Blaschke, D., E-mail: blaschke@ift.uni.wroc.pl [University of Wroclaw, Institute for Theoretical Physics (Poland)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work a formula for charmonium suppression obtained by Matsui in 1989 is analytically generalized for the case of complex cc-barpotential described by a 3-dimensional and isotropic time-dependent harmonic oscillator (THO). It is suggested that under certain scheme the formula can be applied to describe J/{psi} suppression in heavy-ion collisions at CERN-SPS, RHIC, and LHC with the advantage of analytical tractability.

  4. on Active Resonance and Flutter Suppression Techniques John B. Moore, PhD, FIEEE, FTS, Professor, Dept. of Systems Engineering, Australiwt-ffational University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    . of Systems Engineering, .Ausiraiian Nationai University . 1. Introduction Reafistic aircmft models for controller design purposes are of very f@ ordm and normally with muftiple-inputs and mukiple- outputs of aircraft controller design, a namraf application for adaptive augmentation of a "robust" design

  5. Background Suppression Effects on Signal Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma detectors at border crossings are intended to detect illicit nuclear material. One performance challenge involves the fact that vehicles suppress the natural background, thus potentially reducing detection probability for threat items. Methods to adjust for background suppression have been considered in related but different settings. Here, methods to adjust for background suppression are tested in the context of signal estimation. Adjustment methods include several clustering options. We find that for the small-to-moderate suppression magnitudes exhibited in the analyzed data, suppression adjustment is only moderatel helpful in locating the signal peak, and in estimating its width or magnitude.

  6. Blast Effects Suppression System - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator Rewind Denison PowerhouseBlast

  7. FINAL REPORT FOR PSerc PROJECT Avoiding and Suppressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    FINAL REPORT FOR PSerc PROJECT Avoiding and Suppressing Oscillations December 1999 POWER SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.4 Summary guide to this report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.4 Arbitrary topology networks with high order machine models . . . . . . . . . 43 5.5 The eigenvalue solution

  8. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  9. Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large populations of stable flies can substantially reduce the income of beef and dairy producers. This publication explains how to suppress stable flies effectively and economically....

  10. Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Quantifying precipitation suppression due to air Pollution First author: Amir Givati The Hebrew January 2004 #12;ABSTRACT: Urban and industrial air pollution has been shown qualitatively to suppress of the ratio of hill/coast precipitation during the 20th century in polluted areas in line with the increasing

  11. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  12. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westover, M. Brandon

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological ...

  13. aircraft halon bottles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vassilis Kouroublakis, Engineering Websites Summary: on the environment during their life cycle. The shape of the bottle is formed by separating it into a number of parts,...

  14. Rotary rail car dumper coal-dust-suppressant experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, J.H.; Hereford, L.G.; Lenkevich, M.J.

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotary rail car dumper dust-suppressant experiment was performed at the PEPCO Morgantown Power Plant coal handling facility, Newburg, Maryland during the late summer and early fall of 1983. From previous observations of rotary coal car dumping, it was observed that large amounts of dust, especially for washed coal, were generated from the exposed top layer of coal in the open rail car. An overhead spray system using water and surfactant was used to examine the effectiveness of surface wetting just before dumping. High volume sampling at both the entrance and exit doorways of the dumper shed was used to determine the coal dust reduction. A total of 23 tests was performed, of which 16 tests were considered valid. All data were normalized for background, number of tons dumped and sampling time. The use of an overhead spray system can substantially suppress fugitive coal dust generated by rotary rail car dumping of coal. A water and surfactant mixture provided coal-dust-suppressant efficiencies ranging from 47% to 79% with an average of 61% for a combination of washed, mixed, and unwashed coal.

  15. THEORETICAL ISSUES IN J/PSI SUPPRESSION.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two decades ago Matsui and Satz suggested that Debye screening in the quark-gluon plasma would result in J/{psi} suppression in heavy ion collisions. Much has happened in the subsequent years, and the picture of quark-gluon plasma at present is rapidly evolving - what does it imply for the J/{psi} suppression? What are the recent RHIC and SPS results trying to tell us? What else has to be done? This talk is an attempt to address these questions.

  16. Suppression and enhancement of transcriptional noise by DNA looping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose M. G. Vilar; Leonor Saiz

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA looping has been observed to enhance and suppress transcriptional noise but it is uncertain which of these two opposite effects is to be expected for given conditions. Here, we derive analytical expressions for the main quantifiers of transcriptional noise in terms of the molecular parameters and elucidate the role of DNA looping. Our results rationalize paradoxical experimental observations and provide the first quantitative explanation of landmark individual-cell measurements at the single molecule level on the classical lac operon genetic system [Choi et al., Science 322, 442-446 (2008)].

  17. Suppression of Longitudinal Coupled-Bunch Instabilities at the KEK-PF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obina, T.; Tobiyama, M.; Honda, T.; Tadano, M.; Flanagan, J.W.; Mitsuhashi, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Cheng, W.X.; Fox, J.D.; /SLAC; Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A bunch-by-bunch feedback system has been developed to suppress longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities at the KEK-PF. A longitudinal kicker based on a DAFNE-type overdamped cavity has been designed and installed in the ring, and a general purpose signal processor, called iGp, has been developed by the collaboration of the KEK, SLAC, and INFN-LNF. The entire feedback loop has been closed by the end of June 2007, and the feedback system has successfully suppressed the longitudinal dipole-mode instabilities up to 430 mA.

  18. Baseline Suppression of Vehicle Portal Monitor Gamma Count Profiles: A Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopresti, Charles A.; Weier, Dennis R.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitor (RPM) systems based upon polyvinyl toluene scintillator (PVT) gamma ray detectors have been deployed to detect illicit trafficking in radioactive materials at border crossings. This report sets forth a characterization of the baseline suppression effect in gross-count gamma ray profiles due to shadow shielding by vehicles entering radiation portal monitors. Shadow shielding is of interest because it reduces the alarm sensitivity of portal monitors. This observational study investigated three types of PVT based commercial RPM systems currently deployed at selected ports of entry in terms of spatial effects relative to detector panel orientation - driver versus passenger side, top versus bottom, and narrow lanes versus wide lanes - as observed for a large number of vehicles. Each portal site appears to have a distinctive baseline suppression signature, based on percent maximum suppression relative to measured background. Results suggest that alarm algorithms based on gross-counts may be further refined through attention to individual site characteristics. In addition, longer vehicle transit times were often correlated with stronger baseline suppression, suggesting that baseline suppression studies should take into account duration (length) of transit. (PIET-43741-TM-333-NIM)

  19. LOCALLY WEIGHTED TOTAL VARIATION DENOISING FOR RINGING ARTIFACT SUPPRESSION IN PET RECONSTRUCTION USING PSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with PSF modeling is now implemented and widely used in clinical PET/CT systems. Some work has been doneLOCALLY WEIGHTED TOTAL VARIATION DENOISING FOR RINGING ARTIFACT SUPPRESSION IN PET RECONSTRUCTION tomography (PET) images, but also introduces ringing artifacts and over enhancement that is contrast

  20. Harmonics suppression effect of the quasi-periodic undulator in SASE free-electron-laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai-Lin Wu; Qi-Ka Jia; He-Ting Li

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the harmonics suppression effect of QPUs in SASE FEL is investigated. The numerical results show that the harmonics power is reduced by using QPUs, but the fundamental radiation power also has a pronounced decrease as the saturation length gets very long. The cases of employing QPUs as parts of undulators are studied. The calculations show that if the fraction of QPUs and their offgap are appropriate in an undulator system, the harmonics radiation could be suppressed remarkably, meanwhile the fundamental saturation length does not increase too much.

  1. Metasurfaces for suppressing reflection over broadband

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patra, Anuradha; Nagarajan, Arvind; Achanta, Venu Gopal

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfaces patterned with arrays of quasi-periodic air holes having conical depth profile have been studied for their effectiveness in suppressing air-substrate reflection in the wavelength range of 450-1350 nm (limited by our measurement). The role of quasi-periodic air-hole pattern, depth of holes and launch angle on the observed antireflection behavior are investigated. The average optical transmittance of the patterned quartz substrate at near normal incidence is more than 97% and reflectance is less than 2%. Patterned quartz surfaces with 450 nm thin graded rarefaction region maintain the antireflective property up to 30{\\deg} (limited by our measurements) angle of incidence.

  2. Suppression of Magnetic State Decoherence Using Ultrafast Optical Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Search; P. R. Berman

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the magnetic state decoherence produced by collisions in a thermal vapor can be suppressed by the application of a train of ultrafast optical pulses.

  3. acids suppresses diethylnitrosamine-induced: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Geosciences Websites Summary: from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants...

  4. acid suppression therapy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2006-01-01 2 Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Geosciences Websites Summary: from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants...

  5. acid suppression trial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1997-01-01 2 Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Geosciences Websites Summary: from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants...

  6. acid suppression predict: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Davis, Matt 2 Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Geosciences Websites Summary: from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants...

  7. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Yi [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, T.-L. [Department of Anesthesiology, Wan-Fang Hospital, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sheu, J.-R. [Department of Anesthesiology, Wan-Fang Hospital, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, R.-M. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China) and Department of Anesthesiology, Wan-Fang Hospital, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  8. Speculative Execution Exception Recovery Write-back Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlke, Scott A.

    Speculative Execution Exception Recovery using Write-back Suppression Roger A. Bringmann Scott A or extra register pressure. This paper introduces a new architecture scheme referred to as write-back that with a modest amount of hardware, write- back suppression supports accurate reporting and handling of exceptions

  9. Performance analysis of interference suppression techniques for multiple antenna systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amihood, Patrick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-BLAST-DFE Technique for MISO Channels with DecentralizedPrecoding Operating over MISO Frequency Selec- tive Fadingon a Nonlinear Precoder for MISO Channels with Decentralized

  10. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  11. Quadrature mixture LO suppression via DSW DAC noise dither

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Dudley, Peter A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A Quadrature Error Corrected Digital Waveform Synthesizer (QECDWS) employs frequency dependent phase error corrections to, in effect, pre-distort the phase characteristic of the chirp to compensate for the frequency dependent phase nonlinearity of the RF and microwave subsystem. In addition, the QECDWS can employ frequency dependent correction vectors to the quadrature amplitude and phase of the synthesized output. The quadrature corrections cancel the radars' quadrature upconverter (mixer) errors to null the unwanted spectral image. A result is the direct generation of an RF waveform, which has a theoretical chirp bandwidth equal to the QECDWS clock frequency (1 to 1.2 GHz) with the high Spurious Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) necessary for high dynamic range radar systems such as SAR. To correct for the problematic upconverter local oscillator (LO) leakage, precision DC offsets can be applied over the chirped pulse using a pseudo-random noise dither. The present dither technique can effectively produce a quadrature DC bias which has the precision required to adequately suppress the LO leakage. A calibration technique can be employed to calculate both the quadrature correction vectors and the LO-nulling DC offsets using the radar built-in test capability.

  12. antigens suppresses murine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in adulthood of autoreactive T cells specific to that antigen. The renal-specific ... Marshall, Naomi Jane 2009-01-01 17 Thymosin Beta 4 has tumor suppressive effects and its...

  13. Nuclear Suppression of Dileptons at Large xF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cepila; J. Nemchik

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a significant nuclear suppression of the relative production rates (p(d)+A)/(p+d(p)) for the Drell-Yan process at large Feynman xF. Since this is the region of minimal values for the light-front momentum fraction variable x2 in the target nucleus, it is tempting to interpret this as a manifestation of coherence or of a Color Glass Condensate. We demonstrate, however, that this suppression mechanism is governed by the energy conservation restrictions in multiple parton rescatterings in nuclear matter. To eliminate nuclear shadowing effects coming from the coherence, we calculate nuclear suppression in the light-cone dipole approach at large dilepton masses and at energy accessible at FNAL. Our calculations are in a good agreement with data from the E772 experiment. Using the same mechanism we predict also nuclear suppression at forward rapidities in the RHIC energy range.

  14. Global microRNA depletion suppresses tumor angiogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sidi

    MicroRNAs delicately regulate the balance of angiogenesis. Here we show that depletion of all microRNAs suppresses tumor angiogenesis. We generated microRNA-deficient tumors by knocking out Dicer1. These tumors are highly ...

  15. Suppression of Dilepton Production in Hot Hadronic Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, C.; Lee, S. H.; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -meson resonance is suppressed as a result of the modification of the pion electromagnetic form factor at finite temperature. The relevance of this phenomenon to the partial restoration of chiral symmetry in hot hadronic matter is discussed....

  16. Climate Dependency of Tree Growth Suppressed by Acid Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapenas, Andrei G.

    uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climateClimate Dependency of Tree Growth Suppressed by Acid Deposition Effects on Soils in Northwest Russia G R E G O R Y B . L A W R E N C E , * , A N D R E I G . L A P E N I S , D A N B E R G G R E N

  17. NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP FOR A FLEXIBLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    NONLINEAR EFFECTS OF A MODAL DOMAIN OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR IN A VIBRATION SUPPRESSION CONTROL LOOP Recently, a modal domain optical fiber sensor has been demonstrated as a sensor in a control system the region of linear operation in terms of the optical fiber sensor parameters. #12;2 1. INTRODUCTION

  18. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  19. Calculation of Fire Severity Factors and Fire Non-Suppression Probabilities For A DOE Facility Fire PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Jim Bouchard; Heather Lucek

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over a 12 month period, a fire PRA was developed for a DOE facility using the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology. The fire PRA modeling included calculation of fire severity factors (SFs) and fire non-suppression probabilities (PNS) for each safe shutdown (SSD) component considered in the fire PRA model. The SFs were developed by performing detailed fire modeling through a combination of CFAST fire zone model calculations and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). Component damage times and automatic fire suppression system actuation times calculated in the CFAST LHS analyses were then input to a time-dependent model of fire non-suppression probability. The fire non-suppression probability model is based on the modeling approach outlined in NUREG/CR-6850 and is supplemented with plant specific data. This paper presents the methodology used in the DOE facility fire PRA for modeling fire-induced SSD component failures and includes discussions of modeling techniques for: • Development of time-dependent fire heat release rate profiles (required as input to CFAST), • Calculation of fire severity factors based on CFAST detailed fire modeling, and • Calculation of fire non-suppression probabilities.

  20. Radar signal pre-processing to suppress surface bounce and multipath

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Mast, Jeffrey E; Beer, N. Reginald

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes that return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  1. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

  2. Arsenite suppression of BMP signaling in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Marjorie A.; Qin, Qin [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States); Hu, Qin; Zhao, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Rice, Robert H., E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8588 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic, a human skin carcinogen, suppresses differentiation of cultured keratinocytes. Exploring the mechanism of this suppression revealed that BMP-6 greatly increased levels of mRNA for keratins 1 and 10, two of the earliest differentiation markers expressed, a process prevented by co-treatment with arsenite. BMP also stimulated, and arsenite suppressed, mRNA for FOXN1, an important transcription factor driving early keratinocyte differentiation. Keratin mRNAs increased slowly after BMP-6 addition, suggesting they are indirect transcriptional targets. Inhibition of Notch1 activation blocked BMP induction of keratins 1 and 10, while FOXN1 induction was largely unaffected. Supporting a requirement for Notch1 signaling in keratin induction, BMP increased levels of activated Notch1, which was blocked by arsenite. BMP also greatly decreased active ERK, while co-treatment with arsenite maintained active ERK. Inhibition of ERK signaling mimicked BMP by inducing keratin and FOXN1 mRNAs and by increasing active Notch1, effects blocked by arsenite. Of 6 dual-specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) targeting ERK, two were induced by BMP unless prevented by simultaneous exposure to arsenite and EGF. Knockdown of DUSP2 or DUSP14 using shRNAs greatly reduced FOXN1 and keratins 1 and 10 mRNA levels and their induction by BMP. Knockdown also decreased activated Notch1, keratin 1 and keratin 10 protein levels, both in the presence and absence of BMP. Thus, one of the earliest effects of BMP is induction of DUSPs, which increases FOXN1 transcription factor and activates Notch1, both required for keratin gene expression. Arsenite prevents this cascade by maintaining ERK signaling, at least in part by suppressing DUSP expression. - Highlights: • BMP induces FOXN1 transcription. • BMP induces DUSP2 and DUSP14, suppressing ERK activation. • Arsenite suppresses levels of phosphorylated Smad1/5 and FOXN1 and DUSP mRNA. • These actions rationalize arsenite suppression of keratinocyte differentiation.

  3. A simplified model of decontamination by BWR steam suppression pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, D.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomena that can decontaminate aerosol-laden gases sparging through steam suppression pools of boiling water reactors during reactor accidents are described. Uncertainties in aerosol properties, aerosol behavior within gas bubbles, and bubble behavior in plumes affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools. Uncertainties in the boundary and initial conditions that are dictated by the progression of severe reactor accidents and that will affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools are discussed. Ten parameters that characterize boundary and initial condition uncertainties, nine parameters that characterize aerosol property and behavior uncertainties, and eleven parameters that characterize uncertainties in the behavior of bubbles in steam suppression pools are identified. Ranges for the values of these parameters and subjective probability distributions for parametric values within the ranges are defined. These uncertain parameters are used in Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses to develop uncertainty distributions for the decontamination that can be achieved by steam suppression pools and the size distribution of aerosols that do emerge from such pools. A simplified model of decontamination by steam suppression pools is developed by correlating features of the uncertainty distributions for total decontamination factor, DF(total), mean size of emerging aerosol particles, d{sub p}, and the standard deviation of the emerging aerosol size distribution, {sigma}, with pool depth, H. Correlations of the median values of the uncertainty distributions are suggested as the best estimate of decontamination by suppression pools. Correlations of the 10 percentile and 90 percentile values of the uncertainty distributions characterize the uncertainty in the best estimates. 295 refs., 121 figs., 113 tabs.

  4. Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, K M

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

  5. Fire suppression efficiency screening using a counterflow cylindrical burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.C.; Donnelly, M.K.; Prive, N.; Grosshandler, W.L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and validation of a counterflow cylindrical burner for fire suppression efficiency screening are described. The stability limits of the burner were mapped using various fuel (propane) and oxidizer (air) flows. The stability envelopes compared favorably with those reported in the literature. The apparatus was characterized using inert gases (argon, helium, and nitrogen), and the relative fire suppression efficiency ranking of these three gases was found to be commensurate with that from cup-burner tests. For liquid suppression experiments, a piezoelectric droplet generator was used to form droplets (<100 {micro}m). Water was used as a representative liquid suppressant to study the feasibility of using such a burner for screening liquid agents. Extinction was facilitated with the addition of water droplets, and the effect of water became more pronounced when its application rate was increased. Suppression experiments using water with and without nitrogen dilution in the oxidizer stream were also performed. Flame extinction due to the combined effect of water and nitrogen dilution was demonstrated.

  6. $J/?$ suppression in the threshold model and QGP formation time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In the QGP motivated threshold model, in addition to the normal nuclear absorption, $J/\\psi$'s are subjected to an additional "anomalous" suppression. We have analysed the recently published PHENIX data on the participant number dependence of the nuclear modification factor for $J/\\psi$'s in Au+Au collisions and extracted the anomalous suppression required to explain the data. At mid rapidity $J/\\psi$'s are anomalously suppressed only above a threshold density $n_c$=3.73 fm$^{-2}$. The forward rapidity data on the otherhand require that $J/\\psi$'s are continuously "anomalously" suppressed. The analysis strongly indicate that in mid rapidity $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed in a deconfined medium. Using the PHENIX data on the participant number dependence of the Bjorken energy density, we have also estimated the QGP formation time. For critical temperature $T_c$=192 MeV, estimated QGP formation time ranges between 0.06-0.08 fm/c.

  7. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  8. Alcohol-induced suppression of the humoral immune response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolen, J.S.; Draxler, S.; Nagle, J.J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report here that summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) pretreated by injection of a small amount of the common alcohol, ethanol, or ethanol containing PCB, showed complete suppression of the immune response to a formalin-killed sewage sludge isolate of the human enteric bacteria, E. coli. The unresponsiveness persisted for up to 42 days after injection of bacteria. Demonstrable agglutinating antibody to E. coli was seen in unpretreated fish after seven days. A second injection of bacteria 42 days after the first in pretreated fish, now resulted in immune responsiveness although the magnitude of the response resembled a primary response, indicating that memory to the first injection was also suppressed. Slightly lower responses were seen in the groups of fish injected with ethanol containing the PCB Aroclor 1254 when compared with those given ethanol alone, but the major suppression was alcohol-induced.

  9. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lietava, R; Pisútová, N; Tomasik, Boris; Lietava, Roman; Pisut, Jan; Pisutova, Neva; Tomasik, Boris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  10. Viscoelastic Suppression of Gravity-Driven Counterflow Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beiersdorfer, P; Layne, D; Magee, E W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to achieve ``top kill'' of actively flowing oil wells by insertion of dense drilling ``muds'', i.e., slurries of dense minerals, from above will fail if the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the gravity-driven counterflow produces turbulence that breaks up the denser fluid into small droplets. Here we estimate the droplet size to be sub-mm for fast flows and suggest the addition of a shear-thickening polymer to suppress turbulence. Laboratory experiments show a progression from droplet formation to complete turbulence suppression at the relevant high velocities, illustrating rich new physics accessible by using a shear-thickening liquid in gravity driven counter-streaming flows.

  11. An alternative model of jet suppression at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Lietava; Jan Pisut; Neva Pisutova; Boris Tomasik

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple Glauber-type mechanism for suppression of jet production up to transverse momenta of about 10 GeV/c at RHIC. For processes in this kinematic region, the formation time is smaller than the interval between two successive hard partonic collisions and the subsequent collision influences the jet production. Number of jets then roughly scales with the number of participants. Proportionality to the number of binary collisions is recovered for very high transverse momenta. The model predicts suppression of jet production in d+Au collisions at RHIC.

  12. Suppressing Proton Decay in Theories with Localised Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobby S. Acharya; Roberto Valandro

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the contribution to the proton decay amplitude from Kaluza-Klein lepto-quarks in theories with extra dimensions, localised fermions and gauge fields which propagate in the bulk. Such models naturally occur within the context of M-theory. In SU(5) models we show that carefully including all such modes gives a distinctive pattern of decays through various channels including a strong suppression of decays into neutrinos or right handed positrons. By contrast there is no such suppression for SO(10).

  13. SUPPRESSION OF DIELECTRONIC RECOMBINATION DUE TO FINITE DENSITY EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, D.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Korista, K. T. [Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Ferland, G. J. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Badnell, N. R. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (n{sub e} = 1 cm{sup -3}) and finite (n{sub e} = 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) densities. We find that the denser case is significantly more ionized due to suppression of DR, warranting further studies of density effects on DR by detailed collisional-radiative calculations which utilize state-of-the-art partial DR rate coefficients. This is expected to impact the predictions of the ionization balance in denser cosmic gases such as those found in nova and supernova shells, accretion disks, and the broad emission line regions in active galactic nuclei.

  14. Suppressed serum prolactin in sinoaortic-denervated rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, N.; Melmed, S.; Morris, M.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors investigated the effect of arterial baroreceptor deafferentation on serum and pituitary prolactin (PRL) and on catecholamines in median eminence (ME) and anterior and posterior pituitaries. Male Wistar rats were sinoaortic denervated (SAD) or sham operated (SO). Three days after surgery serum prolactin, measured by radioimmunoassay, was suppressed in SAD rats, and dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations, measured by radioenzymatic or high-performance liquid chromatography electron capture methods, were significantly reduced in ME of SAD rats. Simultaneously, anterior pituitary of SAD rats had significant increases in both catecholamines, whereas posterior pituitary showed no changes. Four hours after surgery serum PRL was also reduced in SAD rats, but no changes in ME catecholamines were found. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured before and after injection of bromocriptine in SAD and SO rats 3 days after surgery. Bromocriptine markedly suppressed serum PRL in both groups and reduced MAP from 144 +/- 10 to 84 +/- 5 and from 116 +/- 2 to 99 +/- 3 in SAD and SO rats, respectively; heart rate was reduced in SAD rats. They conclude that the SAD rat is a model of hypertension with suppressed serum PRL and that interruption of arterial baroreceptor nerves suppresses PRL secretion probably by modulating tuberoinfundibular turnover of catecholamines.

  15. Range Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezeshki, Ali

    is sensitive to Doppler effect. Off the zero- Doppler axis the ambiguity function of Golay pairs of phase codedRange Sidelobe Suppression in a Desired Doppler Interval Yuejie Chi,1 Ali Pezeshki,2 Robert--We present a novel method of constructing a Doppler resilient pulse train of Golay complementary waveforms

  16. Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolini, Umberto

    Seismic shape parameters estimation and ground-roll suppression using vector-sensor beamforming the problem of estimating the shape parameters of seismic wavefields in linear arrays. The purpose of the subsurface layers from the seismic wavefields registered by surface sensors. However, only the waves

  17. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF SUPPRESSION OF NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION BY LOW DOSES OF LOW LET RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.LESIE REDPATH, PH.D.

    2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We are currently funded (9/01-8/04) by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program to examine mechanisms underlying the suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of low LET radiation. For the new studies proposed under Notice 04-21, we intend to follow up on our observation that upregulation of DNA repair may be an important factor and that its importance is dose-dependent. The experimental system will be the human hybrid cell neoplastic transformation assay that we are currently using. We propose to test the following hypothesis: Down-regulation of DNA dsb repair will abrogate the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation. Using the technique of RNA silencing, it is proposed to test the effect of down-regulation of the two major DNA dsb repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), on the dose response relationship for neoplastic transformation. Based on prior studies, we predict that this will result in abrogation of the suppressive effect at doses in the range 1 to 10 cGy, but not at lower doses. The proposed experiments will also help address the question as to which of the two DNA repair pathways may be the most important in causing suppression of transformation. HR is a pathway that is predominant in S and G2 phase cells and is known to be less error-prone than the NHEJ pathway that is predominant in G1 phase. We hypothesize that down-regulation of HR will result in the most effective abrogation of suppression. An important component of this study will be the determination of the how abrogation of DNA dsb repair impacts the spontaneous transformation frequency, presumably a consequence of endogeneous DNA damage. Experiments will be carried out using partially synchronized populations of cells enriched for G1 and S/G2 respectively. In addition to the endpoint of neoplastic transformation the impact of down-regulation of HR and NHEJ on the formation and disappearance of the DNA dsb marker, gamma-H2AX, will be studied.

  18. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: a solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E. [Stony Brook Univ, Department of Physics and Astronomy, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Physics, Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicates a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc?T?1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. Moreover, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.

  19. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: a solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicatesmore »a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc?T?1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. Moreover, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.« less

  20. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  1. Apparatus and method for suppressing vibration and displacement of a bellows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexible bellows are utilized between two systems, such as a pumping system and a process station, to partially absorb system vibrations and to compensate for misalignment between the systems. It is common practice to either clamp a rigid spacer between flanges of the two systems to separate them from each other, or to maintain the bellows in unsupported relationship between these systems. In the former bellows arrangement, the rigid spacer transmits vibratory energy between the two systems and the bellows tends to function as an undamped or underdamped unit that resonates at its own frequency to create additional vibratory energy, transmitted to the systems. In the latter, unsupported bellows arrangement, the pressure differential prevalent between the fluid flowing through the bellows and ambient normally causes extension or retraction of the bellows and resulting misalignment problems. The present invention substantially solves the above vibration and misalignment problems by providing an inflatable tube in surrounding relationship about a bellows to suppress vibration and displacement thereof. A method for isolating first and second systems from each other to prevent the transmission of vibratory energy therebetween comprises the steps of attaching at least one flexible bellows between the systems, surrounding the bellows with an inflatable tube, and maintaining a predetermined pressure in the tube to urge the tube in flexible contact with at least some of the convolutions of the bellows.

  2. The optimal suppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-good monopoly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUPPRESSION OF A LOW-COST TECHNOLOGY BY A DURABLE-GOODsuppression of a low-cost technology by a durable-goodSuppression of a Low-Cost Technology by a Durable-Good

  3. Optical analog of Rabi oscillation suppression due to atomic motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Muga; B. Navarro

    2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rabi oscillations of a two-level atom illuminated by a laser on resonance with the atomic transition may be suppressed by the atomic motion through averaging or filtering mechanisms. The optical analogs of these velocity effects are described. The two atomic levels correspond in the optical analogy to orthogonal polarizations of light and the Rabi oscillations to polarization oscillations in a medium which is optically active, naturally or due to a magnetic field. In the later case, the two orthogonal polarizations could be selected by choosing the orientation of the magnetic field, and one of them be filtered out. It is argued that the time-dependent optical polarization oscillations or their suppression are observable with current technology.

  4. Suppression MHD instabilities by IBW heating in HT-7 Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Qin; Y. P. Zhao; X. J. Zhang; P. Xu; Y. Yang; the HT-7 team

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In HT-7 tokamak, the m= 2/1 tearing mode can be effectively suppressed by the ion bernstein wave (IBW) when the location of power deposition is near the q=2 rational surface. Off-axis electron heating and greatly increase of electron density was observed, in the meantime, the particle confinement appears to be improved with the increased of the central line averaged electron density and the drop of Da emission. Induced large ne gradients and pressures were spatially correlated with the IBW deposition profile by theoretical calculation >. It is suggested that off-axis IBW heating modifies the electron pressure profile, and so the current density profile could be redistributed resulting in the suppression of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instability. It provides an integrated way for making combined effects on both the stabilization of tearing modes and controlling of pressure profile.

  5. Analysis of Shot Noise Suppression for Electron Beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, Daniel; Huang, Zhirong; Stupakov, Gennady

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Shot noise can affect the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) by driving instabilities (e.g., the microbunching instability) or by competing with seeded density modulations. Recent papers have proposed suppressing shot noise to enhance FEL performance. In this paper we use a onedimensional (1D) model to calculate the noise amplification from an energy modulation (e.g., electron interactions from space charge or undulator radiation) followed by a dispersive section. We show that, for a broad class of interactions, selecting the correct dispersive strength suppresses shot noise across a wide range of frequencies. The final noise level depends on the beam’s energy spread and the properties of the interaction potential. We confirm and illustrate our analytical results with 1D simulations.

  6. Nuclear absorption and $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the NA58 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions. $J/\\psi$ production is assumed to be a two step process, (i) formation of $c\\bar{c}$ pair, which is accurately calculable in QCD and (ii) formation of $J/\\psi$ meson from the $c\\bar{c}$ pair, which can be conveniently parameterized. In a pA/AA collision, a $c\\bar{c}$ pair gain relative square momentum as it passes through the nuclear medium and some of the $c\\bar{c}$ pairs can gain enough momentum to cross the threshold to become an open charm meson, leading to suppression in pA/AA collisions. A new prescription is proposed for the gain in momentum square, consistent with Krammer process. The model without any free parameter could explain the $E_T$ dependence of $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ratio.

