Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method for simultaneously coating a plurality of filaments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses for coating materials, and the products and compositions produced thereby. Substances, such as diamond or diamond-like carbon, are deposited onto materials, such as a filament or a plurality of filaments simultaneously, using one or more cylindrical, inductively coupled, resonator plasma reactors.

Miller, Paul A. (1004 Matia Ct. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Pochan, Paul D. (3308 Morris St. NE., #11, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Siegal, Michael P. (9900 Spain NE., Apt. W-2123, Albuquerque, NM 87111); Dominguez, Frank (11341 Academy Ridge Rd. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Impending U.S. lighting standards will boost market for halogen-infrared lamps: New product line expanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the incandescent floodlights and spotlights manufactured today will not meet lighting efficiency standards taking effect in the US in 1995. As these models cease production, demand will grow for higher efficiency units to fill this huge market, which now totals about 100 million lamps per year. One prime contender is a new class of halogen lamps that use a spectrally selective coating to reflect heat back onto the filament, reducing the amount of electricity needed to generate light. GE Lighting`s Halogen-IR line is the only series of such lamps currently available to replace the conventional floodlights and spotlights that will be banned by the new standards. Other manufacturers may adopt the technology, however, and the Japanese producer Ushio already sells in the US a line of smaller halogen lamps with a similar heat-reflective coating. In terms of efficacy and lifetime, Halogen-IR lamps out perform standard incandescents and standard halogens, but fall far short of fluorescent, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium sources. These other lighting systems are more appropriate and cost-effective than incandescents for many ambient lighting applications. For accent lighting and other tasks that are best suited to incandescent lighting, however, the Halogen-IR lamp is often a superior choice.

Sardinsky, R.; Shepard, M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Endocytosis in filamentous fungi   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endocytosis is little understood in filamentous fungi. For some time it has been controversial as to whether endocytosis occurs in filamentous fungi. A comparative genomics analysis between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ...

Kalkman, Edward R I C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Aerogel-supported filament  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA); Johnson, III, Coleman V. (Dallas, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Aerogel-supported filament  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

Michalske, Terry A. (P.O. Box 1042, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rye, Robert R. (1304 Espanola NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Smith, William L. (9916 Fostoria Rd., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effects of filament-matrix interfaces on the mechanical properties of SiC-reinforced Si sub 3 N sub 4: A Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a literature review of the effects of filament-matrix interfaces on the mechanical properties of ceramic composites composed of SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. A general review of the processing and mechanical properties of SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} is presented with special emphasis on research pertaining to processing-related effects on filament-matrix interfaces and the resulting effects of these interfaces on fracture behavior. A review of coating techniques for ceramic filaments is also presented, and recommendations are made for future directions in processing SiC-filament-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with mechanical properties that are enhanced by the microstructure of the filament-matrix interface. 148 refs., 1 tab.

Schilling, C.H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Galaxy pairs align with galactic filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. Gravitational collapse theory and numerical simulations suggest that the velocity field within large-scale galaxy filaments is dominated by motions along the filaments. Aims. Our aim is to check whether observational data reveal any preferred orientation of galaxy pairs with respect to the underlying filaments as a result of the expectedly anisotropic velocity field. Methods. We use galaxy pairs and galaxy filaments identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. For filament extraction, we use the Bisous model that is based the marked point process technique. During the filament detection, we use the centre point of each pair instead of the positions of galaxies to avoid a built-in influence of pair orientation on the filament construction. For pairs lying within filaments (3012 cases), we calculate the angle between the line connecting galaxies of each pair and their host filament. To avoid redshift-space distortions, the angle is measured in the plain of the sky. Results. The alignment analysis...

Tempel, Elmo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nonequilibrium transport in superconducting filaments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The step-like current-voltage characteristics of highly homogeneous single-crystalline tin and indium thin filaments has been measured. The length of the samples L approximately 1 cm was much greater than the nonequilibrium quasiparticle relaxation length Lambda. It was found that the activation of a successive i-th voltage step occurs at current significantly greater than the one derived with the assumption that the phase slip centers are weakly interacting on a scale L much greater than Lambda. The observation of `subharmonic` fine structure on the voltage-current characteristics of tin filaments confirms the hypothesis of the long-range phase slip centers interaction.

Arutyunov, K.YU.; Danilova, N.P.; Nikolaeva, A.A. [Academy of Sciences of the Moldavian SSR, Kishinev (Russian Federation)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Aluminide coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Studies on the dynamics of limited filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study on the dynamics of filaments in the presence of a diagnostic, conductive limiter is presented. Plasma filaments are coherent structures present in many fusion devices and transport a significant amount of particles ...

Bonde, Jeffrey David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Chemical vapor deposition thin films as biopassivation coatings and directly patternable dielectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organosilicon thin films deposited by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) were investigated as potential biopassivation coatings for neural probes. ...

Pryce Lewis, Hilton G. (Hilton Gavin), 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Unusual Filaments Inside the Umbra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze several unusual filamentary structures, which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges, neither in morphology, nor in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

Kleint, Lucia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

UNUSUAL FILAMENTS INSIDE THE UMBRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze several unusual filamentary structures which appeared in the umbra of one of the sunspots in AR 11302. They do not resemble typical light bridges in morphology or in evolution. We analyze data from SDO/HMI to investigate their temporal evolution, Hinode/SP for photospheric inversions, IBIS for chromospheric imaging, and SDO/AIA for the overlying corona. Photospheric inversions reveal a horizontal, inverse Evershed flow along these structures, which we call umbral filaments. Chromospheric images show brightenings and energy dissipation, while coronal images indicate that bright coronal loops seem to end in these umbral filaments. These rapidly evolving features do not seem to be common, and are possibly related to the high flare-productivity of the active region. Their analysis could help to understand the complex evolution of active regions.

Kleint, L. [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Sainz Dalda, A., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Inter-filament Attractions Narrow the Length Distribution of Actin Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the exponential length distribution that is typical of actin filaments under physiological conditions dramatically narrows in the presence of (i) crosslinker proteins (ii) polyvalent counterions or (iii) depletion mediated attractions. A simple theoretical model shows that in equilibrium, short-range attractions enhance the tendency of filaments to align parallel to each other, eventually leading to an increase in the average filament length and a decrease in the relative width of the distribution of filament lengths.

David Biron; Elisha Moses; Itamar Borukhov; S. A. Safran

2004-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

The WSRT virgo filament survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last few years the realization has emerged that the universal baryons are almost equally distributed by mass in three components: (1) galactic concentrations, (2) a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and (3) a diffuse intergalactic medium. These three components are predicted by hydrodynamical simulations and are probed by QSO absorption lines. To observe the WHIM in neutral hydrogen, observations are needed which are deeper than log(N$_{HI}$)=18. The WHIM should appear as a Cosmic Web, underlying the galaxies with higher column densities. We have used the WSRT, to simulate a filled aperture by observing at very high hour angles, to reach very high column density sensitivity. To achieve even higher image fidelity, an accurate model of the WSRT primary beam was developed. This will be used in the joint deconvolution of the observations. To get a good overview of the distribution and kinematics of the Cosmic Web, a deep survey of 1500 square degrees of sky was undertaken, containing the galaxy filament extending between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster. The auto-correlation data has been reduced and has an RMS of $\\Delta N_{HI} = 4.2\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ over 20 kms$^{-1}$. Several sources have been tentatively detected, which were previously unknown, as well as an indication for diffuse intergalactic filaments.

Attila Popping; Robert Braun

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E...

Nemirovskii, Sergey K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect.

Wu, H.-C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ruhl, H. [Department fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximillians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37A, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); Sheng, Z.-M. [Institute of Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Thompson, Karen G. (Orlando, FL); Bryan, Coleman J. (Merritt Island, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Collective dynamics of active filament complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks of biofilaments are essential for the formation of cellular structures and they support various biological functions. Previous studies have largely investigated the collective dynamics of rod-like biofilaments; however, the shapes of actual subcelluar componensts are often more elaborate. In this study, we investigated an active object composed of two active filaments, which represents a progression from rod-like biofilaments to complex-shaped biofilaments. Specifically, we numerically assessed the collective behaviors of these active objects and observed several types of dynamics depending on the density and the angle of the two filaments as shape parameters of the object. Among the observed collective dynamics, moving density bands that we named 'moving smectic' are reported here for the first time. By using statistical analyses of the orbits of individual objects and the interactions among them, the mechanisms underlying the rise of these dynamics patterns in the system were determined. This study...

Nogucci, Hironobu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Acceleration and vortex filaments in turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report recent results from a high resolution numerical study of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow. Single particle trajectories were followed for a time range spanning more than three decades, from less than a tenth of the Kolmogorov time-scale up to one large-eddy turnover time. We present some results concerning acceleration statistics and the statistics of trapping by vortex filaments.

F. Toschi; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte

2005-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

Sergey K. Nemirovskii

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hot filament CVD of boron nitride films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Using a hot filament (.apprxeq.1400.degree. C.) to activate borazine (B.sub.3 N.sub.3 H.sub.6) molecules for subsequent reaction with a direct line-of-sight substrate, transparent boron ntiride films as thick as 25,000 angstroms are grown for a substrate temperature as low as 100.degree. C. The minimum temperature is determined by radiative heating from the adjacent hot filament. The low temperature BN films show no indication of crystallinity with X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) show the films to have a B:N ratio of 0.97:1 with no other XPS detectable impurities above the 0.5% level. Both Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are characteristic of h-BN with small amounts of hydrogen detected as N-H and B-H bands in the IR spectrum. An important feature of this method is the separation and localization of the thermal activation step at the hot filament from the surface reaction and film growth steps at the substrate surface. This allows both higher temperature thermal activation and lower temperature film growth.

Rye, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

Vogt, G.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Plasma planar filament instability and Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inhomogeneous plasmas filaments instabilities are investigated by using the techniques of classical differential geometry of curves where Frenet torsion and curvature describe completely the motion of curves. In our case the Frenet frame changes in time and also depends upon the other coordinates taking into account the inhomogeneity of the plasma. The exponential perturbation method so commonly used to describe cosmological perturbatons is applied to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma equations to find longitudinal modes describing Alfven waves propagation modes describing plasma waves in the medium. Stability is investigated in the imaginary axis of the spectra of complex frequencies ${\\omega}$ or $Im(\\omega)\

Garcia de Andrade

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flow coating apparatus and method of coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

EERE Desal using Superhydrophobic Coatings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coating's surface; preventing salt creep, and thus virtually eliminates salt induced corrosion on any surface coated. 2. These coatings consist primarily of diatomaceous earth as...

34

ATP Hydrolysis Stimulates Large Length Fluctuations in Single Actin Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP Hydrolysis Stimulates Large Length Fluctuations in Single Actin Filaments Evgeny B. Stukalin is investigated theoretically using a stochastic model that takes into account the hydrolysis of ATP filaments. It is found that the ATP hydrolysis has a strong effect on dynamic properties of single actin

35

Process for the production of superconductor containing filaments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconductor containing filaments having embedments of superconducting material surrounded by a rayon matrix are formed by preparing a liquid suspension which contains at least 10 weight percent superconducting material; forming a multicomponent filament having a core of the suspension and a viscose sheath which contains cellulose xanthate; and thereafter, regenerating cellulose from the cellulose xanthate to form a rayon matrix.

Tuominen, Olli P. (Candler, NC); Hoyt, Matthew B. (Arden, NC); Mitchell, David F. (Asheville, NC); Morgan, Carol W. (Asheville, NC); Roberts, Clyde Gordon (Asheville, NC); Tyler, Robert A. (Canton, NC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Bifurcations of flame filaments in chaotically mixed combustion reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bifurcations of flame filaments in chaotically mixed combustion reactions Shakti N. Menon and Georg ranging fields. Be- sides in the case of combustion, where mixing-induced bifurcations may lead mixing has a significant effect on combustion processes and in particular on flame filamental structures

Gottwald, Georg A.

37

GALAXY SPIN ALIGNMENT IN FILAMENTS AND SHEETS: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of galaxies are known to be affected by their environment. One important question is how their angular momentum reflects the surrounding cosmic web. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the spin axes of spiral and elliptical galaxies relative to their surrounding filament/sheet orientations. To detect filaments, a marked point process with interactions (the {sup B}isous model{sup )} is used. Sheets are found by detecting 'flattened' filaments. The minor axes of ellipticals are found to be preferentially perpendicular to hosting filaments. A weak correlation is found with sheets. These findings are consistent with the notion that elliptical galaxies formed via mergers, which predominantly occurred along the filaments. The spin axis of spiral galaxies is found to align with the host filament, with no correlation between spiral spin and sheet normal. When examined as a function of distance from the filament axis, a much stronger correlation is found in the outer parts, suggesting that the alignment is driven by the laminar infall of gas from sheets to filaments. When compared with numerical simulations, our results suggest that the connection between dark matter halo and galaxy spin is not straightforward. Our results provide an important input to the understanding of how galaxies acquire their angular momentum.

Tempel, Elmo [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)] [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia); Libeskind, Noam I., E-mail: elmo@to.ee, E-mail: nlibeskind@aip.de [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Condensation of actin filaments pushing against a barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a model to describe the force generated by the polymerization of an array of parallel biofilaments. The filaments are assumed to be coupled only through mechanical contact with a movable barrier. We calculate the filament density distribution and the force-velocity relation with a mean-field approach combined with simulations. We identify two regimes: a non-condensed regime at low force in which filaments are spread out spatially, and a condensed regime at high force in which filaments accumulate near the barrier. We confirm a result previously known from other related studies, namely that the stall force is equal to N times the stall force of a single filament. In the model studied here, the approach to stalling is very slow, and the velocity is practically zero at forces significantly lower than the stall force.

K. Tsekouras; D. Lacoste; K. Mallick; J. -F. Joanny

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

39

The extreme nonlinear optics of gases and femtosecond optical filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, powerful ultrashort laser pulses can form greatly extended, propagating filaments of concentrated high intensity in gases, leaving behind a very long trail of plasma. Such filaments can be much longer than the longitudinal scale over which a laser beam typically diverges by diffraction, with possible applications ranging from laser-guided electrical discharges to high power laser propagation in the atmosphere. Understanding in detail the microscopic processes leading to filamentation requires ultrafast measurements of the strong field nonlinear response of gas phase atoms and molecules, including absolute measurements of nonlinear laser-induced polarization and high field ionization. Such measurements enable the assessment of filamentation models and make possible the design of experiments pursuing applications. In this paper, we review filamentation in gases and some applications, and discuss results from diagnostics developed at Maryland for ultrafast measurements of laser-gas interactions.

Milchberg, H. M.; Chen, Y.-H.; Cheng, Y.-H.; Jhajj, N.; Palastro, J. P.; Rosenthal, E. W.; Varma, S.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Zahedpour, S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Differential sthA gene expression between filamentous and isolated forms of Sphaerotilus natans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The activated sludge is the most commonly used technology for biological wastewater treatment. Filamentous to find more efficient treatments against bulking the molecular mechanisms of filamentation have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Metallic coating of microspheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

Meyer, S.F.

1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Production of ozone and nitrogen oxides by laser filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have experimentally measured that laser filaments in air generate up to 10{sup 14}, 3x10{sup 12}, and 3x10{sup 13} molecules of O{sub 3}, NO, and NO{sub 2}, respectively. The corresponding local concentrations in the filament active volume are 10{sup 16}, 3x10{sup 14}, and 3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, and allows efficient oxidative chemistry of nitrogen, resulting in concentrations of HNO{sub 3} in the parts per million range. The latter forming binary clusters with water, our results provide a plausible pathway for the efficient nucleation recently observed in laser filaments.

Petit, Yannick; Henin, Stefano; Kasparian, Jerome; Wolf, Jean-Pierre [GAP Biophotonics, Universite de Geneve, 20 rue de l'Ecole de Medecine, CH1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland)

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Stall force of polymerizing microtubules and filament bundles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate stall force and polymerization kinetics of rigid protofilaments in a microtubule or interacting filaments in bundles under an external load force in the framework of a discrete growth model. We introduce the concecpt of polymerization cycles to describe the stochastic growth kinetics, which allows us to derive an exact expression for the stall force. We find that the stall force is independent of ensemble geometry and load distribution. Furthermore, the stall force is proportional to the number of filaments and increases linearly with the strength of lateral filament interactions. These results are corroborated by simulations, which also show a strong influence of ensemble geometry on growth kinetics below the stall force.

Jaroslaw Krawczyk; Jan Kierfeld

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Formation of beads-on-a-string structures during break-up of viscoelastic filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Break-up of viscoelastic filaments is pervasive in both nature and technology. If a filament is formed by placing a drop of saliva between a thumb and forefinger and is stretched, the filament’s morphology close to break-up ...

Bhat, Pardeep P.

46

Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 th ISE & 8 th HIC Chile, 2009 HYDRAULIC MANAGEMENT OF FILAMENTOUS ALGAE IN OPEN-CHANNEL NETWORKS mechanical interventions to avoid overflows. Moreover, drifting algae cells increase water turbidity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

HFCVD of diamond at low substrate and low filament temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been discovered that the addition of a small amount of oxygen to the CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} feed gas permits HFCVD of diamond at significantly lower filament and substrate temperatures. The effective O/C ratio here is much lower than that used in most studies of the oxygen effect. Careful control of the O/C and C/H ratios were found to be crucial to success. The effects of substrate and filament temperatures on growth rate and film quality were studied. Optimum conditions were found that gave reasonable growth rates ( {approximately}0.5 {mu}m/h ) with high film quality at filament temperatures below 1750{degrees}C and substrate temperatures below 600C. As a result, low temperature deposition has been realized. Power consumption can be reduced 50%, and the filament lifetime is extended indefinitely.

