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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Apparatus for coating and impregnating filament with resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for evenly coating and impregnating a filament with binder material. Dimension control and repeatability of the coating and impregnating characteristics are obtained with the apparatus.

Robinson, S.C.; Pollard, R.E.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Impending U.S. lighting standards will boost market for halogen-infrared lamps: New product line expanding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many of the incandescent floodlights and spotlights manufactured today will not meet lighting efficiency standards taking effect in the US in 1995. As these models cease production, demand will grow for higher efficiency units to fill this huge market, which now totals about 100 million lamps per year. One prime contender is a new class of halogen lamps that use a spectrally selective coating to reflect heat back onto the filament, reducing the amount of electricity needed to generate light. GE Lighting`s Halogen-IR line is the only series of such lamps currently available to replace the conventional floodlights and spotlights that will be banned by the new standards. Other manufacturers may adopt the technology, however, and the Japanese producer Ushio already sells in the US a line of smaller halogen lamps with a similar heat-reflective coating. In terms of efficacy and lifetime, Halogen-IR lamps out perform standard incandescents and standard halogens, but fall far short of fluorescent, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium sources. These other lighting systems are more appropriate and cost-effective than incandescents for many ambient lighting applications. For accent lighting and other tasks that are best suited to incandescent lighting, however, the Halogen-IR lamp is often a superior choice.

Sardinsky, R.; Shepard, M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coatings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microemulsification polymerization of styrene stabilized by a nonionic surfactant and reactive cosurfactant (E39), the measurement of ethoxylation in nonionic systems (E40), and the study of anionic polyurethane ionomer dispersants in water-soluble baking enamels (E41) were also reported during this period. ... Other applications of SEM included the characterization of paper coatings (J11), the degradation of epoxy aerosol can linings when exposed to fluorocarbon propellants (J12), the use of stainless steel as a protective pigment for steel structures (J13), the adhesion of an acrylic primer to pine (J14), and the wear behavior of coatings applied using accelerated electrospark deposition (J15). ...

Dennis G. Anderson

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Aerogel-supported filament  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

Michalske, Terry A. (P.O. Box 1042, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rye, Robert R. (1304 Espanola NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Smith, William L. (9916 Fostoria Rd., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electron emitting filaments for electron discharge devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrons are copiously emitted by a device comprising a loop-shaped filament made of lanthanum hexaboride. The filament is directly heated by an electrical current produced along the filament by a power supply connected to the terminal legs of the filament. To produce a filament, a diamond saw or the like is used to cut a slice from a bar made of lanthanum hexaboride. The diamond saw is then used to cut the slice into the shape of a loop which may be generally rectangular, U-shaped, hairpin-shaped, zigzag-shaped, or generally circular. The filaments provide high electron emission at a relatively low operating temperature, such as 1600/sup 0/C. To achieve uniform heating, the filament is formed with a cross section which is tapered between the opposite ends of the filament to compensate for nonuniform current distribution along the filament due to the emission of electrons from the filament.

Leung, K.N.; Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.

1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

Studies on the dynamics of limited filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study on the dynamics of filaments in the presence of a diagnostic, conductive limiter is presented. Plasma filaments are coherent structures present in many fusion devices and transport a significant amount of particles ...

Bonde, Jeffrey David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Detecting filaments at z=3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the detection of a filament of Ly-alpha emitting galaxies in front of the quasar Q1205-30 at z=3.04 based on deep narrow band imaging and follow-up spectroscopy obtained at the ESO NTT and VLT. We argue that Ly-alpha selection of high redshift galaxies with relatively modest amounts of observing time allows the detection and redshift measurement of galaxies with sufficiently high space densities that we can start to map out the large scale structure at z=2-3 directly. Even more interesting is it that a 3D map of the filaments will provide a new cosmological test for the value of the cosmological constant, Omega_Lambda.

J. P. U. Fynbo; P. Moller; B. Thomsen

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Measurement of birefringence inside a filament  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We quantified the ultrafast birefringence induced in the filament in an atomic gas by measuring the filament-induced polarization rotation of a probe pulse. Based on the dephasing of the probe's orthogonal polarization components in argon, the experiment was done at 1 atm by copropagating a linearly polarized 400-nm probe pulse with an 800-nm pump pulse which generated the filament. The probe's elliptical polarization states were shown under various initial pump-probe polarization schemes. These states were verified by comparing the filament-induced probe polarization rotation angle and the ellipticity of the probe polarization.

Yuan Shuai [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL) et Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Wang, Tie-Jun; Chin, See Leang [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL) et Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Kosareva, Olga; Panov, Nikolay; Makarov, Vladimir [International Laser Center and Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Inter-filament Attractions Narrow the Length Distribution of Actin Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the exponential length distribution that is typical of actin filaments under physiological conditions dramatically narrows in the presence of (i) crosslinker proteins (ii) polyvalent counterions or (iii) depletion mediated attractions. A simple theoretical model shows that in equilibrium, short-range attractions enhance the tendency of filaments to align parallel to each other, eventually leading to an increase in the average filament length and a decrease in the relative width of the distribution of filament lengths.

David Biron; Elisha Moses; Itamar Borukhov; S. A. Safran

2004-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

The WSRT virgo filament survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last few years the realization has emerged that the universal baryons are almost equally distributed by mass in three components: (1) galactic concentrations, (2) a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and (3) a diffuse intergalactic medium. These three components are predicted by hydrodynamical simulations and are probed by QSO absorption lines. To observe the WHIM in neutral hydrogen, observations are needed which are deeper than log(N$_{HI}$)=18. The WHIM should appear as a Cosmic Web, underlying the galaxies with higher column densities. We have used the WSRT, to simulate a filled aperture by observing at very high hour angles, to reach very high column density sensitivity. To achieve even higher image fidelity, an accurate model of the WSRT primary beam was developed. This will be used in the joint deconvolution of the observations. To get a good overview of the distribution and kinematics of the Cosmic Web, a deep survey of 1500 square degrees of sky was undertaken, containing the galaxy filament extending between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster. The auto-correlation data has been reduced and has an RMS of $\\Delta N_{HI} = 4.2\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ over 20 kms$^{-1}$. Several sources have been tentatively detected, which were previously unknown, as well as an indication for diffuse intergalactic filaments.

Attila Popping; Robert Braun

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

Radiation characteristics and optical properties of filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena cylindrica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents experimental measurements of the absorption and scattering cross sections and the spectral complex index of refraction of filamentous cyanobacteria. Filamentous...

Heng, Ri-Liang; Lee, Euntaek; Pilon, Laurent

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of single crystal filaments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program just completed addresses a route to a more efficient longer-lasting electric light bulb filament. All current filaments for light bulbs are metallic in nature. They are subject to embrittlement with age (large grain growth) and relatively high vapor pressures which limits their operating temperature. There is evidence which suggests advantages to using high temperature refractory single crystal fibers as a filament for a light bulb. These refractory materials may include materials such as hafnium or tantalum carbide which have melting points about 500{degrees}C higher than tungsten. Another advantage is that single crystal fibers have a very high degree of crystalline perfection with very few voids and dislocations. Without these imperfections, the atomic mobility at high temperatures is highly restricted. Thus single crystal fibers are very stable at high temperature and will last longer. The efficiencies result from running these single crystal ceramic fiber filaments at higher temperatures and the higher emissivity of the carbide filaments compared to tungsten. The amount of visible light is proportional to the 4the power of the temperature thus a 500{degrees}C higher operating give about a 3-fold increase in radiation in the visible range. The program accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Single crystal fibers of JfC sufficient crystal quality for light bulb filament applications were made. (2) The HfC fiber furnace growth chamber, power control and data collection system was developed for the laboratory scale plant. (3) method for mounting and apparatuses for testing the single crystal fiber filaments were developed and built.

Milewski, J.V.; Shoultz, R.A.; Bourque-McConnell, M.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E...

Nemirovskii, Sergey K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

Centurion, Martin [Physics Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Pu Ye; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dynamics of filament formation in a Kerr medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the large-scale beam breakup and filamentation of femtosecond pulses in a Kerr medium. We have experimentally monitored the formation of stable light filaments, conical emission, and interactions between filaments. Three major stages lead to the formation of stable light filaments: First the beam breaks up into a pattern of connected lines (constellation), then filaments form on the constellations, and finally the filaments release a fraction of their energy through conical emission. We observed a phase transition to a faster filamentation rate at the onset of conical emission. We attribute this to the interaction of conical emissions with the constellation which creates additional filaments. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental results.

Martin Centurion; Ye Pu; Mankei Tsang; Demetri Psaltis

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Filamentation Time Diagnosis of Thinning Troughs and Cutoff Lows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes synoptic-scale trough-thinning processes using a filamentation time diagnostic. The filamentation time diagnostic is derived from the potential vorticity equation expressed in spherical coordinates in the horizontal plane and ...

Yu-Ming Tsai; Hung-Chi Kuo; Wayne H. Schubert

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Submesoscale Cold Filaments in the Gulf Stream  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set of realistic, very high-resolution simulations is made for the Gulf Stream region using the oceanic model Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) to study the life cycle of the intense submesoscale cold filaments that form on the subtropical ...

Jonathan Gula; M. Jeroen Molemaker; James C. McWilliams

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O'Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Flagellar Movement: A Sliding Filament Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sinus-oidal waves such as those which can be produced on a vibrating string. The bends, or bent regions, of the bendina waves have...demonstrated that the propa--ated waves which can be generated by oscillating one end of a passive elastic filament immersed in a viscous...

Charles J. Brokaw

1972-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

25

Plasma Filamentation in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak RTP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence for small scale magnetic structures in the Rijnhuizen tokamak RTP is presented. These are manifest through steps and peaks in the electron temperature and pressure, measured with multiposition Thomson scattering. During central electron cyclotron heating, several filaments of high pressure are found in the power deposition region. They live hundreds of microseconds. Near the sawtooth inversion radius a "step" in the temperature profile occurs. Further out, quasiperiodic structures are observed, in both Ohmic and heated discharges.

N. J. Lopes Cardozo; F. C. Schüller; C. J. Barth; C. C. Chu; F. J. Pijper; J. Lok; A. A. M. Oomens

1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

Acceleration and vortex filaments in turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report recent results from a high resolution numerical study of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow. Single particle trajectories were followed for a time range spanning more than three decades, from less than a tenth of the Kolmogorov time-scale up to one large-eddy turnover time. We present some results concerning acceleration statistics and the statistics of trapping by vortex filaments.

F. Toschi; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte

2005-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reconnection of vortex filaments and Kolmogorov spectrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of the 3D velocity field, induced by collapsing vortex filaments is studied. One of the aims of this work is to clarify the appearance of the Kolmogorov type energy spectrum $E(k)\\varpropto k^{-5/3}$, observed in many numerical works on discrete vortex tubes (quantized vortex filaments in quantum fluids). Usually, explaining classical turbulent properties of quantum turbulence, the model of vortex bundles, is used. This model is necessary to mimic the vortex stretching, which is responsible for the energy transfer in classical turbulence. In our consideration we do not appeal to the possible "bundle arrangement" but explore alternative idea that the turbulent spectra appear from singular solution, which describe the collapsing line at moments of reconnection. One more aim is related to an important and intensively discussed topic - a role of hydrodynamic collapse in the formation of turbulent spectra. We demonstrated that the specific vortex filament configuration generated the spectrum $E(k)$ close to the Kolmogorov dependence and discussed the reason for this as well as the reason for deviation. We also discuss the obtained results from point of view of the both classical and quantum turbulence.

Sergey K. Nemirovskii

2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Thompson, Karen G. (Orlando, FL); Bryan, Coleman J. (Merritt Island, FL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Mechanism of Actin Filament Bundling by Fascin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fascin is the main actin filament bundling protein in filopodia. Because of the important role filopodia play in cell migration, fascin is emerging as a major target for cancer drug discovery. However, an understanding of the mechanism of bundle formation by fascin is critically lacking. Fascin consists of four {beta}-trefoil domains. Here, we show that fascin contains two major actin-binding sites, coinciding with regions of high sequence conservation in {beta}-trefoil domains 1 and 3. The site in {beta}-trefoil-1 is located near the binding site of the fascin inhibitor macroketone and comprises residue Ser-39, whose phosphorylation by protein kinase C down-regulates actin bundling and formation of filopodia. The site in {beta}-trefoil-3 is related by pseudo-2-fold symmetry to that in {beta}-trefoil-1. The two sites are {approx}5 nm apart, resulting in a distance between actin filaments in the bundle of {approx}8.1 nm. Residue mutations in both sites disrupt bundle formation in vitro as assessed by co-sedimentation with actin and electron microscopy and severely impair formation of filopodia in cells as determined by rescue experiments in fascin-depleted cells. Mutations of other areas of the fascin surface also affect actin bundling and formation of filopodia albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that, in addition to the two major actin-binding sites, fascin makes secondary contacts with other filaments in the bundle. In a high resolution crystal structure of fascin, molecules of glycerol and polyethylene glycol are bound in pockets located within the two major actin-binding sites. These molecules could guide the rational design of new anticancer fascin inhibitors.

Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Yang, Changsong; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto (UPENN); (UPENN-MED)

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan [School of Science, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Radiofrequency conical emission from femtosecond filaments in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the broadband conical emission associated with filaments in air extends down to the radiofrequency region. This rf emission which originates from the longitudinal oscillation of charged ions formed during filamentation is strongly enhanced by the presence of a longitudinal static electric field.

Forestier, B.; Houard, A.; Durand, M.; Andre, Y. B.; Prade, B.; Mysyrowicz, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Dauvignac, J.-Y.; Perret, F.; Pichot, Ch. [Laboratoire d'Electronique, Antennes et Telecommunications, CNRS UMR 6071, Universite Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 250 rue Albert Einstein, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pellet, M. [Ministere de la Defense, F-00457 Armees (France)

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

ATP Hydrolysis Stimulates Large Length Fluctuations in Single Actin Filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP Hydrolysis Stimulates Large Length Fluctuations in Single Actin Filaments Evgeny B. Stukalin is investigated theoretically using a stochastic model that takes into account the hydrolysis of ATP filaments. It is found that the ATP hydrolysis has a strong effect on dynamic properties of single actin

34

GALAXY SPIN ALIGNMENT IN FILAMENTS AND SHEETS: OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of galaxies are known to be affected by their environment. One important question is how their angular momentum reflects the surrounding cosmic web. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the spin axes of spiral and elliptical galaxies relative to their surrounding filament/sheet orientations. To detect filaments, a marked point process with interactions (the {sup B}isous model{sup )} is used. Sheets are found by detecting 'flattened' filaments. The minor axes of ellipticals are found to be preferentially perpendicular to hosting filaments. A weak correlation is found with sheets. These findings are consistent with the notion that elliptical galaxies formed via mergers, which predominantly occurred along the filaments. The spin axis of spiral galaxies is found to align with the host filament, with no correlation between spiral spin and sheet normal. When examined as a function of distance from the filament axis, a much stronger correlation is found in the outer parts, suggesting that the alignment is driven by the laminar infall of gas from sheets to filaments. When compared with numerical simulations, our results suggest that the connection between dark matter halo and galaxy spin is not straightforward. Our results provide an important input to the understanding of how galaxies acquire their angular momentum.

Tempel, Elmo [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)] [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia); Libeskind, Noam I., E-mail: elmo@to.ee, E-mail: nlibeskind@aip.de [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Purification, Ultrastructure, and Composition of Axial Filaments from Leptospira  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...typical procaryotic nuclear region. The axial filament...FILAMENTS Denton DV-502 vacuum evaporator with carbon...tetramethylethylenediamine as accelerator in 12 ml of 0.05 M...typical procaryotic nuclear region (Fig. 4...glutaraldehyde-prefixed cells this nuclear region was not apparent...

Robert K. Nauman; Stanley C. Holt; C. D. Cox

1969-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The extreme nonlinear optics of gases and femtosecond optical filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, powerful ultrashort laser pulses can form greatly extended, propagating filaments of concentrated high intensity in gases, leaving behind a very long trail of plasma. Such filaments can be much longer than the longitudinal scale over which a laser beam typically diverges by diffraction, with possible applications ranging from laser-guided electrical discharges to high power laser propagation in the atmosphere. Understanding in detail the microscopic processes leading to filamentation requires ultrafast measurements of the strong field nonlinear response of gas phase atoms and molecules, including absolute measurements of nonlinear laser-induced polarization and high field ionization. Such measurements enable the assessment of filamentation models and make possible the design of experiments pursuing applications. In this paper, we review filamentation in gases and some applications, and discuss results from diagnostics developed at Maryland for ultrafast measurements of laser-gas interactions.

Milchberg, H. M.; Chen, Y.-H.; Cheng, Y.-H.; Jhajj, N.; Palastro, J. P.; Rosenthal, E. W.; Varma, S.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Zahedpour, S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Condensation of actin filaments pushing against a barrier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a model to describe the force generated by the polymerization of an array of parallel biofilaments. The filaments are assumed to be coupled only through mechanical contact with a movable barrier. We calculate the filament density distribution and the force-velocity relation with a mean-field approach combined with simulations. We identify two regimes: a non-condensed regime at low force in which filaments are spread out spatially, and a condensed regime at high force in which filaments accumulate near the barrier. We confirm a result previously known from other related studies, namely that the stall force is equal to N times the stall force of a single filament. In the model studied here, the approach to stalling is very slow, and the velocity is practically zero at forces significantly lower than the stall force.

K. Tsekouras; D. Lacoste; K. Mallick; J. -F. Joanny

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Flow coating apparatus and method of coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Apparatus for coating powders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Production of ozone and nitrogen oxides by laser filamentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have experimentally measured that laser filaments in air generate up to 10{sup 14}, 3x10{sup 12}, and 3x10{sup 13} molecules of O{sub 3}, NO, and NO{sub 2}, respectively. The corresponding local concentrations in the filament active volume are 10{sup 16}, 3x10{sup 14}, and 3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, and allows efficient oxidative chemistry of nitrogen, resulting in concentrations of HNO{sub 3} in the parts per million range. The latter forming binary clusters with water, our results provide a plausible pathway for the efficient nucleation recently observed in laser filaments.

Petit, Yannick; Henin, Stefano; Kasparian, Jerome; Wolf, Jean-Pierre [GAP Biophotonics, Universite de Geneve, 20 rue de l'Ecole de Medecine, CH1211 Geneve 4 (Switzerland)

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short Metal Capillary Columns Packed with Polymer-Coated Fibrous Materials in High-Temperature Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......along with the subsequent commercialization. However, only a limited...After the deac- tivation process, a bundle of heat-resistant...followed by the polymer-coating process onto the packed filaments...capillary The metal deactivation process was carried out according......

Yoshihiro Saito; Mitsuhiro Ogawa; Motohiro Imaizumi; Kazuhiro Ban; Akira Abe; Tsutomu Takeichi; Hiroo Wada; Kiyokatsu Jinno

42

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Formation of beads-on-a-string structures during break-up of viscoelastic filaments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Break-up of viscoelastic filaments is pervasive in both nature and technology. If a filament is formed by placing a drop of saliva between a thumb and forefinger and is stretched, the filament’s morphology close to break-up ...

Bhat, Pardeep P.

45

Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

Miguel A. Aragón-Calvo; Rien van de Weygaert; Bernard J. T. Jones; J. M. Thijs van der Hulst

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ultrastructure of the capitular filaments of Penicillus dumetosus (Chlorophyceae; Siphonales)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE CAPITULAR FILAMENTS OF PENICILLUS DUMETOSUS (CHLOROPHYCEAE; SIPHONALES) A Thesis MICHAEL DOOLEY MCKENZIE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Oceanography ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE CAPITULAR FILAMENTS OF PENICILLUS DUMETOSUS (CHLOROPHYCEAE; SIPHONALES) A Thesis by MICHAEL DOOLEY MCKENZIE Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of ittee...

McKenzie, Michael Dooley

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Top-Down Fragmentation of a Warm Dark Matter Filament  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first high-resolution n-body simulations of the fragmentation of dark matter filaments. Such fragmentation occurs in top-down scenarios of structure formation, when the dark matter is warm instead of cold. In a previous paper (Knebe et al. 2002, hereafter Paper I), we showed that WDM differs from the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) mainly in the formation history and large-scale distribution of low-mass haloes, which form later and tend to be more clustered in WDM than in CDM universes, tracing more closely the filamentary structures of the cosmic web. Therefore, we focus our computational effort in this paper on one particular filament extracted from a WDM cosmological simulation and compare in detail its evolution to that of the same CDM filament. We find that the mass distribution of the halos forming via fragmentation within the filament is broadly peaked around a Jeans mass of a few 10^9 Msun, corresponding to a gravitational instability of smooth regions with an overdensity contrast around 10 at these redshifts. Our results confirm that WDM filaments fragment and form gravitationally bound haloes in a top-down fashion, whereas CDM filaments are built bottom-up, thus demonstrating the impact of the nature of the dark matter on dwarf galaxy properties.

Alexander Knebe; Julien Devriendt; Brad Gibson; Joseph Silk

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Coat protein gene duplication in a filamentous RNA virus of plants.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BYV p24 KKFNKPNPV R TFCATFEDAYIVIARSLP-KL-FLNRTIGKRGIPSGYEFLGA...FL CTV CP G--NRTNAL R VWGRTNDALYLAFCRQNR-NLSYGGRPLD-AGIPAGYHYLCA...kindly provided by H. Pappu, E. J. Anderson, and...are grateful to Drs. H. Pappu, E. J. Anderson, C. L. Niblett, and R. F. Lee for providing...

V P Boyko; A V Karasev; A A Agranovsky; E V Koonin; V V Dolja

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tag: coat drive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 50

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    51

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    52

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    53

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    54

    ATP hydrolysis stimulates large length fluctuations in single actin filaments  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymerization dynamics of single actin filaments is investigated theoretically using a stochastic model that takes into account the hydrolysis of ATP-actin subunits, the geometry of actin filament tips, the lateral interactions between the monomers as well as the processes at both ends of the polymer. Exact analytical expressions are obtained for a mean growth velocity and for dispersion in length fluctuations. It is found that the ATP hydrolysis has a strong effect on dynamic properties of single actin filaments. At high concentrations of free actin monomers the mean size of unhydrolyzed ATP-cap is very large, and the dynamics is governed by association/dissociation of ATP-actin subunits. However, at low concentrations the size of the cap becomes finite, and the dissociation of ADP-actin subunits makes a significant contribution to overall dynamics. Actin filament length fluctuations reach the maximum at the boundary between two dynamic regimes, and this boundary is always larger than the critical concentration. Random and vectorial mechanisms of hydrolysis are compared, and it is found that they predict qualitatively similar dynamic properties. The possibility of attachment and detachment of oligomers is also discussed. Our theoretical approach is successfully applied to analyze the latest experiments on the growth and length fluctuations of individual actin filaments.

    Evgeny B. Stukalin; Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

    2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    55

    Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Wells, Russell P. (Kensington, CA); Craven, Glen E. (Fremont, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    56

    Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

    Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

    1996-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    57

    Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    58

    Effect of filament supports on emissive probe measurements  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We have constructed an emissive probe with a thin tungsten filament spot-welded across two nickel wires insulated with ceramic paint. We show that the ceramic supports covering the nickel wires have a large effect on the potential measurements in low-density plasmas. It is found that the potential measured by the emissive probe is more negative than the potential derived from a Langmuir probe current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve when the plasma density is so low that the emitting filament remains immersed in the sheaths of the ceramic supports. The length of the filament L needs to be larger than about 2 Debye lengths (L > 2{lambda}{sub De}) in order to avoid the influence of the ceramic supports and to achieve reliable plasma potential measurements using emissive probes.

    Wang, X.; Howes, C. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Horanyi, M. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Robertson, S. [NASA Lunar Science Institute: Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    59

    Coated ceramic breeder materials  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    60

    Thermal barrier coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    61

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    62

    8 - Corrosion/Coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Publisher Summary This chapter presents some tips and suggestions on corrosion and coatings used in pipelines. Corrosion failures at compressor stations result from carelessness on the part of the user, or poor choice of material/configuration by the designer. Thus, design engineers should coat everything underground, except ground rods, with a coating properly selected for the conditions; should use proper coating application and inspection; and should use ground rods anodic to steel and insulated (coated) ground wires. Coatings are one of the most important considerations for controlling underground corrosion. Generally, all underground metallic structures, except ground rods, should be coated. This includes gas piping, control lines, tubing, water lines, conduit, air lines, and braces. For gas discharge lines, temperature is a dominant consideration and so one has to make sure to get a coating that withstands gas discharge temperature and should be careful, as sag temperatures listed in coating literature are not maximum operating temperatures. Each water system should have corrosion monitoring provisions designed into the system, such as coupons or corrosion rate probes. If there is a gas treating plant in conjunction with the compressor station, corrosion monitoring provisions should be designed into that system also. Water treatment for corrosion control is considered, depending on individual circumstances and provisions should be considered for cathodic protection of the internal surfaces of storage tanks and water softeners. The Pearson survey is an aboveground technique used to locate coating defects on buried pipelines. In this technique, the defect may be recorded on a preprepared record sheet complete with a measured distance from a fixed reference point or indicated by a marker peg or non-toxic paint.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    63

    Characterization of terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament in air  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We demonstrate that the terahertz emission from a dc-biased filament can be regarded as a sum of an elliptically polarized terahertz source (generated by a filament without external electric field) and a linearly polarized terahertz source induced by the external electric field applied to the filament. The peak frequency and linewidth of the linearly polarized terahertz source are related to the average plasma density of the filament.