  7. Depression and the Ironic Effects of Thought Suppression: Therapeutic Strategies for ImprovingMental Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beevers, Christopher

    are espc- cially likely to engage in thought suppression in an at- tempt to achieve mental control over

  8. Suppression of Rayleigh Taylor instability in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rayleigh Taylor instability in a strongly coupled plasma medium has been investigated using the equations of generalized hydrodynamics. It is demonstrated that the visco-elasticity of the strongly coupled medium due to strong inter particle correlations leads to a suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability unless certain threshold conditions are met. The relevance of these results to experiments on laser compression of matter to high densities including those related to inertial confinement fusion using lasers has also been shown.

  9. Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimír Balek; Matej Škovran

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

  10. Suppression of large-scale perturbations by stiff solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balek, Vladimír

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of large-scale scalar perturbations in the presence of stiff solid (solid with pressure to energy density ratio > 1/3) is studied. If the solid dominated the dynamics of the universe long enough, the perturbations could end up suppressed by as much as several orders of magnitude. To avoid too steep large-angle power spectrum of CMB, radiation must have prevailed over the solid long enough before recombination.

  11. RHIC and LHC jet suppression in non-central collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic; Marko Djordjevic; Bojana Blagojevic

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding properties of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is a major goal of RHIC and LHC experiments. An excellent tool to study these properties is jet suppression of light and heavy flavor observables. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. With this goal, we here extend our dynamical energy loss formalism towards generating predictions for non-central collisions; the formalism takes into account both radiative and collisional energy loss, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Specifically, we here generate predictions for all available centrality ranges, for both LHC and RHIC experiments, and for four different probes (charged hadrons, neutral pions, D mesons and non-prompt $J/\\psi$). We obtain a very good agreement with all available non-central data, and also generate predictions for suppression measurements that will soon become available. Finally, we discuss implications of the obtained good agreement with experimental data with different medium models that are currently considered.

  12. $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions, a conventional description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the latest NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb + Pb collisions. $J/\\psi$ production is assumed to be a two step process, (i) formation of $c\\bar{c}$ pair, which is accurately calculable in QCD and (ii) formation of $J/\\psi$ meson from the $c\\bar{c}$ pair, which can be conveniently parameterized. In a pA/AA collision, the as the $c\\bar{c}$ pair pass through the nuclear medium, it gain relative square momentum at the rate of $\\epsilon^2$ per unit path length. As a result, some of the $c\\bar{c}$ pairs can gain enough momentum to cross the threshold to become an open charm meson, leading to suppression in pA/AA collisions. The parameters of the model were fixed from experimental data on the total $J/\\psi$ cross section as a function of effective nuclear length. The model without any free parameter, give excellent description of NA50 data on $E_T$ dependence of $J/\\psi$ to Drell-Yan ratio. The model was applied to predict the $E_T$ dependence of $J/\\psi$ at RHIC energy. Much larger suppression of $J/\\psi$, in agreement with other model calculations are predicted.

  13. Edinburgh Research Explorer ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    Edinburgh Research Explorer ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells, T 2013, 'ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells, but Is Not Required for Multi date: 26. Jun. 2014 #12;ERK2 Suppresses Self-Renewal Capacity of Embryonic Stem Cells

  14. Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using Large-Bandgap AlGaInN Thin Barrier Layers in InGaN Quantum DOI: 10.1109/JPHOT.2013.2255028 1943-0655/$31.00 Ó2013 IEEE #12;Efficiency-Droop Suppression by Using with the consideration of carrier transport effect for efficiency droop suppression. The lattice-matched Al

  15. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for validation. Comparisons between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data are discussed in detail.

  16. Deconfinement as an entropic self-destruction: a solution for the quarkonium suppression puzzle?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E. [Stony Brook Univ, Department of Physics and Astronomy, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Physics, Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropic approach to dissociation of bound states immersed in strongly coupled systems is developed. In such systems, the excitations of the bound state are often delocalized and characterized by a large entropy, so that the bound state is strongly entangled with the rest of the statistical system. If this entropy S increases with the separation r between the constituents of the bound state, S=S(r), then the resulting entropic force F=T ?S/?r (T is temperature) can drive the dissociation process. As a specific example, we consider the case of heavy quarkonium in strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, where lattice QCD indicates a large amount of entropy associated with the heavy quark pair at temperatures 0.9Tc?T?1.5Tc (Tc is the deconfinement temperature); this entropy S(r) grows with the interquark distance r. We argue that the entropic mechanism results in an anomalously strong quarkonium suppression in the temperature range near Tc. This entropic self-destruction may thus explain why the experimentally measured quarkonium nuclear modification factor at RHIC (lower energy density) is smaller than at LHC (higher energy density), possibly resolving the “quarkonium suppression puzzle”—all of the previously known mechanisms of quarkonium dissociation operate more effectively at higher energy densities, and this contradicts the data. Moreover, we find that near Tc the entropic force leads to delocalization of the bound hadron states; we argue that this delocalization may be the mechanism underlying deconfinement.

  17. Strangeness Suppression of qq? Creation Observed in Exclusive Reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mestayer, Mac [JLAB; Park, Kijun; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Ball, Jacques; Battaglieri, Marco; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Biselli, Angela; Boyarinov, Sergey; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garillon, Brice; Garcon, Michel; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Golovach, Evgeny; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guidal, Michel; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hattawy, Mohammad; Holtrop, Maurik; Hughes, Simon; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Jiang, Hao; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Keller, Dustin; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Levine, William; Livingston, Ken; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; Moody, Cristina; Moutarde, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Peng, Peng; Phelps, William; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Simonyan, Ani; Sokhan, Daria; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Tang, Wei; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Wei, Xiangdong; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  18. Semiclassical suppression of weak anisotropies of a generic Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Valerio Battisti; Riccardo Belvedere; Giovanni Montani

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiclassical mechanism which suppresses the weak anisotropies of an inhomogeneous cosmological model is developed. In particular, a wave function of this Universe having a meaningful probabilistic interpretation is obtained that is in agreement with the Copenhagen School. It describes the evolution of the anisotropies with respect to the isotropic scale factor which is regarded as a semiclassical variable playing an observer-like role. Near the cosmological singularity the solution spreads over all values of the anisotropies while, when the Universe expands sufficiently, the closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model appears to be the favorite state.

  19. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore »Wave heating.« less

  20. Suppression of soft nuclear bremsstrahlung in proton-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. van Goethem; L. Aphecetche; J. C. S. Bacelar; H. Delagrange; J. Diaz; D. d'Enterria; M. Hoefman; R. Holzmann; H. Huisman; N. Kalantar--Nayestanaki; A. Kugler; H. Loehner; G. Martinez; J. G. Messchendorp; R. W. Ostendorf; S. Schadmand; R. H. Siemssen; R. S. Simon; Y. Schutz; R. Turrisi; M. Volkerts; H. W. Wilschut

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon energy spectra up to the kinematic limit have been measured in 190 MeV proton reactions with light and heavy nuclei to investigate the influence of the multiple-scattering process on the photon production. Relative to the predictions of models based on a quasi-free production mechanism a strong suppression of bremsstrahlung is observed in the low-energy region of the photon spectrum. We attribute this effect to the interference of photon amplitudes due to multiple scattering of nucleons in the nuclear medium.

  1. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bertelli, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kramer, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, D. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Crocker, N. A. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Kubota, S. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); White, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  2. Hydrodynamical model for $J/?$ suppression and elliptic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In a hydrodynamic model, we have studied $J/\\psi$ suppression and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. At the initial time, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the fluid. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are dissolved if the local fluid temperature exceeds a melting temperature $T_{J/\\psi}$. Sequential melting of charmonium states ($\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$), with melting temperatures $T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.2T_c$, $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2T_c$ and feed-down fraction $F\\approx 0.3$, is consistent with the PHENIX data on $J/\\psi$ suppression and near zero elliptic flow for $J/\\psi$'s. It is also shown that the model will require substantial regeneration of charmoniums, if the charmonium states dissolve at temperature close to the critical temperature, $T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\leq T_c$, $T_{J/\\psi}\\approx1.2T_c$. The regenerated charmoniums will have positive elliptic flow.

  3. Enhancement and suppression of opto-acoustic parametric interactions using optical feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Zhongyang; Zhao Chunnong; Ju, L.; Blair, D. G. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A three mode opto-acoustic parametric amplifier (OAPA) is created when two orthogonal optical modes in a high finesse optical cavity are coupled via an acoustic mode of the cavity mirror. Such interactions are predicted to occur in advanced long baseline gravitational wave detectors. They can have high positive gain, which leads to strong parametric instability. Here we show that an optical feedback scheme can enhance or suppress the parametric gain of an OAPA, allowing exploration of three-mode parametric interactions, especially in cavity systems that have insufficient optical power to achieve spontaneous instability. We derive analytical equations and show that optical feedback is capable of controlling predicted instabilities in advanced gravitational wave detectors within a time scale of 13approx10 s.

  4. Investigation of the suppression effect of polyethylene glycol on copper electroplating by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, C.-C.; Lee, W.-H.; Wang, Y.-L.; Chan, D.-Y.; Hwang, G.-J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chiayi University, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); College of Science and Engineering, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is an additive that is commonly used as a suppressor in the semiconductor copper (Cu)-electroplating process. In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the electrochemical behavior of PEG in the Cu-electroplating process. Polarization analysis, cyclic-voltammetry stripping, and cell voltage versus plating time were examined to clarify the suppression behavior of PEG. The equivalent circuit simulated from the EIS data shows that PEG inhibited the Cu-electroplating rate by increasing the charge-transfer resistance as well as the resistance of the adsorption layer. The presence of a large inductance demonstrated the strong adsorption of cuprous-PEG-chloride complexes on the Cu surface during the Cu-electroplating process. Increasing the PEG concentration appears to increase the resistances of charge transfer, the adsorption layer, and the inductance of the electroplating system.

  5. Nuclear absorption and anomalous $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss $J/\\psi$ suppression in a QCD based nuclear absorption model. Centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in S+U and in Pb+Pb collisions are explained in the model. However, the model fails to explain the centrality dependence of $\\psi\\prime$ suppression. $\\psi\\prime$ suppression in S+U or in Pb+Pb collisions require additional suppression. Additional suppression of $\\psi\\prime$, due to hadronic comovers or due to QGP formation could not be distinguished in Pb+Pb collisions. We then show that the centrality dependence of the ratio, $\\psi\\prime$ over $J/\\psi$, could possibly distinguish two scenario (e.g. QGP or hadronic comover) at RHIC energy.

  6. acid suppresses uv-b-induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain Geosciences Websites Summary: from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants...

  7. Study on higher harmonic suppression using edge filter and polished Si wafer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R. K., E-mail: rkg@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, Amol, E-mail: rkg@rrcat.gov.in; Modi, Mohammed H., E-mail: rkg@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: rkg@rrcat.gov.in [X-ray Optics Section, ISU Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher harmonics contamination is a severe problem in synchrotron beamlines where grating monochromators are used. In these beamlines, absorption edge filters and critical angle mirrors are used to suppress the harmonic contaminations. In the present study, carried out using Indus-1 reflectivity beamline, a harmonic suppression characteristic of Al edge filter and polished silicon wafer are determined. It is found that the Al filter suppresses higher harmonics in 2–7% range whereas the polished silicon wafer can suppress the higher harmonics below 1%. The results of comparative study are discussed.

  8. Method and apparatus for suppressing waves in a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for suppression of wave energy within a fluid-filled borehole using a low pressure acoustic barrier. In one embodiment, a flexible diaphragm type device is configured as an open bottomed tubular structure for disposition in a borehole to be filled with a gas to create a barrier to wave energy, including tube waves. In another embodiment, an expandable umbrella type device is used to define a chamber in which a gas is disposed. In yet another embodiment, a reverse acting bladder type device is suspended in the borehole. Due to its reverse acting properties, the bladder expands when internal pressure is reduced, and the reverse acting bladder device extends across the borehole to provide a low pressure wave energy barrier.

  9. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  10. FRACTAL SHAPED MICROSTRIP COUPLED LINE BAND PASS FILTERS FOR SUPPRESSION OF 2ND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    1 FRACTAL SHAPED MICROSTRIP COUPLED LINE BAND PASS FILTERS FOR SUPPRESSION OF 2ND HARMONIC Il Kwon Koch fractal curves are proposed for the first time. These filters are fabricated on Liquid Crystal, the 2nd harmonic of fractal filters can be significantly suppressed through the use of fractal shapes

  11. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4 Elekta Oy, Helsinki, Finland Abstract Ultra-low. (2013) Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

  12. Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we need them most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Precipitation suppression by anthropogenic air pollution: major loss of water resources where we inferences of air pollution suppressing precipitation lead us to investigate historical climate records precipitation, decreases with time in the polluted regions and remains unchanged where no pollution sources were

  13. Assessment of compost for suppression of Fusarium Patch (Microdochium nivale) and Typhula Blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Assessment of compost for suppression of Fusarium Patch (Microdochium nivale) and Typhula Blight 2001; accepted 21 May 2002 Abstract Two composts were evaluated for suppression of Fusarium Patch of compost applied at either 48.7 or 97:4kg=100m2 reduced snow mold severity to levels not significantly

  14. Suppressive Drug Interactions between Antifungals Marjon G.J. de Vos1 and Tobias Bollenbach1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulyk, Martha L.

    Suppressive Drug Interactions between Antifungals Marjon G.J. de Vos1 and Tobias Bollenbach1,* 1IST a systematic study of drug interactions be- tween antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur. When two drugs are combined, they may interact synergistically or antago- nistically; for synergistic

  15. Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

  16. Transverse energy dependence of J/Psi suppression in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction for transverse energy dependence of $J/\\psi$ to Drell-Yan ratio in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy was obtained in a model which assume 100% absorption of $J/\\psi$ above a threshold density. The threshold density was obtained by fitting the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energy. At RHIC energy, hard processes may be important. Prediction of $J/\\psi$ suppression with and without hard processes were obtained. With hard processes included, $J/\\psi$'s are strongly suppressed.

  17. Compost: A study of the development process and end-product potential for suppression of turfgrass disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Review Compost: A study of the development process and end-product potential for suppression, biological control, compost, disease, fungi, microbiology, pathogen, suppression, turf, turfgrass Summary The relationships among the chemical, physical and biological aspects of compost and their role in suppression

  18. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  19. The role of E2F4 in the growth suppressive properties of the retinoblastoma protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eunice Y. (Eunice Yoon)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth suppressive functions of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB), the first identified tumor suppressor, are considerably mediated through the repression of the E2F transcription factors. Functional inactivation of ...

  20. Feedback schemes for radiation damping suppression in NMR: a control-theoretical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altafini, C.

    In NMR spectroscopy, the collective measurement is weakly invasive and its back-action is called radiation damping. The aim of this paper is to provide a control-theoretical analysis of the problem of suppressing this ...

  1. Feedback and its Feedback Effect on Feedback: Photoionization Suppression and its Impact on Galactic Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew M. Pieri; Hugo Martel

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiative feedback due to reionization has a pronounced effect on the extent of mechanical feedback due to galactic outflows. The photoionization of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) suppresses low-mass galaxy formation by photoheating the gas and limiting atomic line cooling. The number of low-mass galaxies is central for the enrichment of the IGM as these objects have the capacity to enrich a significant fraction (by volume) of the Universe. We use a modified version of our galactic outflow model, combined with a simple criterion for suppression, to investigate the potential impact upon the IGM. We find that this suppression strongly reduces the enrichment of the IGM and is sensitive to the reionization history. We also investigate the contribution of halos of different masses with varying degrees of suppression.

  2. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  3. Vibration suppression of laminated composite plates using embedded smart material layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Sivasubramaniam

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a complete theoretical formulation of laminated composite plates with integrated smart material layers that serve as sensors and/or actuators is presented for the vibration suppression of laminated composite plates. The third...

  4. Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen; accepted 17 April 2002 Keywords: Bacteria, compost, biocontrol disease suppression, grey snow mould Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

  5. Wideband phased array antennas and compact, harmonic-suppressed microstrip filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Wen-Hua

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Since the electromagnetic spectrum is limited and has to be shared, interference is getting serious as more and more wireless applications emerge. Filters are key components to prevent harmonic interference. The harmonic signals can be suppressed...

  6. Wideband phased array antennas and compact, harmonic-suppressed microstrip filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Wen-Hua

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Since the electromagnetic spectrum is limited and has to be shared, interference is getting serious as more and more wireless applications emerge. Filters are key components to prevent harmonic interference. The harmonic signals can be suppressed...

  7. Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 1. Systems. 1.1. On Line. In this introductory section we will pose no exercises, but instead, will detail. how to use Maple to solve problems in linear ...

  8. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and/or parasitic oscillation modes in a laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing material arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE, parasitic oscillation modes and/or residual pump energy can be effectively suppressed.

  9. Gain media edge treatment to suppress amplified spontaneous emission in a high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Fochs, Scott N. (Livermore, CA); Rotter, Mark D. (San Ramon, CA); Letts, Stephan A. (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. By roughening one or more peripheral edges of a solid-state crystal or ceramic laser gain media and by bonding such edges using a substantially high index bonding elastomer or epoxy to a predetermined electromagnetic absorbing arranged adjacent to the entire outer surface of the peripheral edges of the roughened laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  10. Simple Systems Chapter 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    until dynamic analysis was applied. Similar problems in big steam turbines were investigated in industry through suppression, isolation, or balancing; the constructive use of vibrations in technical processes and control; non-linear systems; and chaos. 3 #12;4 Chapter 1. INTRODUCTION 1.2 Objectives The foundation

  11. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 23 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 7 DECEMBER 1998 Dynamical Bloch Band Suppression in an Optical Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Suppression in an Optical Lattice K. W. Madison, M. C. Fischer, R. B. Diener, Qian Niu, and M. G. Raizen-cooled atoms in an optical lattice, rather than electrons in a superlattice. The main advantage of our system in the lowest band of a one-dimensional optical lattice. We then modulate the position of the potential

  12. Novel rf mems tunable filters with adjustable spurious suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, Vikram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the theory and design of fixed and Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) -based tunable microwave filters for RF and microwave applications. The methodology for the design of coupled resonator filters...

  13. Suppression of premixed combustion dynamics utilizing microjet air injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgins, Duane Edward

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of thermoacoustic instability in continuous combustion systems is a major challenge in the field of propulsion and power generation. With the current environmental and political pressure that is being placed ...

  14. Novel rf mems tunable filters with adjustable spurious suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, Vikram

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the theory and design of fixed and Radio Frequency (RF) Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) -based tunable microwave filters for RF and microwave applications. The methodology for the design of coupled resonator filters...

  15. Vibration suppression, stabilization, motion planning and tracking for flexible beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Target System . . . . 3.2.3 Flexible Beams . . . 3.3 MotionPlanning and Tracking for Flexible Beams A Dissertationand De?ection Angle for Flexible Beams,” ASME Journal of

  16. $J/?$ suppression in the threshold model at RHIC and LHC energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the QGP based threshold model \\cite{Blaizot:2000ev,Blaizot:1996nq}, in addition to the normal nuclear absorption, $J/\\psi$'s are subjected to an 'anomalous' suppression such that above a threshold density $n_{J/\\psi}$, all the $J/\\psi$'s are melted. In the threshold model we have analysed the recent PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Feedback from decay of the state $\\chi$ is accounted for. $J/\\psi$'s are anomalously suppressed above a threshold density, $n_{J/\\psi}=3.57\\pm 0.17$ $fm^{-2}$. Threshold density for anomalous suppression of the state $\\chi$ is uncertain to a large extent, $n_\\chi=0.32 \\pm 0.32$ $fm^{-2}$. The fraction $F$ of the state $\\chi$ can not be determined unambiguously, depending on the nuclear absorption, it can vary from 20% to 40%. We have also predicted for the suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy. In central Pb+Pb collisions, $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed by a factor of 3-4. Suppression pattern is rather similar to that in Au+Au collisions, if not slighty less in central collisions. Using the PHENIX data on the participant number dependence of the Bjorken energy density, we have also estimated the QGP formation time. For critical temperature $T_c$=192 MeV, estimated QGP formation time ranges between 0.07-0.09 fm/c.

  17. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafail V. Abramov

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger mixing system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  18. Suppression of Faraday waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capuzzi, Pablo [Departamento de Fisica, FCEN Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Buenos Aires-CONICET (Argentina); Gattobigio, Mario; Vignolo, Patrizia [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Institut non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS, 1361 route des Lucioles, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of Faraday waves in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of a one-dimensional optical lattice. The waves are parametrically excited by modulating the radial confinement of the condensate close to a transverse breathing mode of the system. For very shallow optical lattices, phonons with a well-defined wave vector propagate along the condensate, as in the absence of the lattice, and we observe the formation of a Faraday pattern. We find that by increasing the potential depth the local sound velocity decreases, and when it equals the condensate local phase velocity, the condensate develops an incoherent superposition of several modes and the parametric excitation of Faraday waves is suppressed.

  19. Electrowetting on liquid-infused film (EWOLF): Complete reversibility and controlled droplet oscillation suppression for fast optical imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Chonglei; Chen, Xuemei; He, Yuncheng; Li, Qiusheng; Li, K Y; Wang, Zuankai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) has emerged as a powerful tool to electrically manipulate tiny individual droplets in a controlled manner. Despite tremendous progress over the past two decades, current EWOD operating in ambient conditions has limited functionalities posing challenges for its applications, including electronic display, energy generation, and microfluidic systems. Here, we demonstrate a new paradigm of electrowetting on liquid-infused film (EWOLF) that allows for complete reversibility and tunable transient response simultaneously. We determine that these functionalities in EWOLF are attributed to its novel configuration, which allows for the formation of viscous liquid-liquid interfaces as well as additional wetting ridges, thereby suppressing the contact line pinning and severe droplet oscillation encountered in the conventional EWOD. Finally, by harnessing these functionalities demonstrated in EWOLF, we also explore its application as liquid lens for fast optical focusing.

  20. Alternative approach to fire suppression - Class A, B & C fire...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or battery systems required - Rugged construction and maintenance free - Vibration and Corrosion resistant U N C L A S S I F I E D U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los...

  1. GNOSIS: THE FIRST INSTRUMENT TO USE FIBER BRAGG GRATINGS FOR OH SUPPRESSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinh, Christopher Q.; Ellis, Simon C.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bryant, Julia; O'Byrne, John [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lawrence, Jon S.; Horton, Anthony J.; Shortridge, Keith; Case, Scott; Colless, Matthew; Gers, Luke; Lee, Steve; Miziarski, Stan [Australian Astronomical Observatory, 105 Delhi Road, North Ryde, P.O. Box 915, NSW 1670 (Australia); Leon-Saval, Sergio G. [Institute of Photonics and Optical Science, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Couch, Warrick; Glazebrook, Karl [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Freeman, Kenneth [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Loehmannsroeben, Hans-Gerd [innoFSPEC-Institut fuer Chemie/Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Haynes, Roger; Roth, Martin M., E-mail: c.trinh@physics.usyd.edu.au [innoFSPEC-Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); and others

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-infrared is an important part of the spectrum in astronomy, especially in cosmology because the light from objects in the early universe is redshifted to these wavelengths. However, deep near-infrared observations are extremely difficult to make from ground-based telescopes due to the bright background from the atmosphere. Nearly all of this background comes from the bright and narrow emission lines of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) molecules. The atmospheric background cannot be easily removed from data because the brightness fluctuates unpredictably on short timescales. The sensitivity of ground-based optical astronomy far exceeds that of near-infrared astronomy because of this long-standing problem. GNOSIS is a prototype astrophotonic instrument that utilizes 'OH suppression fibers' consisting of fiber Bragg gratings and photonic lanterns to suppress the 103 brightest atmospheric emission doublets between 1.47 and 1.7 {mu}m. GNOSIS was commissioned at the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope with the IRIS2 spectrograph to demonstrate the potential of OH suppression fibers, but may be potentially used with any telescope and spectrograph combination. Unlike previous atmospheric suppression techniques GNOSIS suppresses the lines before dispersion and in a manner that depends purely on wavelength. We present the instrument design and report the results of laboratory and on-sky tests from commissioning. While these tests demonstrated high throughput ( Almost-Equal-To 60%) and excellent suppression of the skylines by the OH suppression fibers, surprisingly GNOSIS produced no significant reduction in the interline background and the sensitivity of GNOSIS+IRIS2 is about the same as IRIS2. It is unclear whether the lack of reduction in the interline background is due to physical sources or systematic errors as the observations are detector noise dominated. OH suppression fibers could potentially impact ground-based astronomy at the level of adaptive optics or greater. However, until a clear reduction in the interline background and the corresponding increasing in sensitivity is demonstrated optimized OH suppression fibers paired with a fiber-fed spectrograph will at least provide a real benefit at low resolving powers.

  2. Effect of Island Overlap on ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermacher, M E; Evans, T E; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Aldan, M P; deGrassie, J S; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Moyer, R A; Snyder, P B; Groebner, R J; Jakubowski, M; Leonard, A W; Schmitz, O

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1813 (2003)] experiments show a correlation between the extent of overlap of magnetic islands induced in the edge plasma by perturbation coils and complete suppression of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in plasmas with ITER-like electron pedestal collisionality {nu}*{sub e} {approx} 0.1, flux surface shape and low edge safety factor (q{sub 95} {approx} 3.6). With fixed n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) strength, ELM suppression is obtained only in a finite window in the edge safety factor (q{sub 95}) consistent with maximizing the resonant component of the applied helical field. ELM suppression is obtained over an increasing range of q{sub 95} by either increasing the n = 3 RMP strength, or by adding n = 1 perturbations to 'fill in' gaps between islands across the edge plasma. The suppression of Type-I ELMs correlates with a minimum width of the edge region having magnetic islands with Chirikov parameter >1.0, based on vacuum calculations of RMP mode components excluding the plasma response or rotational shielding. The fraction of vacuum magnetic field lines that are lost from the plasma, with connection length to the divertor targets comparable to an electron-ion collisional mean free path, increases throughout the island overlap region in the ELM suppressed case compared with the ELMing case.

  3. Chaos suppression in flows using proportional pulses in the system variables M. A. Matias*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matías, Manuel A.

    ´as* Departamento de Qui´mica Fi´sica, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca, Spain J. Gu¨e´mez Departamento. Gu¨e´mez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1455 1994 is presented. The method does not require any previous

  4. Method and system for suppression of stimulated Raman scattering in laser materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caird, John A; Bayramian, Andrew J; Ebbers, Christopher A

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition of matter is provided having the general chemical formula K(H,D).sub.2P(.sup.16O.sub.x,.sup.18O.sub.y).sub.4, where x<0.998 or y>0.002, and x+y.apprxeq.1. Additionally, a method of fabricating an optical material by growth from solution is provided. The method includes providing a solution including a predetermined percentage of (H,D).sub.2.sup.16O and a predetermined percentage of (H,D).sub.2.sup.18O, providing a seed crystal, and supporting the seed crystal on a platform. The method also includes immersing the seed crystal in the solution and forming the optical material. The optical material has the general chemical formula K(H,D).sub.2P(.sup.16O.sub.x,.sup.18O.sub.y).sub.4, where x<0.998 or y>0.002, and x+y.apprxeq.1.

  5. Chaos suppression in the parametrically driven Lorenz system Chol-Ung Choe,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : no measurements or extra sensors are re- quired. The idea of this method is to change the complex behavior is known for almost a century. As a textbook example, we men- tion the familiar stabilization of a reverse

  6. Systemic Elevation of PTEN Induces a Tumor-Suppressive Metabolic State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel

    Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. PTEN elevation might therefore be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines ...

  7. Interference characterization and suppression for multiuser direct-sequence spread-spectrum system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Mingxi, 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we investigate efficient modulation and detection techniques for the uplink (i.e. transmission from mobile to base station) of a DS-CDMA network. Specifically, the thesis contains three parts. In the first ...

  8. PPPL extends system for suppressing instabilities to long-pulse experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11:Tel.:162Physics LabPlasma Physics Labon

  9. Feedback suppression of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Jeremy M.; De Bono, Bryan; James, Royce W.; Levesque, Jeffrey P.; Mauel, Michael E.; Maurer, David A.; Navratil, Gerald A.; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Shiraki, Daisuke [Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, 200 S. W. Mudd Building - MC 4701, 500 W. 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the first experimental demonstration of active feedback suppression of rotating external kink modes near the ideal wall limit in a tokamak using Kalman filtering to discriminate the n=1 kink mode from background noise. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. Suppression of the external kink mode is demonstrated over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field, and performance is robust at noise levels that render proportional gain feedback ineffective. Suppression of the kink mode is accomplished without excitation of higher frequencies as was observed in previous experiments using lead-lag loop compensation [A. J. Klein et al., Phys Plasmas 12, 040703 (2005)].

  10. Parametric Instability in Long Optical Cavities and Suppression by Dynamic Transverse Mode Frequency Modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Chunnong; Fang, Qi; Blair, Carl; Qin, Jiayi; Blair, David; Degallaix, Jerome; Yamamoto, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three mode parametric instability has been predicted in Advanced gravitational wave detectors. Here we present the first observation of this phenomenon in a large scale suspended optical cavity designed to be comparable to those of advanced gravitational wave detectors. Our results show that previous modelling assumptions that transverse optical modes are stable in frequency except for frequency drifts on a thermal deformation time scale is unlikely to be valid for suspended mass optical cavities. We demonstrate that mirror figure errors cause a dependence of transverse mode offset frequency on spot position. Combined with low frequency residual motion of suspended mirrors, this leads to transverse mode frequency modulation which suppresses the effective parametric gain. We show that this gain suppression mechanism can be enhanced by laser spot dithering or fast thermal modulation. Using Advanced LIGO test mass data and thermal modelling we show that gain suppression factors of 10-20 could be achieved for ind...

  11. Can $J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ broadening signal the deconfinement transition at RHIC?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the latest NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. It is shown that a QCD based nuclear absorption model, where $J/\\psi$'s are absorbed in nuclear medium could explain the latest NA50 data on the centrality dependence of the $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ratio. The model also explains the NA50 data on $J/\\psi$ over minimum bias ratio and the $p_T$ broadening of $J/\\psi$'s. A QGP based threshold model where all the $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed above a threshold density, also explains the data sets with smeared threshold density. Even at RHIC energy, centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression or $p_T$ broadening could not distinguish between the two models.