Tolt, Z.L.; Heatherly, L.; Clausing, R.E.; Shaw, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Feigerle, C.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

Miguel A. Aragón-Calvo; Rien van de Weygaert; Bernard J. T. Jones; J. M. Thijs van der Hulst

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

7-forming, superconducting filaments through bicomponent dry spinning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fibers which contain potentially superconducting material are dry spun by the steps of preparing a suspension of potentially superconducting powder in a thickened solvent; preparing a solution of fiber-forming polymer; supplying the suspension and the solution to a spinning apparatus; in the spinning apparatus, arranging the solution and the suspension in a bicomponent arrangement; extruding the arranged solution and suspension from a spinneret as a bicomponent filament; and removing the solvent from the filament.

Tuominen, Olli P. (Ogden, UT); Morgan, Carol W. (Asheville, NC); Burlone, Dominick A. (Asheville, NC); Blankenship, Keith V. (Asheville, NC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar selective absorption coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Solar selective absorption coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Discovery of Balmer-filaments Encircling SNR RCW 86  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of Balmer-dominated filaments along almost the complete periphery of the supernova remnant RCW 86 (also known as G 315.2-2.3 or MSH 14-63). Using the UM/CTIO Curtis Schmidt telescope, we obtained deep CCD images in the emission of Halpha and [S II], together with continuum images to remove stellar confusion. After continuum subtraction, we discovered a network of Halpha filaments reaching almost completely around the remnant. Most of the newly identified filaments show no corresponding [S II] emission, indicating that they belong to the peculiar ''Balmer-dominated'' class of filaments. Comparison of these Balmer filaments with existing radio and X-ray images of RCW 86 shows an overall similarity, although interesting differences are apparent upon detailed inspection. While further observations of these newly identified optical filaments may eventually provide more detailed information on the kinematics and distance to RCW 86, the distance currently remains uncertain. We argue that the shorter distance estimates of ~1 kpc are still favored.

R. Chris Smith

1997-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Top-Down Fragmentation of a Warm Dark Matter Filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high-resolution n-body simulations of the fragmentation of dark matter filaments. Such fragmentation occurs in top-down scenarios of structure formation, when the dark matter is warm instead of cold. In a previous paper (Knebe et al. 2002, hereafter Paper I), we showed that WDM differs from the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) mainly in the formation history and large-scale distribution of low-mass haloes, which form later and tend to be more clustered in WDM than in CDM universes, tracing more closely the filamentary structures of the cosmic web. Therefore, we focus our computational effort in this paper on one particular filament extracted from a WDM cosmological simulation and compare in detail its evolution to that of the same CDM filament. We find that the mass distribution of the halos forming via fragmentation within the filament is broadly peaked around a Jeans mass of a few 10^9 Msun, corresponding to a gravitational instability of smooth regions with an overdensity contrast around 10 at these redshifts. Our results confirm that WDM filaments fragment and form gravitationally bound haloes in a top-down fashion, whereas CDM filaments are built bottom-up, thus demonstrating the impact of the nature of the dark matter on dwarf galaxy properties.

Alexander Knebe; Julien Devriendt; Brad Gibson; Joseph Silk

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

Sugama, T.

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

1996-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Wells, Russell P. (Kensington, CA); Craven, Glen E. (Fremont, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

ATP hydrolysis stimulates large length fluctuations in single actin filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymerization dynamics of single actin filaments is investigated theoretically using a stochastic model that takes into account the hydrolysis of ATP-actin subunits, the geometry of actin filament tips, the lateral interactions between the monomers as well as the processes at both ends of the polymer. Exact analytical expressions are obtained for a mean growth velocity and for dispersion in length fluctuations. It is found that the ATP hydrolysis has a strong effect on dynamic properties of single actin filaments. At high concentrations of free actin monomers the mean size of unhydrolyzed ATP-cap is very large, and the dynamics is governed by association/dissociation of ATP-actin subunits. However, at low concentrations the size of the cap becomes finite, and the dissociation of ADP-actin subunits makes a significant contribution to overall dynamics. Actin filament length fluctuations reach the maximum at the boundary between two dynamic regimes, and this boundary is always larger than the critical concentration. Random and vectorial mechanisms of hydrolysis are compared, and it is found that they predict qualitatively similar dynamic properties. The possibility of attachment and detachment of oligomers is also discussed. Our theoretical approach is successfully applied to analyze the latest experiments on the growth and length fluctuations of individual actin filaments.

Evgeny B. Stukalin; Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Dual-frequency terahertz emission from splitting filaments induced by lens tilting in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dual-frequency terahertz radiation from air-plasma filaments produced with two-color lasers in air has been demonstrated experimentally. When a focusing lens is tilted for a few degrees, it is shown that the laser filament evolves from a single one to two sub-filaments. Two independent terahertz sources emitted from the sub-filaments with different frequencies and polarizations are identified, where the frequency of terahertz waves from the trailing sub-filament is higher than that from the leading sub-filament.

Zhang, Zhelin; Chen, Yanping, E-mail: yanping.chen@sjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Liu; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Xu, Jianqiu; Zhang, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sheng, Zhengming [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

64

How Filaments are Woven into the Cosmic Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations indicate galaxies are distributed in a filament-dominated web-like structure. Numerical experiments at high and low redshift of viable structure formation theories also show filament-dominance. We present a simple quantitative explanation of why this is so, showing that the final-state web is actually present in embryonic form in the overdensity pattern of the initial fluctuations, with nonlinear dynamics just sharpening the image. The web is largely defined by the position and primordial tidal fields of rare events in the medium, with the strongest filaments between nearby clusters whose tidal tensors are nearly aligned. Applications of the cosmic web theory to observations include probing cluster-cluster bridges by weak gravitational lensing, X-rays, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and probing high redshift galaxy-galaxy bridges by low column density Lyman alpha absorption lines.

J. Richard Bond; Lev Kofman; Dmitri Pogosyan

1995-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2{lambda}{sub De}) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

Wang, X.; Howes, C. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Horanyi, M. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Robertson, S. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Zipping mechanism for force-generation by growing filament bundles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the force generation by polymerizing bundles of filaments, which form because of short-range attractive filament interactions. We show that bundles can generate forces by a zipping mechanism, which is not limited by buckling and operates in the fully buckled state. The critical zipping force, i.e. the maximal force that a bundle can generate, is given by the adhesive energy gained during bundle formation. For opposing forces larger than the critical zipping force, bundles undergo a force-induced unbinding transition. For larger bundles, the critical zipping force depends on the initial configuration of the bundles. Our results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

Torsten Kuehne; Reinhard Lipowsky; Jan Kierfeld

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Protective Coatings for Turbomachinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for power plant efficiency and reliability, the need to prevent corrosion and erosion is growing. Operators, overhaulers, and manufacturers have been using protective coatings for over twenty-five years to prevent erosion and corrosion. The evolution...

McCune, B.; Hilty, L.

68

Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Closed-loop controlled filament stretching and break-up of polymer solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A constant true (radial) strain rate filament stretching experiment has been the Holy Grail of extensional rheological studies. These experiments are performed on a Filament Stretching Extensional Rheometer (FiSER). A ...

Yeh, Roger, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The role of filament activation in a solar eruption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations show that the mutual relationship between filament eruptions and solar flares cannot be described in terms of an unique scenario. In some cases, the eruption of a filament appears to trigger a flare, while in others the observations are more consistent with magnetic reconnection that produces both the flare observational signatures (e.g., ribbons, plasma jets, post-flare loops, etc.) and later the destabilization and eruption of a filament. We study an event which occurred in NOAA 8471, where a flare and the activation of (at least) two filaments were observed on 28 February 1999. By using imaging data acquired in the 1216, 1600, 171 and 195 \\AA\\ TRACE channels and by BBSO in the continnum and in H$\\alpha$, a morphological study of the event is carried out. Using TRACE 1216 and 1600 \\AA\\ data, an estimate of the "pure" Ly$\\alpha$ power is obtained. The extrapolation of the magnetic field lines is done using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms and assuming a potential field. The potential magnetic field ext...

da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Romano, Paolo; Labrosse, Nicolas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The genome sequence of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa James E. Galagan1 , Sarah E. Calvo1 , Edward L. Braun10 , Alex Zelter4,11 , Ulrich Schulte12 , Gregory O. Kothe3 , Gregory Jedd13 , Werner Mewes14,15 , Chuck Staben16 , Edward Marcotte17 , David Greenberg18 , Alice Roy1 , Karen Foley1 , Jerome

Kellis, Manolis

73

Polymerization and Structure of Nucleotide-free Actin Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymerization and Structure of Nucleotide-free Actin Filaments Enrique M. De La Cruz1,2 , Anna of nucleotide-free actin (NFA). First, actin lacking bound nucleotide denatures rapidly without stabilizing of the bound nucleotide. We used apyrase, EDTA and Dowex-1 to prepare actin that is stable in sucrose and $99

74

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of five different types, NIF possess common structural features, including a conserved alpha-helical central rod domain of NIF in the presence of NF-L (Zackroff et al., 1982; Hisanaga and Hirokawa, 1988; Balin and Lee, 1991

Goldman, Robert D.

75

Evolution of Genes and Gene Networks in Filamentous Fungi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................................................... 137 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Phylogenetic tree assembled from fungi with sequenced genomes ........... 5 2... (subsistence on detritus) lifestyle, may explain such rapid amino acid divergence. Figs. 1 and 2 are phylogenetic trees for the filamentous fungi. Fig. 2 shows the 10 major classes of the 5 Fig. 1: Phylogenetic tree assembled from fungi with sequenced...

Greenwald, Charles Joaquin

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Detection of an optical filament in the Monogem Ring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Monogem Ring is a huge bright soft X-ray enhancement with a diameter of ~ 25$\\degr$. This 0.3 kpc distant structure is a peculiar Galactic supernova remnant in that it is obviously visible only in X-rays, due to its expansion into a region of extremely low ambient density: hence, practically no optical emission or a neutral HI shell was expected to be detectable. - Here we report on the discovery of a very faint arc-like nebula on a POSS II R film copy, at the south-eastern borders of the MR. Spectroscopy revealed this filament to have a very large [SII]$\\lambda$ 6716+6731/Halpha ratio of up to ~ 1.8, indicating shock excitation, and a low density of N_e thin (~ 1 arcmin), structured filament, stretching N-S. We believe that this filament belongs to the MR and became visible due to the interaction of the expanding remnant with a mild density increase in the interstellar medium. Only one other possible optical filament of the MR has been reported in the literature, but no spectrum was provided.

R. Weinberger; S. Temporin; B. Stecklum

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic coatings: autocatalytic (electroless) nickel-phosphorus alloy coatings: specification and test methods

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revêtements métalliques : Dépôts électrolytiques de nickel Metallic coatings : Electrodeposited coatings of nickel

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fiber coating method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fiber coating method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tribology and coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Graphene Coating Coupled Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

Shyamasundar, R.K.

84

Radiofrequency plasma antenna generated by femtosecond laser filaments in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate tunable radiofrequency emission from a meter-long linear plasma column produced in air at atmospheric pressure. A short-lived plasma column is initially produced by femtosecond filamentation and subsequently converted into a long-lived discharge column by application of an external high voltage field. Radiofrequency excitation is fed to the plasma by induction and detected remotely as electromagnetic radiation by a classical antenna.

Brelet, Y.; Houard, A.; Point, G.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; Andre, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Arantchouk, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France); Pellet, M. [Etat-major de la Marine Nationale, Paris (France)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low friction and galling resistant coatings and processes for coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention describes coating processes and the resultant coated articles for use in high temperature sodium environments, such as those found in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and their associated systems. The substrate to which the coating is applied may be either an iron base or nickel base alloy. The coating itself is applied to the substrate by electro-spark deposition techniques which result in metallurgical bonding between the coating and the substrate. One coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and an aluminum electrode. Another coating according to the present invention involves electro-spark depositing material from a cemented chromium carbide electrode and a nickel-base hardfacing alloy electrode.

Johnson, Roger N. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Submicron carbon filament cement-matrix composites for electromagnetic interference shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon filaments of diameter 0.1 mm were found to be a much more effective additive than conventional carbon fibers of diameter 10 mm in providing cement pastes capable of electromagnetic interference shielding. With 0.54 vol. % filaments and a shield thickness of 4 mm, a shielding effectiveness of 30 dB was attained at 1--2 GHz. However, the filaments were less effective than the fibers for reinforcing and for providing strain sensing cement-matrix composites.

Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Simulation of filamentation instability of a current-carrying plasma by particle in cell method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma in the diffusion frequency region is studied using particle in cell simulation. The effects of electron thermal motion and ion-neutral collision on the evolution of this instability in the nonlinear stage of the filaments coalescence are discussed. It is found that the coalescence of the current filaments is enhanced by increasing the temperature and is delayed by increasing the collision frequency.

Niknam, A. R.; Mostafavi, P. S.; Komaizi, D.; Salahshoor, M. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic filamentous fungus Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

filamentous fungus Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ANAEROBIC RUMEN FUNGI: POTENTIAL AND APPLICATIONS Summary: . Yarlett et al. (1986) reported cryopreservation of the anaerobic fungus...

93

Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

design utilizing a nanoparticle in dielectric matrix approach is used to achieve high optical performance. New refractory materials are used to either make or coat the...

96

Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

Henager, Charles H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Carbonaceous film coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

Maya, L.

1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Lateral downflows in sunspot penumbral filaments and their temporal evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the temporal evolution of downflows observed at the lateral edges of penumbral filaments in a sunspot located very close to the disk center. Our analysis is based on a sequence of nearly diffraction-limited spectropolarimetric scans of the Fe I 6173 A line taken with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. We compute Dopplergrams from the observed intensity profiles using line bisectors and filter the resulting velocity maps for subsonic oscillations. Lateral downflows appear everywhere in the center-side penumbra as small, weak patches of redshifts next to or along the edges of blueshifted flow channels. These patches have an intermittent life and undergo mergings and fragmentations quite frequently. The lateral downflows move together with the hosting filaments and react to their shape variations, very much resembling the evolution of granular convection in the quiet Sun. There is a good relation between brightness and velocity of the flow structures in the center-side penumbra, wi...

Pozuelo, S Esteban; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R A T O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunUC-1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings NilgunPaper Sol-gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

Ozer, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thin film ion conducting coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

103

Fitting of random tessellation models to keratin filament Michael Beil1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- physical properties of epithelial cells is poorly understood. This is at least partially due to a lack to Keratin Filament Networks 1 Introduction Keratins belong to the group of intermediate filament proteins proteins (Coulombe and Omary, 2002; Strnad et al., 2002). However, the knowledge about the processes

Schmidt, Volker

104

RecA-mediated SOS induction requires an extended filament conformation but no ATP hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RecA-mediated SOS induction requires an extended filament conformation but no ATP hydrolysis filament on single-stranded DNA and hydrolyzes ATP. The RecA K72R (recA2201) muta- tion eliminates in the presence of ATP. Strains with this mutation do not undergo SOS induction in vivo. We have combined the K72R

Cox, Michael M.

105

Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments mostly work collectively under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors, or resistance coming from cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Certain recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of stall force for individual filaments or motors. To understand this phenomena of excess or deficit collective force generation, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, i.e., the stall force of N filaments(motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is in equilibrium at stall. Consequently, we show that this additivity typically does not hold when the system departs from equilibrium at stall. We thus present a novel and unified underst...

Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Strong Enhancement of Terahertz Radiation from Laser Filaments in Air by a Static Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Strong Enhancement of Terahertz Radiation from Laser Filaments in Air by a Static Electric Field radiation from the laser filament is highly sensitive to the presence of a transverse electric field. We observe a three order of magnitude enhancement of the terahertz (THz) energy radiated by a femtosecond

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

107

Polymerization and Bundling Kinetics of FtsZ Filaments Ganhui Lan,* Alex Dajkovic,y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymerization and Bundling Kinetics of FtsZ Filaments Ganhui Lan,* Alex Dajkovic,y Denis Wirtz a kinetic model that describes the polymerization and bundling mechanism of FtsZ filaments. The model polymerization kinetics data of another researcher, and explains the cooperativity observed in FtsZ kinetics

Sun, Sean

108

Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John and Rongzhou Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John occur 3,4 . Tra- ditionally incandescent lighting filaments, despite being driven from equilibrium the blackbody spectrum. This suggests the pos- sibility of higher efficiency incandescent lighting, through

John, Sajeev

109

Coatings on reflective mask substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

Tong, William Man-Wai (Oakland, CA); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Mangat, Pawitter J. S. (Gilbert, AZ); Stivers, Alan R. (San Jose, CA); Kofron, Patrick G. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, Matthew A. (Austin, TX)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

Ozer, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coates Brostmeyer holds FTTs twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT's twin-spool...

112

Role of ATP-hydrolysis in the dynamics of a single actin filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stochastic dynamics of growth and shrinkage of single actin filaments taking into account insertion, removal, and ATP hydrolysis of subunits either according to the vectorial mechanism or to the random mechanism. In a previous work, we developed a model for a single actin or microtubule filament where hydrolysis occurred according to the vectorial mechanism: the filament could grow only from one end, and was in contact with a reservoir of monomers. Here we extend this approach in several ways, by including the dynamics of both ends and by comparing two possible mechanisms of ATP hydrolysis. Our emphasis is mainly on two possible limiting models for the mechanism of hydrolysis within a single filament, namely the vectorial or the random model. We propose a set of experiments to test the nature of the precise mechanism of hydrolysis within actin filaments.