    Chen Yanping; Wang Tiejun; Marceau, Claude; Chin, See Leang [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL), and Departement de Physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Theberge, Francis; Chateauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques [Defence Research and Development Canada-Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Blvd. North, Quebec, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada); Kosareva, Olga [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    64

    Detection of an optical filament in the Monogem Ring  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Monogem Ring is a huge bright soft X-ray enhancement with a diameter of ~ 25$\\degr$. This 0.3 kpc distant structure is a peculiar Galactic supernova remnant in that it is obviously visible only in X-rays, due to its expansion into a region of extremely low ambient density: hence, practically no optical emission or a neutral HI shell was expected to be detectable. - Here we report on the discovery of a very faint arc-like nebula on a POSS II R film copy, at the south-eastern borders of the MR. Spectroscopy revealed this filament to have a very large [SII]$\\lambda$ 6716+6731/Halpha ratio of up to ~ 1.8, indicating shock excitation, and a low density of N_e thin (~ 1 arcmin), structured filament, stretching N-S. We believe that this filament belongs to the MR and became visible due to the interaction of the expanding remnant with a mild density increase in the interstellar medium. Only one other possible optical filament of the MR has been reported in the literature, but no spectrum was provided.

    R. Weinberger; S. Temporin; B. Stecklum

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    65

    The role of filament activation in a solar eruption  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observations show that the mutual relationship between filament eruptions and solar flares cannot be described in terms of an unique scenario. In some cases, the eruption of a filament appears to trigger a flare, while in others the observations are more consistent with magnetic reconnection that produces both the flare observational signatures (e.g., ribbons, plasma jets, post-flare loops, etc.) and later the destabilization and eruption of a filament. We study an event which occurred in NOAA 8471, where a flare and the activation of (at least) two filaments were observed on 28 February 1999. By using imaging data acquired in the 1216, 1600, 171 and 195 \\AA\\ TRACE channels and by BBSO in the continnum and in H$\\alpha$, a morphological study of the event is carried out. Using TRACE 1216 and 1600 \\AA\\ data, an estimate of the "pure" Ly$\\alpha$ power is obtained. The extrapolation of the magnetic field lines is done using the SOHO/MDI magnetograms and assuming a potential field. The potential magnetic field ext...

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Romano, Paolo; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    66

    Detection of a redshift 3.04 filament  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The filamentary structure of the early universe has until now only been seen in numerical simulations. Despite this lack of direct observational evidence, the prediction of early filamentary structure formation in a Cold Dark Matter dominated universe has become a paradigm for our understanding of galaxy assembly at high redshifts. Clearly observational confirmation is required. Lyman Break galaxies are too rare to be used as tracers of filaments and we argue that to map out filaments in the high z universe, one will need to identify classes of objects fainter than those currently accessible via the Lyman Break technique. Objects selected via their Ly-alpha emission, and/or as DLA absorbers, populate the faintest accessible part of the high redshift galaxy luminosity function, and as such make up good candidates for objects which will map out high redshift filaments. Here we present the first direct detection of a filament (at z=3.04) mapped by those classes of objects. The observations are the deepest yet to have been done in Ly-alpha imaging at high redshift, and they reveal a single string of proto-galaxies spanning about 5 Mpc (20 Mpc comoving). Expanding the cosmological test proposed by Alcock & Paczynski (1979), we outline how observations of this type can be used to determine Omega_Lambda at z=3.

    P. Moller; J. U. Fynbo

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    67

    INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of five different types, NIF possess common structural features, including a conserved alpha-helical central rod domain of NIF in the presence of NF-L (Zackroff et al., 1982; Hisanaga and Hirokawa, 1988; Balin and Lee, 1991

    Goldman, Robert D.

    68

    Evolution of Genes and Gene Networks in Filamentous Fungi  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................................................... 137 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Phylogenetic tree assembled from fungi with sequenced genomes ........... 5 2... (subsistence on detritus) lifestyle, may explain such rapid amino acid divergence. Figs. 1 and 2 are phylogenetic trees for the filamentous fungi. Fig. 2 shows the 10 major classes of the 5 Fig. 1: Phylogenetic tree assembled from fungi with sequenced...

    Greenwald, Charles Joaquin

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    69

    Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 29 Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime. Single-Molecule Lifetime Measurements A. Extract and Sample Preparation B. Microscopy C. Data Analysis Dynamics C. Connecting to Other Types of Measurements IV. Results and Conclusion References Abstract Single-molecule

    Needleman, Daniel

    70

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    71

    Spin coating apparatus  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

    Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    72

    In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of conductive filament during solid electrolyte resistance switching  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of a solid electrolyte, Cu-GeS, during resistance switching is reported. Real-time observations of the filament formation and disappearance process were performed in the TEM instrument and the conductive-filament-formation model was confirmed experimentally. Narrow conductive filaments were formed corresponding to resistance switching from high- to low-resistance states. When the resistance changed to high-resistance state, the filament disappeared. It was also confirmed by use of selected area diffractometry and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that the conductive filament was made of nanocrystals composed mainly of Cu.

    Fujii, Takashi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Fujiwara, Ichiro [Semiconductor Technology Academic Research Center, 3-17-2 Shinyokohama, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 222-0033 (Japan)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    73

    The surface coating industries try on new coats  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Some of the best pollution prevention information is available from state industry-education projects. The preferred pollution prevention method is eliminating or reducing the need for surface coating, often by using coating-free materials such as titanium and aluminum alloys, pultruded fiberglass reinforced plastics and weathering steel. Although it is not feasible to completely eliminate coatings for many applications, the need for coating surfaces often can be minimized by preventing deterioration of the coating. Since surface coatings do not deteriorate uniformly or completely, only small portions of a surface may require recoating. Commercially available alternative coating systems that generate fewer air emissions can be applied in specific applications, although there are inevitable trade-offs. In addition, emerging technologies may offer alternatives to traditional coating systems.

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    74

    Coatings for performance retention  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Performance and performance retention are becoming increasingly important in today’s gas turbine engines. The military aircraft engine operator wants the flexibility and flight envelope that increased performance will give and the commercial user—aircraft utility generation or pumper—demands the long term fuel economy that improved performance retention will provide. Materials advances have provided the intrinsic strength and temperature increases to push the capability of today’s engines and coatings have been an integral part of that advancement. Specifically in the performance retention area coatings and seal systems have become increasingly important in both compressor and turbine components. It is the intent of this overview paper to present a brief review of the coating systems presently in use and in development and to consider areas in which the technology might be heading.

    R. V. Hillery

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    75

    STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    76

    Tribology and coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The future use of fuel-efficient, low-emission, advanced transportation systems (for example, those using low-heat-rejection diesel engines or advanced gas turbines) presents new challenges to tribologists and materials scientists. High service temperatures, corrosive environments, and extreme contact pressures are among the concerns that make necessary new tribological designs, novel materials, and effective lubrication concepts. Argonne is working on methods to reduce friction, wear and corrosion, such as soft metal coatings on ceramics, layered compounds, diamond coatings, and hard surfaces.

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    77

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    78

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    79

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    80

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    81

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    82

    Parameter optimization for spray coating  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The aim of planning path-oriented spray-coating processes is to find a time-dependent continuous sequence of spray gun configurations so that a coating of desired thickness is achieved when executing the sequence. A novel approach to solving the planning ... Keywords: Optimization, Robot path planning, Thermal spray coating

    Alexander Kout; Heinrich Müller

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    83

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    84

    Submicron carbon filament cement-matrix composites for electromagnetic interference shielding  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbon filaments of diameter 0.1 mm were found to be a much more effective additive than conventional carbon fibers of diameter 10 mm in providing cement pastes capable of electromagnetic interference shielding. With 0.54 vol. % filaments and a shield thickness of 4 mm, a shielding effectiveness of 30 dB was attained at 1--2 GHz. However, the filaments were less effective than the fibers for reinforcing and for providing strain sensing cement-matrix composites.

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.] [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Composite Materials Research Lab.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    85

    Complete genome sequence of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The genome sequence of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus shows numerous distinctive features that may shine light on the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis.

    Kuo-Hsiang Tang; Kerrie Barry; Olga Chertkov; Eileen Dalin; Cliff S Han; Loren J Hauser; Barbara M Honchak; Lauren E Karbach; Miriam L Land; Alla Lapidus; Frank W Larimer; Natalia Mikhailova; Samuel Pitluck; Beverly K Pierson; Robert E Blankenship

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    86

    Coatings for improved corrosion resistance  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Several coating approaches are being developed to resist attack in coal-fired environments and thereby minimize corrosion of underlying substrate alloys and extend the time for onset of breakaway corrosion. In general, coating systems can be classified as either diffusion or overlay type, which are distinguished principally by the method of deposition and the structure of the resultant coating-substrate bond. The coating techniques examined are pack cementation, electrospark deposition, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spray, and ion implantation. In addition, ceramic coatings are used in some applications.

    Natesan, K.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    87

    Plastic coating of microsphere substrates  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Microsphere coating techniques and results are described together with the criteria that must be met for successful production of targets. An overview of the work at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics KMS Fusion Inc. Sandia Laboratory and Rockwell–Rocky Flats Division is presented. A detailed overview of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory work describes thick coatings smooth?surface coatings organometallic graded?density and graded?Z coatings; as well as difficult to deposit metal?upon?plastic coatings.

    R. Liepins; M. Campbell; J. S. Clements; J. Hammond; R. J. Fries

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    88

    Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

    89

    Absorber coatings' degradation  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    90

    Composite coatings improve engines  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    About 40% of the power loss in engine systems is attributed to the adverse effects of friction in reciprocating engine components. Over half of this power loss is caused by friction between pistons, piston rings, and cylinder bores. In addition, engine parts may be attacked by corrosive gasoline substitutes such as liquid propane gas and alcohol/gasoline mixtures. To solve both friction and corrosion problems, Nihon Parkerizing Co. has improved the nickel-phosphorus based ceramic composite (NCC) plating technology that was developed for cylinder bores and pistons by Suzuki Motor Co. in the mid 1970s. Iron and nickel-based composite plating technologies have been investigated since the early 1970s, and a few have been used on small two-stroke motorcycle, outboard marine, snowmobile, and some luxury passenger car engine components. Both nickel- and iron-base plating processes are used on cylinders and pistons because they offer excellent wear and corrosion resistance. Nickel-base films have higher corrosion resistance than those based on iron, and are capable of withstanding the corrosive conditions characteristic of high methanol fuels. Unfortunately, they experience a decrease in hardness as operating temperatures increase. However, NCC coatings with phosphorus additions have high hardness even under severe operating conditions, and hardness increases upon exposure to elevated temperatures. In addition to high hardness and corrosion resistance, NCC coatings provide a low friction coefficient, which contributes to the reduction of friction losses between sliding components. When used in low-quality or alcohol fuels, the corrosion resistance of NCC coatings is far higher than that of Fe-P plating. Additionally, the coatings reduce wall and piston temperature, wear of ring groove and skirt, and carbon deposit formation, and they improve output power and torque. These advantages all contribute to the development of light and efficient engines with better fuel mileage.

    Funatani, K.; Kurosawa, K. (Nihon Parkerizing Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    91

    Lateral downflows in sunspot penumbral filaments and their temporal evolution  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the temporal evolution of downflows observed at the lateral edges of penumbral filaments in a sunspot located very close to the disk center. Our analysis is based on a sequence of nearly diffraction-limited spectropolarimetric scans of the Fe I 6173 A line taken with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. We compute Dopplergrams from the observed intensity profiles using line bisectors and filter the resulting velocity maps for subsonic oscillations. Lateral downflows appear everywhere in the center-side penumbra as small, weak patches of redshifts next to or along the edges of blueshifted flow channels. These patches have an intermittent life and undergo mergings and fragmentations quite frequently. The lateral downflows move together with the hosting filaments and react to their shape variations, very much resembling the evolution of granular convection in the quiet Sun. There is a good relation between brightness and velocity of the flow structures in the center-side penumbra, wi...

    Pozuelo, S Esteban; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    92

    Targeted Genomic Deletion of the Lens-Specific Intermediate Filament Protein CP49  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targeted Genomic Deletion of the Lens-Specific Intermediate Filament Protein CP49 Azita Alizadeh,1, by blocking expression of the fiber cell­specific beaded filament protein CP49. METHODS. The first exon of the mouse CP49 gene was deleted by using targeted genomic deletion techniques. Gene deletion was assessed

    Clark, John

    93

    RecA-mediated SOS induction requires an extended filament conformation but no ATP hydrolysis  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RecA-mediated SOS induction requires an extended filament conformation but no ATP hydrolysis filament on single-stranded DNA and hydrolyzes ATP. The RecA K72R (recA2201) muta- tion eliminates in the presence of ATP. Strains with this mutation do not undergo SOS induction in vivo. We have combined the K72R

    Cox, Michael M.