  12. $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions and $p_T$ broadening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analysed the NA50 data, on the centrality dependence of $p_T$ broadening of $J/\\psi$'s, in Pb+Pb collisions, at the CERN-SPS. The data were analysed in a QCD based model, where $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed in 'nuclear' medium. Without any free parameter, the model could explain the NA50 $p_T$ broadening data. The data were also analysed in a QGP based threshold model, where $J/\\psi$ suppression is 100% above a critical density. The QGP based model could not explain the NA50 $p_T$ broadening data. We have also predicted the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression and $p_T$ broadening at RHIC energy. Both the models, the QGP based threshold model and the QCD based nuclear absorption model, predict $p_T$ broadening very close to each other.

  13. Measurement of Lambda(C) Branching Fractions of Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Modes in the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleem, Muhammad; /SUNY, Albany

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation reports on a study of the relative branching fraction measurement of the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c} decaying to the Cabibbo-suppressed modes.

  14. Suppression of static electrification of insulating oil for large power transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, M.; Goto, K.; Ishii, T.; Masunaga, M.; Mori, E.; Okubo, H.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Streaming electrification of large power transformers is discussed here from the standpoint of characteristics of insulating oils used in them. First, the relation between the thermal degradation and charging tendency of insulating oils is defined to show that suppressing the degradation of oils to be caused by long term operation of the transformers can minimize the rise in charging tendency, leading to suppressed streaming electrification within the transformer. Second, experimental results show that alkylbenzene mixture oil and benzotriazol additive oil are excellent in charging characteristics when used as insulating oils of large power transformers.

  15. Longitudinal pulse shaping for the suppression of coherent synchrotron radiation-induced emittance growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitchell, Chad; Qiang, Ji; Emma, Paul

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The damaging effect of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the emittance and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. We propose a mitigation approach in which the dynamical effect of the longitudinal component of CSR is suppressed by appropriately preparing the initial longitudinal current profile of the beam. In a chicane, a linear theory for the mechanism of CSR-induced emittance growth is used to demonstrate how this procedure can produce a beam whose core experiences suppressed transverse emittance growth. The dynamics of such a beam is illustrated for the Berlin-Zeuthen CSR benchmark chicane.

  16. Suppression of Eddy Diffusivity across Jets in the Southern Ocean RAFFAELE FERRARI AND MAXIM NIKURASHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, despite enhanced values of eddy kinetic energy. The expression in the core of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or on its flanks. A simple expression is derived statistics. This novel expression predicts suppression of the cross-jet eddy diffusivity in the core

  17. Metal-Exchanged Clay and Zeolite Additives as Smoke Suppressants and Fire Retardants for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Robert D.

    Metal-Exchanged Clay and Zeolite Additives as Smoke Suppressants and Fire Retardants for Poly studies showed that various metal- exchanged clays and zeolites containing only 3­4% of Cu(II), Cu(I), Zn blends of the clays, and the effectiveness of the additives was usually improved considerably by heat

  18. Dynamical epidemic suppression using stochastic prediction and control Ira B. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Lora

    of stochastic dynamical sys- tems [13].) Other methods pulse the population without sam- pling for predictionDynamical epidemic suppression using stochastic prediction and control Ira B. Schwartz Plasma of stochastic processes with underlying deterministic structure. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.046220 PACS number

  19. Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise suppression and enhanced focusability in plasma Raman amplifier with multi-frequency pump A. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 and Department of Astrophysical Laser pulse compression­amplification through Raman backscattering in plasmas can be facilitated

  20. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  1. Bisphosphonates suppress periosteal osteoblast activity independently of resorption in rat femur and tibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Recent studies demonstrate that bisphosphonates suppress bone resorption by leading to apoptosis of the osteoclast and inhibiting the differentiation to mature osteoclasts. The influence of bisphosphonates on bone and stimulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro, leading to increased bone formation

  2. Electronpolar optical phonon scattering suppression and mobility enhancement in wurtzite heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron­polar optical phonon scattering suppression and mobility enhancement in wurtzite@ee.ucr.edu Abstract. We have shown theoretically that the electron mobility in wurtzite AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures that the electron mobility can be enhanced in heterostructures made of wurtzite AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN semiconductors via

  3. Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiblum, Mordehai "Moty"

    Method for Suppression of Stacking Faults in Wurtzite III-V Nanowires Hadas Shtrikman,*, Ronit, 2008; Revised Manuscript Received January 13, 2009 ABSTRACT The growth of wurtzite GaAs and In wurtzite structure and are observed to thicken (via lateral growth) once the axial growth exceeds a certain

  4. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    P1-030 Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium films under high-flux deuterium) and thick (~500 m) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied. For Ne plasmas, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li-I radiation are consistent

  5. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation……………….... 3 3. Our Focus………………………………………………………. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  6. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation??????.... 3 3. Our Focus?????????????????????. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  7. Sensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ) (b) Fig. 2. (a) Charge driven tube scanner. (b) Voltage equivalent circuit. introduces two simple nonSensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners-fabrication. Much research has proceeded with the aim of reducing hysteresis and vibration, the foremost problems

  8. Progress in year 2010 1. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in year 2010 1. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas with temperatures obtained by fitting the shape of the expanded cloud. 2. Spin gradient demagnetization cooling of ultracold atoms. We have demonstrated a new cooling method in which a time-varying magnetic field gradient

  9. Paclitaxel coating of the luminal surface of hemodialysis grafts with effective suppression of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    Paclitaxel coating of the luminal surface of hemodialysis grafts with effective suppression, we developed a method to coat the drug only on the luminal surface of the graft, with little loading only on the luminal surface of the graft without changing the physical properties. To determine its

  10. Fine-Scale Zonal Flow Suppression of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    as an explanation for the long time build up of the zonal flow in ETG turbulence and it is shown that the generationFine-Scale Zonal Flow Suppression of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence S.E. Parker , J continue to grow algebraically (proportional to time). These fine-scale zonal flows have a radial wave

  11. Is it possible to observe a suppressing of $?$-decay caused by an atomic substance - plasma transition ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is supposed that $\\beta$-decay can be slightly suppressed at an atomic substance - plasma transition under a plasma electron gas action. The estimation shows that this effect can give a relative difference of the decay amount on a level of $10^{-4}$.

  12. Br J Nutr . Author manuscript Calcium carbonate suppresses haem toxicity markers without calcium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Br J Nutr . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Calcium carbonate suppresses haem toxicity markers without-term studies in rats identified calcium carbonate as the most effective calcium salt to bind haem in vitro demonstrated that a diet containing 100 mol/g calcium carbonate did not promote aberrant crypt foci

  13. Suppressed Superconductivity on the Surface of Superconducting RF Quality Niobium for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressed Superconductivity on the Surface of Superconducting RF Quality Niobium for Particle 32310, USA Abstract. Significant performance degradation of superconducting RF (radio frequency) niobium superconductivity at chemically treated RF-quality niobium. We found that pinning of vortices along GBs is weaker

  14. Suppression of 2 phase-slip due to hidden zero modes in one dimensional topological superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Suppression of 2 phase-slip due to hidden zero modes in one dimensional topological superconductors-dimensional topological superconducting wires. These wires have been proposed as building blocks for topologically in decoherence. Phase slips in topological superconductors are peculiar for the reason that they occur

  15. Importance of different energy loss effects in jet suppression at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bojana Blagojevic; Magdalena Djordjevic

    2015-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet suppression is considered to be an excellent probe of QCD matter created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. Our theoretical predictions of jet suppression, which are based on our recently developed dynamical energy loss formalism, show a robust agreement with various experimental data, which spans across different probes, experiments (RHIC and LHC) and experimental conditions (i.e. all available centrality regions). This formalism includes several key ingredients, such as inclusion of dynamical scattering centers, finite size QCD medium, collisional energy loss, finite magnetic mass and running coupling. While these effects have to be included based on theoretical grounds, it is currently unclear what is their individual importance in accurately interpreting the experimental data, in particular because other approaches to suppression predictions commonly neglect some - or all - of these effects. To address this question, we here study the relative importance of these effects in obtaining accurate suppression predictions for D mesons (clear energy loss probe) at top RHIC and LHC energies. We obtain that several different ingredients are responsible for the accurate predictions, i.e. the robust agreement with the data is a cumulative effect of all the ingredients, though inclusion of the dynamical scattering centers has the largest relative importance.

  16. Optimal noise suppression in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) configured for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Optimal noise suppression in Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) configured 131543); published 14 October 2010 An optimal setup in the sense of imaging resolution for the Fresnel of America OCIS codes: 090.1995, 030.6140, 110.4280. 1. Introduction Fresnel incoherent correlation

  17. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation??????.... 3 3. Our Focus?????????????????????. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  18. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation……………….... 3 3. Our Focus………………………………………………………. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  19. Vibration Suppression and Optimal Repetitive Disturbance Rejection Control in Semi-Nyquist Frequency Region using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    suppression and disturbance rejec- tion even in the semi-Nyquist frequency region. First, the continuous and to reject disturbance in high frequency re- gion because the Nyquist frequency is relatively low-sample performance to reject disturbance in the semi-Nyquist frequency region [6]. On the other hand, authors

  20. Nuclear absorption and anomalous J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the J/psi suppression in 158 GeV/c Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. J/psi production is assumed to be a two step process, (i) formation of c bar{c} pair, which is accurately calculable in QCD and (ii) formation of J/psi meson from the c bar{c} pair, which can be conveniently parameterized. In a pA/AA collision, as the c bar{c} pair pass through the nuclear medium, it gains relative square momentum. As a result, some of the c bar{c} pairs can gain enough momentum to cross the threshold to become open charm meson, leading to suppression in pA/AA collisions. The model without any free parameter could describe the of NA50 data on centrality dependence of the ratio's; J/psi over Drell-Yan, J/psi over minimum bias and also the Drell-Yan over minimum bias. The model was used to predict J/psi suppression at RHIC energy. At RHIC energy, hard processes may be important. With hard processes included, J/psi's are strongly suppressed, in agreement with other model calculations. We also show that centrality dependence of J/psi over minimum bias ratio can be used to determine the fraction of hard processes in the collision.

  1. Buckling suppression of SiGe islands on compliant substrates Haizhou Yina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Buckling suppression of SiGe islands on compliant substrates Haizhou Yina) Center for Photonics structure made of SiGe and a cap layer were studied by both modeling and experiment. Both epitaxial silicon and accelerate the lateral relaxation, so that larger, flat, relaxed SiGe islands can be achieved. Using a 31 nm

  2. Freckle suppression in directional solidification of binary and multicomponent alloys using magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    a Lorentz force that opposes the thermosolutal buoyancy force and can be used to control or suppress melt coupling the electromagnetic and fluid flow phenomena. The induced electric potential depends on the fluid heating effect is neglected in the energy equation because of the high electrical conductivity of most

  3. Fractal dimension based sand ripple suppression for mine hunting with sidescan sonar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, James

    mine hunting. Manual inspection of such data can be a time consuming task that requires significant1 Fractal dimension based sand ripple suppression for mine hunting with sidescan sonar J. D. B. Nelson and N. G. Kingsbury Abstract--Sand ripples present a difficult challenge to current mine hunting

  4. Enhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to amplify the negative radiative forcing by increasing cloud cover and cloud water [Albrecht, 1989]. [3] We in ship tracks [Ackerman et al., 2000]. Evidence for secondary effects is ambiguous. Cloud cover is seenEnhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze A

  5. $?(2S)$, $?(3S)$ Suppression in p-Pb, Pb-Pb Collisions and Mixed Hybrid Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard S. Kisslinger

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use our mixed hybrid model for the $\\Psi(2S)$ state to estimate $\\Psi(2S)$ to $J/\\Psi(1S)$ suppression in p-Pb collisions, and the $\\Upsilon(3S)$ state to estimate $\\Upsilon(3S)$ to $\\Upsilon(1S)$ suppression in Pb-Pb collisions, and compare to recent experimental measurements.

  6. Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials Science Subcommittee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Fusion Technologies for Tritium-Suppressed D-D Fusion White Paper prepared for FESAC Materials, Columbia University 2 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT December 19, 2011 Summary The proposal for tritium-suppressed D-D fusion and the understanding of the turbulent pinch in magnetically confined plasma

  7. Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications for imminent acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    Dynamical suppression of sea level rise along the Pacific coast of North America: Indications changes in global mean sea level (MSL) rise have important practical implications for shoreline and beach occurred after the mid1970s regime shift, can account for the suppression of regional sea level rise along

  8. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Koss, T.C. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  9. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  10. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  11. Suppression of Tritium Retention in Remote Areas of ITER by Nonperturbative Reactive Gas Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares, F. L.; Ferreira, J. A.; Ramos, A. [As Euratom-Ciemat, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rooij, G. van; Westerhout, J.; Al, R.; Rapp, J. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, EURATOM Association, TEC, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M. [As Euratom-MHEST, Institut Jozef Stefan, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique based on reactive gas injection in the afterglow region of the divertor plasma is proposed for the suppression of tritium-carbon codeposits in remote areas of ITER when operated with carbon-based divertor targets. Experiments in a divertor simulator plasma device indicate that a 4 nm/min deposition can be suppressed by addition of 1 Pa{center_dot}m{sup 3} s{sup -1} ammonia flow at 10 cm from the plasma. These results bolster the concept of nonperturbative scavenger injection for tritium inventory control in carbon-based fusion plasma devices, thus paving the way for ITER operation in the active phase under a carbon-dominated, plasma facing component background.

  12. Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoi, N. [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

  13. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  14. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberger, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tsiagkouris, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  15. Suppression of turbulence and subcritical fluctuations in differentially rotating gyrokinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential rotation is known to suppress linear instabilities in fusion plasmas. However, even in the absence of growing eigenmodes, subcritical fluctuations that grow transiently can lead to sustained turbulence. Here transient growth of electrostatic fluctuations driven by the parallel velocity gradient (PVG) and the ion temperature gradient (ITG) in the presence of a perpendicular ExB velocity shear is considered. The maximally simplified case of zero magnetic shear is treated in the framework of a local shearing box. There are no linearly growing eigenmodes, so all excitations are transient. The maximal amplification factor of initial perturbations and the corresponding wavenumbers are calculated as functions of q/\\epsilon (=safety factor/aspect ratio), temperature gradient and velocity shear. Analytical results are corroborated and supplemented by linear gyrokinetic numerical tests. For sufficiently low values of q/\\epsilon (<7 in our model), regimes with fully suppressed ion-scale turbulence are po...

  16. Jet suppression of pions and single electrons at Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Djordjevic

    2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet suppression is considered to be a powerful tool to study the properties of a QCD medium created in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. However, theoretical predictions obtained by using jet energy loss in static QCD medium show disagreement with experimental data, which is known as the heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC. We calculate the suppression patterns of pions and single electrons for Au+Au collisions at RHIC by including the energy loss in a finite size dynamical QCD medium, with finite magnetic mass effects taken into account. In contrast to the static case, we here report a good agreement with the experimental results, where this agreement is robust with respect to magnetic mass values. Therefore, the inclusion of dynamical QCD medium effects provides a reasonable explanation of the heavy flavor puzzle at RHIC.

  17. Bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; J. Noronha; F. Grassi

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between shear and bulk viscosities on the flow harmonics, $v_n$'s, at RHIC is investigated using the newly developed relativistic 2+1 hydrodynamical code v-USPhydro that includes bulk and shear viscosity effects both in the hydrodynamic evolution and also at freeze-out. While shear viscosity is known to attenuate the flow harmonics, we find that the inclusion of bulk viscosity decreases the shear viscosity-induced suppression of the flow harmonics bringing them closer to their values in ideal hydrodynamical calculations. Depending on the value of the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\zeta/s$, in the quark-gluon plasma, the bulk viscosity-driven suppression of shear viscosity effects on the flow harmonics may require a re-evaluation of the previous estimates of the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\\eta/s$, of the quark-gluon plasma previously extracted by comparing hydrodynamic calculations to heavy ion data.

  18. Suppression of space broadening of exciton polariton beams by Bloch oscillation effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Xudong; Zhang, Yongyou

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the transport of exciton polaritons under different applied photon potentials. The relation between the photon potentials and the thickness of the cavity layer is calculated by the finite element simulation. The theoretical analysis and numerical calculation indicate that the cavity photon potential is proportional to the thickness of the cavity layer with the coefficient being about $1.8$ meV/nm. Further, the periodic and linear photon potentials are considered to control the transport of the exciton polaritons in weak- and strong-field pump situations. In both situations the periodic potential cannot by itself effectively suppress the scatterings of the disorder potentials of the cavity photons and excitons and the nonlinear exciton-exciton interaction. When the linear potential is added to the cavity photons, the polariton transport exhibits the Bloch oscillation behavior. Importantly, the polariton Bloch oscillation can strongly suppress the space broadening due to the disorder pote...

  19. Advances in the Understanding of ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazikian, R. [PPPL

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on DIII-D have expanding the operating window for RMP ELM suppression to higher q95 with dominant electron heating and fully non-inductive current drive relevant to advanced modes of ITER operation. Robust ELM suppression has also been obtained with a reduced coil set, mitigating the risk of coil failure in maintaining ELM suppression in ITER. These results significantly expand the operating space and reduce risk for obtaining RMP ELM suppression in ITER. Efforts have also been made to search for 3D cause of ELM suppression. No internal non-axisymmetric structure is detected at the top of the pedestal, indicating that the dominant effect of the RMP is to produce an n=0 transport modification of the profiles. Linear two fluid MHD simulations using M3D-C1 indicate resonant field penetration and significant magnetic stochasticity at the top of the pedestal, consistent with the absence of detectable 3D structure in that region. A profile database was developed to compare the scaling of the pedestal and global confinement with the applied 3D field strength in ELM suppressed and ELM mitigated plasmas. The EPED pedestal model accurately predicts the measured pedestal pressure at the threshold of ELM suppression, increasing confidence in theoretical projections to ITER pedestal conditions. Both the H-factor (H(sub)98y2) and thermal energy confinement time do not degrade substantially with applied RMP fields near the threshold of ELM suppression, enhancing confidence in the compatibility of ITER high performance operation with RMP ELM suppression.

  20. Instability suppression of clusters of vector-necklace-ring solitons in nonlocal media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Ming [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Kong Qian [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Laser Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Jeng, Chien-Chung [Department of Physics, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ge Lijuan [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lee, Ray-Kuang [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Krolikowski, Wieslaw [Laser Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the instability suppression of vector-necklace-ring soliton clusters carrying zero, integer, and fractional angular momentums in nonlocal nonlinear media with an arbitrary degree of nonlocality. We show that the combination of nonlocality and mutual trapping of soliton constituent components can completely stabilize the vector-necklace-ring soliton clusters which are otherwise only quasistable in local media. Our results may be useful to studies of the novel soliton states in Bose-Einstein with dipolar long-range interactions.

  1. Variation of jet quenching from RHIC to LHC and thermal suppression of QCD coupling constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a joint jet tomographic analysis of the data on the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ from PHENIX at RHIC and ALICE at LHC. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant. Our results show that the observed slow variation of $R_{AA}$ from RHIC to LHC indicates that the QCD coupling constant is suppressed in the quark-gluon plasma produced at LHC.

  2. The evolution of sex ratio distorter suppression impacts across a 25cM genomic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornett, E. A.; Moran, B.; Reynolds, L. A.; Charlat, S.; Tazzyman, S.; Wedell, N.; Jiggins, C. D.; Hurst, G. D. D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transcriptome sequencing (see Methods and 121 Materials, NCBI SRA accession: SRP045735). These markers were then tested for co-segregation 122 with suppression in order to identify the linkage groups associated with male host survival. Female 123 butterflies... assembler to create the first set of Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) for H. bolina. The 488 trimmed reads have been deposited as one male, and one female, partial transcriptome datasets in 489 the NCBI SRA database, accession SRP045735. 490 491...

  3. Threshold model and the latest NA50 data on $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the QGP motivated threshold model, where all the $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed above a threshold density, we have analyzed the latest version of the NA50 data on the centrality dependence of the $J/\\psi$ over Drell-Yan ratio. The data are not well explain in the model, unless the threshold density is largely smeared. Large smeared threshold density effectively excludes creation of any deconfined medium in the collision.

  4. Experimental investigation of sedimentation of LOCA - generated fibrous debris and sludge in BWR suppression pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souto, F.J.; Rao, D.V.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tests were conducted in a 1:2.4 scale model of a Mark I suppression pool to investigate the behavior of fibrous insulation and sludge debris under LOCA conditions. NUKON{trademark} shreds, manually cut and tore up in a leaf shredder, and iron oxide particles were used to simulate fibrous and sludge debris, respectively. The suppression pool model included four downcomers fitted with pistons to simulate the steam-water oscillations during chugging expected during a LOCA. The study was conducted to provide debris settling velocity data for the models used in the BLOCKAGE computer code, developed to estimate the ECCS pump head loss due to clogging of the strainers with LOCA generated debris. The tests showed that the debris, both fibrous and particulate, remains fully mixed during chugging; they also showed that, during chugging, the fibrous debris underwent fragmentation into smaller sizes, including individual fibers. Measured concentrations showed that fibrous debris settled slower than the sludge, and that the settling behavior of each material is independent of the presence of the other material. Finally, these tests showed that the assumption of considering uniform debris concentration during strainer calculations is reasonable. The tests did not consider the effects of the operation of the ECCS on the transport of debris in the suppression pool.

  5. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

  6. The Relationships Between ELM Suppression, Pedestal Profiles, and Lithium Wall Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Boyle, R. Maingi, P.B. Snyder, J. Manickam, T.H. Osborne, R.E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, and the NSTX Team

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated to wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX

  7. Knockdown of p53 suppresses Nanog expression in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelalim, Essam Mohamed, E-mail: emohamed@qf.org.qa [Qatar Biomedical Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, Doha 5825 (Qatar); Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Department of Cytology and Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Tooyama, Ikuo [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)] [Molecular Neuroscience Research Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Setatsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •We investigate the role of p53 in ESCs in the absence of DNA damage. •p53 knockdown suppresses ESC proliferation. •p53 knockdown downregulates Nanog expression. •p53 is essential for mouse ESC self-renewal. -- Abstract: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) express high levels of cytoplasmic p53. Exposure of mouse ESCs to DNA damage leads to activation of p53, inducing Nanog suppression. In contrast to earlier studies, we recently reported that chemical inhibition of p53 suppresses ESC proliferation. Here, we confirm that p53 signaling is involved in the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 induced downregulation of p21 and defects in ESC proliferation. Furthermore, p53 knockdown resulted in a significant downregulation in Nanog expression at 24 and 48 h post-transfection. p53 knockdown also caused a reduction in Oct4 expression at 48 h post-transfection. Conversely, exposure of ESCs to DNA damage caused a higher reduction of Nanog expression in control siRNA-treated cells than in p53 siRNA-treated cells. These data show that in the absence of DNA damage, p53 is required for the maintenance of mouse ESC self-renewal by regulating Nanog expression.

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Sun, M.-T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chang-Gung University, Kwei-San, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  9. Feedback control of spin systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Altafini

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The feedback stabilization problem for ensembles of coupled spin 1/2 systems is discussed from a control theoretic perspective. The noninvasive nature of the bulk measurement allows for a fully unitary and deterministic closed loop. The Lyapunov-based feedback design presented does not require spins that are selectively addressable. With this method, it is possible to obtain control inputs also for difficult tasks, like suppressing undesired couplings in identical spin systems.

  10. CD8+ T cell antiviral activity: mechanism of induction and the suppression of emerging feline immunodeficiency virus strains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Anagha

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present studies, the essential role of inducer cells for the induction of soluble anti-viral activity against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was investigated. Induction of suppression of FIV replication was ...

  11. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lane, Todd [SNL

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. Suppression of the asymmetric modes for experimentally achieving gigawatt-level radiation from a Ku-band Cerenkov type oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hua; Shu, Ting, E-mail: mrtingshu@qq.com; Ju, Jinchuan; Wu, Dapeng; Bai, Zhen [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis and suppression of asymmetric modes in a Ku-band Cerenkov-type oscillator numerically and experimentally. The asymmetric modes generated in the initial experiments were identified to be HE{sub 11}, HE{sub 21}, and HE{sub 31} modes, respectively, by analyzing of the dispersion relationships, the simulation results and the experiment phenomenon. The factors, such as the cathode emission uniformity, the diode voltage, guiding magnetic field, and the concentricity play key roles in the excitation and suppression of these asymmetric modes. In the improved experiments, the asymmetric modes were suppressed effectively. In the improved experiments the asymmetric modes are suppressed effectively, and the designed TM{sub 01} mode microwave is generated at a frequency of 13.76 GHz with a power of 1.1 GW, which is in good agreement with numerically predications.

  13. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Todd [SNL] [SNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. 1Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Ronald T.

    1Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed

  15. A forced response analysis and application of impact dampers to rotordynamic vibration suppression in a cryogenic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, James Jeffrey

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by JAMES JEFFREY MOORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis...

  16. $J/?$ suppression and $p_T$ spectra in RHIC and LHC energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In a hydrodynamic model, we have studied $J/\\psi$ production in Au+Au/Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. At the initial time, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the fluid. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are dissolved if the local fluid temperature exceeds a threshold temperature $T_{J/\\psi}$. Sequential melting of charmonium states ($\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$), with melting temperatures $T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.2T_c$, $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2T_c$ and feed-down fraction $F\\approx 0.3$, explains the PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions. $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra and the nuclear modification factor in Au+Au collisions are also well explained in the model. The model however over predict centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions by 20-30%. The $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectra are under predicted by 20-30%. The model predict that in central Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=5500 GeV, $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed by a factor of $\\sim$ 10. The model predicted $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ distribution in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC is similar to that in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

  17. Search for the highly suppressed decays B- -> K+ pi- pi- and B- -> K- K- pi+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a search for the decays B- -> K+ pi- pi- and B- -> K- K- pi+, which are highly suppressed in the Standard Model. Using a sample of (467 +/- 5) x 10^6 BBbar pairs collected with the BaBar detector, we do not see any evidence of these decays and determine 90% confidence level upper limits of BF(B- -> K+ pi- pi-) K- K- pi+) < 1.6 x 10^-7 on the corresponding branching fractions, including systematic uncertainties.

  18. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  19. Suppression of dominant topographic overprints in gravity data by adaptive filtering: southern Wyoming Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Ross A.

    1992-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Surv. Prof. Pap. 793, 39 pp., 1973. Black, R. A., S. B. Smithson, and R. L. Kirlin, Adaptive filtering of gravity and topography data, western U.S. (abstract), Eos Trans./AGU, 68, 280, 1987. Clarke, G. K. C., Linear filters to suppress terrain... and uranium potential of Precambrian conglomerates in SE Wyoming: rep. DJBX-139-81, 551 pp., Bendix Field Engineering Corp., 1981. Klein, T. L., The geology and geochemistry of the sulphide deposits of the Seminoe District, Carbon Co. Wyoming, Ph...

  20. Strangeness Suppression in q-qbar Creation Observed in Exclusive Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Park; M. D. Mestayer; the CLAS collaboration

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the ratios of electroproduction cross-sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: $\\Lambda K^+$, $p\\pi^0$, and $n\\pi^+$, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization we extract q-qbar creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single q-qbar pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to non-strange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  1. Measurement of wakefield suppression in a detuned x-band accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Higo, T.; Kubo, K.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Thompson, K.; Wang, J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is underway at SLAC to develop accelerator structures for a next generation linear collider. A full-scale prototype X-band structure has been built in which the dipole mode frequencies were detuned to suppress the long-range transverse wakefield by about two orders of magnitude. To verify that the detuning works as expected, a facility to measure the long-range wakefield, called the Accelerator Structure SETup, or ASSET, was constructed in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). This paper presents the results from the measurement of the prototype X-band structure with this facility.

  2. $J/\\psi$ suppression at FAIR energy collisions and QCD phase diagram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survival probability for $J/\\psi$'s in FAIR energy collisions is studied in a QGP motivated threshold model. In the threshold model $J/\\psi$'s are assumed to dissociate beyond a threshold temperature $T_{J/\\psi}$. Model parameters are obtained by analysing experimental data in $\\snn$=17.4 and 200 GeV collisions. In low energy collisions, model is sensitive to the QCD phase diagram. The model predicts that $J/\\psi$'s are least suppressed in $\\sqrt{s}_{NN}\\approx$ 40 GeV collisions.

  3. Suppression of Tin Whiskers in Lead-Free Solder - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupporting Data-ProducingSupportingSuppression of

  4. Soot suppression by ferrocene in laminar ethylene/air nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Megaridis, C.M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation is presented on the origin of the soot suppressing role of ferrocene additive in laminar, coannular, ethylene/air nonpremixed flames. The conditions examined involve laminar flames operating above and below their smoke point. In-flame diagnostics are employed to discern the interaction between the soot matrix and additive combustion products. The data presented in a previous study, as produced by thermophoretic sampling, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microanalysis techniques, are supplemented by soot volume fraction, temperature, and soot primary size measurements to unravel the mechanisms through which ferrocene combustion products influence soot formation processes. Furthermore, Z-contrast scanning/transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the over-fire aerosol and, in turn, provide insight on the fine-scale dispersion of iron fragments within the carbonaceous soot matrix. It is shown that ferrocene seeding of the fuel stream accelerates the particular inception mechanisms, but does not influence soot loadings when soot growth is dominant. Ferrocene is also found to enhance soot oxidation rates near the flame terminus. It is concluded that the fine-scale incorporation of iron compounds within the soot matrix is a primary factor for the soot suppressing role of ferrocene in nonpremixed flames.

  5. A sheet on deformable sphere: "wrinklogami" patterns suppress curvature-induced delamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Hohlfeld; Benny Davidovitch

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The adhesion of a stiff film onto a curved substrate often generates elastic stresses in the film that eventually give rise to its delamination. Here we predict that delamination of very thin films can be dramatically suppressed through tiny, smooth deformations of the substrate, dubbed here "wrinklogami", that barely affect the macroscale topography. This "pro-lamination" effect reflects a surprising capability of smooth wrinkles to suppress compression in elastic films even when spherical or other doubly-curved topography is imposed, in a similar fashion to origami folds that enable construction of curved structures from an unstretchable paper. We show that the emergence of a wrinklogami pattern signals a nontrivial isometry of the sheet to its planar, undeformed state, in the doubly asymptotic limit of small thickness and weak tensile load exerted by the adhesive substrate. We explain how such an "asymptotic isometry" concept broadens the standard usage of isometries for describing the response of elastic sheets to geomertric constraints and mechanical loads.

  6. Suppressing the impact of a high tensor-to-scalar ratio on the temperature anisotropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo R. Contaldi; Marco Peloso; Lorenzo Sorbo

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The BICEP2 collaboration has reported a strong B mode signal in the CMB polarization, which is well fit by a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ~ 0.2. This is greater than the upper limit r data. The most advocated explanation involves a variation of n_s with scales (denoted as running) that has a magnitude significantly greater than the generic slow roll predictions. We instead study the possibility that the large scale temperature anisotropies are not enhanced because of a suppression of the scalar power at large scales. Such a situation can be achieved for instance by a sudden change of the speed of the inflaton (by about 14 %), and we show that it fits the temperature anisotropies and polarization data considerably better than a constant running (its chi^2 improves by ~ 7.5 over that of the constant running, at the cost of one more parameter). We also consider the possibility that the large scale temperature fluctuations are suppressed by an anti-correlation between tensor and scalar modes. Unfortunately, while such effect does affect the temperature fluctuations at large scales, it does not affect the temperature power spectrum and cannot, therefore, help in reconciling a large value of r with the limits from temperature fluctuations.