Padinhateeri Ranjith; Kirone Mallick; Jean-Francois Joanny; David Lacoste

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Autonomous Motility of Active Filaments due to Spontaneous Flow-Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulate the nonlocal Stokesian hydrodynamics of an elastic filament which is active due a permanent distribution of stresslets along its contour. A bending instability of an initially straight filament spontaneously breaks flow symmetry and leads to autonomous filament motion which, depending on conformational symmetry, can be translational or rotational. At high ratios of activity to elasticity, the linear instability develops into nonlinear fluctuating states with large amplitude deformations. The dynamics of these states can be qualitatively understood as a superposition of translational and rotational motion associated with filament conformational modes of opposite symmetry. Our results can be tested in molecular-motor filament mixtures, synthetic chains of autocatalytic particles, or other linearly connected systems where chemical energy is converted to mechanical energy in a fluid environment.

Gayathri Jayaraman; Sanoop Ramachandran; Somdeb Ghose; Abhrajit Laskar; M. Saad Bhamla; P. B. Sunil Kumar; R. Adhikari

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ceramic composite coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ceramic composite coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

Wicks, G.G.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

116

Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inertial blob-hole symmetry breaking in magnetised plasma filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symmetry breaking between the propagation velocities of magnetised plasma filaments with large positive (blob) and negative (hole) amplitudes, as implied by a dimensional analysis scaling, is studied with global ("full-n") non-Boussinesq gyrofluid computations, which include finite inertia effects through nonlinear polarisation. Interchange blobs on a flat density background have higher inertia and propagate more slowly than holes. In the presence of a large enough density gradient, the effect is reversed: blobs accelerate down the gradient and holes are slowed in their propagation up the gradient. Drift wave blobs spread their initial vorticity rapidly into a fully developed turbulent state, whereas primary holes can remain coherent for many eddy turnover times. The results bear implications for plasma edge zonal flow evolution and tokamak scrape-off-layer transport.

Kendl, Alexander

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Diamond growth on WC-Co substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition: Effect of filamentsubstrate separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polycrystalline diamond films have been grown by hot filament (HF) chemical vapor deposition on WC-Co bar is an established technique for growing hard, wear- resistant polycrystalline diamond films on a range of substratesDiamond growth on WC-Co substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition: Effect of filament

Bristol, University of

119

High Metallicity, Photoionised Gas in Intergalactic Large-Scale Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present high-resolution UV spectra of absorption-line systems toward the low-z QSO HS0624+6907 (z=0.3700). Coupled with spectroscopic galaxy redshifts, we find that many of these absorbers are integalactic gas clouds distributed within large-scale structures. The gas is cool (T0.9). STIS data reveal a cluster of 13 HI Lyman alpha lines within a 1000 km/s interval at z=0.0635. We find 10 galaxies at this redshift with impact parameters ranging from 135 h^-1 kpc to 1.37 h^-1 Mpc. We attribute the HI Lya absorptions to intragroup medium gas, possibly from a large-scale filament viewed along its long axis. Remarkably, the metallicity is near-solar, [M/H] = -0.05 +/- 0.4 (2 sigma uncertainty), yet the nearest galaxy which might pollute the IGM is at least 135 h_70^-1 kpc away. Tidal stripping from nearby galaxies appears to be the most likely origin of this highly enriched, cool gas. More than six Abell galaxy clusters are found within 4 degree of the sight line suggesting that the QSO line of sight passes near a node in the cosmic web. At z~0.077, we find absorption systems as well as galaxies at the redshift of the nearby clusters Abell 564 and Abell 559. We conclude that the sight line pierces a filament of gas and galaxies feeding into these clusters. The absorber at z_abs = 0.07573 associated with Abell 564/559 also has a high metallicity with [C/H] > -0.6, but again the closest galaxy is relatively far from the sight line (293 h^-1 kpc).

Bastien Aracil; Todd M. Tripp; David V. Bowen; Jason X. Proschaska; Hsiao-Wen Chen; Brenda L. Frye

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

Force generation by Myosin II Filaments in Compliant Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Myosin II isoforms with varying mechanochemistry and filament size interact with filamentous actin (F-actin) networks to generate contractile forces in cells. How their properties control force production in environments with varying stiffness is poorly understood. Here, we incorporated literature values for properties of myosin II isoforms into a cross-bridge model. Similar actin gliding speeds and force-velocity curves expected from previous experiments were observed. Motor force output on an elastic load was regulated by two timescales--that of their attachment to F-actin, which varied sharply with the ensemble size, motor duty ratio, and external load, and that of force build up, which scaled with ensemble stall force, gliding speed, and load stiffness. While such regulation did not require force-dependent kinetics, the myosin catch bond produced positive feedback between attachment time and force to trigger switch-like transitions from short attachments and small forces to high force-generating runs at threshold parameter values. Parameters representing skeletal muscle myosin, non-muscle myosin IIB, and non-muscle myosin IIA revealed distinct regimes of behavior respectively: (1) large assemblies of fast, low-duty ratio motors rapidly build stable forces over a large range of environmental stiffness, (2) ensembles of slow, high-duty ratio motors serve as high-affinity cross-links with force build-up times that exceed physiological timescales, and (3) small assemblies of low-duty ratio motors operating at intermediate speeds may respond sharply to changes in mechanical context--at low forces or stiffness, they serve as low affinity cross-links but they can transition to effective force production via the positive feedback mechanism described above. These results reveal how myosin isoform properties may be tuned to produce force and respond to mechanical cues in their environment.

Samantha Stam; Jon Alberts; Margaret L. Gardel; Edwin Munro

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Environmental Technology Verification Coatings and Coating Equipment Program (ETV CCEP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Quality Assurance for the ETV CCEP.....................................................................1.................................................................11 2.2.12 Determination of Total Volatile Content of the UV-Curable Coating.......14 2.3 Schedule.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES.......................................

122

Method of measuring metal coating adhesion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

Roper, John R. (Northglenn, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Prime coats materials and methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prime coat is the application of a suitable bituminous binder applied to a nonbituminous granular base as a preliminary treatment before the application of a bituminous surfacing. The purpose of this research is to establish practical applications...

Mantilla, Christian Augusto

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of {alpha}{sub 00} and {alpha}{sub 02} (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S{sub 02} (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu Bin [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Lu Jianduo [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Molecular Filaments in the Reflection Nebula NGC 7023  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present near-infrared spectroscopy of fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H_2) emission from molecular filaments in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. We derive the relative column densities of H_2 rotational-vibrational states from the measured line emission and compare these results with several model photodissociation regions covering a range of densities, incident UV-fields, and excitation mechanisms. Our best-fit models for one filament suggest, but do not require, either a combination of different densities, suggesting clumps of 10^6 cm^{-3} in a 10^4 - 10^5 cm^{-3} filament, or a combination of fluorescent excitation and thermally-excited gas, perhaps due to a shock from a bipolar outflow. We derive densities and UV fields for these molecular filaments that are in agreement with previous determinations.

Paul Martini; K. Sellgren; Joseph L. Hora

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Observation of laser multiple filamentation process and multiple electron beams acceleration in a laser wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiple filaments formation process in the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) was observed by imaging the transmitted laser beam after propagating in the plasma of different density. During propagation, the laser first self-focused into a single filament. After that, it began to defocus with energy spreading in the transverse direction. Two filaments then formed from it and began to propagate independently, moving away from each other. We have also demonstrated that the laser multiple filamentation would lead to the multiple electron beams acceleration in the LWFA via ionization-induced injection scheme. Besides, its influences on the accelerated electron beams were also analyzed both in the single-stage LWFA and cascaded LWFA.

Li, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Zhijun; Qi, Rong; Wang, Cheng; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filaments evidence Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filaments evidence Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament dynamics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: actin filament dynamics Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin based filaments Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: actin based filaments Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament elongation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filament elongation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament assembly Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filament assembly Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 R728 Current Biology Vol 10 No 20 Cellular regulation of Summary: assembly and disassembly of a network of...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament modeling Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: actin filament modeling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filament formation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament labels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: actin filament labels Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament organization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filament organization Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament nucleation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: actin filament nucleation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - actin filament networks Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: actin filament networks Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Current Biology 16, 19241930, October 10, 2006 2006 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016...

143

Real-Time Measurements of Actin Filament Polymerization by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Measurements of Actin Filament Polymerization by Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence polymerization and its regulation by associated proteins requires an assay to monitor polymerization dynamics nucleotide. INTRODUCTION Actin polymerization contributes to many cellular processes under the control

144

Topological instability along filamented invariant surfaces B. A. Carreras and V. E. Lynch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of quasicoherent structures. In this situation, the isosurfaces of the velocity stream function have a web. These filaments form a complex web in the plasma. The filamentary surfaces can result in the ap- pearance

Martín-Solís, José Ramón

145

Filaments, Collapse and Outflows in Massive Star Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from our numerical simulations of collapsing massive molecular cloud cores. These numerical calculations show that massive stars assemble quickly with mass accretion rates exceeding 10^-3 Msol/yr and confirm that the mass accretion during the collapsing phase is much more efficient than predicted by selfsimilar collapse solutions, dM/dt ~ c^3/G. We find that during protostellar assembly out of a non-turbulent core, the mass accretion reaches 20 - 100 c^3/G. Furthermore, we explore the self-consistent structure of bipolar outflows that are produced in our three dimensional magnetized collapse simulations. These outflows produce cavities out of which radiation pressure can be released, thereby reducing the limitations on the final mass of massive stars formed by gravitational collapse. Additional enhancement of the mass accretion rate comes from accretion along filaments that are built up by supersonic turbulent motions. Our numerical calculations of collapsing turbulent cores result in mass accretion rates as high as 10^-2 Msol/yr.

Robi Banerjee; Ralph E. Pudritz

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Organization ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Okamoto, T. J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Otsuji, K., E-mail: lites@ucar.ed [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF DUSTY FILAMENTS IN HERCULES A: EVIDENCE FOR ENTRAINMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present U-, V-, and I-band images of the host galaxy of Hercules A (3C 348) obtained with HST/WFC3/UVIS. We find a network of dusty filaments which are more complex and extended than seen in earlier Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. The filaments are associated with a faint blue continuum light (possibly from young stars) and faint H{alpha} emission. It seems likely that the cold gas and dust has been stripped from a companion galaxy now seen as a secondary nucleus. There are dusty filaments aligned with the base of the jets on both eastern and western sides of the galaxy. The morphology of the filaments is different on the two sides-the western filaments are fairly straight, while the eastern filaments are mainly in two loop-like structures. We suggest that despite the difference in morphologies, both sets of filaments have been entrained in a slow-moving boundary layer outside the relativistic flow. As suggested by Fabian et al., magnetic fields in the filaments may stabilize them against disruption. We consider a speculative scenario to explain the relation between the radio source and the shock and cavities in the hot intracluster medium seen in the Chandra data. We suggest that the radio source originally ({approx}60 Myr ago) propagated along a position angle of {approx}35 Degree-Sign where it created the shock and cavities. The radio source axis changed to its current orientation ({approx}100 Degree-Sign ) possibly due to a supermassive black hole merger and began its current epoch of activity about 20 Myr ago.

O'Dea, C. P.; Kharb, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Baum, S. A. [Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Cotton, W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Perley, R. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fine-scale structures and material flows of quiescent filaments observed by New Vacuum Solar Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study on the small-scale structures and material flows of solar quiescent filaments is very important for understanding the formation and equilibrium of solar filaments. Using the high resolution H{\\alpha} data observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST), we present the structures of the barbs and the material flows along the threads across the spine in two quiescent filaments on 2013 September 29 and on 2012 November 2, respectively. During the evolution of the filament barb, several parallel tube-shaped structures formed and the width of the structures ranges from about 2.3 Mm to 3.3 Mm. The parallel tube-shaped structures merged together accompanied with the material flows from the spine to the barb. Moreover, the boundary between the barb and surrounding atmosphere is very neat. The counter-streaming flows were not found to appear alternately in the adjacent threads of the filament. However, the large-scale patchy counter-streaming flows are detected in the filament. The flows in one patch of the fi...

Yan, X L; Xiang, Y Y; Yang, L H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Stability of filaments in star-forming clouds and the formation of prestellar cores in them  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now widely accepted that dense filaments of molecular gas are integral to the process of stellar birth. While numerical simulations have succeeded in reproducing filamentary structure in turbulent gas and analytic calculations have predicted the formation of dense gas filaments via radial collapse, the exact process(es) that generate/s such filaments which then form prestellar cores within them, is unclear. In this work we therefore study numerically the formation of a dense filament using a relatively simple set-up of a uniform-density cylinder in pressure equilibrium with its confining medium. In particular, we examine if its propensity to form a dense filament and further, to the formation of prestellar cores within this filament bears on the gravitational state of the initial volume of gas. We report a radial collapse leading to the formation of a dense filamentary cloud is likely when the initial volume of gas is at least critically stable (characterised by the approximate equality between the mass...

Anathpindika, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

HVOF coatings of Diamalloy 2002 and Diamalloy 4010 onto steel: Tensile and bending response of coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HVOF coating of Diamalloy 2002 powders and Diamalloy 4010 powders as well as two-layered coatings consisting of these powders is carried out. In the two-layered structure, Diamalloy 4010 is sprayed at the substrate surface while Diamalloy 2002 is sprayed on the top of Diamalloy 4010 coating. The mechanical properties of the coatings are examined through tensile and three-point bending tests. The coating microstructure and morphology are examined using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the coating produced is free from defects including voids and cracks. The failure mechanism of coating during tensile and three-point bending tests is mainly crack formation and propagation in the coating. The elastic modulus of coating produced from Diamalloy 2002 is higher than that of Diamalloy 4010 coating, which is due to the presence of 12% WC in the coating.

Al-Shehri, Y. A.; Hashmi, M. S. J. [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Eng., DCU, Dublin (Ireland); Yilbas, B. S. [Mech. Eng. Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

152

Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

Ren, Zhifeng; Wen, Jian; Chen, Jinghua; Huang, Zhongping; Wang, Dezhi

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

High Performance Nanostructured Spectrally Selective Coating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

powders for SSC layer paste 'Multi-scale' particles clearly show much better light absorption Multi-scale vs. Mono-scale Structures Coating Process Development Coating of SSC...

156

Constraints on (Omega_m,Omega_Lambda) using distributions of inclination angles for high redshift filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present a scale free method to determine the cosmological parameters (Omega_m, Omega_Lambda). The method is based on the requirement of isotropy of the distribution of orientations of cosmological filaments. The current structure formation paradigm predicts that the first structures to form are voids and filaments, causing a web-like structure of the matter distribution at high redshifts. Recent observational evidence suggests that the threads, or filaments, of the cosmic web most easily are mapped in Ly-alpha emission. We describe how such a 3D map can be used to constrain the cosmological parameters in a way which, contrary to most other cosmological tests, does not require the use of a standard rod or a standard candle. We perform detailed simulations in order to define the optimal survey parameters for the definition of an observing programme aimed to address this test, and to investigate how statistical and observational errors will influence the results. We conclude that observations should target filaments of comoving size 15-50 Mpc in the redshift range 2-4, and that each filament must be defined by at least four Ly-alpha emitters. Detection of 20 filaments will be sufficient to obtain a result, while 50 filaments will make it possible to place significant new constraints on the values of Omega_m and Omega_Lambda permitted by the current supernova observations. In a future paper we study how robust these conclusions are to systematic velocities in the survey box.

M. Weidinger; P. Moller; J. P. U. Fynbo; B. Thomsen; M. P. Egholm

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

Friction- and wear-reducing coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

Zhu, Dong (Farmington Hills, MI); Milner, Robert (Warren, MI); Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim (Troy, MI)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy ANALYSIS REPORT (FAR) CORROSION RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS EISG AWARDEE Chemat://www.energy.ca.gov/research/index.html. #12;Page 1 Corrosion Resistant Coating for Carbonate Fuel Cell Components EISG Grant # 00-05 Awardee

159

Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Terahertz antireflection coatings using metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate terahertz metamaterial antireflection coatings (ARCs) that significantly reduce the reflection and enhance the transmission at an interface of dielectric media. They are able to operate over a wide range of incidence angles for both TM and TE polarizations. Experiments and finite-element simulations will be presented and discussed.

Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM  

Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh environments. Developed for the maritime industry, it is suit-able for the interior & exterior of shipboard structures and tanks as well as other appli-cations where performance counts...

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of higher-order Kerr nonlinearity and plasma diffraction on multiple filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of higher-order Kerr nonlinearity on channel formation by, and filamentation of, ultrashort laser pulses propagating in air is considered. Filament patterns originating from multiphoton ionization of the air molecules with and without the higher-order Kerr and molecular-rotation effects are investigated. It is found that diverging multiple filaments are formed if only the plasma-induced defocusing effect is included. In the presence of the higher-order Kerr effects, the light channel can exist for a long distance. The effect of noise on the filament patterns is also discussed.

Huang, T. W. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhou, C. T. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Science College, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhang, H. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); He, X. T. [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cyanophycin Mediates the Accumulation and Storage of Fixed Carbon in Non-Heterocystous Filamentous Cyanobacteria from Coniform Mats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin, filamentous, non-heterocystous, benthic cyanobacteria (Subsection III) from some marine, lacustrine and thermal environments aggregate into macroscopic cones and conical stromatolites. We investigate the uptake and ...

Liang, Biqing

164

THE SPIN AND ORIENTATION OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN COSMIC FILAMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clusters, filaments, sheets, and voids are the building blocks of the cosmic web. Forming dark matter halos respond to these different large-scale environments, and this in turn affects the properties of galaxies hosted by the halos. It is therefore important to understand the systematic correlations of halo properties with the morphology of the cosmic web, as this informs both about galaxy formation physics and possible systematics of weak lensing studies. In this study, we present and compare two distinct algorithms for finding cosmic filaments and sheets, a task which is far less well established than the identification of dark matter halos or voids. One method is based on the smoothed dark matter density field and the other uses the halo distributions directly. We apply both techniques to one high-resolution N-body simulation and reconstruct the filamentary/sheet like network of the dark matter density field. We focus on investigating the properties of the dark matter halos inside these structures, in particular, on the directions of their spins and the orientation of their shapes with respect to the directions of the filaments and sheets. We find that both the spin and the major axes of filament halos with masses approx<10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} are preferentially aligned with the direction of the filaments. The spins and major axes of halos in sheets tend to lie parallel to the sheets. There is an opposite mass dependence of the alignment strength for the spin (negative) and major (positive) axes, i.e. with increasing halo mass the major axis tends to be more strongly aligned with the direction of the filament, whereas the alignment between halo spin and filament becomes weaker with increasing halo mass. The alignment strength as a function of the distance to the most massive node halo indicates that there is a transit large-scale environment impact: from the two-dimensional collapse phase of the filament to the three-dimensional collapse phase of the cluster/node halo at small separation. Overall, the two algorithms for filament/sheet identification investigated here agree well with each other. The method based on halos alone can be easily adapted for use with observational data sets.