    94

    Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John and Rongzhou Wang  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metallic photonic-band-gap filament architectures for optimized incandescent lighting Sajeev John occur 3,4 . Tra- ditionally incandescent lighting filaments, despite being driven from equilibrium the blackbody spectrum. This suggests the pos- sibility of higher efficiency incandescent lighting, through

    John, Sajeev

    95

    Adenylate deaminase binding to synthetic thick filaments of myosin  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 Communicated by...rather tightly to myosin, heavy meromyosin, and one of...teraction with myosin and heavy meromyosin is characterized...per mol of myosin or heavy meromyosin. The physio...coated with immersion oil and sandwiched between...

    J F Koretz; C Frieden

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    96

    Role of ATP-hydrolysis in the dynamics of a single actin filament  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the stochastic dynamics of growth and shrinkage of single actin filaments taking into account insertion, removal, and ATP hydrolysis of subunits either according to the vectorial mechanism or to the random mechanism. In a previous work, we developed a model for a single actin or microtubule filament where hydrolysis occurred according to the vectorial mechanism: the filament could grow only from one end, and was in contact with a reservoir of monomers. Here we extend this approach in several ways, by including the dynamics of both ends and by comparing two possible mechanisms of ATP hydrolysis. Our emphasis is mainly on two possible limiting models for the mechanism of hydrolysis within a single filament, namely the vectorial or the random model. We propose a set of experiments to test the nature of the precise mechanism of hydrolysis within actin filaments.

    Padinhateeri Ranjith; Kirone Mallick; Jean-Francois Joanny; David Lacoste

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    97

    Autonomous Motility of Active Filaments due to Spontaneous Flow-Symmetry Breaking  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We simulate the nonlocal Stokesian hydrodynamics of an elastic filament which is active due a permanent distribution of stresslets along its contour. A bending instability of an initially straight filament spontaneously breaks flow symmetry and leads to autonomous filament motion which, depending on conformational symmetry, can be translational or rotational. At high ratios of activity to elasticity, the linear instability develops into nonlinear fluctuating states with large amplitude deformations. The dynamics of these states can be qualitatively understood as a superposition of translational and rotational motion associated with filament conformational modes of opposite symmetry. Our results can be tested in molecular-motor filament mixtures, synthetic chains of autocatalytic particles, or other linearly connected systems where chemical energy is converted to mechanical energy in a fluid environment.

    Gayathri Jayaraman; Sanoop Ramachandran; Somdeb Ghose; Abhrajit Laskar; M. Saad Bhamla; P. B. Sunil Kumar; R. Adhikari

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    98

    Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications.

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    99

    High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the major operating and maintenance issues for parabolic trough plants are minimizing heat loss and the eventual replacement of coatings and receivers. The issues are expected...

    100

    Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    101

    Carbonaceous film coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    102

    Microwires fabricated by glass-coated melt spinning  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The glass-coated melt spinning method offers a route for the manufacture of metal filaments with a few micrometers in diameter in a single operation directly from the melt. Cobalt-based amorphous wires, Cu-15.0 atomic percent (at. %) Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa (atomic percent) ferromagnetic wires were successfully produced by this method. The cobalt-based amorphous wire is flexible, and Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires have the tensile elongation of 14%. However, because of chemical reaction with glass and oxidation, it is hard to make Cu–Al–Ni shape-memory wires and Ni–Nb–Sn amorphous wires. Conditions for preparing these materials were summarized, and the differences of the solidification processes among glass-coated amorphous cobalt-based wires, Cu-15.0 at. % Sn shape-memory wires, and Ni{sub 2}MnGa wires were analyzed and discussed.

    Zhao, Y. Y.; Li, H.; Hao, H. Y.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30, Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, P. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    103

    Force generation by Myosin II Filaments in Compliant Networks  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myosin II isoforms with varying mechanochemistry and filament size interact with filamentous actin (F-actin) networks to generate contractile forces in cells. How their properties control force production in environments with varying stiffness is poorly understood. Here, we incorporated literature values for properties of myosin II isoforms into a cross-bridge model. Similar actin gliding speeds and force-velocity curves expected from previous experiments were observed. Motor force output on an elastic load was regulated by two timescales--that of their attachment to F-actin, which varied sharply with the ensemble size, motor duty ratio, and external load, and that of force build up, which scaled with ensemble stall force, gliding speed, and load stiffness. While such regulation did not require force-dependent kinetics, the myosin catch bond produced positive feedback between attachment time and force to trigger switch-like transitions from short attachments and small forces to high force-generating runs at threshold parameter values. Parameters representing skeletal muscle myosin, non-muscle myosin IIB, and non-muscle myosin IIA revealed distinct regimes of behavior respectively: (1) large assemblies of fast, low-duty ratio motors rapidly build stable forces over a large range of environmental stiffness, (2) ensembles of slow, high-duty ratio motors serve as high-affinity cross-links with force build-up times that exceed physiological timescales, and (3) small assemblies of low-duty ratio motors operating at intermediate speeds may respond sharply to changes in mechanical context--at low forces or stiffness, they serve as low affinity cross-links but they can transition to effective force production via the positive feedback mechanism described above. These results reveal how myosin isoform properties may be tuned to produce force and respond to mechanical cues in their environment.

    Samantha Stam; Jon Alberts; Margaret L. Gardel; Edwin Munro

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    104

    Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

    Wadley, Haydn

    105

    Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    106

    Coatings on reflective mask substrates  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

    Tong, William Man-Wai (Oakland, CA); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Mangat, Pawitter J. S. (Gilbert, AZ); Stivers, Alan R. (San Jose, CA); Kofron, Patrick G. (San Jose, CA); Thompson, Matthew A. (Austin, TX)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    107

    Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

    Ozer, N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    108

    Measurements of the Motion of Plasma Filaments in a Plasma Ball  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Measurements were made of the motion of the filamentary structures in a plasma ball using high speed cameras and other optical detectors. These filaments traverse the ball radially at ~106 cm/sec at the driving frequency of ~26 kHz, and drift upward through the ball at ~1 cm/sec. Varying the applied high voltage and frequency caused the number, length, and diameter of the filaments to change. A custom plasma ball was constructed to observe the effects of varying gas pressure and species on the filament structures.

    M. Campanell, J. Laird, T. Provost, S. Vasquez, S.J. Zweben

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    109

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    110

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    111

    ETOILE Regulates Developmental Patterning in the Filamentous Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...initially obtained from the automated annotation of the E...mutant leads to the rapid induction of the branching...filament. Computational modeling allowed the simulation of the etl mutant phenotype...Segregation genetics Computer Simulation Crosses, Genetic Genes...

    Aude Le Bail; Bernard Billoud; Sophie Le Panse; Sabine Chenivesse; Bénédicte Charrier

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    112

    Diamond growth with CF4 addition inhot-filament chemical vapour deposition  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) was added to standard CH4/H2 mixtures ... in hot-filament-assisted chemical vapour deposition. CF4 concentrations in the range of 0.3% ... a small fraction (CF4 was thermally di...

    E. J CORAT; V. J TRAVA-AIROLDI; N. F LEITE; M. C. A NONO…

    113

    The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of {alpha}{sub 00} and {alpha}{sub 02} (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S{sub 02} (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

    Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu Bin [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Lu Jianduo [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    114

    The cytoskeleton is composed of polymeric filaments that provide architectural support and also participate  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    migration, and the out- growth of cellular processes (Schmit and Lambert 1988; Tanaka and Kirschner 1991 are interrelated, such that the dynamics of one type of filament can affect the dynam- ics of the other (Lin

    Baas, Peter W.

    115

    HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF DUSTY FILAMENTS IN HERCULES A: EVIDENCE FOR ENTRAINMENT  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We present U-, V-, and I-band images of the host galaxy of Hercules A (3C 348) obtained with HST/WFC3/UVIS. We find a network of dusty filaments which are more complex and extended than seen in earlier Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. The filaments are associated with a faint blue continuum light (possibly from young stars) and faint H{alpha} emission. It seems likely that the cold gas and dust has been stripped from a companion galaxy now seen as a secondary nucleus. There are dusty filaments aligned with the base of the jets on both eastern and western sides of the galaxy. The morphology of the filaments is different on the two sides-the western filaments are fairly straight, while the eastern filaments are mainly in two loop-like structures. We suggest that despite the difference in morphologies, both sets of filaments have been entrained in a slow-moving boundary layer outside the relativistic flow. As suggested by Fabian et al., magnetic fields in the filaments may stabilize them against disruption. We consider a speculative scenario to explain the relation between the radio source and the shock and cavities in the hot intracluster medium seen in the Chandra data. We suggest that the radio source originally ({approx}60 Myr ago) propagated along a position angle of {approx}35 Degree-Sign where it created the shock and cavities. The radio source axis changed to its current orientation ({approx}100 Degree-Sign ) possibly due to a supermassive black hole merger and began its current epoch of activity about 20 Myr ago.

    O'Dea, C. P.; Kharb, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Baum, S. A. [Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Cotton, W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Perley, R. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    116

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    117

    Fine-scale structures and material flows of quiescent filaments observed by New Vacuum Solar Telescope  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study on the small-scale structures and material flows of solar quiescent filaments is very important for understanding the formation and equilibrium of solar filaments. Using the high resolution H{\\alpha} data observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST), we present the structures of the barbs and the material flows along the threads across the spine in two quiescent filaments on 2013 September 29 and on 2012 November 2, respectively. During the evolution of the filament barb, several parallel tube-shaped structures formed and the width of the structures ranges from about 2.3 Mm to 3.3 Mm. The parallel tube-shaped structures merged together accompanied with the material flows from the spine to the barb. Moreover, the boundary between the barb and surrounding atmosphere is very neat. The counter-streaming flows were not found to appear alternately in the adjacent threads of the filament. However, the large-scale patchy counter-streaming flows are detected in the filament. The flows in one patch of the fi...

    Yan, X L; Xiang, Y Y; Yang, L H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    118

    Method of measuring metal coating adhesion  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

    Roper, John R. (Northglenn, CO)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    119

    The interaction of polarized microwaves with planar arrays of femtosecond laser-produced plasma filaments in air  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The interaction of polarized microwaves with subwavelength arrays of parallel plasma filaments, such as those produced by the propagation of high-power femtosecond laser pulses in ambient air, was investigated by calculating the reflection and transmission coefficients as a function of the incidence angles using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The time evolution of these coefficients was calculated and compared with experiments. It is found that the plasma filaments array becomes transparent when the polarization of the microwave radiation is perpendicular to the filaments axis, regardless the incidence angle of the microwave with respect to the filaments, except near grazing incidence. Increasing the filaments electron density or diameter, or decreasing the electron collision frequency or filaments spacing, decreases the transmission and increases the reflection. Transmission decreases when increasing the number of filament layers while reflection remains unchanged as the number of filament layers exceeds a given number ({approx}3 in our case). Transmission slightly increases when disorder is introduced in the filament arrays. The detailed calculation results are compared with those obtained from the simple birefringent slab model, which provides a convenient framework to calculate approximately the properties of filament arrays.

    Marian, Anca; El Morsli, Mbark; Vidal, Francois; Payeur, Stephane; Kieffer, Jean-Claude [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Chateauneuf, Marc; Theberge, Francis; Dubois, Jacques [Defense R and D Canada Valcartier, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    120

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    121

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    122

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    123

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    124

    Constraints on (Omega_m,Omega_Lambda) using distributions of inclination angles for high redshift filaments  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this paper we present a scale free method to determine the cosmological parameters (Omega_m, Omega_Lambda). The method is based on the requirement of isotropy of the distribution of orientations of cosmological filaments. The current structure formation paradigm predicts that the first structures to form are voids and filaments, causing a web-like structure of the matter distribution at high redshifts. Recent observational evidence suggests that the threads, or filaments, of the cosmic web most easily are mapped in Ly-alpha emission. We describe how such a 3D map can be used to constrain the cosmological parameters in a way which, contrary to most other cosmological tests, does not require the use of a standard rod or a standard candle. We perform detailed simulations in order to define the optimal survey parameters for the definition of an observing programme aimed to address this test, and to investigate how statistical and observational errors will influence the results. We conclude that observations should target filaments of comoving size 15-50 Mpc in the redshift range 2-4, and that each filament must be defined by at least four Ly-alpha emitters. Detection of 20 filaments will be sufficient to obtain a result, while 50 filaments will make it possible to place significant new constraints on the values of Omega_m and Omega_Lambda permitted by the current supernova observations. In a future paper we study how robust these conclusions are to systematic velocities in the survey box.

    M. Weidinger; P. Moller; J. P. U. Fynbo; B. Thomsen; M. P. Egholm

    2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    125

    Coatings for hot section gas turbine components  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Components in the hot section of gas turbines are protected from the environment by oxidation-resistant coatings while thermal barrier coatings are applied to reduce the metal operating temperature of blades and vanes. The integrity of these protective coatings is an issue of major concern in current gas turbine designs. Premature cracking of the protective layer in oxidation-resistant coatings and of the interface in thermal barrier coating systems has become one of the life limiting factors of coated components in gas turbines. Following a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of coated material systems with respect to coating types and their status of application, the fracture mechanisms and mechanics of coated systems are presented and discussed.