  7. Experiments in DIII-D toward achieving rapid shutdown with runaway electron suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; James, A. N.; Yu, J. H.; Izzo, V. A. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Baylor, L. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B.; Wesley, J. C.; Brooks, N. H.; Jackson, G. L.; Zeeland, M. A. van; Wu, W. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Evans, T. E.; Humphreys, D. A.; Strait, E. J.; Austin, M. E. [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] toward understanding runaway electron formation and amplification during rapid discharge shutdown, as well as toward achieving complete collisional suppression of these runaway electrons via massive delivery of impurities. Runaway acceleration and amplification appear to be well explained using the zero-dimensional (0D) current quench toroidal electric field. 0D or even one-dimensional modeling using a Dreicer seed term, however, appears to be too small to explain the initial runaway seed formation. Up to 15% of the line-average electron density required for complete runaway suppression has been achieved in the middle of the current quench using optimized massive gas injection with multiple small gas valves firing simultaneously. The novel rapid shutdown techniques of massive shattered pellet injection and shell pellet injection have been demonstrated for the first time. Experiments using external magnetic perturbations to deconfine runaways have shown promising preliminary results.

  8. Experiments in DIII-D toward achieving rapid shutdown with runaway electron suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Commaux, Nicolas JC [ORNL; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; Evans, T. E. [University of Texas, Austin; Humphreys, D. A. [University of Texas, Austin; James, A. N. [University of California, San Diego; Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Strait, E. J. [University of Texas, Austin; Wesley, J. C. [General Atomics; Yu, J.H. [University of California, San Diego; Austin, M. E. [University of Texas, Austin; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Brooks, N. H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Izzo, V. A. [University of California, San Diego & La Jolla; Jackson, G. L. [General Atomics; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Wu, W. [General Atomics, San Diego

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] toward understanding runaway electron formation and amplification during rapid discharge shutdown, as well as toward achieving complete collisional suppression of these runaway electrons via massive delivery of impurities. Runaway acceleration and amplification appear to be well explained using the zero-dimensional (0D) current quench toroidal electric field. 0D or even one-dimensional modeling using a Dreicer seed term, however, appears to be too small to explain the initial runaway seed formation. Up to 15% of the line-average electron density required for complete runaway suppression has been achieved in the middle of the current quench using optimized massive gas injection with multiple small gas valves firing simultaneously. The novel rapid shutdown techniques of massive shattered pellet injection and shell pellet injection have been demonstrated for the first time. Experiments using external magnetic perturbations to deconfine runaways have shown promising preliminary results. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3309426

  9. Suppression of fine-structure splitting and oscillator strength of sodium D-line in a Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Joyee, E-mail: joyeebasu@yahoo.com; Ray, Debasis, E-mail: ray.debasis@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah, West Bengal 711 103 (India)] [Department of Physics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah, West Bengal 711 103 (India)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically the influence of static plasma screening on relativistic spin-orbit interaction-induced fine-structure splitting of the D-line doublet arising from the transitions 3p{sub 1/2}–3s{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2}–3s{sub 1/2} of the valence electron of a sodium atom embedded in a model plasma environment. The many-electron atomic problem is formulated first as an effective one-electron problem in which the interaction between the optically active valence electron and the atomic ion core is represented by an accurate parametric model potential including core-polarization correction, and then the plasma effect on the atomic system is simulated by the Debye-screening model for the valence-core interaction. It is observed that the magnitude of spin-orbit energy shift reduces for both the upper component 3p{sub 3/2} and the lower component 3p{sub 1/2} with increasing plasma screening strength, thereby reducing the spin-orbit energy separation between these two components as the screening becomes stronger. As a consequence, the magnitude of fine-structure splitting between the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line energies of sodium drops significantly with stronger plasma screening. The optical (absorption) oscillator strength for 3s ? 3p transition is seen to reduce with stronger screening and this leads to a screening-induced gradual suppression of the 3p ? 3s spontaneous decay rate.

  10. Fission-suppressed fusion breeder on the thorium cycle and nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moir, R. W. [Vallecitos Molten Salt Research, 607 E. Vallecitos Rd., Livermore, CA 94550 925-447-8804 (United States)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion reactors could be designed to breed fissile material while suppressing fissioning thereby enhancing safety. The produced fuel could be used to startup and makeup fuel for fission reactors. Each fusion reaction can produce typically 0.6 fissile atoms and release about 1.6 times the 14 MeV neutron's energy in the blanket in the fission-suppressed design. This production rate is 2660 kg/1000 MW of fusion power for a year. The revenues would be doubled from such a plant by selling fuel at a price of 60/g and electricity at $0.05/kWh for Q=P{sub fusion}/P{sub input}=4. Fusion reactors could be designed to destroy fission wastes by transmutation and fissioning but this is not a natural use of fusion whereas it is a designed use of fission reactors. Fusion could supply makeup fuel to fission reactors that were dedicated to fissioning wastes with some of their neutrons. The design for safety and heat removal and other items is already accomplished with fission reactors. Whereas fusion reactors have geometry that compromises safety with a complex and thin wall separating the fusion zone from the blanket zone where wastes could be destroyed. Nonproliferation can be enhanced by mixing {sup 233}U with {sup 238}U. Also nonproliferation is enhanced in typical fission-suppressed designs by generating up to 0.05 {sup 232}U atoms for each {sup 233}U atom produced from thorium, about twice the IAEA standards of 'reduced protection' or 'self protection.' With 2.4%{sup 232}U, high explosive material is predicted to degrade owing to ionizing radiation after a little over 1/2 year and the heat rate is 77 W just after separation and climbs to over 600 W ten years later. The fissile material can be used to fuel most any fission reactor but is especially appropriate for molten salt reactors (MSR) also called liquid fluoride thorium reactors (LFTR) because of the molten fuel does not need hands on fabrication and handling.

  11. Suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the relativistic Ku-band coaxial transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Junpu; He, Juntao; Zhang, Jiande; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Lei [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic Ku-band coaxial transit-time oscillator has been proposed in our previous work. In the experiments, we find that the asymmetric competition mode in the device limits the microwave power with the increase of the input electric power. For solving such a problem, the methods for analysis and suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the device are investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the structure and the material of the collector, the concentricity, and the electron emission uniformity play an important part in the suppression of the asymmetric competition mode in the relativistic Ku-band transit-time oscillator. In the subsequent experiments, the asymmetric mode was suppressed effectively. At a low guiding magnetic field of 0.7?T, a microwave pulse with power of 1?GW, frequency of 14.3?GHz close to the simulation one, and efficiency of 20% was generated.

  12. Suppression of Y production in d + Au + and Au + Au collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| more »1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  13. Sequential melting of charmonium states in an expanding Quark Gluon Plasma and $J/?$ suppression at RHIC and LHC energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a hydrodynamic model to study sequential melting of charmonium states in an expanding QGP medium. According to the initial fluid temperature profile, $J/\\psi$'s are randomly distributed in the transverse plane. As the fluid evolve in time, the free streaming $J/\\psi$'s are suppressed if the local fluid temperature exceed a critical temperature. PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Au+Au collisions at mid-rapidity are explained by sequential melting of the charmonium states, $\\chi_c$, $\\psi\\prime$ and $J/\\psi$, in the expanding medium. The critical temperatures $T_{J/\\psi} \\approx2.09T_c$ and $T_\\chi=T_{\\chi_c}=T_{\\psi\\prime} \\approx 1.1T_c$ agree with lattice motivated calculations. The feed-down fraction $F$ depend on whether the cold nuclear matter effect is included or not. It changes from $F=0.3$ with cold nuclear matter effect included to $F=0.5$ when the effect is neglected. Model fails to reproduce the PHENIX data on the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Cu+Cu collisions at mid-rapidity, indicating that the mechanism of $J/\\psi$ suppression is different in Au+Au and in Cu+Cu collisions. We also use the model to predict for the centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy, $\\sqrt{s}$=5500 GeV. In LHC energy, $J/\\psi$'s are more suppressed in mid central collisions than in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energy.

  14. Suppression of upsilon Production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  15. Suppression of upsilon Production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| more »1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state part on energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  16. Observation of modulation speed enhancement, frequency modulation suppression, and phase noise reduction by detuned loading in a coupled-cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahala, K.; Paslaski, J.; Yariv, A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous direct modulation response enhancement, phase noise (linewidth) reduction, and frequency modulation suppression are produced in a coupled-cavity semiconductor laser by the detuned loading mechanism.

  17. Suppressing the non-Gaussian statistics of Renewable Power from Wind and Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anvari, M; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi; Wächter, M; Milan, P; Heinemann, D; Peinke, Joachim; Lorenz, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power from wind and solar exhibits a nonlinear flickering variability, which typically occurs at time scales of a few seconds. We show that high-frequency monitoring of such renewable powers enables us to detect a transition, controlled by the field size, where the output power qualitatively changes its behaviour from a flickering type to a diffusive stochastic behaviour. We find that the intermittency and strong non-Gaussian behavior in cumulative power of the total field, even for a country-wide installation still survives for both renewable sources. To overcome the short time intermittency, we introduce a time-delayed feedback method for power output of wind farm and solar field that can change further the underlying stochastic process and suppress their strong non- gaussian fluctuations.

  18. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kivel, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the heli...

  19. Suppressing traffic-driven epidemic spreading by edge-removal strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between traffic dynamics and epidemic spreading on complex networks has received increasing attention in recent years. However, the control of traffic-driven epidemic spreading remains to be a challenging problem. In this Brief Report, we propose a method to suppress traffic-driven epidemic outbreak by properly removing some edges in a network. We find that the epidemic threshold can be enhanced by the targeted cutting of links among large-degree nodes or edges with the largest algorithmic betweeness. In contrast, the epidemic threshold will be reduced by the random edge removal. These findings are robust with respect to traffic-flow conditions, network structures and routing strategies. Moreover, we find that the shutdown of targeted edges can effectively release traffic load passing through large-degree nodes, rendering a relatively low probability of infection to these nodes.

  20. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John L. Orrell; Craig E. Aalseth; John F. Amsbaugh; Peter J. Doe; Todd W. Hossbach

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  1. Suppression of the centrifugal barrier effects in the off-energy-shell neutron+$^{17}$O interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gulino; C. Spitaleri; X. D. Tang; G. L. Guardo; L. Lamia; S. Cherubini; B. Bucher; V. Burjan; M. Couder; P. Davies; R. deBoer; X. Fang; V. Z. Goldberg; Z. Hons; V. Kroha; L. Lamm; M. La Cognata; C. Li; C. Ma; J. Mrazek; A. M. Mukhamedzhanov; M. Notani; S. OBrien; R. G. Pizzone; G. G. Rapisarda; D. Roberson; M. L. Sergi; W. Tan; I. . J. Thompson; M. Wiescher

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction $^{17}$O($n,\\alpha$)$^{14}$C was studied at energies from $E_{cm}=0$ to $E_{cm}=350$ keV using the quasi-free deuteron break-up in the three body reaction $^{17}$O$+d \\rightarrow \\alpha+ ^{14}$C$+p$, extending the Trojan Horse indirect method (THM) to neutron-induced reactions. It is found that the $^{18}$O excited state at $E^*=8.125 \\pm 0.002$ MeV observed in THM experiments is absent in the direct measurement because of its high centrifugal barrier. The angular distributions of the populated resonances have been measured for the first time. The results unambiguously indicate the ability of the THM to overcome the centrifugal barrier suppression effect and to pick out the contribution of the bare nuclear interaction.

  2. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Garner, Daniel C. (Murrysville, PA); Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof.

  3. Apparatus for suppressing formation of vortices in the coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor and associated method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Garner, D.C.; Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are provided for suppressing the formation of vortices in circulating coolant fluid of a nuclear reactor. A vortex-suppressing plate having a plurality of openings therein is suspended within the lower plenum of a reactor vessel below and generally parallel to the main core support of the reactor. The plate is positioned so as to intersect vortices which may form in the circulating reactor coolant fluid. The intersection of the plate with such vortices disrupts the rotational flow pattern of the vortices, thereby disrupting the formation thereof. 3 figures.

  4. Novel photonic phenomena in nanostructured material systems with applications and mid-range efficient insensitive wireless energy-transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karalis, Aristeidis, 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of novel mechanisms for the manipulation of light in the nanoscale is provided. In the class of all-dielectric material systems, techniques for the suppression of radiative loss from incomplete-photonic-bandgap ...

  5. Eckol suppresses maintenance of stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Lim, Eun-Jung [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); An, Sungkwan [Functional Genoproteome Research Centre, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Myung-Jin [Division of Radiation Cancer Biology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jin-Won [College of Medicine and Applied Radiological Science Research Institute, Jeju National University, Jeju-si 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Yongjoon [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Jung, E-mail: kimmj74@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae, E-mail: sj0420@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A subpopulation of cancer cells with stem cell properties is responsible for tumor maintenance and progression, and may contribute to resistance to anticancer treatments. Thus, compounds that target cancer stem-like cells could be usefully applied to destroy cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of Eckol, a phlorotannin compound, on stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells. To determine whether Eckol targets glioma stem-like cells, we examined whether Eckol treatment could change the expression levels of glioma stem-like cell markers and self-renewal-related proteins as well as the sphere forming ability, and the sensitivity to anticancer treatments. Alterations in the malignant properties of sphere-derived cells by Eckol were also investigated by soft-agar colony forming assay, by xenograft assay in nude mice, and by cell invasion assay. Treatment of sphere-forming glioma cells with Eckol effectively decreased the sphere formation as well as the CD133{sup +} cell population. Eckol treatment suppressed expression of the glioma stem-like cell markers and the self-renewal-related proteins without cell death. Moreover, treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol significantly attenuated anchorage-independent growth on soft agar and tumor formation in xenograft mice. Importantly, Eckol treatment effectively reduced the resistance of glioma stem-like cells to ionizing radiation and temozolomide. Treatment of glioma stem-like cells with Eckol markedly blocked both phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and Ras-Raf-1-Erk signaling pathways. These results indicate that the natural phlorotannin Eckol suppresses stemness and malignancies in glioma stem-like cells, and thereby makes glioma stem-like cells more sensitive to anticancer treatments, providing novel therapeutic strategies targeting specifically cancer stem-like cells.

  6. Noise suppression in reconstruction of low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jing; Robar, James; Guan Huaiqun [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Departments of Radiation Oncology and Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H1V7 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Saint Vincent Hospital, Worcester, Massachusetts 01608 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To improve the image contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratio for low-Z target megavoltage cone-beam CT (MV CBCT) using a statistical projection noise suppression algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion. Methods: Projection images of a contrast phantom, a CatPhan{sup Registered-Sign} 600 phantom and a head phantom were acquired by a Varian 2100EX LINAC with a low-Z (Al) target and low energy x-ray beam (2.5 MeV) at a low-dose level and at a high-dose level. The projections were then processed by minimizing the PWLS objective function. The weighted least square (WLS) term models the noise of measured projection and the penalty term enforces the smoothing constraints of the projection image. The variance of projection data was chosen as the weight for the PWLS objective function and it determined the contribution of each measurement. An anisotropic quadratic form penalty that incorporates the gradient information of projection image was used to preserve edges during noise reduction. Low-Z target MV CBCT images were reconstructed by the FDK algorithm after each projection was processed by the PWLS smoothing. Results: Noise in low-Z target MV CBCT images were greatly suppressed after the PWLS projection smoothing, without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution. Depending on the choice of smoothing parameter, the CNR of selected regions of interest in the PWLS processed low-dose low-Z target MV CBCT image can be higher than the corresponding high-dose image.Conclusion: The CNR of low-Z target MV CBCT images was substantially improved by using PWLS projection smoothing. The PWLS projection smoothing algorithm allows the reconstruction of high contrast low-Z target MV CBCT image with a total dose of as low as 2.3 cGy.

  7. Fractal-Shape 40 GHz Microstrip Bandpass Filter on High-Resistivity Si for Suppression of the 2nd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Fractal-Shape 40 GHz Microstrip Bandpass Filter on High-Resistivity Si for Suppression of the 2nd, the Koch fractal shape is applied for the first time to microstrip bandpass filters integrated on a high. To reduce the silicon substrate loss, high resistivity silicon (HRS) can be used. Several fractal geometries

  8. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Suppression of Hepatic Fatty Acid Synthase and S14 Gene Expression Does Not Require Peroxisome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    of genes encoding fatty acid synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, the S14 protein, and L-type pyruvate kinasePolyunsaturated Fatty Acid Suppression of Hepatic Fatty Acid Synthase and S14 Gene Expression Does, Maryland 20892 Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) induce hepatic peroxisomal and microsomal fatty

  9. Wildfire Suppression Equipment Engines CSFS has placed 140 federal excess property vehicles located throughout the state. Our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildfire Suppression Equipment Engines ­ CSFS has placed 140 federal excess property vehicles fire engines and provides all major maintenance. The all-wheel drive (4x4 and 6x6) engines are equipped equipment such as hose, nozzles, and hand tools. These engines are inspected annually and updated

  10. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K. [Department of Oral Biology, University of Nebraska College of Dentistry, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)] [Department of Oral Biology, University of Nebraska College of Dentistry, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Simpson, Melanie A., E-mail: msimpson2@unl.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Eppley Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  11. Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits molecular features of induced resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Plant foliar disease suppression mediated by composted forms of paper mill residuals exhibits Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil from field plots amended with composted forms of paper mill residuals (PMR with plants grown in soil from field plots amended with a non-composted PMR or non-amended soils. Similar

  12. Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergy nepdg_5251_5500.pdfAnalysis of DownwashNational Laboratory

  13. Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System, January 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, anEnergy nepdg_5251_5500.pdfAnalysis of DownwashNational

  14. Independent Oversight Review of the Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar EnergyMarchReport -

  15. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  16. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kivel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2015-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  17. Suppression of renal fibrosis by galectin-1 in high glucose-treated renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kaokano@kc.twmu.ac.jp; Tsuruta, Yuki; Yamashita, Tetsuri; Takano, Mari; Echida, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the ability of intracellular galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype of endogenous lectin, to prevent renal fibrosis by regulating cell signaling under a high glucose (HG) condition. We demonstrated that overexpression of Gal-1 reduces type I collagen (COL1) expression and transcription in human renal epithelial cells under HG conditions and transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulation. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is stimulated by Gal-1. HG conditions and TGF-{beta}1 treatment augment expression and nuclear translocation of Gal-1. In contrast, targeted inhibition of Gal-1 expression reduces COL1 expression and increases MMP1 expression. The Smad3 signaling pathway is inhibited, whereas two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), are activated by Gal-1, indicating that Gal-1 regulates these signaling pathways in COL1 production. Using specific inhibitors of Smad3, ERK, and p38 MAPK, we showed that ERK MAPK activated by Gal-1 plays an inhibitory role in COL1 transcription and that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway by Gal-1 plays a negative role in MMP1 production. Taken together, two MAPK pathways are stimulated by increasing levels of Gal-1 in the HG condition, leading to suppression of COL1 expression and increase of MMP1 expression.

  18. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang (Cornell); (Guangdong); (UMM)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  19. Suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films through surface texturing and silver nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhter, Perveen [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@albany.edu; Kadakia, Nirag; Spratt, William; Malladi, Girish; Bakhru, Hassarum [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work demonstrates a novel method combining ion implantation and silver nanostructures for suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films. Samples were implanted with 20-keV hydrogen ions to a dose of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}, and some of them received an additional argon ion implant to a dose of 5?×?10{sup 15} /cm{sup 2} at an energy between 30 and 300?keV. Compared to the case with a single H implant, the processing involved both H and Ar implants and post-implantation annealing has created a much higher degree of surface texturing, leading to a more dramatic reduction of light reflection from polycrystalline Si films over a broadband range between 300 and 1200?nm, e.g., optical reflection from the air/Si interface in the AM1.5 sunlight condition decreasing from ?30% with an untextured surface to below 5% for a highly textured surface after post-implantation annealing at 1000?°C. Formation of Ag nanostructures on these ion beam processed surfaces further reduces light reflection, and surface texturing is expected to have the benefit of diminishing light absorption losses within large-size (>100?nm) Ag nanoparticles, yielding an increased light trapping efficiency within Si as opposed to the case with Ag nanostructures on a smooth surface. A discussion of the effects of surface textures and Ag nanoparticles on light trapping within Si thin films is also presented with the aid of computer simulations.

  20. SPARC-90: A code for calculating fission product capture in suppression pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owczarski, P.C.; Burk, K.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the technical bases and use of two updated versions of a computer code initially developed to serve as a tool for calculating aerosol particle retention in boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression pools during severe accidents, SPARC-87 and SPARC-90. The most recent version is SPARC-90. The initial or prototype version (Owczarski, Postma, and Schreck 1985) was improved to include the following: rigorous treatment of local particle deposition velocities on the surface of oblate spherical bubbles, new correlations for hydrodynamic behavior of bubble swarms, models for aerosol particle growth, both mechanistic and empirical models for vent exit region scrubbing, specific models for hydrodynamics of bubble breakup at various vent types, and models for capture of vapor iodine species. A complete user's guide is provided for SPARC-90 (along with SPARC-87). A code description, code operating instructions, partial code listing, examples of the use of SPARC-90, and summaries of experimental data comparison studies also support the use of SPARC-90. 29 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Nanoscale strain-induced pair suppression as a vortex-pinning mechanism in high- temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llordes, Anna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Palau, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Gazquez, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Coll, M. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Vlad, R. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Pomar, A. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Arbiol, Jordi [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Guzman, Roger [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ye, S. [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Rouco, V [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Sandiumenge, Felip [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Ricart, Susagna [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Puig, Teresa [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Chataigner, D. [CRISMAT, Caen, France; Vanacken, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Gutierrez, J. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Moschalkov, V. [INPAC-Institute for Nanoscale Physics and Chemistry, Leuven, Belgium; Deutscher, G. [Tel Aviv University; Magen Dominguez, Cesar [ORNL; Obradors, Xavier [ICMAB, Barcelona, Spain

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boosting large-scale superconductor applications require nanostructured conductors with artificial pinning centres immobilizing quantized vortices at high temperature and magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate a highly effective mechanism of artificial pinning centers in solution-derived high-temperature superconductor nanocomposites through generation of nanostrained regions where Cooper pair formation is suppressed. The nanostrained regions identified from transmission electron microscopy devise a very high concentration of partial dislocations associated with intergrowths generated between the randomly oriented nanodots and the epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} matrix. Consequently, an outstanding vortex-pinning enhancement correlated to the nanostrain is demonstrated for four types of randomly oriented nanodot, and a unique evolution towards an isotropic vortex-pinning behaviour, even in the effective anisotropy, is achieved as the nanostrain turns isotropic. We suggest a new vortex-pinning mechanism based on the bond-contraction pairing model, where pair formation is quenched under tensile strain, forming new and effective core-pinning regions.

  2. Study of the near-threshold ? ? mass enhancement in doubly OZI-suppressed J / ? ? ? ? ? decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales Morales, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, Z.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2.25×10? J/? event sample accumulated with the BESIII detector is used to study the doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-suppressed decay modes J/?????, ????????, ??K?K?. A strong deviation (>30?) from three-body J/????? phase space is observed near the ?? mass threshold that is consistent with a previous observation reported by the BESII experiment. A partial wave analysis with a tensor covariant amplitude that assumes that the enhancement is due to the presence of a resonance, the X(1810), is performed and confirms that the spin-parity of the X(1810) is 0??. The mass and width of the X(1810) are determined to be M=1795±7(stat)+13-5(syst)±19(mod) MeV/c² and ?=95±10(stat)+21-34(syst)±75(mod) MeV/c², respectively, and the product branching fraction is measured to be B(J/???X(1810))×B(X(1810)???)=(2.00±0.08(stat)+0.45-1.00(syst)±1.30(mod))×10??. These results are consistent within errors with those of the BESII experiment.

  3. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szyszka, A., E-mail: szyszka@ihp-microelectronics.com, E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Lupina, L.; Lupina, G.; Schubert, M. A.; Zaumseil, P. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B. [Siltronic, Hanns-Seidel-Platz 4, 81737 München (Germany); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated that—with respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBR—the insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  4. Background Suppression Using Pulse Shape Analysis with a BEGe Detector for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search with GERDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budjas, Dusan; Schoenert, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Chkvorets, Oleg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, P3E 2C6 Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse shape analysis for distinguishing between double beta decay-like interactions and multiple-scattered photons was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector. This discrimination method is included in the research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment, since active background suppression techniques are necessary to reach sensitivity for the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay half life of >10{sup 26} years. A suppression of backgrounds in the energy region of interest around the {sup 76}Ge Q{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} = 2039 keV is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. This performance is achieved with (89{+-}1)% acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay.

  5. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, S.B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (United States); Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  6. Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of the Drosophila eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kango-Singh, Madhuri

    Ã?Ã? Ã? Ã?Ã?Ã? Ã? Ã?Ã? Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of the Drosophila eye Sarah M. Oros, Meghana Tare, Madhuri Kango-Singh, Amit Singh PII: S0012-1606(10)00975-9 DOI: Oros, Sarah M., Tare, Meghana, Kango-Singh, Madhuri, Singh, Amit, Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr

  7. 1 Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of 2 the Drosophila eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Amit

    1 Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of 2 the Drosophila eye 3 Sarah M. Oros a,b,1 , Meghana Tare b,1 , Madhuri Kango-Singh a,b,c , Amit Singh a,b,c, 4 xxxx 141516 17 Keywords: 18 Drosophila eye 19 Dorso-ventral eye patterning 20 Pannier 21 GATA-1 22

  8. Search for CP violation in singly Cabibbo suppressed four-body D decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinelli, Maurizio; /Bari U.

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for CP violation in a sample of 4.7 x 10{sup 4} singly Cabibbo suppressed D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays and 1.8(2.6) x 10{sup 4} D{sub (s)}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sup +} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} decays. CP violation is searched for in the difference between the T-odd asymmetries, obtained using triple product correlations, measured for D and {bar D} decays. The measured CP violation parameters are A{sub T}(D{sup 0}) = (1.0 {+-} 5.1(stat) {+-} 4.4(syst)) x 10{sup -3}, A{sub T}(D{sup +}) = (-11.96 {+-} 10.04(stat) {+-} 4.81(syst)) x 10{sup -3} and A{sub T}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = (-13.57 {+-} 7.67(stat) {+-} 4.82(syst)) x 10{sup -3}. This search for CP violation showed that the T-odd correlations are a powerful tool to measure the CP violating observable A{sub T}. The relative simplicity of an analysis based on T-odd correlations and the high quality results that can be obtained, allow to consider this tool as fundamental to search for CP violation in four-body decays. Even if the CP violation has not been found, excluding any New Physics effect to the sensitivity of about 0.5%, it is still worth to search for CP violation in D decays. The high statistics that can be obtained at the LHC or by the proposed high luminosity B-factories, make this topic to be considered in high consideration by experiments such as LHCb, SuperB or SuperBelle. The results outlined in this thesis strongly suggest to include a similar analysis into the Physics program of these experiments.

  9. Inflation that runs naturally: Gravitational waves and suppression of power at large and small scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn E. Minor; Manoj Kaplinghat

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out three correlated predictions of the axion monodromy inflation model: large amplitude of gravitational waves, suppression of power on horizon scales and on scales relevant for the formation of dwarf galaxies. While these predictions are likely generic to models with oscillations in the inflaton potential, the axion monodromy model naturally accommodates the required running spectral index through Planck-scale corrections to the inflaton potential. Applying this model to a combined data set of Planck, ACT, SPT, and WMAP low-$\\ell$ polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, we find a best-fit tensor-to-scalar ratio $r_{0.05} = 0.07^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$ due to gravitational waves, which may have been observed by the BICEP2 experiment. Despite the contribution of gravitational waves, the total power on large scales (CMB power spectrum at low multipoles) is lower than the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a power-law spectrum of initial perturbations and no gravitational waves, thus mitigating some of the tension on large scales. There is also a reduction in the matter power spectrum of 20-30\\% at scales corresponding to $k = 10~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, which are relevant for dwarf galaxy formation. This will alleviate some of the unsolved small-scale structure problems in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The inferred matter power spectrum is also found to be consistent with recent Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest data, which is in tension with the Planck-favored $\\Lambda$CDM model with power-law primordial power spectrum.

  10. Receptor for advanced glycation end products inhibits proliferation in osteoblast through suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guofeng [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Xu, Jingren [Department of Traditional Chinese Orthopaedics, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Traditional Chinese Orthopaedics, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China); Li, Zengchun, E-mail: lizc.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)] [Department of Emergency Surgery, East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200120 (China)

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression suppresses cell proliferation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAGE overexpression decreases ERK and PI3K signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes PI3K signaling restored by RAGE blockade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Wnt signaling abolishes ERK signaling restored by RAGE blockade. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in bone metabolism. However, the role of RAGE in the control of osteoblast proliferation is not yet evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrate that RAGE overexpression inhibits osteoblast proliferation in vitro. The negative regulation of RAGE on cell proliferation results from suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, and is restored by RAGE neutralizing antibody. Prevention of Wnt signaling using Sfrp1 or DKK1 rescues RAGE-decreased PI3K and ERK signaling and cell proliferation, indicating that the altered cell growth in RAGE overexpressing cells is in part secondary to alterations in Wnt signaling. Consistently, RAGE overexpression inhibits the expression of Wnt targets cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is partially reversed by RAGE blockade. Overall, these results suggest that RAGE inhibits osteoblast proliferation via suppression of Wnt, PI3K and ERK signaling, which provides novel mechanisms by which RAGE regulates osteoblast growth.