Zhang Youcai; Yang Xiaohu; Lin Weipeng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Partner Group of MPA, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China); Faltenbacher, Andreas; Springel, Volker [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wang Huiyuan, E-mail: yczhang@shao.ac.c [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Center for Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 (China)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

An Excursion Set Model of the Cosmic Web: the Abundance of Sheets, Filaments And Halos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss an analytic approach for modeling structure formation in sheets, filaments and knots. This is accomplished by combining models of triaxial collapse with the excursion set approach: sheets are defined as objects which have collapsed along only one axis, filaments have collapsed along two axes, and halos are objects in which triaxial collapse is complete. In the simplest version of this approach, which we develop here, large scale structure shows a clear hierarchy of morphologies: the mass in large-scale sheets is partitioned up among lower mass filaments, which themselves are made-up of still lower mass halos. Our approach provides analytic estimates of the mass fraction in sheets, filaments and halos, and its evolution, for any background cosmological model and any initial fluctuation spectrum. In the currently popular {Lambda}CDM model, our analysis suggests that more than 99% of the mass in sheets, and 72% of the mass in filaments, is stored in objects more massive than 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} at the present time. For halos, this number is only 46%. Our approach also provides analytic estimates of how halo abundances at any given time correlate with the morphology of the surrounding large-scale structure, and how halo evolution correlates with the morphology of large scale structure.

Shen, Jiajian; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mo, Houjun; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Sheth, Ravi; /Pennsylvania U.

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

An excursion set model of the cosmic web: The abundance of sheets, filaments and halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss an analytic approach for modeling structure formation in sheets, filaments and knots. This is accomplished by combining models of triaxial collapse with the excursion set approach: sheets are defined as objects which have collapsed along only one axis, filaments have collapsed along two axes, and halos are objects in which triaxial collapse is complete. In the simplest version of this approach, which we develop here, large scale structure shows a clear hierarchy of morphologies: the mass in large-scale sheets is partitioned up among lower mass filaments, which themselves are made-up of still lower mass halos. Our approach provides analytic estimates of the mass fraction in sheets, filaments and halos, and its evolution, for any background cosmological model and any initial fluctuation spectrum. In the currently popular $\\Lambda$CDM model, our analysis suggests that more than 99% of the cosmic mass is in sheets, and 72% in filaments, with mass larger than $10^{10} M_{\\odot}$ at the present time. For halos, this number is only 46%. Our approach also provides analytic estimates of how halo abundances at any given time correlate with the morphology of the surrounding large-scale structure, and how halo evolution correlates with the morphology of large scale structure.

Jiajian Shen; Tom Abel; H. J. Mo; Ravi Sheth

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

Fan, Hongyou

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

High efficiency turbine blade coatings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered periodic microstructures in the coating, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of particle transport in the PVD plume, functional graded layer development, the deposition of all layers to form a complete coating, and materials characterization including thermal testing. Ion beam-assisted deposition, beam sharing through advanced digital rastering, substrate pivoting, hearth calorimetry, infrared imaging, fiber optic-enabled optical emission spectroscopy and careful thermal management were used to achieve all the milestones outlined in the FY02 LDRD proposal.

Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits.

Im, Kwan H. (Naperville, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Burr Ridge, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace is described having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits. 7 figs.

Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

174

FROM DUSTY FILAMENTS TO MASSIVE STARS: THE CASE OF NGC 7538 S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on high-sensitivity and high angular resolution archival Submillimeter Array observations of the large ({approx}15,000 AU) putative circumstellar disk associated with the O-type protostar NGC 7538 S. Observations of the continuum resolve this putative circumstellar disk into five compact sources, with sizes {approx}3000 AU and masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }. This confirms the results of recent millimeter observations made with CARMA/BIMA toward this object. However, we find that most of these compact sources eject collimated bipolar outflows, revealed by our silicon monoxide (SiO J = 5-4) observations, and confirm that these sources have a (proto)stellar nature. All outflows are perpendicular to the large and rotating dusty structure. We propose therefore that, rather than being a single massive circumstellar disk, NGC 7538 S could instead be a large and massive contracting or rotating filament that is fragmenting at scales of 0.1-0.01 pc to form several B-type stars, via the standard process involving outflows and disks. As in recent high spatial resolution studies of dusty filaments, our observations also suggest that thermal pressure does not seem to be sufficient to support the filament, so that either additional support needs to be invoked or else the filament must be in the process of collapsing. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulation of the formation of a molecular cloud by converging warm neutral medium flows produces contracting filaments whose dimensions and spacings between the stars forming within them, as well as their column densities, strongly resemble those observed in the filament reported here.

Naranjo-Romero, Raul; Zapata, Luis A.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Takahashi, Satoko [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Palau, Aina [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Schilke, Peter [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Robustness of the filamentation instability for asymmetric plasma shells collision in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The filamentation instability triggered when two counter streaming plasma shells overlap appears to be the main mechanism by which collisionless shocks are generated. It has been known for long that a flow aligned magnetic field can completely suppress this instability. In a recent paper [Phys. Plasmas 18, 080706 (2011)], it was demonstrated in two dimensions that for the case of two cold, symmetric, relativistically colliding shells, such cancellation cannot occur if the field is not perfectly aligned. Here, this result is extended to the case of two asymmetric shells. The filamentation instability appears therefore as an increasingly robust mechanism to generate shocks.

Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)] [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Numerical studies of third-harmonic generation in laser filament in air perturbed by plasma spot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Third-harmonic emission from laser filament intercepted by plasma spot is studied by numerical simulations. Significant enhancement of the third-harmonic generation is obtained due to the disturbance of the additional plasma. The contribution of the pure plasma effect and the possible plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility on the third-harmonic generation enhancement are compared. It is shown that the plasma induced cancellation of destructive interference [Y. Liu et al., Opt. Commun. 284, 4706 (2011)] of two-colored filament is the dominant mechanism of the enhancement of third-harmonic generation.

Feng Liubin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Lu Xin; Liu Xiaolong; Li Yutong; Chen Liming; Ma Jinglong; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Xi Tingting [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas of the Ministry of Education of China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Stabilization of the filamentation instability and the anisotropy of the background plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an anisotropic Maxwellian plasma is investigated, with a focus on the stabilization condition for the filamentation instability. It is found that this condition is very sensitive to the anisotropy degree of the background plasma so that the investigation of the beam instability may not be easily decoupled from the state of the background plasma in typical fusion conditions. Furthermore, regardless of the plasma isotropy, filamentation can no longer be suppressed when the beam density exceeds a threshold value that is determined.

Bret, A.; Deutsch, C. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (CNRS-UMR 8578), Universite Paris XI, Batiment 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Formation of current filaments and magnetic field generation in a quantum current-carrying plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and magnetic field in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the presence of quantum effects using the quantum hydrodynamic model. A new nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained for the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field in the diffusion regime. This equation is solved by applying the Adomian decomposition method, and then the profiles of magnetic field and electron density are plotted. It is shown that the saturation time of filamentation instability increases and, consequently, the instability growth rate and the magnetic field amplitude decrease in the presence of quantum effects.

Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghadosi, M. R.; Majedi, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filamented electron beams have been observed to be emitted from the rear of thin solid targets irradiated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser when there is low-density plasma present at the back of the target. These observations are consistent with a laser-generated beam of relativistic electrons propagating through the target, which is subsequently fragmented by a Weibel-like instability in the low-density plasma at the rear. These measurements are in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations and theory, since the filamentation instability is predicted to be dramatically enhanced when the electron beam density approaches that of the background plasma.

Wei, M.S.; Beg, F.N.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clark, E.L.; Evans, R.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ledingham, K.W.D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Norreys, P.A. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Department of Physics, The Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Findings in seal coat design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Africa (NITRR) and its members Dr. Claude P. Marais, Dr. Alex T. Visser and Dr. C. J. Semmelink for furnishing the relevant data and figures presented in this report. Finally this thesis and accomplishments are dedicated to my project Principal... Volume. 1. Embedment 2. Wear and Degradation. 3. Skid Resistance. 35 40 41 43 44 V SOUTH AFRICANS' RATIONAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF SEAL COATS AND SURFACE TREATMENT. . 50 A. Background. B. Marais' Rational Approach. 1. Aggregate Spread Rate...

Gonzalez Palmer, Miguel Angel

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High temperature solar selective coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

Kennedy, Cheryl E

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pedestal substrate for coated optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Malsbury, Terry N. (Tracy, CA); Patterson, Steven R. (Concord, NC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

184

Unveiling a network of parallel filaments in the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of combined NH3(1,1) and (2,2) line emission observed with the Very Large Array and the Effelsberg 100m telescope of the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506. The NH3 emission reveals a network of filaments constituting two hub-filament systems. Hubs are associated with gas of rotational temperature Trot \\sim 25 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion ~1.1 km/s, and exhibit signs of star formation, while filaments appear to be more quiescent (Trot \\sim 11 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion ~0.6 km/s). Filaments are parallel in projection and distributed mainly along two directions, at PA \\sim 10 deg and 60 deg, and appear to be coherent in velocity. The averaged projected separation between adjacent filaments is between 0.5 pc and 1pc, and the mean width of filaments is 0.12 pc. Cores within filaments are separated by ~0.33 pc, which is consistent with the predicted fragmentation of an isothermal gas cylinder due to the 'sausage'-type instability. The network of parallel filaments observed in G...

Busquet, Gemma; Palau, Aina; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Estalella, Robert; Ho, Paul T P; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar; Pillai, Thushara; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Girart, Josep M; Santos, Fábio P; Franco, Gabriel A P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Polymeric filament thinning and breakup in microchannels P. E. Arratia,1,* J. P. Gollub,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polymeric filament thinning and breakup in microchannels P. E. Arratia,1,* J. P. Gollub,1,2 and D the breakup process, compared to the Newtonian case. Qualitatively, polymeric filaments show much slower two main temporal regimes: flow- and capillary-driven. At early times both polymeric and Newtonian

Gollub, Jerry P.

186

Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Surface roughness of anodized titanium coatings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of grade five 6Al4V titanium alloy were coated with two commercial fluoropolymer anodizations (Tiodize and Canadize) and compared. Neither coating demonstrates significant outgassing. The coatings show very similar elemental analysis, except for the presence of lead in the Canadize coating, which may account for its lower surface friction in humid environments. Surface roughness has been compared by SEM, contact profilometry, optical profilometry, power spectral density and bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The Tiodize film is slightly smoother by all measurement methods, but the Canadize film shows slightly less scatter at all angles of incidence. Both films exhibited initial friction coefficients of 0.2 to 0.4, increasing to 0.4 to 0.8 after 1000 cycles of sliding due to wear of the coating and ball. The coatings are very similar and should behave identically in most applications.

Dugger, Michael Thomas; Chinn, Douglas Alan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

Burin, Michael [CSUSM

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tamás Bánsági, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

Steinbock, Oliver

190

of a brownian ratchet. Thermal fluctuations of the flexible actin filaments expose the tip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a brownian ratchet. Thermal fluctuations of the flexible actin filaments expose the tip long enough for a new monomer to attach. Once the tip springs back, it ratchets the membrane forward by the length of one monomer. Brownian ratchets have found a life of their own in the physics literature

Ahissar, Ehud

191

Measuring molecular rupture forces between single actin filaments and actin-binding proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring molecular rupture forces between single actin filaments and actin-binding proteins Jorge, and accepted by the Editorial Board April 24, 2008 (received for review June 29, 2007) Actin-binding proteins to model the mechanical properties of actin networks grown in vitro; however, there is a lack

Kamm, Roger D.

192

Direct imaging of the acoustic waves generated by femtosecond filaments in air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct imaging of the acoustic waves generated by femtosecond filaments in air J. K. Wahlstrand, N of spatial single- and higher-mode 50 fs, 800 nm pulses in air at 10 Hz and 1 kHz repetition rates. Results in air [9]. They claimed a positive gas density perturba- tion on axis with a microsecond lifetime

Milchberg, Howard

193

Atomistic Simulation Approach to a Continuum Description of Self-Assembled b-Sheet Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be applicable to developing continuum elastic ribbon models of other b-sheet filaments and amyloid fibrils promise as a three-dimensional cell culture matrix or as a tissue engi- neering scaffold. Due to the short). Another important aspect of b-sheet peptide self-assembly is its similarity to amyloid fibrils found

Kamm, Roger D.

194

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division Ganhui Lana , Brian R. Danielsb-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low- density state to a high-density state and generates the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that Fts

Sun, Sean

195

Role of ATP-Hydrolysis in the Dynamics of a Single Actin Filament Padinhateeri Ranjith,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of ATP-Hydrolysis in the Dynamics of a Single Actin Filament Padinhateeri Ranjith, * Kirone, and ATP hydrolysis of subunits either according to the vectorial mechanism or to the random mechanism and by comparing two possible mechanisms of ATP hydro- lysis. Our emphasis is mainly on two possible limiting

Lacoste, David

196

Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films grown by Hot Filament CVD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H4 flow-rate ratio of standard polycrystalline diamond deposition parameters on formationRaman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films grown by Hot Filament CVD of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia b,c Diamond Research Laboratory, School

Bristol, University of

197

Heat transfer in sunspot penumbrae. Origin of dark-cored penumbral filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: Observations at 0.1" have revealed the existence of dark cores in the bright filaments of sunspot penumbrae. Expectations are high that such dark-cored filaments are the basic building blocks of the penumbra, but their nature remains unknown. Aims: We investigate the origin of dark cores in penumbral filaments and the surplus brightness of the penumbra. To that end we use an uncombed penumbral model. Methods: The 2D stationary heat transfer equation is solved in a stratified atmosphere consisting of nearly horizontal magnetic flux tubes embedded in a stronger and more vertical field. The tubes carry an Evershed flow of hot plasma. Results: This model produces bright filaments with dark cores as a consequence of the higher density of the plasma inside the tubes, which shifts the surface of optical depth unity toward higher (cooler) layers. Our calculations suggest that the surplus brightness of the penumbra is a natural consequence of the Evershed flow, and that magnetic flux tubes about 250 km in diameter can explain the morphology of sunspot penumbrae.

B. Ruiz Cobo; L. R. Bellot Rubio

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Annealing Accounts for the Length of Actin Filaments Formed by Spontaneous Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annealing Accounts for the Length of Actin Filaments Formed by Spontaneous Polymerization David by spontaneous polymerization of highly purified actin monomers by fluorescence microscopy after labelingZ concentrations. INTRODUCTION Actin polymerization is important not only for cellular structure and function

199

Abstract The polymerization of filamentous proteins generates mechanical forces which drive many cellular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The polymerization of filamentous proteins generates mechanical forces which drive many microtubule. They found that the force is generally in the range predicted by the "polymerization ratchet generalize the polymerization ratchet model to take into account the "subsidy effect" that arises because

Oster, George

200

Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in D?; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of ‘magnetic shear disconnection’ due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

R.J. Maqueda, D.P. Stotler and the NSTX Team.

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing­16 . The plasma generation balances the self-focusing effect and leads to a limited peak intensity 17­19 along, Germany Received 10 March 2006; published 27 September 2006 Our experiment shows that external focusing

Becker, Andreas

202

Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air Yohann Brelet1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air Yohann Brelet1 , Aurélien, Palaiseau, France A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 k experiments of laser guided discharges obtained in air by high voltage bursts delivered by a compact Tesla

Boyer, Edmond

203

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles Yifat Brill- ses. Cell movement is driven by the dynamic growth of polar actin networks of various structures,[1 containing the lamellipodium, but lacking the nucleus, micro- tubules and other organels can perform movement

Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

204

On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull...

Huang, Yu-Hsuan

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Coated metal articles and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R. (Van Buren Township, IN); Eubank, Lowell D. (Wilmington, DE)

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sheet form For corrosion resistance, apply a coating that is a composite of two materials: - Filler to provide electrical conductivity * Candidate Materials: graphite, carbon...

208

Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

analyses before degradation tests. 5 Project Tasks per Period Phase 1 (FY13) * Task 1.1: Identification and characterization of candidate protective coatings for particular molten...

209

OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference Proceedings,Conference on Gas Turbine Materials in a Marine Environment,in developing new turbine materials, coatings and processes,

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide...