    J. Bressers; S. Peteves; M. Steen

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    126

    Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    127

    Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications Gold-Coated Nanoparticles For Use In Biotechnology Applications A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic...

    128

    Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Dischargin...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    available for licensing: Coating increases electrical conductivity of cathode materials Coating does not hinder battery performance Provides two coating processes that...

    129

    Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron...

    130

    Cyanophycin Mediates the Accumulation and Storage of Fixed Carbon in Non-Heterocystous Filamentous Cyanobacteria from Coniform Mats  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thin, filamentous, non-heterocystous, benthic cyanobacteria (Subsection III) from some marine, lacustrine and thermal environments aggregate into macroscopic cones and conical stromatolites. We investigate the uptake and ...

    Liang, Biqing

    131

    THE SPIN AND ORIENTATION OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN COSMIC FILAMENTS  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clusters, filaments, sheets, and voids are the building blocks of the cosmic web. Forming dark matter halos respond to these different large-scale environments, and this in turn affects the properties of galaxies hosted by the halos. It is therefore important to understand the systematic correlations of halo properties with the morphology of the cosmic web, as this informs both about galaxy formation physics and possible systematics of weak lensing studies. In this study, we present and compare two distinct algorithms for finding cosmic filaments and sheets, a task which is far less well established than the identification of dark matter halos or voids. One method is based on the smoothed dark matter density field and the other uses the halo distributions directly. We apply both techniques to one high-resolution N-body simulation and reconstruct the filamentary/sheet like network of the dark matter density field. We focus on investigating the properties of the dark matter halos inside these structures, in particular, on the directions of their spins and the orientation of their shapes with respect to the directions of the filaments and sheets. We find that both the spin and the major axes of filament halos with masses approx<10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} are preferentially aligned with the direction of the filaments. The spins and major axes of halos in sheets tend to lie parallel to the sheets. There is an opposite mass dependence of the alignment strength for the spin (negative) and major (positive) axes, i.e. with increasing halo mass the major axis tends to be more strongly aligned with the direction of the filament, whereas the alignment between halo spin and filament becomes weaker with increasing halo mass. The alignment strength as a function of the distance to the most massive node halo indicates that there is a transit large-scale environment impact: from the two-dimensional collapse phase of the filament to the three-dimensional collapse phase of the cluster/node halo at small separation. Overall, the two algorithms for filament/sheet identification investigated here agree well with each other. The method based on halos alone can be easily adapted for use with observational data sets.

    Zhang Youcai; Yang Xiaohu; Lin Weipeng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Partner Group of MPA, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China); Faltenbacher, Andreas; Springel, Volker [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wang Huiyuan, E-mail: yczhang@shao.ac.c [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Center for Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 (China)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    132

    Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    133

    An Excursion Set Model of the Cosmic Web: The Abundance of Sheets, Filaments, and Halos  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    We discuss an analytic approach for modeling structure formation in sheets, filaments, and knots. This is accomplished by combining models of triaxial collapse with the excursion set approach: sheets are defined as objects that have collapsed along only one axis, filaments have collapsed along two axes, and halos are objects in which triaxial collapse is complete. In the simplest version of this approach, which we develop here, large-scale structure shows a clear hierarchy of morphologies: the mass in large-scale sheets is partitioned up among lower mass filaments, which themselves are made up of still lower mass halos. Our approach provides analytic estimates of the mass fraction in sheets, filaments, and halos and its evolution, for any background cosmological model and any initial fluctuation spectrum. In the currently popular ?CDM model, our analysis suggests that more than 99% of the cosmic mass is in sheets, and 72% in filaments, with mass larger than 1010 M? at the present time. For halos, this number is only 46%. Our approach also provides analytic estimates of how halo abundances at any given time correlate with the morphology of the surrounding large-scale structure and how halo evolution correlates with the morphology of large-scale structure.

    Jiajian Shen; Tom Abel; H. J. Mo; Ravi K. Sheth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    134

    An Excursion Set Model of the Cosmic Web: the Abundance of Sheets, Filaments And Halos  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We discuss an analytic approach for modeling structure formation in sheets, filaments and knots. This is accomplished by combining models of triaxial collapse with the excursion set approach: sheets are defined as objects which have collapsed along only one axis, filaments have collapsed along two axes, and halos are objects in which triaxial collapse is complete. In the simplest version of this approach, which we develop here, large scale structure shows a clear hierarchy of morphologies: the mass in large-scale sheets is partitioned up among lower mass filaments, which themselves are made-up of still lower mass halos. Our approach provides analytic estimates of the mass fraction in sheets, filaments and halos, and its evolution, for any background cosmological model and any initial fluctuation spectrum. In the currently popular {Lambda}CDM model, our analysis suggests that more than 99% of the mass in sheets, and 72% of the mass in filaments, is stored in objects more massive than 10{sup 10}M{sub {circle_dot}} at the present time. For halos, this number is only 46%. Our approach also provides analytic estimates of how halo abundances at any given time correlate with the morphology of the surrounding large-scale structure, and how halo evolution correlates with the morphology of large scale structure.

    Shen, Jiajian; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mo, Houjun; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Sheth, Ravi; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    135

    HVOF coatings of Diamalloy 2002 and Diamalloy 4010 onto steel: Tensile and bending response of coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HVOF coating of Diamalloy 2002 powders and Diamalloy 4010 powders as well as two-layered coatings consisting of these powders is carried out. In the two-layered structure, Diamalloy 4010 is sprayed at the substrate surface while Diamalloy 2002 is sprayed on the top of Diamalloy 4010 coating. The mechanical properties of the coatings are examined through tensile and three-point bending tests. The coating microstructure and morphology are examined using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the coating produced is free from defects including voids and cracks. The failure mechanism of coating during tensile and three-point bending tests is mainly crack formation and propagation in the coating. The elastic modulus of coating produced from Diamalloy 2002 is higher than that of Diamalloy 4010 coating, which is due to the presence of 12% WC in the coating.

    Al-Shehri, Y. A.; Hashmi, M. S. J. [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Eng., DCU, Dublin (Ireland); Yilbas, B. S. [Mech. Eng. Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    136

    Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    137

    Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

    Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian (Newton, MA); Chen, Jinghua (Chestnut Hill, MA); Huang, Zhongping (Belmont, MA); Wang, Dezhi (Wellesley, MA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    138

    Laser-based coatings removal  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D & D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building.

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    139

    High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High-Performance Nanostructured Coating fact sheet details a SunShot project led by a University of California, San Diego research team working to develop a new high-temperature spectrally selective coating for receiver surfaces. These receiver surfaces, used in concentrating solar power systems, rely on high-temperature SSCs to effectively absorb solar energy without emitting much blackbody radiation.The optical properties of the SSC directly determine the efficiency and maximum attainable temperature of solar receivers, which in turn influence the power-conversion efficiency and overall system cost.

    140

    Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments | U.S. DOE Office  

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Discovering how a microbe makes complex structures to perform complex functions. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    141

    Generation of long-lived underdense channels using femtosecond filamentation in air  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using femtosecond laser pulses at 800 and 400 nm, we characterize the formation of underdense channels in air generated by laser filamentation at the millijoule-energy level by means of transverse interferometry. We find that using tight focusing conditions, filamentation generates a supersonic shock wave and that the resulting low-density channel lasts for more than 90 ms. Comparison of these results with hydrodynamic simulations using an Eulerian hydrodynamic code gives an good agreement and allows us to estimate the initial gas temperature at $\\sim1000$ K. The influence of experimental parameters such as the focusing conditions for the ultrashort laser pulse, its polarization or the wavelength used is then studied and linked to previous characterizations of filamentation-generated plasma columns.

    Point, Guillaume; Couairon, Arnaud; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    142

    Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    143

    FROM DUSTY FILAMENTS TO MASSIVE STARS: THE CASE OF NGC 7538 S  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We report on high-sensitivity and high angular resolution archival Submillimeter Array observations of the large ({approx}15,000 AU) putative circumstellar disk associated with the O-type protostar NGC 7538 S. Observations of the continuum resolve this putative circumstellar disk into five compact sources, with sizes {approx}3000 AU and masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }. This confirms the results of recent millimeter observations made with CARMA/BIMA toward this object. However, we find that most of these compact sources eject collimated bipolar outflows, revealed by our silicon monoxide (SiO J = 5-4) observations, and confirm that these sources have a (proto)stellar nature. All outflows are perpendicular to the large and rotating dusty structure. We propose therefore that, rather than being a single massive circumstellar disk, NGC 7538 S could instead be a large and massive contracting or rotating filament that is fragmenting at scales of 0.1-0.01 pc to form several B-type stars, via the standard process involving outflows and disks. As in recent high spatial resolution studies of dusty filaments, our observations also suggest that thermal pressure does not seem to be sufficient to support the filament, so that either additional support needs to be invoked or else the filament must be in the process of collapsing. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulation of the formation of a molecular cloud by converging warm neutral medium flows produces contracting filaments whose dimensions and spacings between the stars forming within them, as well as their column densities, strongly resemble those observed in the filament reported here.

    Naranjo-Romero, Raul; Zapata, Luis A.; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Takahashi, Satoko [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Palau, Aina [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Schilke, Peter [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    144

    Friction- and wear-reducing coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

    Zhu, Dong (Farmington Hills, MI); Milner, Robert (Warren, MI); Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim (Troy, MI)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    145

    Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

    Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    146

    Stabilization of the filamentation instability and the anisotropy of the background plasma  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an anisotropic Maxwellian plasma is investigated, with a focus on the stabilization condition for the filamentation instability. It is found that this condition is very sensitive to the anisotropy degree of the background plasma so that the investigation of the beam instability may not be easily decoupled from the state of the background plasma in typical fusion conditions. Furthermore, regardless of the plasma isotropy, filamentation can no longer be suppressed when the beam density exceeds a threshold value that is determined.

    Bret, A.; Deutsch, C. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (CNRS-UMR 8578), Universite Paris XI, Batiment 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    147

    Robustness of the filamentation instability for asymmetric plasma shells collision in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The filamentation instability triggered when two counter streaming plasma shells overlap appears to be the main mechanism by which collisionless shocks are generated. It has been known for long that a flow aligned magnetic field can completely suppress this instability. In a recent paper [Phys. Plasmas 18, 080706 (2011)], it was demonstrated in two dimensions that for the case of two cold, symmetric, relativistically colliding shells, such cancellation cannot occur if the field is not perfectly aligned. Here, this result is extended to the case of two asymmetric shells. The filamentation instability appears therefore as an increasingly robust mechanism to generate shocks.

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)] [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    148

    Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filamented electron beams have been observed to be emitted from the rear of thin solid targets irradiated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser when there is low-density plasma present at the back of the target. These observations are consistent with a laser-generated beam of relativistic electrons propagating through the target, which is subsequently fragmented by a Weibel-like instability in the low-density plasma at the rear. These measurements are in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations and theory, since the filamentation instability is predicted to be dramatically enhanced when the electron beam density approaches that of the background plasma.

    Wei, M.S.; Beg, F.N.; Dangor, A.E.; Gopal, A.; Tatarakis, M.; Krushelnick, K. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clark, E.L.; Evans, R.G. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Ledingham, K.W.D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Plasma Physics Department, AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Norreys, P.A. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Department of Physics, The Queen's University, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    149

    Stefan–Boltzmann law for the tungsten filament of a light bulb: Revisiting the experiment  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    A classical laboratory experiment to verify the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law with the tungsten filaments of commercial incandescent lamps has been fully revisited collecting a fairly large amount of data with a computer-controlled four-channel power supply. In many cases the total power dissipated by the lamp is well described by a sum of two power-law terms with one exponent very close to 4 as predicted by the radiation law and the other very close to 1 as for simple heat conduction. This result was true even for filament surfaces with a shiny metallic appearance whose emissivity should vary with temperature.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    150

    Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. 2 figs.

    Park, J.H.

    1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    151

    RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM  

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh environments. Developed for the maritime industry, it is suit-able for the interior & exterior of shipboard structures and tanks as well as other appli-cations where performance counts...

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    152

    Control filamentous bulking caused by chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria through adding a biocide CTAB  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Filamentous bulking sludge due to excessive growth of filamentous bacteria is a serious operational problem in activated sludge plants. The addition of chemicals is one of widespread ways to control filamentous bulking. In this study, filamentous bulking in a continuous activated sludge system was found to be mainly caused by Eikelboom Type 021N filamentous bacteria likely due to low substrate concentration gradients. These Type 021N bacteria were found to be resistant to chlorination, maintaining cell integrity at a dosage of up to 80 mg Cl/gSS. An alternative biocidal agent, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), exhibited a much stronger biocidal effect on these filaments, which significantly improved sludge settleability. Type 021N with filamentous index of 5 was selectively killed, but floc-formers recovery their activity after CTAB termination. The study implied that CTAB might have more penetration capacity to cell wall of chlorine-resistant Type 021N bacteria. We therefore suggest the penetration property of filament cell wall should be considered or tested before the selection of biocide type in practice.