  11. Chitinase genes revealed and compared in bacterial isolates, DNA extracts and a metagenomic library from a phytopathogen suppressive soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjort, K.; Bergstrom, M.; Adesina, M.F.; Jansson, J.K.; Smalla, K.; Sjoling, S.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil that is suppressive to disease caused by fungal pathogens is an interesting source to target for novel chitinases that might be contributing towards disease suppression. In this study we screened for chitinase genes, in a phytopathogen-suppressive soil in three ways: (1) from a metagenomic library constructed from microbial cells extracted from soil, (2) from directly extracted DNA and (3) from bacterial isolates with antifungal and chitinase activities. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of chitinase genes revealed differences in amplified chitinase genes from the metagenomic library and the directly extracted DNA, but approximately 40% of the identified chitinase terminal-restriction fragments (TRFs) were found in both sources. All of the chitinase TRFs from the isolates were matched to TRFs in the directly extracted DNA and the metagenomic library. The most abundant chitinase TRF in the soil DNA and the metagenomic library corresponded to the TRF{sup 103} of the isolate, Streptomyces mutomycini and/or Streptomyces clavifer. There were good matches between T-RFLP profiles of chitinase gene fragments obtained from different sources of DNA. However, there were also differences in both the chitinase and the 16S rRNA gene T-RFLP patterns depending on the source of DNA, emphasizing the lack of complete coverage of the gene diversity by any of the approaches used.

  12. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  13. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, Daniel E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mullen, Carlan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Feldman, Edgar M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meyer, Leroy C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  14. High power laser workover and completion tools and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Workover and completion systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser workover and completion of a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform laser workover and completion operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  15. System to control contamination during retrieval of buried TRU waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menkhaus, D.E.; Loomis, G.G.; Mullen, C.K.; Scott, D.W.; Feldman, E.M.; Meyer, L.C.

    1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described to control contamination during the retrieval of hazardous waste comprising an outer containment building, an inner containment building, within the outer containment building, an electrostatic radioactive particle recovery unit connected to and in communication with the inner and outer containment buildings, and a contaminate suppression system including a moisture control subsystem, and a rapid monitoring system having the ability to monitor conditions in the inner and outer containment buildings.

  16. Technical evaluation of equipment maintenance on fire alarm detection, suppression, and signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korslund, S.M.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document delineates the application of WHC-CM-4-3, Program E-2 to Fire Systems on the Hanford Site.

  17. Suppression of spurious mode oscillation in mega-watt 77-GHz gyrotron as a high quality probe beam source for the collective Thomson scattering in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogasawara, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); Kubo, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8463 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Ito, S.; Takita, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-5292 (Japan); Tatematsu, Y.; Saito, T. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Minami, R.; Kariya, T.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic requires a strong probing beam to diagnose a bulk and fast ion distribution function in fusion plasmas. A mega-watt gyrotron for electron cyclotron resonance heating is used as a probing beam in the large helical device. Spurious mode oscillations are often observed during the turning on/off phase of the modulation. The frequency spectra of the 77-GHz gyrotron output power have been measured, and then one of the spurious modes, which interferes with the CTS receiver system, is identified as the TE{sub 17,6} mode at the frequency of 74.7 GHz. The mode competition calculation indicates that the increase of the magnetic field strength at the gyrotron resonator can avoid such a spurious mode and excite only the main TE{sub 18,6} mode. The spurious radiation at the 74.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated to be suppressed in the stronger magnetic field than that optimized for the high-power operation.

  18. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  19. Initiation disruptor systems and methods of initiation disruption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baum, Dennis W

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that may be used as an initiation disruption system (IDS) according to one embodiment includes an explosive charge; a plurality of particles in a layer at least partially surrounding the explosive charge; and a fire suppressant adjacent the plurality of particles. A method for disabling an object according to one embodiment includes placing the system as recited above near an object; and causing the explosive charge to initiate, thereby applying mechanical loading to the object such that the object becomes disabled. Additional systems and methods are also presented. A device according to another embodiment includes a plurality of particles bound by a binder thereby defining a sidewall having an interior for receiving an explosive; and a fire suppressant adjacent the plurality of particles and binder. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  20. Impact of Reservoir Evaporation and Evaporation Suppression on Water Supply Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Rolando A

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir storage is essential for developing dependable water supplies and is a major component of the river system water budget. The storage contents of reservoirs fluctuate greatly with variations in water use and climatic conditions that range...

  1. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses melanoma growth by inhibiting inflammasome and IL-1{beta} secretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Lixia Z.; Liu, Weimin; Luo, Yuchun; Okamoto, Miyako; Qu, Dovina; Dunn, Jeffrey H. [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)] [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Fujita, Mayumi, E-mail: mayumi.fujita@ucdenver.edu [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States) [Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth via inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} suppression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic component of green tea, has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties. The anti-melanoma effect of EGCG has been previously suggested, but no clear mechanism of action has been established. In this study, we demonstrated that EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). In the search for mechanisms of EGCG-mediated melanoma cell suppression, we found that NF-{kappa}B was inhibited, and that reduced NF-{kappa}B activity was associated with decreased IL-1{beta} secretion from melanoma cells. Since inflammasomes are involved in IL-1{beta} secretion, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} suppression was mediated by inflammasomes, and found that EGCG treatment led to downregulation of the inflammasome component, NLRP1, and reduced caspase-1 activation. Furthermore, silencing the expression of NLRP1 abolished EGCG-induced inhibition of tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a key role of inflammasomes in EGCG efficacy. This paper provides a novel mechanism for EGCG-induced melanoma inhibition: inflammasome downregulation {yields} decreased IL-1{beta} secretion {yields} decreased NF-{kappa}B activities {yields} decreased cell growth. In addition, it suggests inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics.

  2. Operating Characteristics in DIII-D ELM-Suppressed RMP H-modes with ITER Similar Shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, T E; Fenstermacher, M E; Jakubowski, M; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Schmitz, O; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L; Baylor, L R; Boedo, J A; Burrell, K H; deGrassie, J S; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Mordijck, S; Petty, C C; Pinsker, R I; Rhodes, T L; Rost, J C; Snyder, P B; Unterberg, E; West, W P

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast energy transients, incident on the DIII-D divertors due to Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), are eliminated using small dc currents in a simple set of non-axisymmetric coils that produce edge resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). In ITER similar shaped (ISS) plasmas, with electron pedestal collisionalities matched to those expected in ITER a sharp resonant window in the safety factor at the 95 percent normalized poloidal flux surface is observed for ELM suppression at q{sub 95}=3.57 with a minimum width {delta}q{sub 95} of {+-}0.05. The size of this resonant window has been increased by a factor of 4 in ISS plasmas by increasing the magnitude of the current in an n=3 coil set along with the current in a separate n=1 coil set. The resonant ELM-suppression window is highly reproducible for a given plasma shape, coil configuration and coil current but can vary with other operating conditions such as {beta}{sub N}. Isolated resonant windows have also been found at other q95 values when using different RMP coil configurations. For example, when the I-coil is operated in an n=3 up-down asymmetric configuration rather than an up-down symmetric configuration a resonant window is found near q{sub 95}=7.4. A Fourier analysis of the applied vacuum magnetic field demonstrates a statistical correlation between the Chirikov island overlap parameter and ELM suppression. These results have been used as a guide for RMP coil design studies in various ITER operating scenarios.

  3. Observation of suppression of light scattering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in a cold atomic ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pellegrino; R. Bourgain; S. Jennewein; Y. R. P. Sortais; S. D. Jenkins; J. Ruostekoski; A. Browaeys

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the emergence of collective scattering in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions when we illuminate a cold cloud of rubidium atoms with a near-resonant and weak intensity laser. The size of the atomic sample is comparable to the wavelength of light. When we gradually increase the atom number from 1 to 450, we observe a broadening of the line, a small red shift and, consistently with these, a strong suppression of the scattered light with respect to the noninteracting atom case. Numerical simulations, which include the internal atomic level structure, agree with the data.

  4. Evidence of Magnetic Breakdown on the Defects With Thermally Suppressed Critical Field in High Gradient SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eremeev, Grigory [JLAB; Palczewski, Ari [JLAB

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At SRF 2011 we presented the study of quenches in high gradient SRF cavities with dual mode excitation technique. The data differed from measurements done in 80's that indicated thermal breakdown nature of quenches in SRF cavities. In this contribution we present analysis of the data that indicates that our recent data for high gradient quenches is consistent with the magnetic breakdown on the defects with thermally suppressed critical field. From the parametric fits derived within the model we estimate the critical breakdown fields.

  5. Suppression of the thermal hysteresis in magnetocaloric MnAs thin film by highly charged ion bombardment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trassinelli, Martino; Eddrief, M; Etgens, V H; Gafton, V; Hidki, S; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Lamour, Emily; Prigent, Christophe; Rozet, Jean-Pierre; Steydli, S; Zheng, Y; Vernhet, Dominique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the investigation on the modifications of structural and magnetic properties of MnAs thin film epitaxially grown on GaAs induced by slow highly charged ions bombardment under well-controlled conditions. The ion-induced defects facilitate the nucleation of one phase with respect to the other in the first-order magneto-structural MnAs transition with a consequent suppression of thermal hysteresis without any significant perturbation on the other structural and magnetic properties. In particular, the irradiated film keeps the giant magnetocaloric effect at room temperature opening new perspective on magnetic refrigeration technology for everyday use.

  6. Branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dytman, S. A.; Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Aquines, O.; Li, Z.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, using 281 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CLEO-c detector on the {psi}(3770) resonance. We find B(D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})=(2.28{+-}0.36{+-}0.15{+-}0.08)x10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the last error is due to the uncertainty in the reference mode branching fraction.

  7. Suppression of the thermal hysteresis in magnetocaloric MnAs thin film by highly charged ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trassinelli, M., E-mail: martino.trassinelli@insp.jussieu.fr; Marangolo, M.; Eddrief, M.; Etgens, V. H.; Gafton, V.; Hidki, S.; Lacaze, E.; Lamour, E.; Prigent, C.; Rozet, J.-P.; Steydli, S.; Zheng, Y.; Vernhet, D. [CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris (INSP), F-75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, UMR 7588, INSP, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the investigation on the modifications of structural and magnetic properties of MnAs thin film epitaxially grown on GaAs induced by slow highly charged ions bombardment under well-controlled conditions. The ion-induced defects facilitate the nucleation of one phase with respect to the other in the first-order magneto-structural MnAs transition, with a consequent suppression of thermal hysteresis without any significant perturbation on the other structural and magnetic properties. In particular, the irradiated film keeps the giant magnetocaloric effect at room temperature opening new perspective on magnetic refrigeration technology for everyday use.

  8. Interaction of nucleus and plastome in sunflower. III. Suppression of phenotypic expression of plastid mutation by alien nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beletskii, Yu.D.; Razoriteleva, E.K.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four plastome mutations of type chlorina were crossed as female parents with variety Mayak. It was demonstrated that a three-phases hybridization led to the loss of chlorophyll defect in F/sub 1/. The suppression of plastic mutation is controlled by a single dominant gene. Four viable plastid mutants were used in the study-en: chlorina-1 (1-24), en:chlorina-3 (1-138), en:chlorina-5 (2-25), and en:chlorina-7 (2-43).

  9. Commissioning of FPGA-based Transverse and Longitudinal Bunch-by-Bunch Feedback System for the TLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, K. H.; Kuo, C. H.; Lau, W. K.; Yeh, M. S.; Hsu, S. Y.; Chou, P. J.; Wang, M. H.; Lee, Demi; Chen, Jenny; Wang, C. J.; Hsu, K. T. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, T. [JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan); Dehler, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-bunch instabilities deteriorate beam quality, increasing beam emittance, or even causing beam loss in the synchrotron light source. The feedback system is essential to suppress multi-bunch instabilities caused by the impedances of beam ducts, and trapped ions. A new FPGA based transverse and longitudinal bunch-by-bunch feedback system have been commissioned at the Taiwan Light Source recently, A single feedback loop is used to simultaneously suppress the horizontal and the vertical multi-bunch instabilities. Longitudinal instabilities caused by cavity-like structures are suppressed by the longitudinal feedback loop. The same FPGA processor is employed in the transverse feedback and the longitudinal feedback system respectively. Diagnostic memory is included in the system to capture the bunch oscillation signal, which supports various studies.

  10. Cold Vacuum Drying facility fire protection system design description (SYS 24)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) fire protection system (FPS). The FPS provides fire detection, suppression, and loss limitation for the CVDF structure, personnel, and in-process spent nuclear fuel. The system provides, along with supporting interfacing systems, detection, alarm, and activation instrumentation and controls, distributive piping system, isolation valves, and materials and controls to limit combustibles and the associated fire loadings.

  11. Suppressing Riser-Based Slugging in Multiphase Flow by State Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    of the system, x1 is the total mass of gas in the volume upstream of the riser base (volume one), x2 is the total mass of gas in the riser (volum or vertical pipe sections, and is potentially damaging to downstream processing equipment such as separators

  12. An analog approach to interference suppression in ultra-wideband receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Timothy W.

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    are presented, and a solution is proposed. To combat interference in Multi-Band OFDM (MB-OFDM) UWB systems, an analog notch filter is designed to be included in the UWB receive chain. The architecture of the filter is based on feed-forward subtraction...

  13. Optimal suppression of defect generation during a passage across a quantum critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wu; Arun Nanduri; Herschel Rabitz

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of quantum phase transitions are inevitably accompanied by the formation of defects when crossing a quantum critical point. For a generic class of quantum critical systems, we solve the problem of minimizing the production of defects through the use of a gradient-based deterministic optimal control algorithm. By considering a finite size quantum Ising model with a tunable global transverse field, we show that an optimal power law quench of the transverse field across the Ising critical point works well at minimizing the number of defects, in spite of being drawn from a subset of quench profiles. These power law quenches are shown to be inherently robust against noise. The optimized defect density exhibits a transition at a critical ratio of the quench duration to the system size, which we argue coincides with the intrinsic speed limit for quantum evolution.

  14. Combination External Beam Radiation and Brachytherapy Boost With Androgen Suppression for Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: An Initial Report of CALGB 99809

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Mark D. [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: mhurwitz@lroc.harvard.edu; Halabi, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ou, San-San [CALGB Statistical Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); McGinnis, Lamar S. [Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Keuttel, Michael R. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); DiBiase, Steven J. [University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Small, Eric J. [University of California at San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy (TPPB) can be used with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to provide a high-dose conformal boost to the prostate. The results of a multicenter Phase II trial assessing safety of combination of EBRT and TPPB boost with androgen suppression (AST) in treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer are present here. Materials and Methods: Patients had intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Six months of AST was administered. EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles was administered to 45Gy followed by TPPB using either {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd to deliver an additional 100Gy or 90Gy. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute CTC version 2 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring systems. Results: Sixty-three patients were enrolled. Median follow-up was 38 months. Side effects of AST including sexual dysfunction and vasomotor symptoms were commonly observed. Apart from erectile dysfunction, short-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was noted in 21% and 7%, primarily genitourinary related. Long-term Grade 2 and 3 toxicities were noted in 13% and 3%. Two patients had Grade 3 dysuria that resolved with longer follow-up. The most common Grade 2 long-term toxicity was urinary frequency (5%). No biochemical or clinical evidence of progression was noted for the entire cohort. Conclusions: In a cooperative group setting, combination EBRT and TPPB boost with 6 months of AST was generally well tolerated with expected genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. Further follow-up will be required to fully assess long-term toxicity and cancer control.

  15. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  16. Corrigendum to “Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  17. Corrigendum to “Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore »rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  18. Suppression of Upsilon Production in d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; K. Hill; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; G. Wimsatt; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of Upsilon meson production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Upsilon yield to the measured cross section in p+p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d+Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p+p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) in the rapidity range |y|<1 in d+Au collisions of R_dAu = 0.79 +/- 0.24 (stat.) +/- 0.03 (sys.) +/- 0.10 (pp sys.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au+Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R_AA=0.49 +/- 0.1 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (sys.) +/- 0.06 (pp sys.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au+Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au+Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark-Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d+Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au+Au can be made.

  19. A Fusing Switch for Fault Suppression in the SNS High Voltage Converter Modulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Mark A.; Burkhart, Craig; Nguyen, Minh N.; /SLAC; Anderson, David E.; /Oak Ridge

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Voltage Converter Modulators (HVCMs) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have operated in excess of a combined 250,000 hours. Performance and reliability improvements to the HVCM are ongoing to increase modulator availability as accelerator system demands increase. There is a relatively large amount of energy storage in the HVCMs, {approx}180 kJ. This energy has the potential to dump into unsuppressed faults, cause damage, and increase the time to repair. The 'fusing switch' concept involves isolation of this stored energy from the location of the most common faults. This paper introduces this concept and its application to the HVCMs.

  20. Suppressing tin whisker growth in lead-free solders and platings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Elizabeth N; Lam, Poh-Sang

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of irradiation Sn containing Pb-free solder to mitigate whisker formation and growth thereon is provided. The use of gamma radiation such as cobalt-60 has been applied to a substrate of Sn on copper has been found to change the morphology of the crystalline whisker growth to a more truncated hillock pattern. The change in morphology greatly reduces the tendency of whiskers to contribute to electrical short-circuits being used as a Pb-free solder system on a copper substrate.

  1. Suppression of infrared instability in trans-sonic flows by condensation of zero-frequency short wave length phonons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xavier Busch; Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the peculiar infrared instability that characterizes stationary inhomogeneous flows when their velocity crosses the sound speed by decreasing values. For definiteness, we work in the context of one dimensional atomic Bose condensates. These flows are unstable under ultra low real frequency perturbations because of the unbounded mode amplification near the sonic horizon. This results in a condensation of low frequency phonons which produces a spatially structured flow in the supersonic domain. Numerical simulations reveal that this zero-frequency undulation suppresses the instability when its spatial extension is infinite, and when its phase is near that of a "shadow soliton" solution attached to the sonic horizon. These phenomena are akin to the condensation of rotons in flowing superfluid helium-4 when exceeding the Landau velocity. They also pertain to shallow water waves propagating on transcritical flows.

  2. Blinking suppression of CdTe quantum dots on epitaxial graphene and the analysis with Marcus electron transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Takuya; Tamai, Naoto, E-mail: tamai@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Kutsuma, Yasunori; Kurita, Atsusi; Kaneko, Tadaaki [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have prepared epitaxial graphene by a Si sublimation method from 4H-SiC. Single-particle spectroscopy of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) on epitaxial graphene covered with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) showed the suppression of luminescence blinking and ?10 times decreased luminescence intensity as compared with those on a glass. The electronic coupling constant, H{sub 01}, between CdTe QDs and graphene was calculated to be (3.3?±?0.4)?×?10{sup 2?}cm{sup ?1} in PVP and (3.7?±?0.8)?×?10{sup 2?}cm{sup ?1} in PEG based on Marcus theory of electron transfer and Tang-Marcus model of blinking with statistical distribution.

  3. Narrow-band injection seeding of a terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser: Selection and suppression of longitudinal modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nong, Hanond, E-mail: Nong.Hanond@rub.de; Markmann, Sergej; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan, E-mail: Nathan.Jukam@rub.de [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Pal, Shovon [Arbeitsgruppe Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany); Mohandas, Reshma A.; Dean, Paul; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44780 (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal with multiple poling periods is used to generate tunable narrow-bandwidth THz pulses for injection seeding a quantum cascade laser (QCL). We demonstrate that longitudinal modes of the quantum cascade laser close to the gain maximum can be selected or suppressed according to the seed spectrum. The QCL emission spectra obtained by electro-optic sampling from the quantum cascade laser, in the most favorable case, shows high selectivity and amplification of the longitudinal modes that overlap the frequency of the narrow-band seed. Proper selection of the narrow-band THz seed from the PPLN crystal discretely tunes the longitudinal mode emission of the quantum cascade laser. Moreover, the THz wave build-up within the laser cavity is studied as a function of the round-trip time. When the seed frequency is outside the maximum of the gain spectrum the laser emission shifts to the preferential longitudinal mode.

  4. Centrality dependence of high $p_T$ suppression in Au+Au collisions suggest quark matter formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pQCD-based model, we have analyzed the STAR data on the high $p_T$ suppression of charged hadrons, in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=200 GeV. In the jet quenching or the energy loss picture, $p_T$ spectra of charged hadrons as well as the $p_T$ dependence of nuclear modification factor, in all the centrality ranges, are well explained, with nearly a constant relative energy loss, $\\Delta E/E=0.56\\pm 0.03$. Centrality independence of relative energy loss indicate that the matter produced in central and in peripheral collisions are different, otherwise relative energy loss would have shown strong centrality dependence. Qualitatively, centrality independence of relative energy loss can be understood, if in central Au+Au collisions deconfined matter is produced and the matter remain confined in peripheral collisions.

  5. Comment to `The dependence of the anomalous J/psi suppression on the number of participant nucleons'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Kostyuk; H. Stoecker; W. Greiner

    2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently published experimental dependence of the J/psi suppression pattern in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS on the energy of zero degree calorimeter E_ZDC are analyzed. It is found that the data obtained within the `minimum bias' analysis (using `theoretical Drell-Yan') are at variance with the previously published experimental dependence of the same quantity on the transversal energy of neutral hadrons E_T. The discrepancy is related to the moderate centrality region: 100 < N_p < 200 (N_p is the number of nucleon participants). This could result from systematic experimental errors in the minimum bias sample. A possible source of the errors may be contamination of the minimum bias sample by off-target interactions. The data obtained within the standard analysis (using measured Drell-Yan multiplicity) are found to be much less sensitive to the contamination.

  6. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  7. Ascorbic acid suppresses endotoxemia and NF-?B signaling cascade in alcoholic liver fibrosis in guinea pigs: A mechanistic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhilash, P.A.; Harikrishnan, R.; Indira, M., E-mail: indiramadambath@gmail.com

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcohol consumption increases the small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and intestinal permeability of endotoxin. The endotoxin mediated inflammatory signaling plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. We evaluated the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), silymarin and alcohol abstention on the alcohol induced endotoxemia and NF-?B activation cascade pathway in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Guinea pigs were administered ethanol at a daily dose of 4 g/kg b.wt for 90 days. After 90 days, ethanol administration was stopped. The ethanol treated animals were divided into abstention, silymarin (250 mg/kg b.wt) and AA (250 mg/kg b.wt) supplemented groups and maintained for 30 days. The SIBO, intestinal permeability and endotoxin were significantly increased in the ethanol group. The mRNA expressions of intestinal proteins claudin, occludin and zona occludens-1 were significantly decreased in ethanol group. The mRNA levels of inflammatory receptors, activity of IKK? and the protein expressions of phospho-I?B?, NF-?B, TNF-?, TGF-?{sub 1} and IL-6 were also altered in ethanol group. The expressions of fibrosis markers ?-SMA, ?{sub 1} (I) collagen and sirius red staining in the liver revealed the induction of fibrosis. But the supplementation of AA could induce greater reduction of ethanol induced SIBO, intestinal barrier defects, NF-?B activation and liver fibrosis than silymarin. The possible mechanism may be the inhibitory effect of AA on SIBO, intestinal barrier defect and IKK?, which decreased the activation of NF-?B and synthesis of cytokines. This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Alcohol increases intestinal bacterial overgrowth and permeability of endotoxin. • Endotoxin mediated inflammation plays a major role in alcoholic liver fibrosis. • Ascorbic acid reduces endotoxemia, NF-?B activation and proinflammatory cytokines. • AA's action is by inhibition of SIBO, IKK? and alteration of intestinal permeability. • This might have led to suppression of HSCs activation and liver fibrosis.

  8. Smith-Type Methods for Balanced Truncation of Large Sparse Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    Smith-Type Methods for Balanced Truncation of Large Sparse Systems Serkan Gugercin1 and Jing various media, signal propagation through electric circuits, vibration suppression of bridges for paralleliza- tion. The Smith method [SMI68], the alternating direction implicit (ADI) iteration method [WAS88a

  9. Smith-Type Methods for Balanced Truncation of Large Sparse Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing-Rebecca

    Smith-Type Methods for Balanced Truncation of Large Sparse Systems Serkan Gugercin1 and Jing various media, signal propagation through electric circuits, vibration suppression of bridges they retain the sparsity of the problem and are much more suitable for paralleliza- tion. The Smith method [44

  10. Submitted to Trans. Circuits and Systems I Wideband CMOS Low Noise Amplifier Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Submitted to Trans. Circuits and Systems I Wideband CMOS Low Noise Amplifier Design Based On Source for wideband CMOS low noise amplifier (LNA) with source degener- ation is presented. By allowing an arbitrary in the design of the LNA is to achieve sufficiently large gain and low noise figure to suppress the additive

  11. Charge-transfer-induced suppression of galvanic replacement and synthesis of (Au-Ag)-Au double shell nanoparticles for highly uniform, robust and sensitive bioprobes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dao Thi Ngoc Anh; Singh, Prerna; Shankar, Cheshta; Mott, Derrick; Maenosono, Shinya [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of double shell (Au-Ag)-Au nanoparticles is accomplished through suppression of the galvanic replacement reaction caused by an electron transfer phenomenon. The resulting nanoparticles are monodisperse with a thin and uniform second Au shell. These particles are ultimately expected to lead to sensitive probes for biomolecular sensing and diagnostics.

  12. British Journal of Nutrition, 2010, Allam et al., Calcium carbonate blocks haem without side effect. Authors' Version 1 Calcium Carbonate Suppresses Haem Toxicity Markers without

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    British Journal of Nutrition, 2010, Allam et al., Calcium carbonate blocks haem without side effect. Authors' Version 1 Calcium Carbonate Suppresses Haem Toxicity Markers without Calcium Phosphate Side identified calcium carbonate as the most effective calcium salt to bind haem in vitro and to decrease faecal

  13. Edge-Localized-Mode Suppression through Density-Profile Modification with Lithium-Wall Coatings in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    a pulsed power load that would limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) unless the energyEdge-Localized-Mode Suppression through Density-Profile Modification with Lithium-Wall Coatings to low-n peeling or ballooning modes, while broader pressure profiles stabilized the post-Li discharges

  14. Impaired NFAT and NF?B activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by ?{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Kaplan, Barbara L.F. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University (United States); Kaminski, Norbert E., E-mail: kamins11@msu.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously reported that ?{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (?{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of ?{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with ?{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that ?{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NF?B to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of ?{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLC?1/2, Akt, and GSK3?. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NF?B signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which ?{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • ?{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • ?{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NF?B. • ?{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • ?{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLC?1/2, Akt, and GSK3?.

  15. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)] [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Milatovic, Dejan [Department of Pediatrics/Pediatric Toxicology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics/Pediatric Toxicology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Splittgerber, Ryan [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)] [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Fan, Guo-Huang [Department of Neurobiology and Neurotoxicology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37221 (United States)] [Department of Neurobiology and Neurotoxicology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37221 (United States); Richmond, Ann, E-mail: ann.richmond@vanderbilt.edu [VA Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States) [VA Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or CXCL12 prevented dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotection through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of ADAM17. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotection of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo by MIP-2 or CXCL12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP-2 or CXCL12 prevent elevation of F2-Isoprostanes against A{beta} treatment.

  16. Synthesis of controllers for prespecified performance in linear uncertain systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franchek, Matthew Albert

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is not contradictory to the idea of optimal control design since the higher fre- quency dynamics unnecessarily suppressed by control effort are now naturally rejected by the augmented system bandwidth allowing sll of the control ef- fort to reject the real... 10. 12. 13. 15. 17. Performance Regions in a Bode Plot Time Domain Bounds on a Step Reference Straight Line Approximation of the Lower Target Bound Straight Line Approximation of the Upper Target Bound Real Term as a Function oi...

  17. Detector Systems at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Simon

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider CLIC is designed to deliver e+e- collisions at a center of mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The detector systems at this collider have to provide highly efficient tracking and excellent jet energy resolution and hermeticity for multi-TeV final states with multiple jets and leptons. In addition, the detector systems have to be capable of distinguishing physics events from large beam-induced background at a crossing frequency of 2 GHz. Like for the detector concepts at the ILC, CLIC detectors are based on event reconstruction using particle flow algorithms. The two detector concepts for the ILC, ILD and SID, were adapted for CLIC using calorimeters with dense absorbers limiting leakage through increased compactness, as well as modified forward and vertex detector geometries and precise time stamping to cope with increased background levels. The overall detector concepts for CLIC are presented, with particular emphasis on the main detector and engineering challenges, such as: the ultra-thin vertex detector with high resolution and fast time-stamping, hadronic calorimetry using tungsten absorbers, and event reconstruction techniques related to particle flow algorithms and beam background suppression.

  18. Maximally Accessible Purity in Coherently Controlled Open Quantum Systems: Application to Quantum State Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Li; Dawei Lu; Zhihuang Luo; Raymond Laflamme; Xinhua Peng; Jiangfeng Du

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental problem in quantum control is to precisely characterize the controlled system dynamics when decoherence effects are present. In this work, we derive the upper bound of achievable purity for coherently driven dissipative systems, which is rather useful for assessing control performances. The theory is further testified on a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system. Under joint effects of coherent pulses and system relaxation, we are able to implement the tasks of open system polarization transfer and pseudopure state preparation with remarkably, both of them approaching near optimal performance in purity. Our work shows great applicative potential of utilizing rather than suppressing relaxation effects in open system control protocols.

  19. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part I: Potential for ELM suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, I; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A potential technique for suppressing edge localized magnetohydrodynamic instabilities (ELMs) is theoretically analyzed. Recent experiments have shown that externally generated resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can stabilize ELMs by modifying the density profile [T. E. Evans, et al., Nature Phys. 2, 419 (2006); Y. Liang, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265004 (2007)]. Driving toroidally asymmetric current internally, through the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma itself, can also generate RMPs that are close to the required threshold for ELM control. The limiting ion saturation current densities can be achieved by producing potential differences on the order of the electron temperature. Although the threshold is uncertain in future devices, if driven coherently though the SOL, the upper limit for the resulting field would exceed the present experimental threshold. This analysis provides the tools required for estimating the magnitude of the coherent SOL current and RMP generated via toroidally asymmetric biasing of the target. Flux expansion increases the RMP near the X-point, while phase interference due to the shearing of field lines near the X-point reduces the amplitude of the effective SOL perturbation and makes the result sensitive to both toroidal mode number n and the radial coherence width of the biasing region. If the limiting current density decays rapidly enough radially, both the width and the amplitude of the current density drawn from the target will be reduced. The RMP can still exceed the present threshold at low n if the radial location and width of the biasing region are optimally chosen.

  20. Development of electron reflection suppression materials for improved thermionic energy converter performance using thin film deposition techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Mohammad; Inal, Osman T.; Luke, James R. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications (IERA) , 901 University Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106-4339 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonideal electrode surfaces cause significant degree of electron reflection from collector during thermionic converter operation. The effect of the collector surface structure on the converter performance was assessed through the development of several electron reflection suppression materials using various thin film deposition techniques. The double-diode probe method was used to compare the J-V characteristics of converters with polished and modified collector surfaces for emitter temperature and cesium vapor pressure in the ranges of 900-2000 K and 0.02-1.5 torr, respectively. The coadsorption of cesium and oxygen with respective partial vapor pressures of {approx}1.27 torr and a few microtorrs reduced the emitter work function to a minimum value of 0.99 eV. It was found that the collector surfaces with matte black appearance such as platinum black, voided nickel from radio-frequency plasma sputtering, and etched electroless Ni-P with craterlike pore morphology exhibited much better performance compared with polished collector surface. For these thin films, the increase in the maximum output voltage was up to 2.0 eV. For optimum performance with minimum work function and maximum saturation emission current density, the emitter temperature was in the range of 1100-1500 K, depending on the collector surface structure. The use of these materials in cylindrical converter design and/or in combination with hybrid mode triode configuration holds great potential in low and medium scale power generators for commercial use.