211

ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from H? and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)] [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kobayashi, Ken [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States); DeForest, Craig [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

[TiII] and [NiII] emission from the strontium filament of eta Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the nature of the [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the TiII and NiII systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the TiII ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with an electron density of the order of $10^7$ cm$^{-3}$ and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March~2000 and November~2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused by dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of \\etacar. We study the condensation chemistry of Ti, Ni and Fe within the filament and suggest that the observed gas phase overabundance of Ti

M. A. Bautista; H. Hartman; T. R. Gull; N. Smith; K. Lodders

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Explicit mean-field radius for nearly parallel vortex filaments in statistical equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophysical research has focused on flows, such as ocean currents, as two dimensional. Two dimensional point or blob vortex models have the advantage of having a Hamiltonian, whereas 3D vortex filament or tube systems do not necessarily have one, although they do have action functionals. On the other hand, certain classes of 3D vortex models called nearly parallel vortex filament models do have a Hamiltonian and are more accurate descriptions of geophysical and atmospheric flows than purely 2D models, especially at smaller scales. In these ``quasi-2D'' models we replace 2D point vortices with vortex filaments that are very straight and nearly parallel but have Brownian variations along their lengths due to local self-induction. When very straight, quasi-2D filaments are expected to have virtually the same planar density distributions as 2D models. An open problem is when quasi-2D model statistics behave differently than those of the related 2D system and how this difference is manifested. In this paper we study the nearly parallel vortex filament model of Klein, Majda, Damodaran in statistical equilibrium. We are able to obtain a free-energy functional for the system in a non-extensive thermodynamic limit that is a function of the mean square vortex position $R^2$ and solve \\emph{explicitly} for $R^2$. Such an explicit formula has never been obtained for a non-2D model. We compare the results of our formula to a 2-D formula of \\cite{Lim:2005} and show qualitatively different behavior even when we disallow vortex braiding. We further confirm our results using Path Integral Monte Carlo (Ceperley (1995)) \\emph{without} permutations and that the Klein, Majda, Damodaran model's asymptotic assumptions \\emph{are valid} for parameters where these deviations occur.

Timothy D. Andersen; Chjan C. Lim

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

Cunnington, G.R.; Clark, R.K.; Robinson, J.C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

UNVEILING A NETWORK OF PARALLEL FILAMENTS IN THE INFRARED DARK CLOUD G14.225-0.506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of combined NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line emission observed with the Very Large Array and the Effelsberg 100 m telescope of the infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506. The NH{sub 3} emission reveals a network of filaments constituting two hub-filament systems. Hubs are associated with gas of rotational temperature T{sub rot} {approx} 15 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub NT} {approx} 1 km s{sup -1}, and exhibit signs of star formation, while filaments appear to be more quiescent (T{sub rot} {approx} 11 K and {sigma}{sub NT} {approx} 0.6 km s{sup -1}). Filaments are parallel in projection and distributed mainly along two directions, at P.A. {approx} 10 Degree-Sign and 60 Degree-Sign , and appear to be coherent in velocity. The averaged projected separation between adjacent filaments is between 0.5 pc and 1 pc, and the mean width of filaments is 0.12 pc. Cores within filaments are separated by {approx}0.33 {+-} 0.09 pc, which is consistent with the predicted fragmentation of an isothermal gas cylinder due to the {sup s}ausage{sup -}type instability. The network of parallel filaments observed in G14.225-0.506 is consistent with the gravitational instability of a thin gas layer threaded by magnetic fields. Overall, our data suggest that magnetic fields might play an important role in the alignment of filaments, and polarization measurements in the entire cloud would lend further support to this scenario.

Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C-5 parell, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-05125 Firenze (Italy); Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pillai, Thushara [Caltech Astronomy Department, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wyrowski, Friedrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Santos, Fabio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P., E-mail: gemma.busquet@iaps.inaf.it [Departamento de Fisica-ICEx-UFMG, Caixa Postal 702, 30.123-970 Belo Horizonte-MG (Brazil)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

OBSERVATIONS FROM SDO, HINODE, AND STEREO OF A TWISTING AND WRITHING START TO A SOLAR-FILAMENT-ERUPTION CASCADE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze data from SDO (AIA, HMI), Hinode (SOT, XRT, EIS), and STEREO (EUVI) of a solar eruption sequence of 2011 June 1 near 16:00 UT, with an emphasis on the early evolution toward eruption. Ultimately, the sequence consisted of three emission bursts and two filament ejections. SDO/AIA 304 A images show absorbing-material strands initially in close proximity which over {approx}20 minutes form a twisted structure, presumably a flux rope with {approx}10{sup 29} erg of free energy that triggers the resulting evolution. A jump in the filament/flux rope's displacement (average velocity {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) and the first burst of emission accompanies the flux-rope formation. After {approx}20 more minutes, the flux rope/filament kinks and writhes, followed by a semi-steady state where the flux rope/filament rises at ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) for {approx}10 minutes. Then the writhed flux rope/filament again becomes MHD unstable and violently erupts, along with rapid (50 km s{sup -1}) ejection of the filament and the second burst of emission. That ejection removed a field that had been restraining a second filament, which subsequently erupts as the second filament ejection accompanied by the third (final) burst of emission. Magnetograms from SDO/HMI and Hinode/SOT, and other data, reveal several possible causes for initiating the flux-rope-building reconnection, but we are not able to say which is dominant. Our observations are consistent with magnetic reconnection initiating the first burst and the flux-rope formation, with MHD processes initiating the further dynamics. Both filament ejections are consistent with the standard model for solar eruptions.

Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L. [Space Science Office, ZP13, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Hara, Hirohisa, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov, E-mail: hirohisa.hara@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

218

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of stochastic growth and inter-filament correlation in an actin-inspired many-body Brownian ratchet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a computational and theoretical study of a many-body Brownian ratchet, in which a "gel" of multiple, stiff polymerizing filaments pushes a diffusing obstacle. Our results show that steady-state dynamics of this system are strongly influenced by a layer of depleted filament density at the obstacle-gel interface. Inter-filament correlations within this molecule-thick layer have dramatic consequences for the velocity and structure of the growing gel. These emergent behaviors can be captured by mean field theories that emphasize the non-additivity of polymerization forces and indicate a key role for the fluctuating gap between gel and obstacle.

Hohlfeld, Evan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is available in sheet form For corrosion resistance, apply a coating that is a composite of two materials: ­ Filler to provide electrical conductivity · Candidate Materials: graphite, carbon black, TiB2 and CaB6Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings Jennifer Mawdsley Argonne National Laboratory Fuel

222

Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

High Temperature Oxidation Performance of Aluminide Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation resistance of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. Steam and exhaust gas environments are of particular interest because alumina is less susceptible to the accelerated attack due to hydroxide formation observed for chromia- and silica-forming alloys and ceramics. For water vapor testing, one ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and one austenitic alloy (304L) have been selected as substrate materials and CVD coatings have been used in order to have a well-controlled, high purity coating. It is anticipated that similar aluminide coatings could be made by a higher-volume, commercial process such as pack cementation. Previous work on this program has examined as-deposited coatings made by high and low Al activity CVD processes and the short-term performance of these coatings. The current work is focusing on the long term behavior in both diffusion tests16 and oxidation tests of the thicker, high Al activity coatings. For long-term coating durability, one area of concern has been the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between coating and substrate. This difference could cause cracking or deformation that could reduce coating life. Corrosion testing using thermal cycling is of particular interest because of this potential problem and results are presented where a short exposure cycle (1h) severely degraded aluminide coatings on both types of substrates. To further study the potential role of aluminide coatings in fossil energy applications, several high creep strength Ni-base alloys were coated by CVD for testing in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO{sub 2} environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Such alloys would be needed as structural and turbine materials in this concept. For Ni-base alloys, CVD produces a {approx}50{mu}m {beta}-NiAl outer layer with an underlying interdiffusion zone. Specimens of HR160, alloy 601 and alloy 230 were tested with and without coatings at 900 C and preliminary post-test characterization is reported.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

227

High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers High-Temperatuer Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers This presentation was...

228

Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High-Performance Membranes Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...

229

Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

Sangeeta, D. (Cincinnati, OH); Johnson, Curtis Alan (Schenectady, NY); Nelson, Warren Arthur (Clifton Park, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman Spectroscopy and XPS. Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman Spectroscopy...

231

Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Project Profile: High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers Sandia National...

232

Coated metal fiber coalescing cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Filamentous carbon particles for cleaning oil spills and method of production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact hydrogen generator is coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. The hydrogen generator can be conveniently integrated with high temperature fuel cells to produce an efficient and self-contained source of electrical power.

Muradov, Nazim

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Origin of the Galactic Center Nonthermal Radio Filaments: Young Stellar Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unusual class of magnetized nonthermal radio filaments (NTF), threads and streaks with their unique physical characteristics are found only within the inner couple of degrees of the Galactic center. Also, a number of young, mass-losing and rare stellar clusters are recognized to lie in the Galactic center region. The latter characteristic of the Galactic center region is used to explain the origin of the nonthermal radio filaments. We consider a mechanism in which the collective winds of massive WR and OB stars within a dense stellar environment produce shock waves that can accelerate particles to relativistic energies. This mechanism is an extension of a model originally proposed by Rosner and Bodo (1996), who suggested that energetic nonthermal particles are produced in a terminal shock of mass-losing stars. The large-scale distribution of the magnetic field in the context of this model is argued to have neither poloidal geometry nor pervasive throughout the Galactic center region.

F. Yusef-Zadeh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Non-equilibrium self-assembly of a filament coupled to ATP/GTP hydrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stochastic dynamics of growth and shrinkage of single actin filaments or microtubules taking into account insertion, removal, and ATP/GTP hydrolysis of subunits. The resulting phase diagram contains three different phases: a rapidly growing phase, an intermediate phase and a bound phase. We analyze all these phases, with an emphasis on the bound phase. We also discuss how hydrolysis affects force-velocity curves. The bound phase shows features of dynamic instability, which we characterize in terms of the time needed for the ATP/GTP cap to disappear as well as the time needed for the filament to reach a length of zero, i.e., (to collapse) for the first time. We obtain exact expressions for all these quantities, which we test using Monte Carlo simulations.

Padinhateeri Ranjith; David Lacoste; Kirone Mallick; Jean-Francois Joanny

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Spindles and active vortices in a model of confined filament-motor mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust self-organization of subcellular structures is a key principle governing the dynamics and evolution of cellular life. In fission yeast cells undergoing division, the mitotic spindle spontaneously emerges from the interaction of microtubules, motor proteins and the confining cell walls, and asters and vortices have been observed to self-assemble in quasi-two dimensional microtubule-kinesin assays. Their is no clear microscopic picture of the role of the active motors driving this pattern formation, and the relevance of continuum modeling to filament-scale structures remains uncertain. Here we present results of numerical simulations of a discrete filament-motor protein model confined to a pressurised cylindrical box. Stable spindles, nematic configurations, asters and high-density semi-asters spontaneously emerge, the latter pair having also been observed in cytosol confined within emulsion droplets. State diagrams are presented delineating each stationary state as the pressure, motor speed and motor de...

Head, David A; Gompper, Gerhard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Spatial and temporal evolution of filamentation instability in a current-carrying plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial and temporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the nonlinear regime. Using the magnetohydrodynamic equations, a nonlinear diffusion equation for the magnetic field in the plasma is obtained. This nonlinear equation is numerically solved and the spatiotemporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields and the electron density distribution are plotted. It is shown that as the time passes, the profile of the electric and magnetic fields changes from a sinusoidal shape to a saw-tooth one and the electron density distribution becomes very steepened. Also, the mechanism of the filament formation is then discussed. Furthermore, the effects of the thermal motion, collisions, and ion mass on growth rate of filaments as well as the saturation time are argued. Finally, it is found that the energy dissipation is associated with the aforementioned effects and strong plasma density gradient.

Mohammadhosseini, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

3D Simulations of Plasma Filaments in the Scrape Off Layer: A Comparison with Models of Reduced Dimensionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a 3D reduced fluid code. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarisation and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satis...

Easy, Luke; Omotani, John; Dudson, Benjamin; Havlí?ková, Eva; Tamain, Patrick; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Filaments of the radio cosmic web: opportunities and challenges for SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of the diffuse gas component of the cosmic web remains a formidable challenge. In this work we study synchrotron emission from the cosmic web with simulated SKA1 observations, which can represent an fundamental probe of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We investigate radio emission originated by relativistic electrons accelerated by shocks surrounding cosmic filaments, assuming diffusive shock acceleration and as a function of the (unknown) large-scale magnetic fields. The detection of the brightest parts of large ($>10 \\rm Mpc$) filaments of the cosmic web should be within reach of the SKA1-LOW, if the magnetic field is at the level of a $\\sim 10$ percent equipartition with the thermal gas, corresponding to $\\sim 0.1 \\mu G$ for the most massive filaments in simulations. In the course of a 2-years survey with SKA1-LOW, this will enable a first detection of the "tip of the iceberg" of the radio cosmic web, and allow for the use of the SKA as a powerful tool to study the origin of cosmic magneti...

Vazza, Franco; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Gheller, Claudio; Braun, Robert; Brown, Shea

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Is the Taurus B213 Region a True Filament?: Observations of Multiple Cyanoacetylene Transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have obtained spectra of the J=2-1 and J=10-9 transitions of cyanoacetylene (\\hc3n) toward a collection of positions in the most prominent filament, B213, in the Taurus molecular cloud. The analysis of the excitation conditions of these transitions reveals an average gas H$_2$ volume density of $(1.8\\pm 0.7) \\times10^{4} $ \\cc. Based on column density derived from 2MASS and this volume density, the line of sight dimension of the high density portion of B213 is found to be $\\simeq$ 0.12 pc, which is comparable to the smaller projected dimension and much smaller than the elongated dimension of B213 ($\\sim$2.4 pc). B213 is thus likely a true cylinder--like filament rather than a sheet seen edge-on. The line width and velocity gradient seen in \\hc3n are also consistent with Taurus B213 being a self-gravitating filament in the early stage of either fragmentation and/or collape.

Li, Di

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Influence of Filaments in the Private Flux Region on Divertor Particle and Power Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transport of particles via intermittent filamentary structures in the private flux region of plasmas in the MAST tokamak has been investigated using a fast framing camera recording visible light emission from the volume of the lower divertor, as well as Langmuir probes and IR thermography monitoring particle and power fluxes to plasma-facing surfaces in the divertor. The visible camera data suggests that, in the divertor volume, fluctuations in light emission above the X-point are strongest in the scrape-off layer (SOL). Conversely, in the region below the X-point, it is found that these fluctuations are strongest in the private flux region (PFR) of the inner divertor leg. Detailed analysis of the appearance of these filaments in the camera data suggests that they are approximately circular, around 1-2cm in diameter. The most probable toroidal mode number is between 2 and 3. These filaments eject plasma deeper into the private flux region, sometimes by the production of secondary filaments, moving at a sp...

Harrison, J R; Thornton, A J; Walkden, N R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Robustness of the filamentation instability in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field: Full three dimensional calculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The filamentation (Weibel) instability plays a key role in the formation of collisionless shocks which are thought to produce Gamma-Ray-Bursts and High-Energy-Cosmic-Rays in astrophysical environments. While it has been known for long that a flow-aligned magnetic field can completely quench the instability, it was recently proved in 2D that in the cold regime, such cancelation is possible if and only if the field is perfectly aligned. Here, this result is finally extended to a 3D geometry. Calculations are conducted for symmetric and asymmetric counter-streaming relativistic plasma shells. 2D results are retrieved in 3D: the instability can never be completely canceled for an oblique magnetic field. In addition, the maximum growth-rate is always larger for wave vectors lying in the plan defined by the flow and the oblique field. On the one hand, this bears consequences on the orientation of the generated filaments. On the other hand, it certifies 2D simulations of the problem can be performed without missing the most unstable filamentation modes.

Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

Fan, H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

Not Listed

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Performance of Polymer Coatings Under Forming Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepainted metal sheets being environment friendly and cost effective as compared to postpainted metal sheets, are widely used in construction, packaging, transportation and automotive industries. One of the key requirements for prepainted coatings...

Purohit, Zalak

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

250

Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials - F13 Q1 Corrosion in Very High-Temperature Molten Salt for Next Generation CSP Systems Direct s-CO2...

251

Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antireflection film made from reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

Ashley, C.S.; Reed, S.T.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 1977 Flat Plate Solar Collector Conference- USDOE," Wash.Second Coatings for Solar Collectors Symp. , 11 Winter Park,assuming the finisher and the collector manufacturer are not

Lampert, Carl M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Onset voltage of corona on coated conductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is aimed for investigating the effect of surface coating on the positive and negative onset voltages of corona from stressed conductor as a pre-requisite for onset-voltage calculation. The electric field is accurately calculated by the charge simulation technique. The calculated onset voltages agreed satisfactorily with those measured experimentally for bare conductors. The effect of coating-layer thickness and permittivity as well as conductor radius and height on the onset-voltage values is discussed.

Abdel-Salam, M. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Abo-Shal, Y. [SCECO-East, Dammam (Saudi Arabia). Electrical Engineering Div.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially... available roof coatings, and productivity gains associated with these energy saving strategies. This type of situation is evidenced in the justification of energy rebates distributed by Florida Power & Light in exchange for the application of Energy Star...

Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

Kennedy, C. E.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

262

Discoloration resistant, flexible, radiation curable coating compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low dosage radiation polymerizable protective and decorative coating composition or paint, coated articles bearing such a protective coating and processess for preparing such articles. The radiation polymerizable coating composition comprises an organic resin/monomer mixture of: (A) between about 97 and about 3 weight percent alphabeta olefinically unsaturated organic resin containing between about 0.5 and about 5 vinyl unsaturation units per 1000 molecular weight of said resin, and (B) between about 3 and about 97 weight percent vinyl monomers polymerizable with said resin upon exposure to radiation, characterized in that said vinyl monomers include N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in an amount of from about 3 and up to about 10 weight percent based on the total weight of (A) and (B). The flexible coating exhibits excellent physical qualtities and good adhesion to a variety of substrates being particularly suitable for use on vinyl chloride fabric, wherein it is discoloration resistant after heat aging. Preferred articles bearing such a coating, which may comprise large amounts of pigment, are preferably cured by exposure to electron beam radiation.