    Jianhua Guo; Yongzhen Peng; Zhongwei Wang; Zhiguo Yuan; Xiong Yang; Shuying Wang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    153

    UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    154

    Thermo-mechanical Characterization of Metal/Polymer Composite Filaments and Printing Parameter Study for Fused Deposition Modeling in the 3D Printing Process  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    New metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) processes were developed in order to observe the thermo-mechanical properties of the new filaments. The acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (A...

    Seyeon Hwang; Edgar I. Reyes; Kyoung-sik Moon…

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    155

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

    156

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    157

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    158

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    159

    Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    160

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    161

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    162

    DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615 From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles Yifat Brill- ses. Cell movement is driven by the dynamic growth of polar actin networks of various structures,[1 containing the lamellipodium, but lacking the nucleus, micro- tubules and other organels can perform movement

    Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    163

    FILAMENTOUS FLOWER Controls the Formation and Development of Arabidopsis Inflorescences and Floral Meristems  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...leafy (lf y), and unusual floral organs (ufo), filamentous structures are formed...CAULIFLOWER (CAL), UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), two flowering-time loci (FT and FWA...meristem identity genes, AP1, FIL, CAL, UFO, FT, and FWA, and analyzed structural...

    Shinichiro Sawa; Toshiro Ito; Yoshiro Shimura; Kiyotaka Okada

    164

    Fossil evidence for spin alignment of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in filaments  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ......and so we briefly review what has been achieved using other, more standard, methods. We also review the theoretical motivation...identification. We plan to use the edge-on...these filaments. The plan of the paper is to review the theoretical notions......

    Bernard J. T. Jones; Rien van de Weygaert; Miguel A. Aragón-Calvo

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    165

    Role of ATP-Hydrolysis in the Dynamics of a Single Actin Filament Padinhateeri Ranjith,  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Role of ATP-Hydrolysis in the Dynamics of a Single Actin Filament Padinhateeri Ranjith, * Kirone, and ATP hydrolysis of subunits either according to the vectorial mechanism or to the random mechanism and by comparing two possible mechanisms of ATP hydro- lysis. Our emphasis is mainly on two possible limiting

    Lacoste, David

    166

    Heat transfer in sunspot penumbrae. Origin of dark-cored penumbral filaments  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Context: Observations at 0.1" have revealed the existence of dark cores in the bright filaments of sunspot penumbrae. Expectations are high that such dark-cored filaments are the basic building blocks of the penumbra, but their nature remains unknown. Aims: We investigate the origin of dark cores in penumbral filaments and the surplus brightness of the penumbra. To that end we use an uncombed penumbral model. Methods: The 2D stationary heat transfer equation is solved in a stratified atmosphere consisting of nearly horizontal magnetic flux tubes embedded in a stronger and more vertical field. The tubes carry an Evershed flow of hot plasma. Results: This model produces bright filaments with dark cores as a consequence of the higher density of the plasma inside the tubes, which shifts the surface of optical depth unity toward higher (cooler) layers. Our calculations suggest that the surplus brightness of the penumbra is a natural consequence of the Evershed flow, and that magnetic flux tubes about 250 km in diameter can explain the morphology of sunspot penumbrae.

    B. Ruiz Cobo; L. R. Bellot Rubio

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    167

    Coiled-coil intermediate filament stutter instability and molecular unfolding Melis Arslana  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coiled-coil intermediate filament stutter instability and molecular unfolding Melis Arslana , Zhao of the discontinuities in the dimer's coiled-coil region is the so-called `stutter' region. The stutter is a region where-tempered metadynamics that for the coil2 domain of vimentin IFs the stutter is more stable in a non

    Buehler, Markus J.

    168

    Eruptions of Two Coupled Filaments Observed by SDO, GONG and STEREO  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On 2012 July 11, two solar filaments were observed in the northeast of the solar disk and their eruptions due to the interaction between them are studied by using the data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG). The eastern filament (F1) first erupted toward the northeast. During the eruption of F1, some plasma from F1 fell down and was injected to the North-East part of another filament (F2), and some plasma of F1 fell down to the northern region close to F2 and caused the plasma to brighten. Meanwhile, the North-East part of F2 first started to be active and rise, but did not erupt finally. Then the South-West part of F2 erupted successfully. Therefore, the F2's eruption is a partial filament eruption. Two associated CMEs related to the eruptions were observed by STEREO/COR1. We find two possible reasons that lead to the instability and the eruption of F2. One main reason is that the magnetic loops overlying the...

    Xue, Z K; Qu, Z Q; Xu, C L; Zhao, L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    169

    Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in D?; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of ‘magnetic shear disconnection’ due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

    R.J. Maqueda, D.P. Stotler and the NSTX Team.

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    170

    Amyloid-Like Adhesins Produced by Floc-Forming and Filamentous Bacteria in Activated Sludge  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...and Filamentous Bacteria in Activated Sludge Published ahead of print on 11 January...importance to the floc properties in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTP...abundance of amyloid adhesins in activated sludge flocs from different WWTP and the identity...

    Poul Larsen; Jeppe Lund Nielsen; Daniel Otzen; Per Halkjær Nielsen

    2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    171

    Self-Assembly of Filamentous Amelogenin Requires Calcium and Phosphate: From Dimers via Nanoribbons to Fibrils  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Self-Assembly of Filamentous Amelogenin Requires Calcium and Phosphate: From Dimers via Nanoribbons, San Francisco, California 94143, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Enamel matrix self-assembly tested if amelogenin, the main enamel matrix protein, can self-assemble into ribbon-like structures

    Sali, Andrej

    172

    Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing­16 . The plasma generation balances the self-focusing effect and leads to a limited peak intensity 17­19 along, Germany Received 10 March 2006; published 27 September 2006 Our experiment shows that external focusing

    Becker, Andreas

    173

    HINODE OBSERVATIONS OF COHERENT LATERAL MOTION OF PENUMBRAL FILAMENTS DURING AN X-CLASS FLARE  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The X-3.4 class flare of 2006 December 13 was observed with a high cadence of 2 minutes at 0.2 arcsec resolution by HINODE/SOT FG instrument. The flare ribbons could be seen in G-band images also. A careful analysis of these observations after proper registration of images shows flare-related changes in penumbral filaments of the associated sunspot for the first time. The observations of sunspot deformation, decay of penumbral area, and changes in magnetic flux during large flares have been reported earlier in the literature. In this Letter, we report lateral motion of the penumbral filaments in a sheared region of the delta-sunspot during the X-class flare. Such shifts have not been seen earlier. The lateral motion occurs in two phases: (1) motion before the flare ribbons move across the penumbral filaments and (2) motion afterward. The former motion is directed away from expanding flare ribbons and lasts for about 4 minutes. The latter motion is directed in the opposite direction and lasts for more than 40 minutes. Further, we locate a patch in adjacent opposite polarity spot moving in opposite direction to the penumbral filaments. Together these patches represent conjugate footpoints on either side of the polarity inversion line, moving toward each other. This converging motion could be interpreted as shrinkage of field lines.

    Gosain, S.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 198, Dewali, Badi Road, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    174

    Experimental observation of a traveling plasma grating formed by two crossing filaments in gases  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The spatial motion and effective duration of a traveling plasma grating formed by two interfering femtosecond laser filaments in gases is characterized by its Doppler effect imparted on a probe pulse. The shift velocity determined experimentally agrees with the theoretical calculations.

    Durand, Magali [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech-Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France); ONERA, Chemin de la Huniere, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Liu Yi; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Mysyrowicz, Andre [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech-Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    175

    Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condensation of FtsZ filaments can drive bacterial cell division Ganhui Lana , Brian R. Danielsb-ring undergoes a condensation transition from a low- density state to a high-density state and generates the condensation transition, but does not directly generate forces. In vivo fluorescence measurements show that Fts

    Sun, Sean

    176

    Fine Control of THz radiation from filamentation by molecular lensing in air  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with peak field amplitude as high as 400 kV/cm has been reported with this method using tightly focused with a transmission line model. After the formation of a plasma column by the first filament, which remains for a few to the mutual conductance and inductance, these two parallel plasma columns can be viewed as a transmission line

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    177

    Emergent multicellular life cycles in filamentous bacteria owing to density-dependent population dynamics  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...filament lengths is reached. The corresponding pie-charts indicate the fraction of single...In figure-3 f, the box plots and the pie charts show the proportion of short and...capacity. As for the simulation results, the pie charts illustrate three length classes...

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    178

    Sec. 2.1 Filaments in the cell 21 PART I -RODS AND ROPES  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , individual filaments may be relatively straight or highly convoluted, reflecting, in part, their resistance, such as their bending or stretching resistance; the two chapters making up the remainder of Part I consider how, and may themselves be constructed of more elementary chemical units. For example, the monomeric unit

    Boal, David

    179

    Phased?Array Focusing Potential in Pipe with Viscoelastic Coating  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    This work investigates the effectiveness of traditional guided?wave focusing techniques in piping with viscoelastic coating. Focusing results for an uncoated pipe are compared to that of pipe with a fusion?bonded epoxy coating a coal?tar mastic coating a coal?tar epoxy coating a coal?tar tape coating a wax coating and an enamel coating. Experimental results are compared to computationally derived models. Results show that for most coating types focusing can be achieved without special consideration of the coating. This is significant in that it demonstrates the immediate applicability of traditional focusing techniques to coated pipeline.

    J. K. Van Velsor; L. Zhang; L. J. Breon; J. L. Rose

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    180

    [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the strontium filament of eta Carinae  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the nature of the [TiII] and [NiII] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the TiII and NiII systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the TiII ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with an electron density of the order of $10^7$ cm$^{-3}$ and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March~2000 and November~2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused by dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of \\etacar. We study the condensation chemistry of Ti, Ni and Fe within the filament and suggest that the observed gas phase overabundance of Ti

    M. A. Bautista; H. Hartman; T. R. Gull; N. Smith; K. Lodders

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    181

    LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. I. THE ANATOMY OF A FILAMENT  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Observations are revealing the ubiquity of filamentary structures in molecular clouds. As cores are often embedded in filaments, it is important to understand how line profiles from such systems differ from those of isolated cores. We perform radiative transfer calculations on a hydrodynamic simulation of a molecular cloud in order to model line emission from collapsing cores embedded in filaments. We model two optically thick lines, CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0), and one optically thin line, N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0), from three embedded cores. In the hydrodynamic simulation, gas self-gravity, turbulence, and bulk flows create filamentary regions within which cores form. Though the filaments have large dispersions, the N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines indicate subsonic velocities within the cores. We find that the observed optically thick line profiles of CS(2-1) and HCN(1-0) vary drastically with viewing angle. In over 50% of viewing angles, there is no sign of a blue asymmetry, an idealized signature of infall motions in an isolated spherical collapsing core. Profiles that primarily trace the cores, with little contribution from the surrounding filament, are characterized by a systematically higher HCN(1-0) peak intensity. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) lines do not follow this trend. We demonstrate that red asymmetric profiles are also feasible in the optically thick lines, due to emission from the filament or one-sided accretion flows onto the core. We conclude that embedded cores may frequently undergo collapse without showing a blue asymmetric profile, and that observational surveys including filamentary regions may underestimate the number of collapsing cores if based solely on profile shapes of optically thick lines.

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Stutz, Amelia M., E-mail: rowanjsmith.astro@googlemail.com [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    182

    Explicit mean-field radius for nearly parallel vortex filaments in statistical equilibrium  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geophysical research has focused on flows, such as ocean currents, as two dimensional. Two dimensional point or blob vortex models have the advantage of having a Hamiltonian, whereas 3D vortex filament or tube systems do not necessarily have one, although they do have action functionals. On the other hand, certain classes of 3D vortex models called nearly parallel vortex filament models do have a Hamiltonian and are more accurate descriptions of geophysical and atmospheric flows than purely 2D models, especially at smaller scales. In these ``quasi-2D'' models we replace 2D point vortices with vortex filaments that are very straight and nearly parallel but have Brownian variations along their lengths due to local self-induction. When very straight, quasi-2D filaments are expected to have virtually the same planar density distributions as 2D models. An open problem is when quasi-2D model statistics behave differently than those of the related 2D system and how this difference is manifested. In this paper we study the nearly parallel vortex filament model of Klein, Majda, Damodaran in statistical equilibrium. We are able to obtain a free-energy functional for the system in a non-extensive thermodynamic limit that is a function of the mean square vortex position $R^2$ and solve \\emph{explicitly} for $R^2$. Such an explicit formula has never been obtained for a non-2D model. We compare the results of our formula to a 2-D formula of \\cite{Lim:2005} and show qualitatively different behavior even when we disallow vortex braiding. We further confirm our results using Path Integral Monte Carlo (Ceperley (1995)) \\emph{without} permutations and that the Klein, Majda, Damodaran model's asymptotic assumptions \\emph{are valid} for parameters where these deviations occur.