  1. Measurements of $\\Lambda^+_c$ Branching Fractions of Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Modes involving $\\Lambda$ and $\\Sigma^{0}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, Roy; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Allmendinger, T; Altenburg, D; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, S; Barate, R; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyarski, A M; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Breon, A B; Brose, J; Brown, C L; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Buchmüller, O L; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Bulten, H; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Capra, R; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cristinziani, M; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; Day, C T; De Groot, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dickopp, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, D; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eichenbaum, A M; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fan, S; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gaillard, J R; Galeazzi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Giroux, X; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Goetzen, K; Golubev, V B; Gopal, G P; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Grancagnolo, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Graziani, G; Green, M G; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Q H; Hadavand, H K; Hadig, T; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hodgkinson, M C; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; John, M J J; Johnson, J R; Judd, D; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelly, M P; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Kitayama, I; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kocian, M L; Koeneke, K; Kofler, R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kravchenko, E A; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Langenegger, U; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, H; Li, X; Libby, J; Lista, L; Liu, R; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; London, G W; Long, O; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mayer, B; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Messner, R; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Minamora, J S; Mir, L M; Mohanty, G B; Mohapatra, A K; Mommsen, R K; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morgan, S E; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the branching ratios of the Cabibbo-suppressed decays $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $K^+$ and $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $K^+$ %(measured with improved accuracy). relative to the Cabibbo-favored decay modes $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ and $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$ to be $ 0.044 \\pm 0.004 ~(\\textnormal{stat.})~ \\pm ~0.003 \\~(\\textnormal{syst.})$ and $ 0.039~ \\pm ~0.005 ~(\\textnormal{stat.})~ \\pm \\~0.003 ~(\\textnormal{syst.})$, respectively. We set an upper limit on the branching ratio at 90 % confidence level for $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $K^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to be $ 4.1 \\times ~10^{-2}$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ and for $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $K^+ \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ to be $ 2.0 \\times ~10^{-2}$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$. We also measure the branching fraction for the Cabibbo-favored mode $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Sigma^{0}$ $\\pi^+$ relative to $\\Lambda^+_c$ $\\to$ $\\Lambda$ $\\pi^+$ to be $0.977~ \\pm ~0.015 ~(\\textnorm...

  2. Revamping AK-Ashland gas cleaning system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, H.; Koerbel, R. [Mannesmann Demag Corp., Coraopolis, PA (United States); Haberkamp, K. [Mannesmann Demag Huttentechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Keeton, S. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AK Steel`s (formerly Armco) BOF shop was using a static precipitator for the primary collection. The system was designed for full combustion in the gas collecting hoods. No secondary dust collection was in place. A detailed study on alternative solutions led to a completely different system in 1990, and an order was awarded to Mannesmann Demag Corp. (MDC) in Dec. 1990. The new gas collection system is using suppressed combustion with the capability to collect Co at a later stage. The gas cleaning uses the Mannesmann Demag Baumco scrubber with a venturi throat for gas flow control. All auxiliary components, water treatment plant, electric substations and sludge handling were designed and supplied by MDC. The secondary dust collection covers the hot metal and scrap charging into the BOF`s, reladling, desulfurization and deslagging by a pulse jet baghouse. All emission limits set by the EPA and guaranteed by MDC have been met by the systems installed.

  3. Suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations and improvement of confinement due to current profile modification by biased electrode in Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Pal, Rabindranath [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF-Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ghosh, Joydeep; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvement of plasma confinement is achieved in normal q{sub a} discharges of SINP-tokamak by introducing a biased electrode inside the last closed flux surface. All the important features of high confinement mode are observed biasing the electrode negatively with respect to the vacuum vessel. Arrays of electric and magnetic probes introduced in the edge plasma region reveal suppression of electric and magnetic fluctuations over distinct frequency ranges as well as modification of the toroidal current profile due to biasing. Further analysis identifies the electrostatic fluctuations to be due to drift mode and the magnetic fluctuations may be of slow compressional Alfven waves. Both get suppressed due to current profile modification during biasing, hence leading to the improvement of plasma confinement.

  4. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T†-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallic phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.

  5. Suppression of high transverse momentum D mesons in central Pb--Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration; B. Abelev; J. Adam; D. Adamová; A. M. Adare; M. M. Aggarwal; G. Aglieri Rinella; A. G. Agocs; A. Agostinelli; S. Aguilar Salazar; Z. Ahammed; N. Ahmad; A. Ahmad Masoodi; S. U. Ahn; A. Akindinov; D. Aleksandrov; B. Alessandro; R. Alfaro Molina; A. Alici; A. Alkin; E. Almaráz Aviña; J. Alme; T. Alt; V. Altini; S. Altinpinar; I. Altsybeev; C. Andrei; A. Andronic; V. Anguelov; J. Anielski; C. Anson; T. Anticic; F. Antinori; P. Antonioli; L. Aphecetche; H. Appelshäuser; N. Arbor; S. Arcelli; A. Arend; N. Armesto; R. Arnaldi; T. Aronsson; I. C. Arsene; M. Arslandok; A. Asryan; A. Augustinus; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; J. Äystö; M. D. Azmi; M. Bach; A. Badalà; Y. W. Baek; R. Bailhache; R. Bala; R. Baldini Ferroli; A. Baldisseri; A. Baldit; F. Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa; J. Bán; R. C. Baral; R. Barbera; F. Barile; G. G. Barnaföldi; L. S. Barnby; V. Barret; J. Bartke; M. Basile; N. Bastid; S. Basu; B. Bathen; G. Batigne; B. Batyunya; C. Baumann; I. G. Bearden; H. Beck; I. Belikov; F. Bellini; R. Bellwied; E. Belmont-Moreno; G. Bencedi; S. Beole; I. Berceanu; A. Bercuci; Y. Berdnikov; D. Berenyi; D. Berzano; L. Betev; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; J. Bhom; N. Bianchi; L. Bianchi; C. Bianchin; J. Bielcík; J. Bielcíková; A. Bilandzic; S. Bjelogrlic; F. Blanco; F. Blanco; D. Blau; C. Blume; M. Boccioli; N. Bock; A. Bogdanov; H. Bøggild; M. Bogolyubsky; L. Boldizsár; M. Bombara; J. Book; H. Borel; A. Borissov; S. Bose; F. Bossú; M. Botje; S. Böttger; B. Boyer; E. Braidot; P. Braun-Munzinger; M. Bregant; T. Breitner; T. A. Browning; M. Broz; R. Brun; E. Bruna; G. E. Bruno; D. Budnikov; H. Buesching; S. Bufalino; K. Bugaiev; O. Busch; Z. Buthelezi; D. Caballero Orduna; D. Caffarri; X. Cai; H. Caines; E. Calvo Villar; P. Camerini; V. Canoa Roman; G. Cara Romeo; W. Carena; F. Carena; N. Carlin Filho; F. Carminati; C. A. Carrillo Montoya; A. Casanova Díaz; J. Castillo Castellanos; J. F. Castillo Hernandez; E. A. R. Casula; V. Catanescu; C. Cavicchioli; C. Ceballos Sanchez; J. Cepila; P. Cerello; B. Chang; S. Chapeland; J. L. Charvet; S. Chattopadhyay; S. Chattopadhyay; I. Chawla; M. Cherney; C. Cheshkov; B. Cheynis; V. Chibante Barroso; D. D. Chinellato; P. Chochula; M. Chojnacki; S. Choudhury; P. Christakoglou; C. H. Christensen; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; S. U. Chung; C. Cicalo; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; J. Cleymans; F. Coccetti; F. Colamaria; D. Colella; G. Conesa Balbastre; Z. Conesa del Valle; P. Constantin; G. Contin; J. G. Contreras; T. M. Cormier; Y. Corrales Morales; P. Cortese; I. Cortés Maldonado; M. R. Cosentino; F. Costa; M. E. Cotallo; E. Crescio; P. Crochet; E. Cruz Alaniz; E. Cuautle; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; H. H. Dalsgaard; A. Danu; K. Das; I. Das; D. Das; A. Dash; S. Dash; S. De; G. O. V. de Barros; A. De Caro; G. de Cataldo; J. de Cuveland; A. De Falco; D. De Gruttola; H. Delagrange; E. Del Castillo Sanchez; A. Deloff; V. Demanov; N. De Marco; E. Dénes; S. De Pasquale; A. Deppman; G. D Erasmo; R. de Rooij; M. A. Diaz Corchero; D. Di Bari; T. Dietel; C. Di Giglio; S. Di Liberto; A. Di Mauro; P. Di Nezza; R. Divià; Ø. Djuvsland; A. Dobrin; T. Dobrowolski; I. Domínguez; B. Dönigus; O. Dordic; O. Driga; A. K. Dubey; L. Ducroux; P. Dupieux; A. K. Dutta Majumdar; M. R. Dutta Majumdar; D. Elia; D. Emschermann; H. Engel; H. A. Erdal; B. Espagnon; M. Estienne; S. Esumi; D. Evans; G. Eyyubova; D. Fabris; J. Faivre; D. Falchieri; A. Fantoni; M. Fasel; R. Fearick; A. Fedunov; D. Fehlker; L. Feldkamp; D. Felea; B. Fenton-Olsen; G. Feofilov; A. Fernández Téllez; A. Ferretti; R. Ferretti; J. Figiel; M. A. S. Figueredo; S. Filchagin; D. Finogeev; F. M. Fionda; E. M. Fiore; M. Floris; S. Foertsch; P. Foka; S. Fokin; E. Fragiacomo; M. Fragkiadakis; U. Frankenfeld; U. Fuchs; C. Furget; M. Fusco Girard; J. J. Gaardhøje; M. Gagliardi; A. Gago; M. Gallio; D. R. Gangadharan; P. Ganoti; C. Garabatos; E. Garcia-Solis; I. Garishvili; J. Gerhard; M. Germain; C. Geuna; M. Gheata; A. Gheata; B. Ghidini; P. Ghosh; P. Gianotti; M. R. Girard; P. Giubellino; E. Gladysz-Dziadus; P. Glässel; R. Gomez; E. G. Ferreiro; L. H. González-Trueba; P. González-Zamora; S. Gorbunov; A. Goswami; S. Gotovac; V. Grabski; L. K. Graczykowski; R. Grajcarek; A. Grelli; C. Grigoras; A. Grigoras; V. Grigoriev; S. Grigoryan; A. Grigoryan; B. Grinyov; N. Grion; P. Gros; J. F. Grosse-Oetringhaus; J. -Y. Grossiord; R. Grosso; F. Guber; R. Guernane; C. Guerra Gutierrez; B. Guerzoni; M. Guilbaud; K. Gulbrandsen; T. Gunji; R. Gupta; A. Gupta; H. Gutbrod; Ø. Haaland; C. Hadjidakis; M. Haiduc; H. Hamagaki; G. Hamar; B. H. Han; L. D. Hanratty; A. Hansen; Z. Harmanova; J. W. Harris; M. Hartig; D. Hasegan; D. Hatzifotiadou; A. Hayrapetyan; S. T. Heckel; M. Heide; H. Helstrup; A. Herghelegiu; G. Herrera Corral; N. Herrmann; K. F. Hetland

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of the prompt charm mesons $D^0$, $D^+$, $D^{*+}$, and their antiparticles, was measured with the ALICE detector in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV per nucleon--nucleon collision. The $\\pt$-differential production yields in the range $2suppression by a factor 3-4, for transverse momenta larger than 5 GeV/c in the 20% most central collisions. The suppression is reduced for peripheral collisions.

  6. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T†-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallicmore »phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.« less

  7. D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from Fermilab experiment E791 on D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +} meson. In order to search for D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing, the authors use only D{sup 0} mesons from D{sup *+} decays in which case the charge of the pion from the D{sup *+} decay identifies the charm quantum number of the D{sup 0} at birth. When the D{sup 0} decays, the charge of the kaon identifies the charm quantum number and this way one can tell if mixing has occurred. This kind of search can be carried out by CLEO II as well and their conclusion was that there is some evidence of a wrong sign signal (0.77 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.25)% of the right sign signal. However, because of a lack of lifetime information, they cannot distinguish between doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays which are expected at the level of the observed signal and mixing. They use their excellent lifetime sensitivity to obtain separate limits. During the past year, the authors have been working on extracting D{sup +} doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay signals from E791`s data sample. These decays are interesting both because they have never been observed and because definite predictions have been made about their rates, based on models of D mesons and their decay mechanisms. Preliminary analyses of 1/3 of the data have now been completed. Figure 3 shows the Cabibbo-favored signal D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the next figure shows the signal in the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  8. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/105/3?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in High efficiency InGaN/GaN (2014); 10.1063/1.4867023 Effect of V-defects on the performance deterioration of InGaN/GaN multiple

  9. MRP4 knockdown enhances migration, suppresses apoptosis, and produces aggregated morphology in human retinal vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagami, Mizuki [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kusuhara, Sentaro, E-mail: kusu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Imai, Hisanori [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Uemura, Akiyoshi [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan) [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Vascular Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Honda, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Yasutomo; Negi, Akira [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery Related, Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous VEGF decreases MRP4 expression in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} MRP4 knockdown leads to enhanced cell migration. {yields} MRP4 knockdown suppresses caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis. {yields} MRP4 knockdown produces cell assembly and cell aggregation. -- Abstract: The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) MRP4/ABCC4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that actively effluxes endogenous and xenobiotic substrates out of cells. In the rodent retina, Mrp4 mRNA and protein are exclusively expressed in vascular endothelial cells, but the angiogenic properties of Mrp4 are poorly understood so far. This study aims to explore the angiogenic properties of MRP4 in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) utilizing the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. MRP4 expression was decreased at the mRNA and protein levels after stimulation with exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor in a dose-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated MRP4 knockdown in HRECs do not affect cell proliferation but enhances cell migration. Moreover, cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation was less prominent in MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs as compared to control siRNA-treated HRECs. In a Matrigel-based tube-formation assay, although MRP4 knockdown did not lead to a significant change in the total tube length, MRP4 siRNA-treated HRECs assembled and aggregated into a massive tube-like structure, which was not observed in control siRNA-treated HRECs. These results suggest that MRP4 is uniquely involved in retinal angiogenesis.

  10. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jian-Yong [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China) [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Huang, Yi [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Li, Ji-Peng [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Meng, Yan-Ling [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Yan, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Bian, Yong-Qian [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); Wang, Wei-Zhong, E-mail: weichang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi'an (China); and others

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  11. Change of caged dynamics at Tg in hydrated proteins found after suppressing the methyl-group rotation contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. Ngai; S. Capaccioli; A. Paciaroni

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional glassformers at sufficiently short times and low enough temperatures, molecules are mutually caged by the intermolecular potential. The fluctuation and dissipation from motion of caged molecules when observed by elastic incoherent neutron scattering exhibit a change in temperature dependence of the mean square displacement (MSD) at the glass transition temperature Tg. This is a general and fundamental property of caged dynamics in glassformers, which is observed always near Tg independent of the energy resolution of the spectrometer. Recently we showed the same change of T-dependence at Tg is present in proteins solvated with bioprotectants, coexisting with the dynamic transition at a higher temperature Td. In these solvated proteins, all having Tg and Td higher than the proteins hydrated by water alone, the observation of the change of T-dependence of the MSD at Tg is unobstructed by the methyl-group rotation contribution at lower temperatures. On the other hand, proteins hydrated by water alone have lower Tg and Td, and hence unambiguous evidence of the transition of MSD at Tg is hard to find. Notwithstanding, evidence on the break of the MSD at Tg can be found by deuterating the protein to suppress the methyl-group contribution. An alternative strategy is the use of a spectrometer that senses motions faster than 15 ps, which confers the benefit of shifting both the onset of methyl-group rotation contribution as well as the dynamic transition to higher temperatures, and again the change of MSD at Tg becomes evident. The break of the elastic intensity or the MSD at Tg coexists with the dynamics transition at Td in hydrated and solvated proteins. Recognition of this fact helps to remove inconsistency and conundrum encountered in interpreting the data that thwart progress in understanding the origin of the dynamic transition and its connection to biological function.

  12. Top-Down Suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, JA; Zanto, TP

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cortex contribute to top-down modulation of visual2003). Neural mechanisms of top-down control during spatialC. D. , & Li, W. (2013). Top-down influences on visual

  13. Amplitude death in coupled slow and fast dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajari Gupta; G. Ambika

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how mismatch between dynamical time scales of interacting identical systems can result in the suppression of collective dynamics leading to amplitude death. We find that the inability of the interacting systems to fall in step leads to difference in phase as well as change in amplitude. If the mismatch is small, the systems settle to a frequency synchronised state with constant phase difference. But as mismatch in time scale increases, the systems have to compromise to a state of no oscillations. We establish that this regime of amplitude death exists in a net work of identical systems also for sufficient number of slow systems. For standard nonlinear systems, the regions of quenched dynamics in the parameter plane and the transition curves are studied analytically and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  14. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun-nudt@126.com; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)] [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  15. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  16. Library System Library System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Library System #12;Library System 5150 Anthony Wayne Drive David Adamany Undergraduate Library that for the current fiscal year, we've been given an additional $600,000 for our library materials budget. We're very subscriptions. The Wayne State University Libraries are deeply committed to providing our faculty and students

  17. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Il-Rae [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Whan [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Horio, Yoshiyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Oh, Sangtaek [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Fermentation Fusion Science and Technology, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin in the cells. Finally, activation of SIRT1 inhibited the proliferation of Panc-PAUF cells by down-regulation of cyclin-D1, a target molecule of {beta}-catenin. These results suggest that SIRT1 activation may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF via the down-regulation of {beta}-catenin.

  18. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurements with x-ray optics. Part 1: Review of LTP errorsprecise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Inst. and Meth. Ameasurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for

  19. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritiuim Faciity Safety Significant Fire Suppression System, November 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y earEnergy T H E Dofitems purchased

  20. Gasification Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SYSTEMS Gasi cation Systems Advanced Combustion Systems Advanced Turbines Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Plant Optimization Coal Utilization Sciences University Training and Research...

  1. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uli Walther

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of A-hypergemetric systems. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems ... Power series ansatz: z = ?. ? k=0 aktk shows ak ? vj >0 vj ?1. ? l=0.

  2. Suppression of conductivity in Mn-doped ZnO thin films W. M. Hlaing Oo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    in the films.6 II. EXPERIMENTAL A cold-wall Emcore MOCVD system at Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory be tackled by using appropriately designed main and dopant precursors that decompose at similar tem

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kageyama, Ken, E-mail: kageyamaken0112@gmail.com; Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: loveakirayamamoto@gmail.com; Okuma, Tomohisa, E-mail: o-kuma@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Hamamoto, Shinichi, E-mail: hamashin_tigers1975@yahoo.co.jp; Takeshita, Toru, E-mail: takeshita3595@view.ocn.ne.jp; Sakai, Yukimasa, E-mail: sakaiy@trust.ocn.ne.jp; Nishida, Norifumi, E-mail: norifumin@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tmatsuoka@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio, E-mail: yukio.miki@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Osaka City University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)] [Osaka City University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  4. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  5. Neutral Beam Power System for TPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Bowen, O.N.; O`Conner, T.; Edwards, J.; Fromm, N.; Hatcher, R.; Newman, R.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; von Halle, A.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements.

  6. Results from a Prototype MAPS Sensor Telescope and Readout Systemwith Zero Suppression for the Heavy Flavor Tracker at STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Ritter, Hans G.; Rose, AndrewA.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal A.; Thomas, James H.; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard H.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a three Mimostar-2 Monolithic Active PixelSensor (MAPS) sensor telescope prototype with an accompanying readoutsystem incorporating on-the-fly data sparsification. The system has beencharacterized and we report on the measured performance of the sensortelescope and readout system in beam tests conducted both at the AdvancedLight Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and inthe STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Thiseffort is part of the development and prototyping work that will lead toa vertex detector for the STAR experiment.

  7. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallic phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.

  8. Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing ERK activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Li, Jinqing; Dong, Xiaoyu; Potts, Jay D. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)] [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Tang, Dong-Qi [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Li, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: dsli@yymc.edu.cn [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China)] [Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, Tai He Hospital, Yunyang Medical College, 32 S. Renmin Rd., Shiyan, Hubei 442000 (China); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)] [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation. We have recently demonstrated that a DUB of ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) inhibits vascular lesion formation via suppressing inflammatory responses in vasculature. However, the precise underlying mechanism remains to be defined. Herein, we report that a posttranscriptional up-regulation of UCH-L1 provides a negative feedback to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In rat adult VSMCs, adenoviral over-expression of UCH-L1 inhibited TNF{alpha}-induced activation of ERK and DNA synthesis. In contrast, over-expression of UCH-L1 did not affect platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced VSMC proliferation and activation of growth stimulating cascades including ERK. TNF{alpha} hardly altered UCH-L1 mRNA expression and stability; however, up-regulated UCH-L1 protein expression via increasing UCH-L1 translation. These results uncover a novel mechanism by which UCH-L1 suppresses vascular inflammation.

  9. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan) [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Department of Pharmacy, Nara Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, 1248-1 Ikoma, Nara 630-0293 (Japan); Tsubaki, Masanobu [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Yamazoe, Yuzuru [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Kinki University Hospital, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Ogaki, Mitsuhiko [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Higahiosaka City General Hospital, Higashi-osaka, Osaka 578-8588 (Japan); Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan)] [Department of Pathology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osakasayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Kusunoki, Takashi [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Otolaryngology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Shozo, E-mail: nishida@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kinki University School of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  10. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Demir, Hilmi Volkan, E-mail: EXWSUN@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  11. Long-time electron spin storage via dynamical suppression of hyperfine-induced decoherence in a quantum dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the nuclear spin environment in a quantum dot can be substantially increased by subjecting the electron and characterized. The impact of system and control nonidealities is also assessed, including the effect.125336 PACS number s : 03.67.Pp, 03.65.Yz, 75.10.Jm, 02.60.Cb I. INTRODUCTION Electron and nuclear spin

  12. Computer System,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    undergraduate summer institute http:institutes.lanl.govistisummer-school 2015 Computer System, Cluster, and Networking Summer Institute Purpose The Computer System,...

  13. Multiple channel data acquisition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawley, H. Bert (Ames, IA); Rosenberg, Eli I. (Ames, IA); Meyer, W. Thomas (Ames, IA); Gorbics, Mark S. (Ames, IA); Thomas, William D. (Boone, IA); McKay, Roy L. (Ames, IA); Homer, Jr., John F. (Ames, IA)

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple channel data acquisition system for the transfer of large amounts of data from a multiplicity of data channels has a plurality of modules which operate in parallel to convert analog signals to digital data and transfer that data to a communications host via a FASTBUS. Each module has a plurality of submodules which include a front end buffer (FEB) connected to input circuitry having an analog to digital converter with cache memory for each of a plurality of channels. The submodules are interfaced with the FASTBUS via a FASTBUS coupler which controls a module bus and a module memory. The system is triggered to effect rapid parallel data samplings which are stored to the cache memories. The cache memories are uploaded to the FEBs during which zero suppression occurs. The data in the FEBs is reformatted and compressed by a local processor during transfer to the module memory. The FASTBUS coupler is used by the communications host to upload the compressed and formatted data from the module memory. The local processor executes programs which are downloaded to the module memory through the FASTBUS coupler.

  14. Multiple channel data acquisition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawley, H.B.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Meyer, W.T.; Gorbics, M.S.; Thomas, W.D.; McKay, R.L.; Homer, J.F. Jr.

    1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple channel data acquisition system for the transfer of large amounts of data from a multiplicity of data channels has a plurality of modules which operate in parallel to convert analog signals to digital data and transfer that data to a communications host via a FASTBUS. Each module has a plurality of submodules which include a front end buffer (FEB) connected to input circuitry having an analog to digital converter with cache memory for each of a plurality of channels. The submodules are interfaced with the FASTBUS via a FASTBUS coupler which controls a module bus and a module memory. The system is triggered to effect rapid parallel data samplings which are stored to the cache memories. The cache memories are uploaded to the FEBs during which zero suppression occurs. The data in the FEBs is reformatted and compressed by a local processor during transfer to the module memory. The FASTBUS coupler is used by the communications host to upload the compressed and formatted data from the module memory. The local processor executes programs which are downloaded to the module memory through the FASTBUS coupler. 25 figs.

  15. Microfluidic Systems Integrated Microfluidic Systems**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Microfluidic Systems Integrated Microfluidic Systems** Rustem F. Ismagilov* Keywords: analytical methods · enzymes · microfluidics · microreactors · protein structures Microfluidic systems use networks of channels thinner than a human hair to manipulate nanoliter volumes of re- agents. The goal of microfluidics

  16. Suppression of energy-relaxation-induced decoherence in ?-type three-level SQUID flux qubits: A dark-state approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I; Han, Siyuan

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ), decoherence induced by energy re- laxation does not pose a serious problem as long as the junc- tion’s effective resistance is reasonably high. For instance, for a rf SQUID qubit with a moderate damping resistance R=10 MV the energy relaxation time T1 could... by spontaneous decay from the auxiliary level.13,14 For a L-type three-level system without dissipation, the dark state uDl=cos ustdu0l?sin ustdu1l is an eigenstate of the system, here tan ustd;V0std /V1std is the ratio of the two Rabi frequencies for the ui=0,1l...

  17. Two-photon interference from a quantum dot--microcavity: Persistent pure-dephasing and suppression of time-jitter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Unsleber; Dara P. S. McCutcheon; Michael Dambach; Matthias Lermer; Niels Gregersen; Sven Höfling; Jesper Mørk; Christian Schneider; Martin Kamp

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the emission of highly indistinguishable photons from a quasi-resonantly pumped coupled quantum dot--microcavity system operating in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Changing the sample temperature allows us to vary the quantum dot--cavity detuning, and on spectral resonance we observe a three-fold improvement in the Hong--Ou--Mandel interference visibility, reaching values in excess of 80\\%. Our measurements off-resonance allow us to investigate varying Purcell enhancements, and to probe the dephasing environment at different temperatures and energy scales. By comparison with our microscopic model, we are able to identify pure-dephasing and not time-jitter as the dominating source of imperfections in our system.

  18. Theoretical study of the dual harmonic system and its application on the CSNS/RCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Yao-Shuo; Xu, Shou-Yan; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Sheng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dual harmonic system has been widely used in high intensity proton synchrotrons to suppress the space charge effect, as well as reduce the beam loss. To investigate the longitudinal beam dynamics in the dual rf system, the potential well, the sub-buckets in the bunch and the multi-solutions of the phase equation have been studied theoretically. Based on these theoretical studis, the optimization of bunching factor and rf voltage waveform are made for the dual harmonic rf system in the upgrade phase of the CSNS/RCS. In the optimization process, the simulation with space charge effect is done by using a newly developed code C-SCSIM.

  19. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and induction of endogenous mda-7 mRNA by combination treatment did not result in significant intracellular MDA-7 protein. Radiation hybrid mapping assigned the mda-7 gene to human chromosome 1q, at 1q 32.2 to 1q41, an area containing a cluster of genes associated with the IL-10 family of cytokines. Mda-7 represents a differentiation, growth and apoptosis associated gene with potential utility for the gene-based therapy of diverse human cancers.

  20. A novel shogaol analog suppresses cancer cell invasion and inflammation, and displays cytoprotective effects through modulation of NF-?B and Nrf2-Keap1 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Fei-Fei; Ling, Hui; Ang, Xiaohui; Reddy, Shridhivya A.; Lee, Stephanie S-H.; Yang, Hong; Tan, Sock-Hoon [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Hayes, John D. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Chui, Wai-Keung [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Chew, Eng-Hui, E-mail: phaceh@nus.edu.sg [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural compounds containing vanilloid and Michael acceptor moieties appear to possess anti-cancer and chemopreventive properties. The ginger constituent shogaol represents one such compound. In this study, the anti-cancer potential of a synthetic novel shogaol analog 3-phenyl-3-shogaol (3-Ph-3-SG) was assessed by evaluating its effects on signaling pathways. At non-toxic concentrations, 3-Ph-3-SG suppressed cancer cell invasion in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells through inhibition of PMA-activated MMP-9 expression. At similar concentrations, 3-Ph-3-SG reduced expression of the inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostanglandin-E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. Inhibition of cancer cell invasion and inflammation by 3-Ph-3-SG were mediated through suppression of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-?B) signaling pathway. The 3-Ph-3-SG also demonstrated cytoprotective effects by inducing the antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven genes NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cytoprotection by 3-Ph-3-SG was achieved at least partly through modification of cysteine residues in the E3 ubiquitin ligase substrate adaptor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which resulted in accumulation of transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The activities of 3-Ph-3-SG were comparable to those of 6-shogaol, the most abundant naturally-occurring shogaol, and stronger than those of 4-hydroxyl-null deshydroxy-3-phenyl-3-shogaol, which attested the importance of the 4-hydroxy substituent in the vanilloid moiety for bioactivity. In summary, 3-Ph-3-SG is shown to possess activities that modulate stress-associated pathways relevant to multiple steps in carcinogenesis. Therefore, it warrants further investigation of this compound as a promising candidate for use in chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive strategies. - Highlights: • Novel shogaol 3-phenyl-3-shogaol suppressed cancer cell invasion and inflammation. • Anti-invasive and anti-inflammatory effects were NF-?B-dependent. • 3-Phenyl-3-shogaol induced ARE-driven genes to achieve cytoprotection. • Cytoprotective effects were brought about by modification of cysteines in Keap1. • Chemopreventive activities of 3-phenyl-3-shogaol and 6-shogaol were comparable.

  1. Scaling patterns for the suppression of charged hadron yields in Pb+Pb collisions at Root_s = 2.76 TeV: Constraints on transport coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey; N. N. Ajitanand; J. M. Alexander; J. Jia; A. Taranenko

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppression measurements for charged hadrons are used to investigate the path length (L) and transverse momentum (p_T) dependent jet quenching patterns of the hot and dense QCD medium produced in Pb+Pb collisions at Root_s =2.76 TeV at the LHC. The observed scaling patterns, which are similar to those observed for Au+Au collisions at Root_s = 0.20 TeV at RHIC, show the trends predicted for jet-medium interactions dominated by radiative energy loss. They also allow a simple estimate of the transport coefficient $\\hat{q}$, which suggests that the medium produced in LHC collisions is somewhat less opaque than that produced at RHIC, if the same parton-medium coupling strength is assumed. The higher temperature produced in LHC collisions could reduce the parton-medium coupling strength to give identical values for $\\hat{q}$ in LHC and RHIC collisions.