Cassatta, J.C.; Garrett, D.L. Jr.; Van Oene, H.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Québec (Québec), Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

An investigation of evaluation methods for internal FBE pipe coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosivity of CO{sub 2}-containing water used for injection into formations is very high. One of the means for mitigating this corrosion is through the use of internal Fusion Bonded Epoxy (FBE) pipe coatings. However, these are very demanding services for coatings. Pressures and temperatures are high enough in some cases to severely stress the coating. Most FBE coatings are permeated by CO{sub 2}, and when pressures are released, blistering of the coating may occur. This compromises the integrity of the coating which may result in premature failure of the coating followed by corrosion of the pipe metal. The identification of coatings with good performance is absolutely essential. The failure of the coating alone can result in great losses due to the initial cost of the coating application, plus potential operating problems. When corrosive penetrations of the pipe occur, the costs escalate even higher as a result of required maintenance and down time. This paper describes the test work conducted to determine how to evaluate coatings for such services, and to determine which coatings will give successful, long-term performance. Test methods contained in an industry standard have been validated, and suitable coatings identified. Future test work needed to add to these findings has also been recommended. Although this work was designed for CO{sub 2} services, it does give valuable insight into tests that are required to properly qualify FBE coatings for non-CO{sub 2} services.

Thompson, S.P. [Thompson (Stanley P.), Paris, TX (United States); Varughese, K. [Al-Qahtani Pipe Coating Terminal, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. Katz, “Advanced Ceramics: Thermal Barrier Coatings BeatConductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier CoatingsFatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings,” NASA/

Glaeser, A M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cobalt and chromium. Ceramic or thermal barrier coatings canin fuel usage. Also, ceramic or thermal barrier coatings~n Oslo developed ceramic or thermal barrier coatings that

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticorrosive crc coatings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Hard Disks* Summary: and the functional layers - a magnetic coating, anti-corrosion coating, protective coating and a lubricate layer... denotations: 1 - substrate...

269

Levitation and collection of diamond fine particles in the rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the levitation of diamond fine particles in a H{sub 2} rf plasma chamber equipped with a hot filament and heated electrodes. The levitation conditions should be carefully chosen to compensate the strong thermophoretic forces caused by the filament and the electrodes. This levitation technique with the existence of a hot filament can be applied, e.g., for the efficient growth of diamond layers on seed particles injected and levitated in an rf plasma with reactive gases, e.g., CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}. Additionally, the method for direct capture of levitated particles on a planar substrate was established, which is useful if it is necessary to analyze the particles after the levitation.

Shimizu, S.; Shimizu, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jacob, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

A theoretical study of the incandescent filament lamp performance under voltage flicker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incandescent filament lamp flicker, produced by voltage fluctuation, is a power quality problem that caused engineering concern since the onset of electrical illumination technology. The flicker phenomenon was analyzed and explained in early studies. Standards dealing with acceptable flicker levels are well known, nevertheless, today the discussion about flicker continues to be a top priority topic due to the fact that steady-state and transient voltage waveform distortion is a growing problem in low and medium voltage systems. In many situations voltage flicker is caused by subharmonics and interharmonics of voltage. Cycloconverters, welders and arc furnaces, eccentrically operating tools and integral cycle controlled power equipment are notorious for producing voltage flicker. The goal of this paper is to provide solid mathematical basis for the analytical modeling of incandescent filament lamp flicker when the voltage is nonsinusoidal. A mathematical model that enables the evaluation of the luminous flux modulation caused by noninteger harmonics (subharmonics and interharmonics) is presented. Three situations are detailed: square-wave voltage modulation, sinusoidal modulation and the case of noninteger harmonics with nearly contiguous frequencies.

Peretto, L. [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)] [Univ. of Bologna (Italy); Emanuel, A.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States)] [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Finite element analyses of continuous filament ties for masonry applications : final report for the Arquin Corporation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finite-element analyses were performed to simulate the response of a hypothetical vertical masonry wall subject to different lateral loads with and without continuous horizontal filament ties laid between rows of concrete blocks. A static loading analysis and cost comparison were also performed to evaluate optimal materials and designs for the spacers affixed to the filaments. Results showed that polypropylene, ABS, and polyethylene (high density) were suitable materials for the spacers based on performance and cost, and the short T-spacer design was optimal based on its performance and functionality. Simulations of vertical walls subject to static loads representing 100 mph winds (0.2 psi) and a seismic event (0.66 psi) showed that the simulated walls performed similarly and adequately when subject to these loads with and without the ties. Additional simulations and tests are required to assess the performance of actual walls with and without the ties under greater loads and more realistic conditions (e.g., cracks, non-linear response).

Quinones, Armando, Sr. (Arquin Corporation, La Luz, NM); Bibeau, Tiffany A.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Figure correction of multilayer coated optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Glass/ceramic coatings for implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc; Glass, Robert S.; Lee, Tae H.

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

Zemanian, Thomas Samuel (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen (Kennwick, WA); Ustyugov, Oleksiy A. (Spokane, WA)

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

Richard O'Shaughnessy

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Superhard Coating Systems | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4Superhard Coating Systems Superhard Coating Systems

284

Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

Beardsley, M B

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Systematic Evaluation of Jc Decrease in Thick Film Coated Conductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Address both thickness dependence of Jc, in thick film YBCO coated conductors through an application of a suite of new measurement techniques to thick film wire samples produced by commercially viable coated conductor technologies.

Alex Ignatiev; Dr. Amit Goyal

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2...

287

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q1 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q1...

288

area supplemental coatings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unknown authors 4 Continuous blade coating for multi-layer large-area organic light-emitting diode and solar cell Materials Science Websites Summary: Continuous blade coating for...

289

The possibility of forming a sacrificial anode coating for Mg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mg is the most active engineering metal, and is often used as a sacrificial anode/coating to protect other engineering metals from corrosion attack. So far no sacrificial anode coating has been developed or considered for Mg. This study explores the possibility of forming a sacrificial coating for Mg. A lithiated carbon coating and a metaphosphated coating are applied on the Mg surface, respectively, and their open-circuit-potentials are measured in saturated Mg(OH)2 solution. They exhibit more negative potentials than bare Mg. SEM reveals that the metaphosphated coating offers more effective and uniform protection for Mg than the lithiated carbon coating. These preliminary results indicate that development of a sacrificial anode coating for Mg is indeed possible.

Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

291

Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw T-713: Blue Coat Reporter Directory Traversal Flaw September 9, 2011 - 10:47am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Blue...

293

Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

Value pricing of surface coatings for mitigating heat exchanger fouling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crystallisation fouling; (b) fluorocarbon-based coatings which offer antifouling performance but can reduce heat transfer, for crystallisation fouling; and (c) fluorocarbon-based coatings in a dairy pasteuriser application. A novel strategy, of replacing stainless...

Wilson, D.I.; Gomes da Cruz, L.; Ishiyama, E.M.; Boxler, C.; Augustin, W.; Scholl, S.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

Subramanian, Ramesh

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

296

Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAW Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings havefor Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings J.

Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTMACROCELL TESTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENT­MACROCELL TESTS by Khaled Z. Kahhaleh, Enrique corrosion experimental program was conducted to study the performance of bent epoxy- coated bars. The damage. The coated bars were embedded in concrete prisms and linked electrically to uncoated bars to set up macro-corrosion

Texas at Austin, University of

299

High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

Severs, Kevin

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Delamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-tempera- ture exposure to oxygen, and an outer low thermal conduc- tivity ceramic coating, such as ytrriaDelamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers Matthew R layers upon thermal cycling delamination failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) driven by thickening

Wadley, Haydn

302

Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell.

Iacovangelo, Charles D. (Schenectady, NY); Browall, Kenneth W. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A new method of coating oilfield core for laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for coating oilfield core for laboratory studies. It consists of applying a steel coating and aluminum wraps around the outer surface of a core. The strength of the coating, the short time needed to apply it, and its low cost are the major advantages of this new method.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.; Shadizadeh, R.S.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal barrier coatings The rare earth zirconates (M2Zr2O7, M=LaGd) have a low intrinsic thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability making them attractive candidates for thermal barrier coating conditions and the coating composition, structure, texture, pore morphology, and thermal conductivity

Wadley, Haydn

305

Reaction, transformation and delamination of samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycling between 100 and 1100 °C. This cycling eventually led to delamination of the coatings, with failure thick (50­100 m) metallic "bond coat" applied to the turbine airfoil alloy to slow the kinetics of oxidation and promote TGO adherence. The bond coat has a high aluminum concentration to promote slow

Wadley, Haydn

306

Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molten silicate interactions with thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a, , Carlos G. Levi b is enhanced by incorporation of through-thickness pores within the coating. However, molten calcium­magnesium­alumino­silicate in dissolution of the coat- ing in the silicate melt, precipitation of new phases, and the elimination

Wadley, Haydn

307

Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

SiPMs coated with TPB : coating protocol and characterization for NEXT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are the photon detectors chosen for the tracking readout in NEXT, a neutrinoless {\\beta}{\\beta} decay experiment which uses a high pressure gaseous xenon time projection chamber (TPC). The reconstruction of event track and topology in this gaseous detector is a key handle for background rejection. Among the commercially available sensors that can be used for tracking, SiPMs offer important advantages, mainly high gain, ruggedness, cost-effectiveness and radio-purity. Their main drawback, however, is their non sensitivity in the emission spectrum of the xenon scintillation (peak at 175 nm). This is overcome by coating these sensors with the organic wavelength shifter tetraphenyl butadienne (TPB). In this paper we describe the protocol developed for coating the SiPMs with TPB and the measurements performed for characterizing the coatings as well as the performance of the coated sensors in the UV-VUV range.

Álvarez, V; Ball, M; Batallé, M; Bayarri, J; Borges, F I G; Bolink, H; Brine, H; Cárcel, S; Carmona, J M; Castel, J; Catalá, J M; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Chan, D; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Ferrando, J; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; García, S A; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, E; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González, K; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Hernando-Morata, J A; Herrera, D C; Herrero, V; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kalinnikov, V; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martin-Albo, J; Méndez, A M; Miller, T; Moisenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Monzó, J M; Mora, F J; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Pérez, J; Radicioni, E; Quinto, M; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodriguez, A; Rodriguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Soriano, A; Spieler, H; Toledo, J F; Collell, J Torrent; Tomás, A; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Velicheva, E; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; Weber, T; White, J T; Yahlali, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their allows. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles Itai Cohen,1 Hui Li,2 James L. Hougland,2 Milan Mrksich,2 Sidney R. Nagel1 We report a method that uses the process of selective withdrawal of one fluid a tube with its orifice slightly above a water-oil interface. Upon increasing the flow rate

Mrksich, Milan

316

Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

317

Urethane coatings rehabilitate large crude oil pipeline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc. (IPL) provides a vital transportation link for moving liquid petroleum resources from oil-producing areas of western Canada to refining centers and markets in eastern canada and the midwestern US. Together with Lakehead Pipe Line Co., Inc., the pipeline system consists of about 7,600 miles of pipe. Approximately 1.6 million bpd of crude oil and liquid hydrocarbons are transported by the system. Along with high-resolution inspection data, an in-house engineering critical assessment process based on Battelle`s NG-18 surface flaw equation was developed to identify corrosion anomalies needing structural reinforcement sleeve repairs. A majority of ht non-critical anomalies remained unearthed and were exposed to possible future growth which could become critical. Several rehabilitation methods were considered including on-going sleeve repair, selective pipe replacement, and coating reconditioning. Economics and logistics of sleeving programs and selective pipe replacement were well known at IPL. However, aspects of replacing a coating system over a relatively long length of pipe were not completely known. Preliminary cost estimates favored replacement of the coating over a massive sleeving program or pipe replacement. To gain further insight, IPL began a two-year pilot program to research long length coating replacement feasibility. Two sections of Line 3 ultimately were rehabilitated in this manner. This paper reviews the project.

Kresic, W. [Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Biosolvents for Coatings, Resins and Biobased Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With close collaboration with several industrial coatings manufacturers several solvent blends were developed tested and optimized. These were then piloted in the commercial company’s reactors and systems. Three were successfully tested in commercial applications and two of these - Methotate replacement and a specialty ketone replacement were sold in commercial quantities in 2009. Further sales are anticipated in 2010 and the following years.

Datta, Rathin [Vertec BioSolvents, Inc.] [Vertec BioSolvents, Inc.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

324

Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called ?-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments The biological membrane is, in essence, a thermodynamically-nonequilibrium lipid bilayer [6, 30, 34, 43, 47] with a variety of molecular motors, ion pumps, or channels residing within [19

Young, Yuan N.

326

Trapping and Destruction of Long-Range High-Intensity Optical Filaments by Molecular Quantum Wakes in Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Air S. Varma, Y.-H. Chen, and H. M. Milchberg Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied in atmospheric air on the long-range filamentary propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a pump following a pump pulse filamenting in air has a dramatic effect on the propagation of an intense probe pulse

Milchberg, Howard

327

Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2 Haoxiang Luo- action between rigid objects. In the situation that one rigid object is located in the downstream wake bodies in tandem arrangement, the downstream one suffers a drag increase and flaps with a larger

Luo, Haoxiang

328

High-mass star formation triggered by collision between CO filaments in N159 West in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out 13CO (J=2-1) observations of the active star-forming region N159 West in the LMC with ALMA. We have found that the CO distribution at a sub-pc scale is highly elongated with a small width. These elongated clouds called "filaments" show straight or curved distributions with a typical width of 0.5-1.0 pc and a length of 5-10 pc. All the known infrared YSOs are located toward the filaments. We have found broad CO wings of two molecular outflows toward young high-mass stars in N159W-N and N159W-S, whose dynamical timescale is ~10^4 yrs. This is the first discovery of protostellar outflow in external galaxies. For N159W-S which is located toward an intersection of two filaments we set up a hypothesis that the two filaments collided with each other ~10^5 yrs ago and triggered formation of the high-mass star having ~37Mo. The colliding clouds show significant enhancement in linewidth in the intersection, suggesting excitation of turbulence in the shocked interface layer between them as is consist...

Fukui, Yasuo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Morioka, Yuuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Torii, Kazufumi; Ohama, Akio; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Saigo, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanna; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Mizuno, Norikazu; Chen, Rosie

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Quantum Hasimoto transformation and nonlinear waves on a superfluid vortex filament under the quantum local induction approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hasimoto transformation between the classical LIA (local induction approximation, a model approximating the motion of a thin vortex filament) and the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) has proven very useful in the past, since it allows one to construct new solutions to the LIA once a solution to the NLS is known. In the present paper, the quantum form of the LIA (which includes mutual friction effects) is put into correspondence with a type of complex nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation (PDE) with cubic nonlinearity (similar in form to a Ginsburg-Landau equation, with additional nonlinear terms). Transforming the quantum LIA in such a way enables one to obtain quantum vortex filament solutions once solutions to this dispersive PDE are known. From our quantum Hasimoto transformation, we determine the form and behavior of Stokes waves and a standing 1-soliton solution under normal and binormal friction effects. The soliton solution on a quantum vortex filament is a natural generalization of the classical 1-soliton solution constructed mathematically by Hasimoto (which motivated subsequent real-world experiments). The quantum Hasimoto transformation is useful when normal fluid velocity is relatively weak, so for the case where the normal fluid velocity is dominant we resort to other approaches. We consider the dynamics of the tangent vector to the vortex filament directly from the quantum LIA, and this approach, while less elegant than the quantum Hasimoto transformation, enables us to study waves primarily driven by the normal fluid velocity.

Robert A. Van Gorder

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic fatigue characteristics of silica fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic. Wojcik c , A. Walewski c a Hybrid Glass Technologies, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852, USA b Rutgers coatings. Recently developed sol-gel derived inorganic- organic hybrid materials called hybrid glass

Matthewson, M. John

331

Overdensity of X-Ray sources near 3C 295: a candidate filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46) aimed at the search for clustering of X-ray sources. Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field. In particular, the ACF shows a clear signal on scales of 0.5 - 5 arcmin. This correlation angle is > 2 times higher than that of a sample of 8 ACIS-I field at the 2.5 sigma confidence level. If this overdensity is spatially associated to the cluster, we are observing a 'filament' of the large scale structure of the Universe. We discuss some first results that seem to indicate such an association.

V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; F. Cocchia

2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Self-similar condensation of rotating magnetized self-gravitating isothermal filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ordinary differential equations describing the self-similar collapse of a rotating, magnetized, self-gravitating and isothermal filament are derived. Explicit homologous solutions are studied with special emphasis on the bifurcation that occurs at the magnetosonic critical point. It is shown that there is a critical value for the toroidal magnetic field slope at the origin above which no bifurcation occurs, the solution remains homologous, and below which the density and the poloidal magnetic field tend to zero at large radius (envelope) whereas the toroidal magnetic field and azimuthal velocity relax towards a constant value. A series of spatial profiles of density, velocity and magnetic field, potentially useful for comparison with numerical or observational studies, is obtained numerically and discussed.

P. Hennebelle

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur 782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Filamentation of magnetosonic wave and generation of magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical model for the magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction due to the nonlinear coupling of magnetosonic wave with ion acoustic wave in overdense plasma. For this study, dynamical equations of magnetosonic waves and the ion acoustic waves have been developed in the presence of ponderomotive force due to the pump magnetosonic wave. Slowly converging and diverging behavior has been studied semi-analytically, this results in the formation of filaments of the magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has also been carried out to study nonlinear stage. From the results, it has been found that the localized structures become quite complex in nature. Further, power spectrum has been studied. Results show that the spectral index follows (?k{sup ?2.0}) scaling at smaller scale. Relevance of the present investigation has been shown with the experimental observation.