    Timothy D. Andersen; Chjan C. Lim

    2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    183

    Chapter 8 - Corrosion/Coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Publisher Summary This chapter explains that pipe is buoyant, and an empty line may float in water. Wet silts are like viscous fluids causing inadequately weighted pipelines to pop up. There are various government entities that have jurisdiction over navigable rivers, bays, marshlands, and offshore waters. These agencies may stipulate that pipelines be buried at certain depths and be stabilized. A good way to stabilize a pipeline is to use an adequate concrete weight coating. Determining the thickness of the concrete involves a process of balancing upward forces such as buoyancy of the mud and the downward forces—weights of pipe, protective coating, and concrete, allowing a factor of 60 (negative buoyancy). Such computations with several variables can become involved and tedious.

    E.W. McAllister

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    184

    Findings in seal coat design  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Africa (NITRR) and its members Dr. Claude P. Marais, Dr. Alex T. Visser and Dr. C. J. Semmelink for furnishing the relevant data and figures presented in this report. Finally this thesis and accomplishments are dedicated to my project Principal... Volume. 1. Embedment 2. Wear and Degradation. 3. Skid Resistance. 35 40 41 43 44 V SOUTH AFRICANS' RATIONAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF SEAL COATS AND SURFACE TREATMENT. . 50 A. Background. B. Marais' Rational Approach. 1. Aggregate Spread Rate...

    Gonzalez Palmer, Miguel Angel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    185

    High temperature solar selective coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    186

    UNVEILING A NETWORK OF PARALLEL FILAMENTS IN THE INFRARED DARK CLOUD G14.225-0.506  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We present the results of combined NH{sub 3} (1,1) and (2,2) line emission observed with the Very Large Array and the Effelsberg 100 m telescope of the infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506. The NH{sub 3} emission reveals a network of filaments constituting two hub-filament systems. Hubs are associated with gas of rotational temperature T{sub rot} {approx} 15 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub NT} {approx} 1 km s{sup -1}, and exhibit signs of star formation, while filaments appear to be more quiescent (T{sub rot} {approx} 11 K and {sigma}{sub NT} {approx} 0.6 km s{sup -1}). Filaments are parallel in projection and distributed mainly along two directions, at P.A. {approx} 10 Degree-Sign and 60 Degree-Sign , and appear to be coherent in velocity. The averaged projected separation between adjacent filaments is between 0.5 pc and 1 pc, and the mean width of filaments is 0.12 pc. Cores within filaments are separated by {approx}0.33 {+-} 0.09 pc, which is consistent with the predicted fragmentation of an isothermal gas cylinder due to the {sup s}ausage{sup -}type instability. The network of parallel filaments observed in G14.225-0.506 is consistent with the gravitational instability of a thin gas layer threaded by magnetic fields. Overall, our data suggest that magnetic fields might play an important role in the alignment of filaments, and polarization measurements in the entire cloud would lend further support to this scenario.

    Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C-5 parell, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-05125 Firenze (Italy); Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); De Gregorio-Monsalvo, Itziar [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pillai, Thushara [Caltech Astronomy Department, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wyrowski, Friedrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Santos, Fabio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P., E-mail: gemma.busquet@iaps.inaf.it [Departamento de Fisica-ICEx-UFMG, Caixa Postal 702, 30.123-970 Belo Horizonte-MG (Brazil)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    187

    Electrodeposited coatings for diamond turning applications  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Electrodeposited coatings are attractive for precision machining operations because thick coatings can be economically applied, with good adhesion, to a variety of substrates. Approximately 20 pure metals and a large number of alloys can be deposited from aqueous solutions. Fused salt and organic solvent electrolytes can be used to lengthen the list of metals that can be electrodeposited. However, both the choice of the metallic coating and the control of the plating process are critical for success in precision finishing of electrodeposited coatings. Some preliminary results at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory suggest that electrodeposited nickel-phosphorus alloys are excellent coatings for single point diamond turning from the standpoint of material properties and low tool wear. Electrodeposited aluminum and aluminum alloy coatings also merit consideration for precision finishing where weight is an important factor. 10 refs., 6 figs.

    Mayer, A.; Bramlett, R.D.; Day, R.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Evans, C.J.; Polvani, R.S. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    188

    Surface roughness of anodized titanium coatings.  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samples of grade five 6Al4V titanium alloy were coated with two commercial fluoropolymer anodizations (Tiodize and Canadize) and compared. Neither coating demonstrates significant outgassing. The coatings show very similar elemental analysis, except for the presence of lead in the Canadize coating, which may account for its lower surface friction in humid environments. Surface roughness has been compared by SEM, contact profilometry, optical profilometry, power spectral density and bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The Tiodize film is slightly smoother by all measurement methods, but the Canadize film shows slightly less scatter at all angles of incidence. Both films exhibited initial friction coefficients of 0.2 to 0.4, increasing to 0.4 to 0.8 after 1000 cycles of sliding due to wear of the coating and ball. The coatings are very similar and should behave identically in most applications.

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Chinn, Douglas Alan

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    189

    On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull...

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    190

    AOC opens gel-coat facility  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    AOC HAS extended its service to North American customers with the opening of a new facility for the development and production of gel-coats at its Collierville, Tennessee, USA, headquarters. The new gel-coat centre is said to be ‘world-class’. The company already operates gel-coat facilities in Canada and Mexico. This is a short news story only. Visit www.reinforcedplastics.com for the latest plastics industry news.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    191

    Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    192

    Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings Jennifer Mawdsley Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington DC October 1, 2009 2 Metallic Bipolar Plates with...

    193

    Coatings in geothermal energy production  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Geothermal energy has a forecasted potential of 25000 MW years of electrical and 16 000-67 000 MW years of thermal energy capacity by the year 2000. Current estimates indicate that lower temperature resources exist in at least 39 states. The development of these resources requires a wide range of cost-effective materials. The purpose of this paper is to review geothermal conditions and the present use of coatings in geothermal production, and to assess the potential for their future applications. The early identification of such materials needs is an essential step for planning the total requirements for well drilling and facilities construction in all sectors of the energy program.

    Robert R. Reeber

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    194

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    195

    Non-equilibrium self-assembly of a filament coupled to ATP/GTP hydrolysis  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the stochastic dynamics of growth and shrinkage of single actin filaments or microtubules taking into account insertion, removal, and ATP/GTP hydrolysis of subunits. The resulting phase diagram contains three different phases: a rapidly growing phase, an intermediate phase and a bound phase. We analyze all these phases, with an emphasis on the bound phase. We also discuss how hydrolysis affects force-velocity curves. The bound phase shows features of dynamic instability, which we characterize in terms of the time needed for the ATP/GTP cap to disappear as well as the time needed for the filament to reach a length of zero, i.e., (to collapse) for the first time. We obtain exact expressions for all these quantities, which we test using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Padinhateeri Ranjith; David Lacoste; Kirone Mallick; Jean-Francois Joanny

    2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    196

    Spindles and active vortices in a model of confined filament-motor mixtures  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robust self-organization of subcellular structures is a key principle governing the dynamics and evolution of cellular life. In fission yeast cells undergoing division, the mitotic spindle spontaneously emerges from the interaction of microtubules, motor proteins and the confining cell walls, and asters and vortices have been observed to self-assemble in quasi-two dimensional microtubule-kinesin assays. Their is no clear microscopic picture of the role of the active motors driving this pattern formation, and the relevance of continuum modeling to filament-scale structures remains uncertain. Here we present results of numerical simulations of a discrete filament-motor protein model confined to a pressurised cylindrical box. Stable spindles, nematic configurations, asters and high-density semi-asters spontaneously emerge, the latter pair having also been observed in cytosol confined within emulsion droplets. State diagrams are presented delineating each stationary state as the pressure, motor speed and motor de...

    Head, David A; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    197

    Sensitivity of propagation and energy deposition in femtosecond filamentation to the nonlinear refractive index  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The axial dependence of femtosecond filamentation in air is measured under conditions of varying laser pulsewidth, energy, and focusing f-number. Filaments are characterized by the ultrafast z-dependent absorption of energy from the laser pulse and diagnosed by measuring the local single cycle acoustic wave generated. Results are compared to 2D+1 simulations of pulse propagation, whose results are highly sensitive to the instantaneous (electronic) part of the nonlinear response of $N_2$ and $O_2$. We find that recent measurements of the nonlinear refractive index ($n_2$) in [J.K. Wahlstrand et al., Phys. Rev. A. 85, 043820 (2012)] provide the best match and an excellent fit between experiments and simulations.

    Rosenthal, E W; Jhajj, N; Zahedpour, S; Wahlstrand, J K; Milchberg, H M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    198

    Transcriptomic and physiological insights into the robustness of UASB granule-prevalent long filamentous cells of Methanosaeta harundinacea  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...quantitative reverse transcription PCR indicated that transcription of the genes involved in aceticlastic methanogenesis and energy metabolism was upregulated 1.2- to 10.3-fold in long filaments, while those for the methyl-oxidative shunt were upregulated...

    Liguang Zhou; Haiying Yu; Guomin Ai; Bo Zhang; Songnian Hu; Xiuzhu Dong

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    199

    3D Simulations of Plasma Filaments in the Scrape Off Layer: A Comparison with Models of Reduced Dimensionality  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a 3D reduced fluid code. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarisation and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satis...

    Easy, Luke; Omotani, John; Dudson, Benjamin; Havlí?ková, Eva; Tamain, Patrick; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    200

    Automated Technique For Comparison Of Magnetic Field Inversion Lines With Filament Skeletons From The Solar Feature Catalogue  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    We present an automated technique for comparison of magnetic field inversion-line maps from SOHO/MDI magnetograms with solar ... component labelling are used to identify nearest inversion lines to filament skelet...

    S. S. Ipson; V. V. Zharkova; S. Zharkov; A. K. Benkhalil; J. Aboudarham…

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    201

    Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, amorphous silicon films by hot filament technique using ``safe`` silicon source gas  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method is described for producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate by flowing a stream of safe (diluted to less than 1%) silane gas past a heated filament. 7 figs.

    Mahan, A.H.; Molenbroek, E.C.; Nelson, B.P.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    202

    Identification of coronal holes and filament channels in SDO/AIA 193\\r{A} images via geometrical classification methods  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this study, we describe and evaluate shape measures for distinguishing between coronal holes and filament channels as observed in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun. For a set of well-observed coronal hole and filament channel regions extracted from SDO/AIA 193\\r{A} images we analyze their intrinsic morphology during the period 2011 to 2013, by using well known shape measures from the literature and newly developed geometrical classification methods. The results suggest an asymmetry in the morphology of filament channels giving support for the sheared arcade or weakly twisted flux rope model for filaments. We find that the proposed shape descriptors have the potential to reduce coronal hole classification errors and are eligible for screening techniques in order to improve the forecasting of solar wind high-speed streams from coronal hole observations in solar EUV images.

    Reiss, M; Rotter, T; Hofmeister, S J; Veronig, A M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    203

    Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

    Cunnington, G.R.; Clark, R.K.; Robinson, J.C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    204

    Filaments of the radio cosmic web: opportunities and challenges for SKA  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The detection of the diffuse gas component of the cosmic web remains a formidable challenge. In this work we study synchrotron emission from the cosmic web with simulated SKA1 observations, which can represent an fundamental probe of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We investigate radio emission originated by relativistic electrons accelerated by shocks surrounding cosmic filaments, assuming diffusive shock acceleration and as a function of the (unknown) large-scale magnetic fields. The detection of the brightest parts of large ($>10 \\rm Mpc$) filaments of the cosmic web should be within reach of the SKA1-LOW, if the magnetic field is at the level of a $\\sim 10$ percent equipartition with the thermal gas, corresponding to $\\sim 0.1 \\mu G$ for the most massive filaments in simulations. In the course of a 2-years survey with SKA1-LOW, this will enable a first detection of the "tip of the iceberg" of the radio cosmic web, and allow for the use of the SKA as a powerful tool to study the origin of cosmic magneti...