  2. Mechanisms of tolerance in murine radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Nonspecific suppression of alloreactivity by spleen cells from early, but not late, chimeras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auchincloss, H. Jr.; Sachs, D.H.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allogeneic chimeras were prepared using lethally irradiated B6 hosts and untreated marrow from exsanguinated BALB/c donors. For about two months after reconstitution, chimeras had very weak antihost cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) reactivity and little third-party alloreactivity. During this time a cell population capable of suppressing CML reactivity against both host and third-party alloantigens (i.e., antigen-nonspecific) was demonstrated in chimera spleens by in vitro mixing experiments. The putative suppressor cells were Thy-1-negative and radiation-sensitive. Subsequently, mature chimeras showed host tolerance and strong third-party alloreactivity. At this point suppressor mechanisms could no longer be demonstrated. These data are consistent with a clonal elimination hypothesis in that they do not provide evidence to indicate that maintenance of specific immune tolerance is mediated by an active suppressor mechanism.

  3. Suppression of inclusive J/$\\mathbf?$ and $\\mathbf?$(2S) production in p-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswarup Paul; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALICE Collaboration has studied inclusive J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV with the Muon Spectrometer. The measurement was performed at forward (2.03 $nuclear modification factor of J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) has been measured as a function of transverse momentum and event activity. Theoretical models based on nuclear shadowing, coherent energy loss or both are in reasonable agreement with the J/$\\psi$ results but cannot describe the $\\psi$(2S) behaviour. Other mechanisms must be invoked in order to explain the $\\psi$(2S) suppression in p-Pb collisions.

  4. Suppression pattern of neutral pions at high transverse momentum in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and constraints on medium transport coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV we measure neutral pion production with good statistics for transverse momentum, p_T, up to 20 GeV/c. A fivefold suppression is found, which is essentially constant for 5 transport coefficient of the medium, e.g. \\mean(q^hat) in the parton quenching model. The spectral shape is similar for all collision classes, and the suppression does not saturate in Au+Au collisions; instead, it increases proportional to the number of participating nucleons, as N_part^2/3.

  5. Dark-state suppression and optimization of laser cooling and fluorescence in a trapped alkaline-earth-metal single ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lindvall; M. Merimaa; I. Tittonen; A. A. Madej

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and destabilization of dark states in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion caused by the cooling and repumping laser fields required for Doppler cooling and fluorescence detection of the ion. By numerically solving the time-dependent density matrix equations for the eight-level system consisting of the sublevels of the 5s 2S1/2, 5p 2P1/2, and 4d 2D3/2 states, we analyze the different types of dark states and how to prevent them in order to maximize the scattering rate, which is crucial for both the cooling and the detection of the ion. The influence of the laser linewidths and ion motion on the scattering rate and the dark resonances is studied. The calculations are then compared with experimental results obtained with an endcap ion trap system located at the National Research Council of Canada and found to be in good agreement. The results are applicable also to other alkaline earth ions and isotopes without hyperfine structure.

  6. Measurement of jet suppression in central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) spectrum and nuclear modification factor ($R_{\\rm AA}$) of reconstructed jets in 0-10% and 10-30% central Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV were measured. Jets were reconstructed from charged and neutral particles, utilizing the ALICE tracking detectors and Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal), with the anti-$k_{\\rm T}$ jet algorithm with a resolution parameter of R=0.2. The jet $p_{\\rm T}$ spectra are reported in the pseudorapidity interval of $|{\\eta}_{\\rm jet}|5$ GeV/$c$ to suppress jets constructed from the combinatorial background in Pb-Pb collisions. The effect of the leading charged particle requirement has been studied in both pp and Pb-Pb collisions and has been shown to have negligible effects on the $R_{\\rm AA}$ within the uncertainties of the measurement. The nuclear modification factor is obtained by dividing the jet spectrum measured in Pb-Pb by that in pp collisions scaled by the number of independent nucleon-nucleon collisions estimated using a Glauber model. $R_{\\rm AA}$ is found to be $0.28\\pm0.04$ in 0-10% and $0.35\\pm0.04$ in 10-30% collisions, independent of $p_{\\rm T,jet}$ within the uncertainties of the measurement. The observed suppression is in fair agreement with expectations from two model calculations with different approaches to jet quenching.

  7. Thermalization and decoherence in open Majorana systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earl T. Campbell

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling to a thermal bath leads to thermalisation and decoherence of stored quantum information. For a system of Gaussian fermions, the fermionic analog of linear or Gaussian optics, these dynamics can be elegantly and efficiently described by evolution of the system's covariance matrix. Taking both system and bath to be Gaussian fermionic, we observe that thermalization and decoherence occurs at a rate that is independent of the bath temperature. Furthermore, we also consider a weak coupling regime where the dynamics are Markovian. We present a microscopic derivation of Markovian master equations entirely in the language of covariance matrices, where temperature independence remains manifest. This is radically different from behaviour seen in other scenarios, such as when fermions interact with a bosonic bath. Our analysis applies to many Majorana fermion systems that have been heralded as very robust, topologically protected, qubits. In these systems, it has been claimed that thermal decoherence can be exponentially suppressed by reducing temperature, but we find Gaussian decoherence cannot be cooled away.

  8. Exterior Differential Systems for Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estabrook, Frank B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cartan forms and Exterior Differential Systems, set in the state space of field and potential variables taken together with four space-time variables, are formulated for Maxwell, SU(2), SU(3) and SU(4) classical gauge theories minimally coupled to Dirac spinor multiplets. Their Cartan character tables are calculated, showing the EDS, and so the Euler-Lagrange partial differential equations, of the first of these to be well posed. That theory anticipates QED. In the other cases, only if the Dirac fields' conserved currents are suppressed as sources for the Yang-Mills fields is a well posed EDS found. PACS numbers: 02.30.Xx 02.40.Hw 03.50.De 03.50.-z

  9. 5f delocalization-induced suppression of quadrupolar order in U(Pd1-xPtx)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, H. C.; Le, M. D.; McEwen, K. A.; Bleckmann, M.; Süllow, S.; Mazzoli, C.; Wilkins, S. B.; Fort, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present bulk magnetic and transport measurements and x-ray resonant scattering measurements on U(Pd1-xPtx)? for x=0.005 and 0.01, which demonstrate the high sensitivity of the quadrupolar order in the canonical antiferroquadrupolar ordered system UPd? to doping with platinum. Bulk measurements for x=0.005 reveal behavior similar to that seen in UPd?, albeit at a lower temperature, and x-ray resonant scattering provides evidence of quadrupolar order described by the Qxy order parameter. In contrast, bulk measurements reveal only an indistinct transition in x=0.01, consistent with the observation of short-range quadrupolar order in our x-ray resonant scattering results.

  10. Formation of paramagnetic species upon radiolysis of a polycarbonate-poly(butylene terephthalate) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, A.Yu.; Fel`dman, V.I.; Sukhov, F.F. [Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of paramagnetic species upon low-temperature radiolysis of a polycarbonate-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PC-PBTP) system was studied by ESR spectroscopy. The radiation-chemical yields of paramagnetic species in pure polymers and their blends with various blending times were measured. The decrease of G values for samples with a long blending time was explained by the suppression of formation of neutral radicals from the PC units. The formation of CO-separated radical pairs, which result from the PC fragments, is suppressed efficiently as the blending time increases. It is concluded that the spectral parameters of the radical pairs are the most sensitive features to the change in the microenvironment of the radiolysis products.

  11. System Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

  12. Ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced HIF-1? protein synthesis by inhibition of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Cho, Hyun-Ji [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of); Magae, Junji [Magae Bioscience Institute, 49-4 Fujimidai, Tsukuba 300-1263 (Japan); Lee, In-Kyu [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun-Gyu, E-mail: kpark@knu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Young-Chae, E-mail: ycchang@cu.ac.kr [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 plays an important role in tumor progression, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the potential molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-angiogenic effect of ascofuranone, an isoprenoid antibiotic from Ascochyta viciae, in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-1 responsive human breast cancer cells. Ascofuranone significantly and selectively suppressed EGF-induced HIF-1? protein accumulation, whereas it did not affect the expression of HIF-1?. Furthermore, ascofuranone inhibited the transcriptional activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by reducing protein HIF-1?. Mechanistically, we found that the inhibitory effects of ascofuranone on HIF-1? protein expression are associated with the inhibition of synthesis HIF-1? through an EGF-dependent mechanism. In addition, ascofuranone suppressed EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6 kinase, but the phosphorylation of ERK/JNK/p38 kinase was not affected by ascofuranone. These results suggest that ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced HIF-1? protein translation through the inhibition of Akt/mTOR/p70S6 kinase signaling pathways and plays a novel role in the anti-angiogenic action. - Highlights: • Inhibitory effect of ascofuranone on HIF-1? expression is EGF-specific regulation. • Ascofuranone decreases HIF-1? protein synthesis through Akt/mTOR pathways. • Ascofuranone suppresses EGF-induced VEGF production and tumor angiogenesis.

  13. A photon detector system for the search for the rare muon decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ausdeln, L.A.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and state of the art pair spectrometer system to measure the photon component of {mu}{sup +} decay to obtain an improved branching ratio limit for the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is investigated. Analysis algorithms are developed and an experimental inner bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained and agrees well with Monte Carlo simulations. Background sources are investigated and found to be highly suppressed at various stages of acquisition and analysis.

  14. Demonstration of Open Quantum System Optimal Control in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah Sheldon; David G. Cory

    2015-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to transfer polarization from electron spins to nuclear spins. The resulting nuclear polarization enhancement can, in theory, be two or three orders of magnitude depending on the sample. In solid state systems, however, there are competing mechanisms of DNP, which, when occurring simultaneously, reduce the net polarization enhancement of the nuclear spin. We present a simple quantum description of DNP and apply optimal control theory (OCT) with an open quantum system framework to design pulses that select one DNP process and suppress the others. We demonstrate experimentally an order of magnitude improvement in the DNP enhancement using OCT pulses.

  15. Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shuang; Sullivan, Maurice O.; Hui, Rongqing

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex-optical-field lidar system for range and vector velocity measurement Shuang Gao,1,2 Maurice O’Sullivan,3 and Rongqing Hui2,* 1Department of Electronic Engineering and Information Science, University of Science and Technology of China... lidar system based on the measurement of complex optical field is demonstrated for the first time. An electro-optic in- phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator is used in the lidar transmitter to realize carrier-suppressed complex optical field modulation...

  16. A DC-81-indole conjugate agent suppresses melanoma A375 cell migration partially via interrupting VEGF production and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Ming-Chu [Graduate Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hu, Wan-Ping [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yu, Hsin-Su [Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Chuan [Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Long-Sen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ying-Hsien, E-mail: danyhkao@gmail.com [Department of Medical Research, E-DA Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jeh-Jeng, E-mail: jjwang@kmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) chemicals are antitumor antibiotics inhibiting nucleic acid synthesis. An indole carboxylate-PBD hybrid with six-carbon spacer structure (IN6CPBD) has been previously demonstrated to induce melanoma cell apoptosis and reduce metastasis in mouse lungs. This study aimed at investigating the efficacy of the other hybrid compound with four-carbon spacer (IN4CPBD) and elucidating its anti-metastatic mechanism. Human melanoma A375 cells with IN4CPBD treatment underwent cytotoxicity and apoptosis-associated assays. Transwell migration assay, Western blotting, and ELISA were used for mechanistic study. IN4CPBD exhibited potent melanoma cytotoxicity through interrupting G1/S cell cycle progression, increasing DNA fragmentation and hypodipoidic DNA contents, and reducing mitochondrial membrane potential. Caspase activity elevation suggested that both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were involved in IN4CPBD-induced melanoma apoptosis. IN4CPBD up-regulated p53 and p21, thereby concomitantly derailing the equilibrium between Bcl-2 and Bax levels. Transwell migration assay demonstrated that stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}) stimulated A375 cell motility, while kinase inhibitors treatment confirmed that Rho/ROCK, Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways were involved in SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced melanoma migration. IN4CPBD not only abolished the SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced chemotactic motility but also suppressed constitutive MMP-9 and VEGF expression. Mechanistically, IN4CPBD down-regulated Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK total proteins and MYPT1 phosphorylation. In conclusion, beyond the fact that IN4CPBD induces melanoma cell apoptosis at cytotoxic dose, the interruption in the VEGF expression and the SDF-1{alpha}-related signaling at cytostatic dose may partially constitute the rationale for its in vivo anti-metastatic potency. - Research Highlights: > A novel carboxylate-PBD hybrid as anti-melanoma drug. > IN4CPBD interrupts melanoma cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis. > IN4CPBD suppresses SDF-1{alpha}-enhanced signaling and melanoma migration. > IN4CPBD abolishes angiogenic factor production and chemotactic effect of SDF-1{alpha}. > This drug is clinically applicable to melanoma therapy.

  17. Suppression of activation energy and superconductivity by the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Qasim, Irfan; Mumtaz, M.; Zubair, M.; Nadeem, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, FBAS, International Islamic University (IIU) Islamabad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Khurram, A. A. [Experimental Physics Labs, National Centre for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Low anisotropic (Cu{sub 0.5}Tl{sub 0.5})Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10??} (CuTl-1223) high T{sub c} superconducting matrix was synthesized by solid-state reaction and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared separately by co-precipitation method. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were added with different concentrations during the final sintering cycle of CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix to get the required (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub y}/CuTl-1223, y?=?0.0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.5?wt.?%, composites. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, and dc-resistivity (?) measurements. The activation energy and superconductivity were suppressed with increasing concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles in (CuTl-1223) matrix. The XRD analysis showed that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles did not affect the crystal structure of the parent CuTl-1223 superconducting phase. The suppression of activation energy and superconducting properties is most probably due to weak flux pinning in the samples. The possible reason of weak flux pinning is reduction of weak links and enhanced inter-grain coupling due to the presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries. The presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles at the grain boundaries possibly reduced the number of flux pinning centers, which were present in the form of weak links in the pure CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix. The increase in the values of inter-grain coupling (?) deduced from the fluctuation induced conductivity analysis with the increased concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles is a theoretical evidence of improved inter-grain coupling.

  18. Real-time system for imaging and object detection with a multistatic GPR array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N Reginald; Bond, Steven W; Top, Philip L; Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Donetti, John G; Mason, Blake C; Jones, Steven M

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  19. INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SYSTEMS Providing an efficient, seamless virtual work environment To accelerate progress toward mission goals, our business and operations processes will be aggressively...

  20. Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    by their very nature represent a reduced fire hazard compared to dry filter booth systems. NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) fire safety codes require the use of fire suppression automatic sprinklers on dry filter booths but not on water wash booths...Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs Mike McGinness VP-R&D EcoShield Environmental Systems, Inc. Houston, Texas ABSTRACT HAP (Hazardous Air Pollutant) and VOC (Volatile...

  1. Emergency cooling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

  2. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Chunxia [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Yi, Bin, E-mail: yibin1974@163.com [Department of Anesthesia, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China) [Department of Anesthesia, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Bai, Li [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)] [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Xia, Yongzhi [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)] [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Feng, Hua [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  3. Atomic Beam Merging and Suppression of Alkali Contaminants in Multi Body High Power Targets: Design and Test of Target and Ion Source Prototypes at ISOLDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouquerel, Elian J A; Lettry, J; Stora, T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of high power ISOL-facilities will deliver intense and pure radioactive ion beams. Two key issues of developments mandatory for the forthcoming generation of ISOL target-ion source units are assessed and demonstrated in this thesis. The design and production of target and ion-source prototypes is described and dedicated measurements at ISOLDE-CERN of their radioisotope yields are analyzed. The purity of short lived or rare radioisotopes suffer from isobaric contaminants, notably alkalis which are highly volatile and easily ionized elements. Therefore, relying on their chemical nature, temperature controlled transfer lines were equipped with a tube of quartz that aimed at trapping these unwanted elements before they reached the ion source. The successful application yields high alkali-suppression factors for several elements (ie: 80, 82mRb, 126, 142Cs, 8Li, 46K, 25Na, 114In, 77Ga, 95, 96Sr) for quartz temperatures between 300ºC and 1100ºC. The enthalpies of adsorption on quartz were measu...

  4. The Superfluid State of a Bose Liquid as a Superposition of a Suppressed Bose-Eistein Condensate and an Intensive Pair Coherent Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Pashitskii; S. V. Mashkevich; S. I. Vilchynskyy

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent model of the superfluid (SF) state of a Bose liquid with strong interaction between bosons is considered, in which at T=0, along with a weak single-particle Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), there exists an intensive pair coherent condensate (PCC) of bosons, analogous to the Cooper pair condensate of fermions. Such a PCC emerges due to an effective attraction between bosons in some regions of momentum space, which results from an oscillating sign-changing momentum dependence of the Fourier component V(p) of the interaction potential. The collective many-body effects of renormalization ("screening") of the initial interaction, which are described by the bosonic polarization operator \\Pi(p,\\omega), lead to a suppression of the repulsion [V(p)>0] and an enhancement of the effective attraction [V(p)energy parts is obtained with account for the terms of first order in the BEC density. In the framework of the ``soft spheres'' model with the single fitting parameter--the value of the repulsion potential at r=0, a theoretical quasiparticle spectrum E(p) is obtained, which is in good accordance with the experimental spectrum E_{exp}(p) of elementary excitations in superfluid $^4$He.

  5. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhengrong [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhan Wenhua [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)]. E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhu Baohe [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); He Yulong [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Peng Junsheng [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai Shirong [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Ma Jinping [Department of Gastrointestinopancreatic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Gastric Center of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  6. Suppression of the spin pumping in Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with nano-oxide layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Duck-Ho; Kim, Hong-Hyoun; You, Chun-Yeol [Department of Physics, Inha University, Namgu Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the spin pumping effect can be effectively suppressed with a nano-oxide layer. Spin pumping effect manifests itself by an enhancement of the Gilbert damping parameter in normal metal/ferromagnetic hetero-structures, while many spintronics devices prefer smaller damping parameter. Since the spin pumping effect is directly related with the spin dependent interface conductance, we can modify the spin pumping by altering the interface conductance with the nano-oxide layer. We prepared series of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers with different pausing time between Pd and Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} depositions in order to control the interface conductance. The Gilbert damping parameters are determined from the line-width measurements in the ferromagnetic resonance spectra for each pausing time sample. They are 0.0490, 0.0296, 0.0278, and 0.0251 for 0, 6, 30, and 60 s pausing time, respectively. We find that the damping parameter of Pd/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} is almost recovered to one of the Cu/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayer with 60 s pausing time, while the static magnetic properties are not noticeably changed.

  7. Power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  8. Time Reversal Symmetry and Energy Drift in Conservative Systems L. Brugnano and D. Trigiante

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brugnano, Luigi

    effects among multiple Savonius turbines J. Renewable Sustainable Energy 4, 053107 (2012) Suppressing on

  9. Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heim, Robert R; Adams, Scott Ryan; Cole, Matthew Denver; Kirby, William E; Linnebur, Paul Damon

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for dismantling a nuclear reactor are described. In one aspect the system includes a remotely controlled heavy manipulator ("manipulator") operatively coupled to a support structure, and a control station in a non-contaminated portion of a workspace. The support structure provides the manipulator with top down access into a bioshield of a nuclear reactor. At least one computing device in the control station provides remote control to perform operations including: (a) dismantling, using the manipulator, a graphite moderator, concrete walls, and a ceiling of the bioshield, the manipulator being provided with automated access to all internal portions of the bioshield; (b) loading, using the manipulator, contaminated graphite blocks from the graphite core and other components from the bioshield into one or more waste containers; and (c) dispersing, using the manipulator, dust suppression and contamination fixing spray to contaminated matter.

  10. Optimized Dynamical Decoupling in ?-Type n-Level Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linping Chan; Shuang Cong

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we first design a type of Bang-Bang (BB) operation group to reduce the phase decoherence in a {\\Xi}-type n-level quantum system based on the dynamical decoupling mechanism. Then, we derive two kinds of dynamical decoupling schemes: periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) and Uhrig dynamical decoupling (UDD). We select the non-diagonal element of density matrix as a reference index, and investigate the behavior of quantum coherence of the {\\Xi}-type n-level atom under these two dynamical decoupling schemes proposed. At last, we choose a {\\Xi}-type six-level atom as a system controlled, and use the decoupling schemes proposed to suppress the phase decoherence. The simulation experiments and the comparison results are given.

  11. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  12. Battery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

  13. Systems List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems List. General Computing Servers: Hostname: bers.math.purdue.edu. Sun Microsystems Sun Fire V210 2 x 1.002 GHz UltraSPARC IIIi processors (total

  14. Propofol pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in cultured hepatocytes by suppressing MAPK/ERK activity and NF-{kappa}B translocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jawan, Bruno [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Kao, Y.-H. [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Goto, Shigeru [Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Iwao Hospital, 3059-1 Kawakami, Yufuin, Oita 879-5102 (Japan); Pan, M.-C. [Department of Anesthesiology and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-C.; Hsu, L.-W.; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, C.-Y.; Sun, C.-K.; Cheng, Y.-F. [Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, 123 Ta-Pei Road, Niao-Sung Hsiang, Kaohsiung Hsien 833, Taiwan (China); Tai, M.-H. [Department of Biological Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research and Education, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, 386 Ta-Chung 1st Road, Kaohsiung 813, Taiwan (China)] (and others)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Propofol (PPF), a widely used intravenous anesthetic for induction and maintenance of anesthesia during surgeries, was found to possess suppressive effect on host immunity. This study aimed at investigating whether PPF plays a modulatory role in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine expression in a cell line of rat hepatocytes. Morphological observation and viability assay showed that PPF exhibits no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 300 {mu}M after 48 h incubation. Pretreatment with 100 {mu}M PPF for 24 h prior to LPS stimulation was performed to investigate the modulatory effect on LPS-induced inflammatory gene production. The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PPF pretreatment significantly suppressed the LPS-induced toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene expression. Western blotting analysis showed that PPF pretreatment potentiated the LPS-induced TLR-4 downregulation. Flow cytometrical analysis revealed that PPF pretreatment showed no modulatory effect on the LPS-upregulated CD14 expression on hepatocytes. In addition, PPF pretreatment attenuated the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and I{kappa}B{alpha}, as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B primed by LPS. Moreover, addition of PD98059, a MAPK kinase inhibitor, significantly suppressed the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and GM-CSF production, suggesting that the PPF-attenuated GM-CSF production in hepatocytes may be attributed to its suppressive effect on MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. In conclusion, PPF as an anesthetic may clinically benefit those patients who are vulnerable to sepsis by alleviating sepsis-related inflammatory response in livers.

  15. Study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D+ --> K+ pi- pi+ and D(s)+ --> K+ pi- pi+ in the FOCUS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edera, Laura

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis illustrates a complete study of the doubly and singly Cabibbo suppressed decays D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. Data for this analysis have been collected by the fixed-target high-energy photoproduction experiment FOCUS at Fermilab. The authors have selected the D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} samples with cuts to obtain a sufficiently high statistics, a good signal to noise ratio and, at the same time, eliminate possible contaminations from the more copious and favored decays. The D{sup +} yield consists of 189 {+-} 24 events, with a signal to noise ratio {approx} 1; the D{sub s}{sup +} yield is 567 {+-} 31 and the signal to noise ratio is {approx} 2.5. The authors have measured {Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0065 {+-} 0.0008 {+-} 0.004 and {Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.127 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.014, improving the previous determinations of a factor of 2 and 5, respectively. The author has also performed a Dalitz plot analysis for both decays. The amplitude analysis for D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} represents the first available measurement for this channel.

  16. Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttrey, K.E.

    1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  17. Systems Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  18. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinett, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Parker, Gordon G. (Houghton, MI); Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Petterson, Ben J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory .gamma.(t), which includes a jib angular acceleration .gamma., a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle .theta.(t) and a radial rotation angle .phi.(t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular .gamma. and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach.

  19. Sway control method and system for rotary cranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinett, R.D.; Parker, G.G.; Feddema, J.T.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Petterson, B.J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator-commanded or computer-controlled maneuvers. An Input-shaping filter receives input signals from multiple operator input devices and converts them into output signals readable by the crane controller to dampen the payload tangential and radial sway associated with rotation of the jib. The input signals are characterized by a hub rotation trajectory [gamma](t), which includes a jib angular acceleration [gamma], a trolley acceleration x, and a load-line length velocity L. The system state variables are characterized by a tangential rotation angle [theta](t) and a radial rotation angle [phi](t) of the load-line. The coupled equations of motion governing the filter are non-linear and configuration-dependent. In one embodiment, a filter is provided between the operator and the crane for filtering undesired frequencies from the angular [gamma] and trolley x velocities to suppress payload oscillation. In another embodiment, crane commands are computer generated and controlled to suppress vibration of the payload using a postulated asymmetrical shape for the acceleration profiles of the jib, which profiles are uniquely determined by a set of parameters (including the acceleration pulse amplitude and the duration and coast time between pulses), or a dynamic programming approach. 25 figs.

  20. Quantitative Constraints on the Transport Properties of Hot Partonic Matter from Semi-Inclusive Single High Transverse Momentum Pion Suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

    2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment has measured the suppression of semi-inclusive single high transverse momentum pi^0's in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The present understanding of this suppression is in terms of energy-loss of the parent (fragmenting) parton in a dense color-charge medium. We have performed a quantitative comparison between various parton energy-loss models and our experimental data. The statistical point-to-point uncorrelated as well as correlated systematic uncertainties are taken into account in the comparison. We detail this methodology and the resulting constraint on the model parameters, such as the initial color-charge density dN^g/dy, the medium transport coefficient , or the initial energy-loss parameter epsilon_0. We find that high transverse momentum pi^0 suppression in Au+Au collisions has sufficient precision to constrain these model dependent parameters at the +/1 20%-25% (one standard deviation) level. These constraints include only the experimental uncertainties, and further studies are needed to compute the corresponding theoretical uncertainties.

  1. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-? D(? K+?-)K- and B-? D(? K+?-)?- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-? D(? K+?-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3 as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- ? D(? K+?-)?- decay are also reported.

  2. Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

  3. Galileon forces in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melinda Andrews; Yi-Zen Chu; Mark Trodden

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the challenging problem of obtaining an analytic understanding of realistic astrophysical dynamics in the presence of a Vainshtein screened fifth force arising from infrared modifications of General Relativity. In particular, we attempt to solve -- within the most general flat spacetime galileon model -- the scalar force law between well separated bodies located well within the Vainshtein radius of the Sun. To this end, we derive the exact static Green's function of the galileon wave equation linearized about the background field generated by the Sun, for the minimal cubic and maximally quartic galileon theories, and then introduce a method to compute the general leading order force law perturbatively away from these limits. We also show that the same nonlinearities which produce the Vainshtein screening effect present obstacles to an analytic calculation of the galileon forces between closely bound systems within the solar system, such as that of the Earth and Moon. Within the test mass approximation, we deduce that a large enough quartic galileon interaction would suppress the effect on planetary perihelion precession below the level detectable by even the next-generation experiments.

  4. A 24 km fiber-based discretely signaled continuous variable quantum key distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quyen Dinh Xuan; Zheshen Zhang; Paul L. Voss

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a continuous variable key distribution system that achieves a final secure key rate of 3.45 kb/sec over a distance of 24.2 km of optical fiber. The protocol uses discrete signaling and post-selection to improve reconciliation speed and quantifies security by means of quantum state tomography. Polarization multiplexing and a frequency translation scheme permit transmission of a continuous wave local oscillator and suppression of noise from guided acoustic wave Brillouin scattering by more than 27 dB.

  5. Entanglement preservation for multilevel systems under non-ideal pulse control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Z Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how to effectively preserve the entanglement between two noninteracting multilevel oscillators coupled to a common reservoir under non-ideal pulse control. A universal characterization using fidelity is developed for the behavior of the system based on Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. Our analysis includes the validity of the approximation method and the decoherence-suppression by the non-ideal pulse control. The power of our strategy for protecting entanglement is numerically tested, showing potential applications for quantum information processing.

  6. Entanglement preservation for multilevel systems under non-ideal pulse control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Xu; M. Feng

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how to effectively preserve the entanglement between two noninteracting multilevel oscillators coupled to a common reservoir under non-ideal pulse control. A universal characterization using fidelity is developed for the behavior of the system based on Nakajima-Zwanzig projection operator technique. Our analysis includes the validity of the approximation method and the decoherence-suppression by the non-ideal pulse control. The power of our strategy for protecting entanglement is numerically tested, showing potential applications for quantum information processing.

  7. NERSC File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems NERSC File Systems Overview NERSC file systems can be divided into two categories: local and global. Local file systems are only accessible on a single platform, providing...

  8. Gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

  9. Gasification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

  10. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  11. Heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishman, P.J.

    1983-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system utilizing solar panels and buried ground conduits to collect and store heat which is delivered to a heatpump heat exchanger. A heat-distribution fluid continuously circulates through a ground circuit to transfer heat from the ground to the heat exchanger. The ground circuit includes a length of buried ground conduit, a pump, a check valve and the heat exchanger. A solar circuit, including a solar panel and a second pump, is connected in parallel with the check valve so that the distribution fluid transfers solar heat to the heat exchanger for utilization and to the ground conduit for storage when the second pump is energized. A thermostatically instrumented control system energizes the second pump only when the temperature differential between the solar panel inlet and outlet temperatures exceeds a predetermined value and the ground temperature is less than a predetermined value. Consequently, the distribution fluid flows through the solar panel only when the panel is capable of supplying significant heat to the remainder of the system without causing excessive drying of the ground.

  12. Braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  13. Multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzman, J.A.; Bartlett, J.F.; Bixler, R.M.; Davidow, W.H.; Despotakis, J.A.; Graziano, P.J.; Green, M.D.; Greig, D.A.; Hayashi, S.J.; Mackie, D.R.

    1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an input/output system for a multiprocessor system of the kind in which a plurality of separate processor modules are interconnected for processing, each of the processor modules having a central processing unit and an associated main memory, at least pair of the processor modules each having an input/output channel with each such channel being independent of other such channels, the input/output system comprising: device controller for controlling the transfer of data between the pair of processor modules and a peripheral device, the device controller having multiple ports, with each such port being failure-independent of the other such ports and connected to a respective one of the input/output channels, each port including an enable latch operable in response to a disable command communicated to the port by the associated processor module to disable the port from any further data communication; the device controller including interface logic means responsive to signaling from a one of the processor modules for selecting one of the ports to the exclusion of the other of the ports for data transfers between the peripheral device and the one processor module connected to the selected port through its associated input/output channel; and interprocessor bus means communicating the pair of processor modules to one another for data transfer therebetween; each of processors modules being operable to provide a data communication path to the peripheral device for itself and for the other of the pair of processor modules.