Modi, K. V., E-mail: kvmodi.iitd@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India); Tiwary, Prem Pyari, E-mail: prempyari@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Dayal Bagh Educational Institute (Deemed University), Dayal Bagh, Agra 282005 (India); Singh, Ram Kishor, E-mail: ram007kishor@gmail.com; Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ac.in [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Satsangi, V. R. [Department of Physics and Computer Science, Dayal Bagh Educational Institute (Deemed University), Dayal Bagh, Agra 282005 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5070 (United States); Kulkarni, Anand [Siemens Energy, Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Method of applying a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating on a metal substrate, and related articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for applying at least one bond coating on a surface of a metal-based substrate is described. A foil of the bond coating material is first attached to the substrate surface and then fused thereto, e.g., by brazing. The foil is often initially prepared by thermally spraying the bond coating material onto a removable support sheet, and then detaching the support sheet. Optionally, the foil may also include a thermal barrier coating applied over the bond coating. The substrate can be a turbine engine component.

Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Borom, Marcus Preston (Tucson, AZ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Anti-stiction coating for microelectromechanical devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for depositing an anti-stiction coating on a MEMS device comprises reacting the vapor of an amino-functionalized silane precursor with a silicon surface of the MEMS device in a vacuum chamber. The method can further comprise cleaning the silicon surface of the MEMS device to form a clean hydroxylated silicon surface prior to reacting the precursor vapor with the silicon surface. The amino-functionalized silane precursor comprises at least one silicon atom, at least one reactive amino (or imine) pendant, and at least one hydrophobic pendant. The amino-functionalized silane precursor is highly reactive with the silicon surface, thereby eliminating the need for a post-process anneal step and enabling the reaction to occur at low pressure. Such vapor-phase deposition of the amino-functionalized silane coating provides a uniform surface morphology and strong adhesion to the silicon surface.

Hankins, Matthew G. (Albuquerque, NM); Mayer, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coating considerations for mirrors of CPV devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the different optical concepts for concentrator devices is to place a focussing primary mirror behind a transparent front plate. In addition (also in case of Fresnel-diffractive main optics), further 'secondary' reflectors may be used further along the beam path. Such mirrors are usually implemented as coating stacks of a highly reflective metal - usually silver - and protective layers. The protective layers are preferably designed as reflection enhancing interference stack. The design of such protective layer stacks yields two difficulties, which are addressed in this paper: (a) vacuum coating of three-dimensional parts will result in a thickness distribution and the optical design of the stack should thus be tolerant to layer thickness variations, and (b) different places of the mirror will have different angle-of-incidence of the sunlight under operating conditions. As result, the layer stack has a different design at different places of the mirror.

Schmauder, Torsten; Sauer, Peter; Ickes, Gerd [Leybold Optics GmbH, Siemensstr. 88, D-63755 Alzenau (Germany)

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

Simpson, John T (Clinton, TN) [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

High temperature low friction surface coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Downdrag on bitumen-coated piles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

included standard laboratory tests for asphalts as well as some specialized research tests to further study the bitumens' behavior. The testing procedures are explained in detail and the results are presented in graphical or tabular form. Two field sites... bitumens were used for Louisiana and the softer bitumens for Alberta. These bitumens were not intended to act as the only possible bitumens for coating piles. Instead, they represented a range of properties available in commercial asphalts. Some...

Bush, Randall Keith

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process.

Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brij B.

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided. 13 figs.

Sugama, T.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

North American Coating Laboratories | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company) Jump to:City)Norristown, Pennsylvania: EnergyCoating

352

ALARA{trademark} 1146 strippable coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strippable or temporary coatings are innovative technologies for decontamination that effectively reduce loose contamination at low cost. These coatings have become a viable option during the deactivation and decommissioning of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. The ALARA{trademark} 1146 strippable coating was demonstrated as part of the Savannah River Site LSDDP and successfully removed transferable (surface) contamination from multiple surfaces (metal and concrete) with an average decontamination factor for alpha contamination of 6.68 and an average percentage of alpha contamination removed of 85.0%. Beta contamination removed was an average DF of 5.55 and an average percentage removed of 82.0%. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users. This Innovative Technology offers a 35% cost savings over the Baseline Technology.

Fricke, V.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al2O3-0-3 wt % La2O3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al2O3-3-40% TiO2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al2O3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Surface figure control for coated optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA); Spence, Paul A. (Pleasanton, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

The influence of coating compliance on the delamination of thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao , Zhuo Yu, Haydn N.G. Wadley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings have been deposited on NiCoCrAlY over-lay bond-coated Hastelloy-X

Wadley, Haydn

357

TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

Sindelar, R.L.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Process for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal, the process comprising: (a) forming an aqueous slurry of tungsten carbide having a particle size of no greater than - 100 mesh, and zinc metal powder; (b) adding ammonia to the slurry with the amount of the ammonia being sufficient so that the slurry is basic after the subsequent addition of cobalt chloride in step c; (c) adding to the resulting ammoniated slurry, a solution of cobalt chloride with agitation, to form a coating of partially reduced cobalt on the tungsten carbide; (d) removing the resulting cobalt coated tungsten carbide from the resulting liquor; and (e) heating the cobalt coated tungsten carbide in a reducing atmosphere to effect the essentially complete reduction of the cobalt and to produce a cobalt metal coating on the tungsten carbide, the coating making up no greater than about 15% of weight of the tungsten carbide.

Ritsko, J.E.; Lee, J.S.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Mechanical Loss in Tantala/Silica Dielectric Mirror Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use test masses with mirror coatings formed from multiple layers of dielectric materials, most commonly alternating layers of SiO2 (silica) and Ta2O5 (tantala). However, mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings may limit the design sensitivity for advanced detectors. We have investigated sources of mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings, including loss associated with the coating-substrate interface, with the coating-layer interfaces, and with the bulk material. Our results indicate that the loss is associated with the bulk coating materials and that the loss of Ta2O5 is substantially larger than that of SiO2.

Steven D. Penn; Peter H. Sneddon; Helena Armandula; Joseph C. Betzwieser; Gianpietro Cagnoli; Jordan Camp; D. R. M. Crooks; Martin M. Fejer; Andri M. Gretarsson; Gregory M. Harry; Jim Hough; Scott E. Kittelberger; Michael J. Mortonson; Roger Route; Sheila Rowan; Christophoros C. Vassiliou

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Sierra Designs 20 degrees F Wild Bill Climashield Sleeping Bag ClimashieldTM HL, a high-loft continuous filament insulation, offers excellent thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-loft continuous filament insulation, offers excellent thermal efficiency, durability and water resistance Chest to create a pillow; no need for a pillow to take up valuable space in your backpack Insulated draft tube

Walker, Lawrence R.

363

Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

The role of electroplated coatings in metal joining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electroplated and electroless coatings often play an important role in soldering, brazing, and welding operations. Thin deposits applied to critical surfaces before the joining operations can provide the difference between success and failure. Diffusion welding applications sometimes require coatings to help promote joining. For some applications, electroplating by itself can be used to join metals that cannot be welded or brazed because of metallurgical incompatibility. The use of electroplated coatings for these various joining applications is reviewed here.

Dini, J.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Low gloss UV-cured coatings for aircraft  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of applying a low gloss coating to a substrate such as the exterior surface of an aircraft is disclosed. The coating composition comprising a polyene, a polythiol, a flatting agent and a coloring pigment is applied to the substrate and given a first dosage of UV radiation followed by a second dosage in which the second dosage is greater than the first resulting in an ultralow gloss coating.

Bowman, Mark; Muschar, Harry

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Self-fabricated single mode waveguide in fluoride glass excited by self-channeled plasma filaments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-fabricated permanent structure of single mode waveguide in optical fluoride glasses was demonstrated using the self-channeled plasma filament excited by a femtosecond (130 fs) Ti:sapphire laser ({lambda}{sub p}=790 nm). The photoinduced refractive index modification in ZrF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF glasses reached a length of approximately 10-15 mm from the input surface of the optical glass with the diameters ranging from 5 to 8 {mu}m at the input intensities of more than 1.0x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. The graded refractive index profiles were fabricated to be a symmetric form from the center of optical fluoride glass, and a maximum value of refractive index change ({delta}n) was measured to be 1.3x10{sup -2}. The beam profile of the output beam transmitted through the modified region showed that the photoinduced refractive index modification produced a permanent structure of single mode waveguide.

Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jae-Goo; Whang, Kyoung-Hyun [Nano Machining Laboratory, Korea Institute of Machinery and Material (KIMM), 171 Jang-dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

369

Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Large Solar Energetic Particle Events Associated with Filament Eruptions Outside of Active Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on four large filament eruptions (FEs) from solar cycles 23 and 24 that were associated with large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and interplanetary type II radio bursts. The post-eruption arcades corresponded to mostly C-class soft X-ray enhancements, but an M1.0 flare was associated with one event. However, the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were fast (speeds about 1000 km/s) and appeared as halo CMEs in the coronagraph field of view. The interplanetary type II radio bursts occurred over a wide wavelength range indicating the existence of strong shocks throughout the inner heliosphere. No metric type II bursts were present in three events, indicating that the shocks formed beyond 2 to 3 Rs. In one case, there was a metric type II burst with low starting frequency indicating a shock formation height of about 2 Rs. The FE-associated SEP events did have softer spectra (spectral index greater than 4) in the 10 to 100 MeV range, but there were other low-intensity SEP events with spectr...

Gopalswamy, N; Akiyama, S; Yashiro, S; Xie, H; Thakur, N; Kahler, S W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse: filament formation and magnetic field amplification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k rho^Gamma, with both sub-isothermal exponents Gamma 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For Gamma > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For Gamma < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

Thomas Peters; Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Ralf S. Klessen; Robi Banerjee; Christoph Federrath; Rowan J. Smith; Sharanya Sur

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

372

IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Finite element analyses of continuous filament ties for masonry applications:final report for the Arquin Corporation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Finite-element analyses were performed to simulate the response of a hypothetical masonry shear wall with and without continuous filament ties to various lateral loads. The loads represented three different scenarios: (1) 100 mph wind, (2) explosive attack, and (3) an earthquake. In addition, a static loading analysis and cost comparison were performed to evaluate optimal materials and designs for the spacers affixed to the filaments. Results showed that polypropylene, ABS, and polyethylene (high density) were suitable materials for the spacers based on performance and cost, and the short T-spacer design was optimal based on its performance and functionality. Results of the shear-wall loading simulations revealed that simulated walls with the continuous filament ties yielded factors of safety that were at least ten times greater than those without the ties. In the explosive attack simulation (100 psi), the simulated wall without the ties failed (minimum factor of safety was less than one), but the simulated wall with the ties yielded a minimum factor of safety greater than one. Simulations of the walls subject to lateral loads caused by 100 mph winds (0.2 psi) and seismic events with a peak ground acceleration of 1 ''g'' (0.66 psi) yielded no failures with or without the ties. Simulations of wall displacement during the seismic scenarios showed that the wall with the ties resulted in a maximum displacement that was 20% less than the wall without the ties.

Quinones, Armando (Arquin Corporation, La Luz, NM); Bibeau, Tiffany A.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

OPTI 577-Advanced Optical Interference Coatings Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to current market design, optical characterization and post-process analysis software. Prerequisite: OPTI 575, inhomogeneity. Electrochromic Coatings. Introduction to Chemical Vapor Deposition and Coater #4. Refinement

Arizona, University of

375

Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

these novel optical coatings on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of concentrating solar power (CSP) system in field trials. Innovation The durability and cleanability, in...

376

Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optimal design of antireflection coatings with different metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roles in laser technology, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, solar energy, and many other fields of applied optics. The most common optical coatings are those ...

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

are low risk Goal: Develop solar selective coatings for next- generation concentrated solar power towers that exhibit high absorptance with low thermal emittance, that can...

380

aluminium based coatings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XI, Universit de 5 Machining of nickel based superalloys using coated PCBN tooling. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Following a comprehensive literature...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

antireflection coatings based: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gupta, S Dutta 2013-01-01 26 Machining of nickel based superalloys using coated PCBN tooling. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Following a comprehensive literature...

382

Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sacrificial Protective Coating Materials That Can Be Regenerated In-Situ to Enable High-Performance Membranes Membrane Technology Provides Energy-Efficient Method to Concentrate...

384

Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat the system, decreases the oper- ation noise and the pumping cost. Another major consideration for a heat

Aguilar, Guillermo

387

Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

Kniseley, Richard N. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Merkle, Brian D. (Ames, IA)

1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'Â?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for depositing thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades and vanes using Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) combined with Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD).

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); McDonald, Jimmie M. (Albuquerque, NM); Lutz, Thomas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallis, Michail A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC)...

392

Evaluation of Perfluoropolyether Coatings for Environmental Protection of Stone.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) as an environmentally safe coating process. RESS allows… (more)

Harris, Robert Bryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Corrosion protection mechanism of polyaniline blended organic coating on steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epoxy-coal tar coatings are widely used to protect steel structures exposed to marine atmosphere due to their good barrier property. However, the presence of micropores and microcracks formed during the coating formation leads to failure of the coating due to permeation of corrosive ions. In recent years, it has been established that the coatings containing polyaniline (PANI) is able to protect pinholes and defects due to its passivating ability. Hence, a study has been made on the effect of polyaniline content (1 and 3%) in epoxy-coal tar coating on the corrosion protection of steel in 3% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Both phosphate- and chloride-doped polyanilines were prepared by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. From EIS studies, it has been found that the resistance value of the coatings containing 1 and 3% phosphate-doped polyaniline and 3% chloride-doped polyaniline pigmented coatings are similar to 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} even after 90 days exposure to NaCl solution, which are two orders high in comparison to that of conventional coal tar epoxy coatings. Besides, the conducting state of polyaniline has been found to be decreased after exposure to NaCl solution due to redox property of PANI. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have shown that polyaniline forms a complex layer with iron beneath the coating along with iron oxide.

Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaram, R.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Venkatachari, G. [Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikkudi (India)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic Feedstock - EnergyCoal2 - MarchCoated

397

Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

399

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (20) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating (20) consists essentially of a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula consisting essentially of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements selected from La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof; where B is selected from the group of elements selected from Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof; n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

Jeffrey W. Fergus

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Nondestructive optical characterization of chemical conversion coatings on aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium phosphate conversion coatings on aluminum have been characterized with nondestructive optical techniques. Complementary vibrational spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy, prove the presence of chromium phosphate as principal component in the coating. Additionally, aluminum oxide and indications for the presence of chromium oxide and aluminum fluoride are found. Reflection/absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) allows analysis of coatings as thin as 40 nm, while confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is limited to thicknesses above about 150 nm. Compared to RAIRS spectra, the interpretation of Raman spectra is easier due to the morphological characteristics of the conversion coatings, e.g., the coating thickness, using a simulation and regression procedure based on a two-layer optical model. The optical constants of the upper layer, which in a first approximation can be attributed to the chromium phosphate part of the conversion coating, can explain the greenish appearance of the thickest conversion coatings. A linear relationship exists between the coating thickness and the conversion time. An analogous linear relation exists between the conversion time and the peak areas of most of the absorption peaks in the RAIRS spectra.

Schram, T.; De Laet, J.; Terryn, H. [Vrije Univ. Brussel, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Metallurgy, Electrochemistry, and Materials Science

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

Sindelar, R.L.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yttria-stabilized zir- conia (YSZ) is then applied to provide thermal insulation [1]. This ceramic layer]. The thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer has been found to depend on the pore morphology within a coatingMorphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings Hengbei Zhao a

Wadley, Haydn

409

ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINOSILICATE-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS By JORGE ANTONIO JEREZ transport experiments; Dr. Barbara Williams and Jason Shira from University of Idaho for providing access-COATED SILICA SAND FOR REACTIVE TRANSPORT EXPERIMENTS Abstract by Jorge Antonio Jerez Briones, Ph.D. Washington

Flury, Markus

410

New capabilities and applications for electrophoretically deposited coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our primary purpose in this test is to provide a brief general description of a few applications of various electrophoretic systems which have been investigated and have found use in various coating applications at Sandia National Laboratories. Both organic and inorganic suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous media have been considered in these studies. Applications include high voltage insulating dielectrics, thermally conductive/electrically insulating films, adherent lubricating films, uniform photoresist films, glass coatings, and fissile uranium oxide/carbon composite films for studies of nuclear powered lasers. More recently, we have become interested in the beneficial environmental aspects of being able to provide protective polymer coatings which reduce or minimize the use of organic solvents required by traditional spray coat processes. Important practical factors which relate to film uniformity, adhesion, and composition are related to unique coating or plating capabilities and applications. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Sharp, D.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Thailand's gas line underway: coating a major achievement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using primarily local personnel and materials, Bredero Price International's Thai pipe-coating plant has prepared some 374 miles of 34 and 28-in. pipe for service in the Gulf of Thailand gas-pipeline project. The enamel-coating shop cleaned, primed and coated all the pipe with coal-tar enamel, glass-fiber mat, felt, and a kraft-paper outer wrap; the cement-coating facility then added a concrete-weight coating to the portion of the pipe earmarked for offshore duty. Scheduled for a 1981 completion, the pipeline will initially carry 250 million CF/day to power-generating plants in Bangpakong and South Bangkok; the volume transported will eventually reach 500 million CF/day when addition offshore production is tied in to the line and an offshore compressor station added.

Hale, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sputtering for Depositing Solar Collector Coatings".AES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta. Ga.Surfaces on Flat Plate Solar Collectors". Proceedings of 2nd

Lampert, Carl M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

METAL FOILS FOR DIRECT APPLICATION OF ABSORBER COATINGS ON SOLAR COLLECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surfaces on Flat Plate Solar Collectors". Proceedings of 2ndfor Depositing Solar Collector Coatings i i • Proceedings ofAES Coatings for Solar Collectors Symposium. Atlanta. Ga.

Lampert, Carl M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermal Barrier Coatings Chemically and Mechanically Resistant to High Temperature Attack by Molten Ashes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used on component in the hottest sections of gas turbine engines, used for power generation and aviation.… (more)

Gledhill, Andrew Dean

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum coatings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is currently... will elucidate the corrosion initiation mechanisms on coated aluminum alloy substrates, as well as determine... -polymer coatings may make them suitable for...

420

ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Finaltion of Super alloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J, Metals,

Boone, Donald H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tribological degradation of fluorocarbon coated silicon microdevice surfaces in normal and sliding degradation of the contact interface of a fluorocarbon monolayer-coated polycrystalline silicon microdevice

Krim, Jacqueline

422

UV-Shifted Durable Silver Coating for Astronomical Mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silver has the highest reflectance of all of the metals, but it tarnishes in the presence of sulfides, chlorides, and oxides in the atmosphere. Also, the silver reflectance is very low at wavelengths below 400 nm making aluminum more desirable mirror coating for the UV region. They have found a way to prevent silver tarnishing by sandwiching the silver layer between two thin layers of NiCrN{sub x}, and to extend the metal's high reflectance down to 200 nm by depositing the (thin) Ag layer on top of Al. Thus, the uv is transmitted through the thin Ag layer below 400 nm wavelength, and is reflected from the Al layer underneath. This UV-shifted durable coating provides a valuable alternative to the aluminum coating for telescope mirror coatings where high throughput and durability are important considerations. The throughput for a telescope with, say, six reflections from silver coatings is (0.97){sup 6} = 83% compared to (0.92){sup 6} = 60% for aluminum coatings, or 28% less. The use of silver coatings allows more photons to be collected by primary mirror. Aluminum also has a reflectance dip at 850 nm caused by inter-band transitions which is eliminated by placing the thin Ag layer on top. This paper describes a non-tarnishing silver coating having high reflectance down into the UV region. The average specular reflectance is 70%-97% in the near-UV, 95%-99% in the visible region, and {ge} 99% in the infrared region covering the total wavelength range 200 nm to 10,000 nm. Figure 1 compares the reflectance of the UVHR-LLNL silver coating to bare silver and aluminum over-coated with magnesium fluoride over the wavelength range 300 nm to 2000 nm.

Thomas, N.L.; Wolfe, J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic top coat to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic-level understanding of the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic interfaces present in thermal barrier coatings. We have interfaces weaken as the ceramic thickens. This provides atomic-level insight as to why thermal barrier

Carter, Emily A.

424

Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition to the Bond Coat Alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition engine turbine blades can shield the temperature to which the underlying superalloy is exposed modifications that should inhibit the failure of these jet engine turbine thermal barrier coatings. Research

Carter, Emily A.

425

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High temperature coatings for gas turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device (10) is made, having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10), is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16) and is applied by a process that is not an electron beam physical vapor deposition process. The sintering inhibiting material (22) has a morphology adapted to improve the functionality of the sintering inhibiting material (22), characterized as continuous, nodule, rivulet, grain, crack, flake and combinations thereof and being disposed within at least some of the vertical and horizontal gaps.

Subramanian, Ramesh; Seth, Brig B.

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at 0.25 A$g1 achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F$g1 on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to 0.43 F$cm2.

Jost, Kristy [Drexel University; Perez, Carlos O [ORNL; Mcdonough, John [Drexel University; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Heon, Min [Drexel University; Dion, Genevieve [Drexel University; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Young Stellar Clusters, WR-type Phenomenon and the Origin of the Galactic Center Nonthermal Radio Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations of the Arches cluster located within a projected distance of 30 pc from the dynamical center of the Galaxy have shown the presence of diffuse and discrete X-ray continuum emission, diffuse 6.4keV line emission as well as thermal and nonthermal radio continuum emission. This young and dense stellar cluster is also recognized to be within the 95% error circle of an identified steady source of $\\gamma$-ray emission associated with the EGRET source 3EG J1746--2851. Much of the thermal and nonthermal emission can be explained by shocked gas resulting from colliding winds originating from massive binaries within the cluster. In particular, we argue that nonthermal particles could upscatter the radiation field of the cluster by ICS and account for the $\\gamma$-ray emission. We also consider that the fluorescent 6.4 keV line emission may be the result of the impact of low-energy relativistic particles on neutral gas distributed in the vicinity of the cluster. Lastly, we sketch an interpretation in which young stellar clusters and massive young binary systems are responsible for the origin of nonthermal radio filaments found throughout the inner 300pc of the Galaxy. The collimation of the nonthermal filaments may be done in the colliding wind region by the ionized surface of individual mass-losing stars of massive binary systems. In this picture, a WR-type phenomenon is expected to power a central star burst in the Galactic center in order to account for all the observed filaments.

F. Yusef-Zadeh

2004-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by VUV-emission of Filament Driven Hydrogen Arc Discharge Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H^- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

Laulainen, J; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Tarvainen, O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Measurement of the work function of filament-evaporated M?g???[?subscript -x]A?u?[?subscript x] films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Roland E. Allen (Member) Mi Lu ( Member) J. W. Howze (Head of Department) December Igg0 ABSTRACT Measurement of the Work Function of Filament-Evaporated Mgr, Au Films. (December 1990) Dong Li, M. S. , Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy... energy hv I = AT'(W, ? hv) '~'f( ) hT (1. 2) where A is a constant independent of v, T and P. W, is the surface potential and and f(x) 1 )u+1 n2 u=r 2 2 cd ? uz ? + ? ? 2 (-I)"" 6 2 ?, nr (z & 0) (& -0) (1. 3) Journal model is IEEE Transactions...

Li, Dong

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that will be able to withstand a few MW proton beam and hopefully will be able to be used after possible future upgrades to the SNS to greater than a 3MW beam.

Vispute, R D [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Ermer, Henry K [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Sinsky, Phillip [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Seiser, Andrew [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Wilson, Leslie L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ultraviolet antireflection coatings for use in silicon detector design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the development of coatings for a charged-coupled device (CCD) detector optimized for use in a fixed dispersion UV spectrograph. Because of the rapidly changing index of refraction of Si, single layer broadband antireflection (AR) coatings are not suitable to increase quantum efficiency at all wavelengths of interest. Instead, we describe a creative solution that provides excellent performance over UV wavelengths. We describe progress in the development of a coated CCD detector with theoretical quantum efficiencies (QEs) of greater than 60% at wavelengths from 120 to 300 nm. This high efficiency may be reached by coating a backside-illuminated, thinned, delta-doped CCD with a series of thin film AR coatings. The materials tested include MgF{sub 2} (optimized for highest performance from 120-150 nm), SiO{sub 2} (150-180 nm), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (180-240 nm), MgO (200-250 nm), and HfO{sub 2} (240-300 nm). A variety of deposition techniques were tested and a selection of coatings that minimized reflectance on a Si test wafer were applied to functional devices. We also discuss future uses and improvements, including graded and multilayer coatings.

Hamden, Erika T.; Greer, Frank; Hoenk, Michael E.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

440

Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Interdiffusion Behavior of Aluminide Coatings on Fe-Base Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the potential degradation modes of oxidation-resistant iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coatings into Fe-base substrate alloys that typically contain no Al. To address this issue, interdiffusion between aluminide coatings and steel substrates was studied for times up to 10,000 h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized in a laboratory chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor on representative commercial ferritic alloy Fe-9Cr-1Mo and type 304L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructural and compositional changes after diffusion anneals were examined in detail. An initial attempt to model the interdiffusion behavior was carried out by applying an existing software program COSIM (coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model). Complementary work was conducted using a simple mathematic model developed by Heckel et al. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles for the aluminide coatings on ferritic alloys. Model results were then applied to predict coating lifetime.

Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Liu, A. P. [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

Hershcovitch, A; Brennan, J M; Chawla, A; Fischer, W; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W; Todd, R; Custer, A; Erickson, M; Jamshidi, N; Kobrin, P; Laping, R; Poole, H J; Jimenez, J M; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Yin-Vallgren, C; Sochugov, N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

M. Frederick

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

Ebadian, M.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

448

Preparation of high-strength nanometer scale twinned coating and foil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Very high strength single phase stainless steel coating has been prepared by magnetron sputtering onto a substrate. The coating has a unique microstructure of nanometer spaced twins that are parallel to each other and to the substrate surface. For cases where the coating and substrate do not bind strongly, the coating can be peeled off to provide foil.

Zhang, Xinghang (Los Alamos, NM); Misra, Amit (Los Alamos, NM); Nastasi, Michael A. (Santa Fe, NM); Hoagland, Richard G. (Santa Fe, NM)

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

449

The radial velocity profile of the filament galaxies in the vicinity of the Virgo cluster as a test of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radial velocities of the galaxies in the vicinity of a massive cluster shows deviation from the pure Hubble flow due to their gravitational interaction with the cluster. According to a recent study of Falco et al. with a high-resolution N-body simulation based on General Relativity (GR), the radial velocity profile of the galaxies located at distances larger than three times the virial radius of a neighbour cluster has a universal shape and could be reconstructed from direct observables provided that the galaxies are distributed along one dimensional filament. Analyzing the narrow filamentary structure identified by Kim et al. in the vicinity of the Virgo cluster from the NASA-Sloan-Atlas catalog, we reconstruct the radial velocity profile of the Virgo filament galaxies and compare it with the universal formula derived by Falco et al. It is found that unless the virial mass of the Virgo cluster exceeds $10^{15}\\,h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ the universal formula fails to describe the reconstructed radial velocity pro...

Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo-Chang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Preparation of high temperature superconducting coated wires by dipping and post annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for coating a film on a wire substrate, it comprises: melting a superconducting metal oxide mixture in a crucible to form a melt; coating the substrate with a diffusion barrier; dipping the coated wire substrate into the melt; cooling the coated wire substrate at a rate sufficiently slow to avoid thermal shock and hot cracking; and post-annealing the cooled, coated wire substrate to relieve thermal stresses in the coating, whereupon the superconducting metal-oxide mixture forms a perovskite coating upon the wire substrate.

Provenzano, V.; Singh, A.K.; Imam, M.A.; Tritt, T.M.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

al coated a2: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings Engineering Websites Summary: AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties...

452

adhesive protein coatings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Mussel-Inspired Adhesives and Coatings Materials Science Websites Summary: to circumvent the high dielectric and solvation...

453

Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

Sindelar, R.L.

2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Oxidation resistance of composite silicide coatings on niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the oxidation of NbSi/sub 2/-MoSi/sub 2/ composite silicide coatings produced by diffusive siliconizing of molybdenum films on a niobium surface. Molybdenum-coated niobium was siliconized and an x-ray microspectral analysis of the composite silicide coating showed the phase composition to be an ca 80-um-thick outer molybdenum disilicide film with a characteristic coarsely crystalline columnar structure, and inner ca 20-um film of niobium disilicide consisting of the tiny columnar crystals, and a substrate/coating interface comprising a thin, 2-3 um film of lower silicide, i.e., Nb/sub 5/Si/sub 3/. The average grain sizes, unit cell parameters, and x-ray determined densities of the Mo films obtained by various methods are shown.

Gloshko, P.I.; Kurtsev, N.F.; Lisichenko, V.I.; Nadtoka, V.N.; Petrenko, M.I.; Zmii, V.I.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

MOF Coating a Promising Path to White LEDs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(MOF); the structure was determined at Beamline 11.3.1. Coating a blue light-emitting diode (LED) with this compound readily generates white light with high luminous...

456

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications vari- ous nanoparticles onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Charged and nonagglomerated aerosol unique hybrid nanostructures at- tractive for various energy applications. DOI: 10

Chen, Junhong

457

Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

p-type seminconductor, and back contact. A typical solar cell consists of a glass or plastic cover, an antireflective coating, a front contact to allow electrons to enter a...

458

Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Shape Memory Assisted Self-Healing Coating Xiaofan Luo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as high cost. There has been a constant market demand for coating materials that can "self of fusible thermo- plastics in a thermoset host.7,8 At least two of these approaches have also been

Mather, Patrick T.

462

Photodegradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene coatings for liquid argon detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have ...

Jones, Benjamin James Poyner

463

A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Platinum- and Platinum Alloy-Coated Palladium and Palladium Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Platinum- and Platinum Alloy-Coated Palladium and Palladium Alloy Particles and Uses Thereof...

465

A novel approach to antireflection coating using planar metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate a novel antireflection coating using planar metamaterials. It dramatically reduces the reflectance and enhances the transmittance over a wide range of incidence angles for both polarizations near the designed wavelength.

Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Global optimization of silicon photovoltaic cell front coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The front-coating (FC) of a solar cell controls its efficiency, determining admission of light into the absorbing material and potentially trapping light to enhance thin absorbers. Single-layer FC designs are well known, ...

Ghebrebrhan, Michael

467

Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing an oxidation-resistant interfacial coating for continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) continues to be a major challenge. CFCCs` mechanical behavior are influenced by the interfacial bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite element modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Stinton, D.P.; Bleier, A.; Besmann, T.M.; Lara-Curzio, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rebillat, F. [LCTS, Pessac (France)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hirschfeld, D.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Impact of graphene coating on the atom-plate interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the recently proposed quantum electrodynamical formalism, we calculate the Casimir-Polder free energies and forces between the ground state atoms of Rb, Na, Cs and He${}^{\\ast}$ and the plates made of Au, Si, sapphire and fused silica coated with a graphene sheet. It is shown that the graphene coating has no effect on the Casimir-Polder interaction for metallic plates, but influences significantly for plates made of dielectric materials. The influence of graphene coating increases with decreasing static dielectric permittivity of the plate material and the characteristic frequency of an atomic dynamic polarizability. Simple analytic expressions for the classical limit of the Casimir-Polder free energy and force between an atom and a graphene-coated plate are obtained. From the comparison with the results of numerical computations, the application region of these expressions is determined.

G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

470

Strategies for incorporating functional block copolymers into polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the creation of thin film responsive hydrogel coatings via Layer-by Layer assembly (LbL) of temperature (T) responsive block copolymer - polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). First, the LbL conditions ...

Tan, Wui Siew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

474

Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

POLYETHERSULFONE COATING FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF STEEL IN GEOTHERMAL ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emphasis was directed toward evaluating the usefulness of a polyethersulfone (PES)-dissolved N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent precursor as a low-temperature film-forming anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel in simulated geothermal environments at brine temperatures up to 300 C. A {approx} 75 {micro}m thick PES coating performed well in protecting the steel against corrosion in brine at 200 C. However, at {>=} 250 C, the PES underwent severe hydrothermal oxidation that caused the cleavage of sulfone- and ether-linkages, and the opening of phenyl rings. These, in turn, led to sulfone {yields} benzosulfonic acid and ether {yields} benzophenol-type oxidation derivative transformations, and the formation of carbonyl-attached open rings, thereby resulting in the incorporation of the functional groups, hydroxyl and carbonyl, into the coating. The presence of these functional groups raised concerns about the diminutions in water-shedding and water-repellent properties that are important properties of the anti-corrosion coatings; such changes were reflected in an enhancement of the magnitude of susceptibility of the coatings surfaces to moisture. Consequently, the disintegration of the PES structure by hydrothermal oxidation was detrimental to the maximum efficacy of the coating in protecting the steel against corrosion, allowing the corrosive electrolytes to infiltrate easily through it.

SUGAMA, T.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Coating system to permit direct brazing of ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a ceramic component that enables direct brazing using a non-active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a ceramic component to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by using this brazing method. The ceramic can be high purity alumina. The method comprises applying a first coating of a silicon-bearing oxide material (e.g. silicon dioxide or mullite (3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.2SiO.sub.2) to the ceramic. Next, a thin coating of active metal (e.g. Ti or V) is applied. Finally, a thicker coating of a non-active metal (e.g. Au or Cu) is applied. The coatings can be applied by physical vapor deposition (PVD). Alternatively, the active and non-active metals can be co-deposited (e.g. by sputtering a target made of mullite). After all of the coatings have been applied, the ceramic can be fired at a high temperature in a non-oxidizing environment to promote diffusion, and to enhance bonding of the coatings to the substrate. After firing, the metallized ceramic component can be brazed to other components using a conventional non-active braze alloy. Alternatively, the firing and brazing steps can be combined into a single step. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

Cadden, Charles H. (Danville, CA); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA)

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

482

Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

483

SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

484

Process for producing a corrosion-resistant solid lubricant coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A corrosion-resistant surface formed of a sulfide-forming metal, in particular nickel, is first subjected to an electric plasma in an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide to form an adherent sulfide on said surface. The sulfided surface is then exposed to simultaneous cathodic sputtering of at least one solid lubricant which is a chalcogen compound of layer structure, in particular MoS/sub 2/, and at least one hydrophobic solid polymer, in particular PTFE. The coating thus formed is a composite coating in which the particles of the chalcogen compound are coated by the polymer. When the surface of the part to be coated does not consist of a corrosion-resistant sulfide-forming metal, a layer of such a metal is first deposited by cathodic sputtering. The composite coating withstands a wet oxidizing atmosphere, contrary to a coating of MoS/sub 2/ alone, and the method is applicable to any mechanical part intended to rub on other surfaces, such as a watch balance wheel staff and ball or roller bearings.

Niederhaeuser, P.; Hintermann, H.E.; Maillat, M.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Experiments and modeling of multilayered coatings and membranes : application to thermal barrier coatings and reverse osmosis membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I developed a novel methodology for characterizing interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coatings. The proposed methodology involves novel experiments-plus numerical simulations in order to determine ...

Luk-Cyr, Jacques

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Mosier, Annika [Stanford University] [Stanford University

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

487

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006. The size of each also use transparent paper or film, overlay the paper on each image, and mark the locations carefully

488

From Ultrananocrystalline Diamond to Single Crystal Diamond Growth in Hot Filament and Microwave Plasma-Enhanced CVD Reactors: a Unified Model for Growth Rates and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Ultrananocrystalline Diamond to Single Crystal Diamond Growth in Hot Filament and Microwave, Moscow State UniVersity, 119991 Moscow, Russia ReceiVed: April 29, 2008 CVD Diamond can now be deposited either in the form of single crystal homoepitaxial layers, or as polycrystalline films with crystal sizes

Bristol, University of

489

In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

490