  14. File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »Travel andFifth Annual RadWasteFile Systems

  15. A sub nrad beam pointing monitoring and stabilization system for controlling input beam jitter in GW interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canuel, Benjamin; Mantovani, Maddalena; Marque, Julien; Ruggi, Paolo; Tacca, Matteo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a simple and very effective control system to monitor and suppress the beam jitter noise at the input of an optical system, called Beam Pointing Control (BPC) system, will be described showing the theoretical principle and an experimental demonstration for the application of large scale gravitational wave interferometers, in particular for the Advanced Virgo detector. For this purpose the requirements for the control accuracy and the sensing noise will be computed by taking into account the Advanced Virgo optical configuration and the outcomes will be compared with the experimental measurement obtained in the laboratory. The system has shown unprecedented performance in terms of control accuracy and sensing noise. The BPC system has achieved a control accuracy of ~ $10^{-8}$ rad for the tilt and ~ $10^{-7}$ m for the shift and a sensing noise of less than 1 nrad/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ resulting compliant with the Advance Virgo gravitational wave interferometer requirements.

  16. Estimating Systems Engineering Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortune, Jared

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems engineering reuse is the utilization of previously developed systems engineering products or artifacts such as

  17. Computer Systems Administrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Systems Administrator Fort Collins, CO POSITION A Computer Systems Administrator (Non activities. RESPONSIBILITIES The System Administrator will provide Unix/Linux, Windows computer system or computer science, and three years computer systems administration experience. DURATION The work is planned

  18. Transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurosawa, Kanji (Tokyo, JP); Koga, Bunichiro (Miyagi, JP); Ito, Hideki (Miyagi, JP); Kiriyama, Shigeru (Miyagi, JP); Higuchi, Shizuo (Kanagawa, JP)

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A transport system includes a traveling rail (1) which constitutes a transport route and a transport body (3) which is capable of traveling on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. Flexible drive tubes (5) are arranged on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. The transport body includes a traveling wheel (4) which is capable of rolling on the traveling rail and drive wheels (2) which are capable of rolling on the drive tubes upon receiving the rotational drive power generated by pressure of a pressure medium supplied to the drive tubes while depressing the drive tubes. The traveling rail includes a plurality of transport sections and the transport body is capable of receiving a rotational drive force from the drive tubes at every transport sections. If necessary, a transport route changeover switch which changes over the transport route can be provided between the transport sections.

  19. Low energy synthesis gas systems - New technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julemont, V.; Ribesse, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas steam reforming today covers more than 70% of synthesis gas production. The gas specific consumption has been largely improved during the last thirty years. It has now reached 32 GJ/metric ton of NH/sub 3/ on HHV, from 45 in the sixties. Ammonia is still the major user of synthesis gas. The successive improvements are: thermal energy recovery from the combustion gases at the outlet of the tubular reformer, where only 40% of the energy input is absorbed by the endothermal reaction; better quality of the reforming and conversion catalysts; better CO/sub 2/ removal processes; improved catalyst for ammonia and methanol synthesis and recovery of the H/sub 2/ from the purge gas. One of these processes has been successfully experimented. It involves the suppression of the tubular steam reforming, replaced by a simpler autothermal catalytic reactor and the new REGATE reheater of reactant gases to 1500/sup 0/C under pressure (air + steam for NH/sub 3/, recycled gas + steam for H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 3/OH). No oxygen is needed. The system is simpler, more efficient (27,0 GJ/metric ton of NH/sub 3/ HHV) and safer.

  20. System architecture of offshore oil production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, James (James Thomas)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an approach to applying Systems Architecture methods to the development of large, complex, commercial systems, particularly offshore oil and gas productions systems. The aim of this research was to ...

  1. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

  2. Examining Survivability of Systems of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekdeci, Brian

    Previous research has identified design principles that enable survivability for systems, but it is unclear if these principles are appropriate and sufficient for systems of systems as well. This paper presents a preliminary ...

  3. Systemic Risk in the International System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Piepers

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk of systemic war seems dependant on the level of criticality and sensitivity of the International System, and the system's conditions. The level of criticality and sensitivity is dependant on the developmental stage of the International System. Initially, following a systemic war, the increase of the level of criticality and sensitivity go hand in hand. However, at a certain stage the sensitivity of the International System for larger sized wars decreases; as a consequence of a network effect, we argue. This network effect results in increased local stability of the System. During this phase the criticality of the International System steadily increases, resulting in a release deficit. This release deficit facilitates a necessary build up of energy to push the International System, by means of systemic war, into a new stability domain. Systemic war is functional in the periodic rebalancing of an anarchistic international system.

  4. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version Energy Systems Integration Facility Newsroom The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) will be one of the only megawatt-scale test facilities in the United...

  5. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 136: 333353, January 2010 Part B Modelling convective processes during the suppressed phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    NASA Langley Research Center, USA d European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, UK e, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, China iMet Office, Exeter, UK jLawrence Livermore National evolution of convection is assessed as part of a Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud System Study

  6. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems Michael S. Zisman*Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target andthe Neutrino Factory systems downstream of the target and

  7. Franklin File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Files systems Files systems NERSC's global home and project file systems are available on Franklin. Additionally, Franklin has over 400 TB of locally attached high-performance...

  8. System design description cone penetrometer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The system design description documents in detail the design of the cone penetrometer system. The systems includes the cone penetrometer physical package, raman spectroscopy package and moisture sensor package. Information pertinent to the system design, development, fabrication and testing is provided.

  9. Communication Systems Chair of Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    , porn sites, web services, ... :-)) #12;8 | 28 Communication Systems network insecurity Inner and intra

  10. Complex System Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Christopher

    2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

  11. Novel coupling scheme to control dynamics of coupled discrete systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snehal M. Shekatkar; G. Ambika

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new coupling scheme to control spatio-temporal patterns and chimeras on 1-d and 2-d lattices and random networks of discrete dynamical systems. The scheme involves coupling with an external lattice or network of damped systems. When the system network and external network are set in a feedback loop, the system network can be controlled to a homogeneous steady state or synchronized periodic state with suppression of the chaotic dynamics of the individual units. The control scheme has the advantage that its design does not require any prior information about the system dynamics or its parameters and works effectively for a range of parameters of the control network. We analyze the stability of the controlled steady state or amplitude death state of lattices using the theory of circulant matrices and Routh-Hurwitz's criterion for discrete systems and this helps to isolate regions of effective control in the relevant parameter planes. The conditions thus obtained are found to agree well with those obtained from direct numerical simulations in the specific context of lattices with logistic map and Henon map as on-site system dynamics. We show how chimera states developed in an experimentally realizable 2-d lattice can be controlled using this scheme. We propose this mechanism can provide a phenomenological model for the control of spatio-temporal patterns in coupled neurons due to non-synaptic coupling with the extra cellular medium. We extend the control scheme to regulate dynamics on random networks and adapt the master stability function method to analyze the stability of the controlled state for various topologies and coupling strengths.

  12. D0 Cryo System Control System Autodialer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The DO cryogenic system is controlled by a TI565-PLC based control system. This allows the system to be unmanned when in steady state operation. System experts will need to be contacted when system parameters exceed normal operating points and reach alarm setpoints. The labwide FIRUS system provides one alarm monitor and communication link. An autodialer provides a second and more flexible alarm monitor and communication link. The autodialer monitors contact points in the control system and after receiving indication of an alarm accesses a list of experts which it calls until it receives an acknowledgement. There are several manufacturers and distributors of autodialer systems. This EN explains the search process the DO cryo group used to fmd an autodialer system that fit the cryo system's needs and includes information and specs for the unit we chose.

  13. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

  14. N Controller Target System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Arch Evaluator Adaptation Engine Model Manager Adaptation Executor Running System System API System Layer Probes Resource Discovery Effectors Running System System API System Layer Probes Resource COSMOS asynchronous push pull COSMOS (a)synchronous pull Local SCA binding Remote SCA binding (REST, RPC

  15. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  16. Nonlinearity-Induced Entanglement Stability in a Qubit-Oscillator System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Víctor Montenegro; Alessandro Ferraro; Sougato Bose

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a system composed of a qubit interacting with a quartic (undriven) nonlinear oscillator (NLO) through a conditional displacement Hamiltonian. We show that even a modest nonlinear perturbation in the NLO potential can enhance and stabilize the quantum entanglement dynamically generated between the qubit and the NLO. In absence of the nonlinearity the entanglement between the qubit and the oscillator is known to periodically oscillate between 0 and 1, whereas the nonlinearity suppresses the dynamical decay of entanglement once it is generated. While the generation of entanglement is due to the superposition principle combined with conditional displacements in the NLO, as noted in several works before, the improvements in this entanglement is because of the squeezing and other complex processes induced by two- and four-phonon interactions. Finally, we have solved the Markovian master equation, and even in this open case the system preserves the previous features and remain robust.

  17. Design of fast tuning elements for the ITER ICH system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, D.W.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling between the ion cyclotron (IC) antenna and the ITER plasma (as expressed by the load resistance the antenna sees) will experience relatively fast variations due to plasma edge profile modifications. If uncompensated, these will cause an increase in the amount of power reflected back to the transmitter and ultimately a decrease in the amount of radio frequency (rf) power to the plasma caused by protective suppression of the amount of rf power generated by the transmitter. The goals of this task were to study several alternate designs for a tuning and matching (T&M) system and to recommend some research and development (R&D) tasks that could be carried out to test some of the most promising concepts. Analyses of five different T&M configurations are presented in this report. They each have different advantages and disadvantages, and the choice among them must be made depending on the requirements for the IC system. Several general conclusions emerge from our study: The use of a hybrid splitter as a passive reflected-power dump [``edge localized mode (ELM)-dump``] appears very promising; this configuration will protect the rf power sources from reflected power during changes in plasma loading due to plasma motion or profile changes (e.g., ELM- induced changes in the plasma scrape-off region) and requires no active control of the rf system. Trade-offs between simplicity of design and capability of the system must be made. Simple system designs with few components near the antenna either have high voltages over considerable distances of transmission lines, or they are not easily tuned to operate at different frequencies. Designs using frequency shifts and/or fast tuning elements can provide fast matching over a wide range of plasma loading; however, the designs studied here require components near the antenna, complicating assembly and maintenance. Capacitor-tuned resonant systems may offer a good compromise.

  18. March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 1 Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 1 Information Systems #12;March 23, 2008 Databases: Information Systems 2 Objectives What is an Information System (IS) + Classification of Information Systems + Evolution of Information Systems + Information System Management + Performance Requirements of ISs + #12

  19. Suppression of the metal-insulator transition by magnetic field in (Pr{sub 1?y}Y{sub y}){sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} (y?=?0.0625)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naito, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tnaito@iwate-u.ac.jp; Fujishiro, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Nishizaki, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Norio [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Hejtmánek, Ji?í; Knížek, Karel; Jirák, Zden?k [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Cukrovarnická 10, 162 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The (Pr{sub 1?y}Y{sub y}){sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} compound (y?=?0.0625, T{sub MI-SS}=40?K), at the lower limit for occurrence of the first-order metal-insulator (MI) and simultaneous spin-state (SS) transitions, has been studied using electrical resistivity and magnetization measurements in magnetic fields up to 17?T. The isothermal experiments demonstrate that the low-temperature insulating phase can be destabilized by an applied field and the metallic phase returns well below the transition temperature T{sub MI-SS}. The reverse process with decreasing field occurs with a significant hysteresis. The temperature scans taken at fixed magnetic fields reveal a parabolic-like decrease in T{sub MI-SS} with increasing field strength and a complete suppression of the MI-SS transition in fields above 9?T.

  20. Suppression of thermal carrier escape and efficient photo-carrier generation by two-step photon absorption in InAs quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells using a dot-in-well structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahi, S.; Teranishi, H.; Kasamatsu, N.; Kada, T.; Kaizu, T.; Kita, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the effects of an increase in the barrier height on the enhancement of the efficiency of two-step photo-excitation in InAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with a dot-in-well structure. Thermal carrier escape of electrons pumped in QD states was drastically reduced by sandwiching InAs/GaAs QDs with a high potential barrier of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As. The thermal activation energy increased with the introduction of the barrier. The high potential barrier caused suppression of thermal carrier escape and helped realize a high electron density in the QD states. We observed efficient two-step photon absorption as a result of the high occupancy of the QD states at room temperature.

  1. Influence strategies for systems of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Nirav Bharat, 1979-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed decision making has been identified as a source of managerial complexity for leaders of systems of systems (SoS). A new framework, AIR (Anticipation-Influence-Reaction), is proposed to capture the feedback ...

  2. Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Landscape Management Systems The Visual Management System of the Forest Service, USDA1 Warren R presentation on how the Visual Management System (VMS) functions. 1/ Presented at the National Conference Manual 2380, Landscape Management, USDA. INTRODUCTION The American people are concerned about the quality

  3. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  4. Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Nancy

    Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

  5. Systems Science Harder House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Science Harder House 1604 SW 10th Avenue 503-725-4960 www.sysc.pdx.edu/ M.S. Ph.D. Systems governing systems of widely differing types. Systems concepts and techniques are used extensively for both who are skilled in modern methods of decision making and systems design and who are capable

  6. Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Minimal Fusion Systems Ellen Henke University of Birmingham Ellen Henke Minimal Fusion Systems #12;Introduction Minimal Fusion Systems Maximal Parabolics Results Contents 1 Introduction 2 Minimal Fusion Systems 3 Maximal Parabolics 4 Results Ellen

  7. Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Conclusions Fractionated Space Systems There is a growing interest in fractionated space system design. Fractionated space systems are inherently flexible and modular. There are many key technologies of flexibility serves as a source of motivation for system designers to embed flexibility into a system design (i

  8. The Enamovirus P0 protein is a silencing suppressor which inhibits local and systemic RNA silencing through AGO1 degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusaro, Adriana F. [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia) [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Correa, Regis L. [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia) [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jackson, Craig [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kawchuk, Lawrence [Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB T1J4B1 (Canada)] [Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB T1J4B1 (Canada); Vaslin, Maite F.S. [Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil)] [Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Waterhouse, Peter M., E-mail: peter.waterhouse@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The P0 protein of poleroviruses and P1 protein of sobemoviruses suppress the plant's RNA silencing machinery. Here we identified a silencing suppressor protein (SSP), P0{sup PE}, in the Enamovirus Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1) and showed that it and the P0s of poleroviruses Potato leaf roll virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus have strong local and systemic SSP activity, while the P1 of Sobemovirus Southern bean mosaic virus supresses systemic silencing. The nuclear localized P0{sup PE} has no discernable sequence conservation with known SSPs, but proved to be a strong suppressor of local silencing and a moderate suppressor of systemic silencing. Like the P0s from poleroviruses, P0{sup PE} destabilizes AGO1 and this action is mediated by an F-box-like domain. Therefore, despite the lack of any sequence similarity, the poleroviral and enamoviral SSPs have a conserved mode of action upon the RNA silencing machinery.

  9. Quantum Measurement-induced Dynamics of Many-Body Ultracold Bosonic and Fermionic Systems in Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Elliott, Thomas J; Mekhov, Igor B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trapping ultracold atoms in optical lattices enabled numerous breakthroughs uniting several disciplines. Although the light is a key ingredient in such systems, its quantum properties are typically neglected, reducing the role of light to a classical tool for atom manipulation. Here we show how elevating light to the quantum level leads to novel phenomena, inaccessible in setups based on classical optics. Interfacing a many-body atomic system with quantum light opens it to the environment in an essentially nonlocal way, where spatial coupling can be carefully designed. The competition between typical processes in strongly correlated systems (local tunnelling and interaction) with global measurement backaction leads to novel multimode dynamics and the appearance of long-range correlated tunnelling capable of entangling distant lattices sites, even when tunnelling between neighbouring sites is suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate both the break-up and protection of strongly interacting fermion ...

  10. Controllable optical output fields from an optomechanical system with a mechanical driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xun-Wei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of the optical output fields from a cavity optomechanical system, where the cavity is driven by a strong coupling and a weak probe optical fields and the mechanical resonator is driven by a coherent mechanical pump. When the frequency of the mechanical pump matches the frequency difference between the coupling and probe optical fields, due to the interference between the different optical components at the same frequency, we demonstrate that the large positive or negative group delay of the output field at the frequency of probe field can be achieved and tuned by adjusting the phase and amplitude of the mechanical driving field. Moreover, the strength of the output field at the frequency of optical four-wave-mixing (FWM) field also can be controlled (enhanced and suppressed) by tuning the phase and amplitude of the mechanical pump. We show that the power of the output field at the frequency of the optical FWM field can be suppressed to zero or enhanced so much that it can be comp...

  11. Lighting system with thermal management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton; Stecher, Thomas; Seeley, Charles; Kuenzler, Glenn; Wolfe, Jr., Charles; Utturkar, Yogen; Sharma, Rajdeep; Prabhakaran, Satish; Icoz, Tunc

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having unique configurations are provided. For instance, the lighting system may include a light source, a thermal management system and driver electronics, each contained within a housing structure. The light source is configured to provide illumination visible through an opening in the housing structure. The thermal management system is configured to provide an air flow, such as a unidirectional air flow, through the housing structure in order to cool the light source. The driver electronics are configured to provide power to each of the light source and the thermal management system.

  12. Reuse in Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gan

    Reuse in systems engineering is a frequent but poorly understood phenomenon. Nevertheless, it has a significant impact on system development and on estimating the appropriate amount of systems engineering effort with models ...

  13. Control system design method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, David G. (Tijeras, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  14. Genomics and Systems Biology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Genomics and Systems Biology Genomics and Systems Biology Los Alamos scientists perform research in functional genomics and structural genomics, and applications for such work...

  15. CONTRACTOR PURCHASING SYSTEM REVIEWS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PURCHASING SYSTEM REVIEWS RISK ASSESSMENT MATRIX RISK CATEGORY PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE COST HIGH (3) --Performance data casts significant doubt on the ability of the system or...

  16. Umbra's system representation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Michael James

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Umbra System representation. Umbra System representation, initially developed in the spring of 2003, is implemented in Incr/Tcl using concepts borrowed from Carnegie Mellon University's Architecture Description Language (ADL) called Acme. In the spring of 2004 through January 2005, System was converted to Umbra 4, extended slightly, and adopted as the underlying software system for a variety of Umbra applications that support Complex Systems Engineering (CSE) and Complex Adaptive Systems Engineering (CASE). System is now a standard part Of Umbra 4. While Umbra 4 also includes an XML parser for System, the XML parser and Schema are not described in this document.

  17. Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems * Bosch FFV Project Structure and Partners * Purpose of Work - Project Highlights * Barriers - Existing Flex Fuel Systems and Problems * Approach - Bosch...

  18. Data & File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Policies NERSC File Systems HPSS Data Archive IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats...

  19. Euclid File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File storage File storage Disk Quota Change Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and...

  20. Suppression of the phagocytic capabilities of coelomocytes from Lumbricus terrestris following an in-vitro exposure to heavy metals and evaluation of their metabolic activities by flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brousseau, P.; Fugere, N.; Coderre, D.; Flipo, D.; Foumier, M. [Univ. du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Immunotoxic effects of environmental exposure to chemical contaminants can be evaluated by monitoring cellular and functional parameters of the immune system of sentinel species. In this scope, the earthworm may represent a relevant sentinel species to determine the level of toxicity linked to soil contaminants or to test the efficacy of remediation protocols. In this work, coelomocytes were incubated in vitro for 18 hours with mercury, cadmium, zinc or lead at concentrations ranging from 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}4}M. The analysis of phagocytosis by flow cytometry revealed that this natural response was impaired at non cytotoxic concentrations of mercury, cadmium and zinc. Moreover, the analysis of cells obtained from coelomic fluid, based on the combination of low angle forward scatter (FSC) and side scatter (SSC) allowed to discriminate between two distinct populations of coelomocytes. With the use of fluorescent probes, such as carboxyfluorescin diacetate (CFDA), dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) and chloromethyl fluorescin diacetate (CFDA), to study the esterase activity and Fluo-3 to measure free cytoplasmic calcium, the results showed that the first discrimination between the two populations of cells based on size and complexity could be further accentuated on the basis of their metabolic activities. In summary, the data make very attractive the use of flow cytometry to study cellular and functional parameters of the earthworm.

  1. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung

    1995-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has shown that pulverized bituminous coals that were treated by coal cleaning (via froth flotation) or aerodynamic sizing exhibited altered aerosol emission characteristics. Specifically, the emissions of aerosol for the cleaned and sized coals increased by as much as one order of magnitude. The goals of the present program are to: (1) perform measurements on carefully characterized coals to identify the means by which the coal treatment increases aerosol yields; (2) investigate means by which coal cleaning can be done in a way that will not increase aerosol yields; and (3) identify whether this mechanism can be used to reduce aerosol yields from systems burning straight coal. The current experimental series focuses on the use of artificial char to study sodium vaporization and aerosol formation associated with dispersed sodium and mineral inclusions. Artificial char has the advantage over natural coal in that the composition can be precisely controlled, such that the influences of specific mineral composition and content can be investigated. The study showed: the addition of calcite had no effect of the aerosol yield; increased amounts of pyrite did not lead to increased residual ash formation; in spite of the increase in mineral content, the yield of aerosol on the backup filter did not correlate with the amount of added minerals; and the general trend was for reduced aerosol yields as the amount of bentonite increased which suggested that the bentonite was effective at complexing sodium and reducing its overall vaporization.

  2. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramlich, J.C.; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory work and studies of full-scale coal-fired boilers have identified two general mechanisms for ash production. The vast majority of the ash is formed from mineral matter that coalesces as the char burns, yielding particles that are normally larger than 0.5 {mu}m. The second major mechanism is the generation of a submicron aerosol through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. Previous work has shown that pulverized bituminous coals that were treated by coal cleaning (via froth flotation) or aerodynamic sizing exhibited altered aerosol emission characteristics. Specifically, the emissions of aerosol for the cleaned and sized coals increased by as much as one order of magnitude. The goals of the present progress are to: (1) perform measurements on carefully characterized coals to identify the means by which the coal treatment increases aerosol yields; (2) investigate means by which coal cleaning can be done in a way that will not increase aerosol yields; (3) identify whether this mechanism can be used to reduce aerosol yields from systems burning straight coal. This paper discusses model description and model formulation, and reports on the progress of furnace design and construction, and coal selection.

  3. Branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B[over-bar] 0 to D[superscript (*)0?0, D[superscript (*)0]?, D[superscript (*)0]?, and D[superscript(*)0]?? and measurement of the polarization in the decay B[over-bar] 0-->D[superscript *0]?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B? 0-->D0?0, D*0?0, D0?, D*0?, D0?, D*0?, D0??, and D*0??. We measure the branching fractions (×10-4): B(B? 0?D0?0)=2.69±0.09±0.13, B(B? ...

  4. Control of transversal instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonja Molnos; Jakob Löber; Jan Frederik Totz; Harald Engel

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In two-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems, local curvature perturbations in the shape of traveling waves are typically damped out and disappear in the course of time. If, however, the inhibitor diffuses much faster than the activator, transversal instabilities can arise, leading from flat to folded, spatio-temporally modulated wave shapes and to spreading spiral turbulence. For experimentally relevant parameter values, the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction (PBZR) does not exhibit transversal wave instabilities. Here, we propose a mechanism to artificially induce these instabilities via a wave shape dependent spatio-temporal feedback loop, and study the emerging wave patterns. In numerical simulations with the modified Oregonator model for the PBZR using experimentally realistic parameter values we demonstrate the feasibility of this control scheme. Conversely, in a piecewise-linear version of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model transversal instabilities and spiral turbulence in the uncontrolled system are shown to be suppressed in the presence of control, thereby stabilising flat wave propagation.

  5. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  6. State observers and Kalman filtering for high performance vibration isolation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beker, M. G., E-mail: M.Beker@Nikhef.nl; Bertolini, A.; Hennes, E.; Rabeling, D. S. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, J. F. J. van den; Bulten, H. J. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands) [National Institute for Subatomic Physics Nikhef, Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong scientific case for the study of gravitational waves at or below the lower end of current detection bands. To take advantage of this scientific benefit, future generations of ground based gravitational wave detectors will need to expand the limit of their detection bands towards lower frequencies. Seismic motion presents a major challenge at these frequencies and vibration isolation systems will play a crucial role in achieving the desired low-frequency sensitivity. A compact vibration isolation system designed to isolate in-vacuum optical benches for Advanced Virgo will be introduced and measurements on this system are used to present its performance. All high performance isolation systems employ an active feedback control system to reduce the residual motion of their suspended payloads. The development of novel control schemes is needed to improve the performance beyond what is currently feasible. Here, we present a multi-channel feedback approach that is novel to the field. It utilizes a linear quadratic regulator in combination with a Kalman state observer and is shown to provide effective suppression of residual motion of the suspended payload. The application of state observer based feedback control for vibration isolation will be demonstrated with measurement results from the Advanced Virgo optical bench suspension system.

  7. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramlich, J.C.; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

    1993-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The second major ash producing mechanism is the generation of a submicron aerosol through a vaporization/condensation mechanism. When the ash size distribution is plotted in terms of number density, the submicron mode generally peaks at about 0. 1 {mu}m. When plotted in terms of mass, this mode is sometimes distinct from the residual ash mode, and sometimes merged into it. During diffusion-limited char combustion, the interior of the particle becomes hot and fuel-rich. The non-volatile oxides (e.g., Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, MgO, CaO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can be reduced to more volatile suboxides and elements, and partially vaporized. These reoxidize while passing through the boundary layer surrounding the char particle, thus becoming so highly supersaturated that rapid homogeneous nucleation occurs. This high nuclei concentration in the boundary layer promotes more extensive coagulation than would occur if the nuclei were uniformly distributed across the flow field. The vaporization can be accelerated by the overshoot of the char temperature beyond the local gas temperature. Although these particles represent a relatively small fraction of the mass, they can present a large fraction of the surface area. Thus, they are a preferred site for the condensation of the more volatile oxides later in the furnace. This leads to a layering effect in which the refractory oxides are concentrated at the particle core and the more volatile oxides resideat the surface. This also explains the enrichment of the aerosol by volatile oxides that has been noted in samples from practical furnaces. These volatile metal oxides include the majority of the toxic metal contaminants, e.g., mercury, arsenic, selenium and nickel. Risk assessment studies suggest that toxic metal emissions represent a significant portion of the health risk associated with combustion systems.

  8. Space System Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McManus, Dr. Hugh

    Final Report of SSPARC: the Space Systems, Policy, and Architecture Research Consortium (Thrust II and III)

  9. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA, Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville Solar Energy Generation Facility Constructed Systems that produce electricity

  10. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  11. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase suppresses U-2 OS cell invasion and migration via downregulating the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tao Fang; Wang, Heng [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Peng, Ai Fen [Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangxi (China)] [Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangxi (China); Luo, Qing Feng [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Jiangxi (China); Liu, Zhi Li, E-mail: zgm7977@163.com [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Zhou, Rong Ping [Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China); Gao, Song; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen Zhao [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)] [Department of Orthopedics, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •We investigate the relationship between FASN and HER2 or p-HER2 by IHC in OS tissues. •We construct FASN-specific RNAi plasmid. •Inhibiting FASN down-regulates HER2/PI3K/AKT cell signaling in U-2 OS. •Inhibiting FASN blocks U-2 OS cell invasion and migration. -- Abstract: FASN plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of various tumors. Our previous studies show that inhibition FASN could induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in human osteosarcoma (OS) cell in vivo and vitro. The aim in this study was to investigate the effect of inhibition FASN on the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT axis and invasion and migration of OS cell. The expression of FASN, HER2 and p-HER2(Y1248) proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry in OS tissues from 24 patients with pulmonary metastatic disease, and the relationship between FASN and p-HER2 as well as HER2 was investigated. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between FASN and HER2 as well as p-HER2 protein expression. The U-2 OS cells were transfected with either the FASN specific RNAi plasmid or the negative control RNAi plasmid. FASN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. Western blot assays was performed to examine the protein expression of FASN, HER2, p-HER2(Y1248), PI3K, Akt and p-Akt (Ser473). Migration and invasion of cells were investigated by wound healing and transwell invasion assays. The results showed that the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by inhibiting FASN. Meanwhile, the U-2OS cells migration and invasion were also impaired by inhibiting the activity of FASN/HER2/PI3K/AKT. Our results indicated that inhibition of FASN suppresses OS cell invasion and migration via down-regulation of the “HER2/PI3K/AKT” axis in vitro. FASN blocker may be a new therapeutic strategy in OS management.

  12. Mock Tridiagonal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the notion of a {\\it mock tridiagonal system}. This is a generalization of a tridiagonal system in which the irreducibility assumption is replaced by a certain non-vanishing condition. We show how mock tridiagonal systems can be used to construct tridiagonal systems that meet certain specifications. This paper is part of our ongoing project to classify the tridiagonal systems up to isomorphism.

  13. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  14. AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC INSPECTION EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David N. Rocheleau, Senior Investigator; Edward A. Hamilton, Associate Director, SCUREF; Jerry L. Hudgins, Senior Investigator; Paul McCarty, Graduate Research Assistant; Robert J. Schalkoff, Senior Investigator; Robert O. Pettus, Project Manager & Principal Investigator

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains appendices on these topics: COMPUTERS AND CONTROLS; COMPUTER VISION SYSTEM; ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS; MECHANICAL SYSTEMS; ROBOTIC VEHICLE SYSTEMS; FIELD TRIALS.

  15. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A., E-mail: parkin@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  16. Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2005 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY #12 Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy

  17. ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    countries to install solar energy technologies into local schools and hospitals. In its Energy PolicyMEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS #12;MEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS Electrical energy is vital aspects of modern life. One of the biggest challenges facing society is the need for reliable energy

  18. System identification for passive linear quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Naoki Yamamoto

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    System identification is a key enabling component for the implementation of quantum technologies, including quantum control. In this paper, we consider the class of passive linear input-output systems, and investigate several basic questions: (1) which parameters can be identified? (2) Given sufficient input-output data, how do we reconstruct system parameters? (3) How can we optimize the estimation precision by preparing appropriate input states and performing measurements on the output? We show that minimal systems can be identified up to a unitary transformation on the modes, and systems satisfying a Hamiltonian connectivity condition called "infecting" are completely identifiable. We propose a frequency domain design based on a Fisher information criterion, for optimizing the estimation precision for coherent input state. As a consequence of the unitarity of the transfer function, we show that the Heisenberg limit with respect to the input energy can be achieved using non-classical input states.

  19. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

  20. Performance of Integrated Systems of Automated Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byoung-Chul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsRoller Shade Systems and Daylight Responsive Dimming SystemsBerkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Daylight responsive dimming