    Vazza, Franco; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Gheller, Claudio; Braun, Robert; Brown, Shea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    205

    Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    206

    Robustness of the filamentation instability in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field: Full three dimensional calculation  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The filamentation (Weibel) instability plays a key role in the formation of collisionless shocks which are thought to produce Gamma-Ray-Bursts and High-Energy-Cosmic-Rays in astrophysical environments. While it has been known for long that a flow-aligned magnetic field can completely quench the instability, it was recently proved in 2D that in the cold regime, such cancelation is possible if and only if the field is perfectly aligned. Here, this result is finally extended to a 3D geometry. Calculations are conducted for symmetric and asymmetric counter-streaming relativistic plasma shells. 2D results are retrieved in 3D: the instability can never be completely canceled for an oblique magnetic field. In addition, the maximum growth-rate is always larger for wave vectors lying in the plan defined by the flow and the oblique field. On the one hand, this bears consequences on the orientation of the generated filaments. On the other hand, it certifies 2D simulations of the problem can be performed without missing the most unstable filamentation modes.

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    207

    Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    208

    High Temperature Oxidation Performance of Aluminide Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation resistance of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. Steam and exhaust gas environments are of particular interest because alumina is less susceptible to the accelerated attack due to hydroxide formation observed for chromia- and silica-forming alloys and ceramics. For water vapor testing, one ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and one austenitic alloy (304L) have been selected as substrate materials and CVD coatings have been used in order to have a well-controlled, high purity coating. It is anticipated that similar aluminide coatings could be made by a higher-volume, commercial process such as pack cementation. Previous work on this program has examined as-deposited coatings made by high and low Al activity CVD processes and the short-term performance of these coatings. The current work is focusing on the long term behavior in both diffusion tests16 and oxidation tests of the thicker, high Al activity coatings. For long-term coating durability, one area of concern has been the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between coating and substrate. This difference could cause cracking or deformation that could reduce coating life. Corrosion testing using thermal cycling is of particular interest because of this potential problem and results are presented where a short exposure cycle (1h) severely degraded aluminide coatings on both types of substrates. To further study the potential role of aluminide coatings in fossil energy applications, several high creep strength Ni-base alloys were coated by CVD for testing in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO{sub 2} environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Such alloys would be needed as structural and turbine materials in this concept. For Ni-base alloys, CVD produces a {approx}50{mu}m {beta}-NiAl outer layer with an underlying interdiffusion zone. Specimens of HR160, alloy 601 and alloy 230 were tested with and without coatings at 900 C and preliminary post-test characterization is reported.

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Haynes, James A [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    209

    Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel...

    210

    Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman Spectroscopy and XPS. Accelerated Testing of HT-9 with Zirconia Coatings Containing Gallium using Raman...

    211

    Accelerated electrospark deposition and the wear behavior of coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a coating process that ... such as pulse energy, pulse frequency, and deposition time are presented. Electrospark deposition coating by the new equipment on AISI...

    P. -Z. Wang; G. -S. Pan; Y. Zhou; J. -X. Qu…

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    212

    Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings | Department...  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA...

    213

    Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

    214

    Coated metal fiber coalescing cell  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

    Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

    1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    215

    2 - Products Using Vacuum Deposited Coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Publisher Summary Most of the vacuum coating done is thin metal coating for packaging applications covering many aspects of packaging. The metal coatings can be bright and highly reflective providing more advertising impact than metallic inks, which are duller. The metalized polymer webs can be used directly by heat sealing, laminated to other webs, or have the metallic layer transferred onto other surfaces by a stamping process. These and other variations make the aluminized film very versatile as a packaging material. The more important feature of the metal coating is that it provides a barrier performance against oxygen, water, and light. The barrier performance of the metal thin film depends on the thickness of the coating and the cleanliness of the coating. The use of lacquers or transparent colored inks enables metalized papers to be overprinted and used to make more reflective printed products than can be achieved by metallic inks. Many of these applications of metalized paper are purely esthetic. Holograms are bright, usually reflective, patterns or images that are used as decorative packaging and/or as security devices. Where holograms are used for packaging, they can be in the form of a small area integrated into the pack design or as a patterned background to the whole pack. This chapter provides examples of a large variety of products that make use of vacuum deposited coatings onto flexible substrates. Some of these may not be obvious to the users. The products range from flexible packaging, capacitors, pyrotechnics, flake fillers for paints and inks, holographic devices, transparent conducting coatings, thin film batteries, electronic circuits through to the current high market growth products such as displays, photovoltaics (solar cells), and high barrier coatings.

    Charles A. Bishop

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    216

    Thermally sprayed coatings for boiler protection  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FBC boilers are large, expensive installations which suffer enormously from wear caused by corrosion, aggravated by high temperatures. The exact type of wear experienced varies from one part of a boiler to another and is influenced by the overall design of the boiler and the type of fuel burnt in it. Boiler manufacturers and users face a difficult choice in selecting materials to fight these problems. Inexpensive and easily worked metals, unfortunately, offer little resistance to the types of wear experienced in boilers, while alloys which are resistant to erosion and corrosion are very costly as well as being difficult to form and join. This paper presents a number of ways in which these material losses and related costs in boiler systems can be reduced by application of thermally sprayed coatings which lead to significant increases in service life. The selection of the coating material and of the correct deposition process can, today, be based on the results of laboratory tests (elevated temperature corrosion and erosion), small scale in-situ test coatings and on full scale FBC boiler protection coating utilization. Practical examples are given of thermal spray coatings which have been successfully applied to different kinds of FBC boilers including those burning coal, waste (chemical, industrial, household) and wood chips. The paper describes the procedures for applying coatings to boiler components, the properties of the resulting coatings and how best to select coating materials for use in some specific wear and corrosion environmentals. In addition, future trends in the utilization of thermally sprayed coatings are discussed.

    Gustafsson, S.; Steine, H.T. [Eutectic and Castolin, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ridgway, W.F. [Eutectic and Castolin, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    217

    Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    218

    Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. In order to develop a comprehensive lifetime evaluation approach for aluminide coatings used in fossil energy systems, some of the important issues have been addressed in this report for aluminide coatings on Fe-based alloys (Task I) and on Ni-based alloys (Task II). In Task I, the oxidation behavior of iron aluminide coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied in air + 10vol.% H{sub 2}O in the temperature range of 700-800 C and the interdiffusion behavior between the coating and substrate was investigated in air at 500-800 C. Commercial ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and type 304L (Fe-18Cr-9Ni, nominally) austenitic stainless steels were used as the substrates. For the oxidation study, the as-deposited coating consisted of a thin (<5 {micro}m), Al-rich outer layer above a thicker (30-50 {micro}m), lower Al inner layer. The specimens were cycled to 1000 1-h cycles at 700 C and 500 1-h cycles at 800 C, respectively. The CVD coating specimens showed excellent performance in the water vapor environment at both temperatures, while the uncoated alloys were severely attacked. These results suggest that an aluminide coating can substantially improve resistance to water vapor attack under these conditions. For the interdiffusion study, the ferritic and austenitic steels were coated with relatively thicker aluminide coatings consisting of a 20-25 {micro}m outer layer and a 150-250 {micro}m inner layer. The composition profiles before and after interdiffusion testing (up to 5,000h) were measured by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The decrease of the Al content at the coating surface was not significant after extended diffusion times ({le} 5,000h) at temperatures {le} 700 C. More interdiffusion occurred at 800 C in coatings on both Fe- 9Cr-1Mo and 304L alloys; a two-phase microstructure was formed in the outer coating layer on 304L after interdiffusion of 2,000h at 800 C. The interdiffusion behavior was simulated using a computer model COSIM (Coating Oxidation and Substrate Interdiffusion Model), which was originally developed for MCrAlY overlay coatings by NASA. Complimentary modeling work using a mathematic model from Heckel et al. also was conducted. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles, particularly for aluminide coatings on Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. In Task II, the research focused on the CVD aluminide bond coats for thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The martensitic phase transformation in single-phase {beta}-NiAl and (Ni,Pt)Al coatings was studied and compared. After isothermal exposure to 1150 C for 100 hours, the {beta} phase in both types of coatings was transformed to a martensite phase during cooling to room temperature. Martensitic transformation also was observed in the (Ni,Pt)Al bond coat with and without the ceramic top layer after thermal cycling at 1150 C (700 1-h cycles). Such transformation resulted from Al depletion in the coating due to the formation of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on coating surface and interdiffusion between the coating and superalloy substrate. The volume changes associated with the martensitic transformation could affect the coating surface stability (''rumpling'') and thus contributing to TBC failure. To elucidate the effect of Hf levels in the superalloy substrate on the oxidation performance, directionally-solidified Rene 142 superalloys containing three different Hf contents with and without aluminide coatings were cyclically oxidized at 1100 and 1150 C in air. Poor scale adhesion was observed for all bare and NiAl-coated Rene 142 superalloys, as compared with single-crystal superalloys such as Rene N5. Spallation occurred at relatively early stages disregarding the Hf contents in the superalloys. Finally, a platinum plating system has been set up at Tennessee Technological University to carefully control the Pt pla

    Zhang, Y

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    219

    Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang [Washington University, St. Louis; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Honchak, Barbara M [Washington University, St. Louis; Karbach, Lauren E [Washington University, St. Louis; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pierson, Beverly K [University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    220

    Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

    Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Québec (Québec), Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    221

    Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    222

    Graphene-coated tapered nanowire infrared probe: a comparison with metal-coated probes  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    We propose in this paper a graphene-coated tapered nanowire probe providing strong field enhancement in the infrared regimes. The analytical field distributions and characteristic...

    Zhu, Bofeng; Ren, Guobin; Gao, Yixiao; Yang, Yang; Lian, Yudong; Jian, Shuisheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    223

    From metallurgical coatings to surface engineering  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The history of the Vacuum Metallurgy Division (VMD) which is now the Advanced Surface Engineering Division (ASED) of the American Vacuum Society is reviewed briefly. The focus of the VMD moved from vacuum melting of materials to metallurgical coatings. The division sponsored two conferences the Conference on Vacuum Metallurgy and the International Conference on Metallurgical Coatings. As the interest in vacuum metallurgy eventually subsided interest grew in the deposition of metallurgical coatings. However the emphasis at the Metallurgical Coatings conference has changed from just depositingcoatings to surface engineering of a component. Today the challenge is to use the tools of surface engineering with advances in deposition technology such as high-power pulsed sputtering. To align itself with the changing interests of the majority of its members the VMD changed its name to the ASED.

    William D. Sproul

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    224

    Corrosion protection properties of chromium coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    To improve the wear resistance of components and protect them from corrosion in a mine atmosphere saturated with coal dust and gases, with periodic immersion in acid water or in a marine atmosphere, use is made either of an uncracked single-layer of chromium or of a two-layer chromium coating. In this article, the author studies the corrosion behaviour of steel specimens covered with single-layer or double-layer chromium coatings in various conditions. The corrosion protection properties were studied by means of accelerated tests - the 'Korrodkot' method; after ten 16h test cycles, the results of this method are comparable with the behavior of chromium coating in a marine atmosphere. The crack content of the chromium coating was revealed by anodic etching in 10% KOH solution.

    Solodkova, L.N.; Solov'eva, Z.A.; Vinokurova, I.A.; Traktirova, T.V.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    225

    Nickel coated aluminum battery cell tabs  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A battery cell tab is described. The battery cell tab is anodized on one end and has a metal coating on the other end. Battery cells and methods of making battery cell tabs are also described.

    Bucchi, Robert S.; Casoli, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kathleen M.; Nicotina, Joseph

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    226

    Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    227

    UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975, and therefore has had the opportunity to evaluate practical operations of the UV technology...

    Donhowe, E. T.

    228

    Onset voltage of corona on coated conductors  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This paper is aimed for investigating the effect of surface coating on the positive and negative onset voltages of corona from stressed conductor as a pre-requisite for onset-voltage calculation. The electric field is accurately calculated by the charge simulation technique. The calculated onset voltages agreed satisfactorily with those measured experimentally for bare conductors. The effect of coating-layer thickness and permittivity as well as conductor radius and height on the onset-voltage values is discussed.

    Abdel-Salam, M. [Assiut Univ. (Egypt). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Abo-Shal, Y. [SCECO-East, Dammam (Saudi Arabia). Electrical Engineering Div.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    229

    Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    230

    Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    231

    Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roof Coating Procedures and their Productivity Gains John Bonaby and Dr. Diane Schaub, University of Florida As building envelope improvements are realized in organizations as ways to insulate businesses from high energy costs, the relative... benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially...

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    232

    Superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The superconducting nano-layer coating without insulator layer is studied. The magnetic-field distribution and the forces acting on a vortex are derived. Using the derived forces, the vortex-penetration field and the lower critical magnetic field can be discussed. The vortex-penetration field is identical with the multilayer coating, but the lower critical magnetic field is not. Forces acting on a vortex from the boundary of two superconductors play an important role in evaluations of the free energy.

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    233

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    234

    Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70`s by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also to provide protection. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    235

    Discoloration resistant, flexible, radiation curable coating compositions  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A low dosage radiation polymerizable protective and decorative coating composition or paint, coated articles bearing such a protective coating and processess for preparing such articles. The radiation polymerizable coating composition comprises an organic resin/monomer mixture of: (A) between about 97 and about 3 weight percent alphabeta olefinically unsaturated organic resin containing between about 0.5 and about 5 vinyl unsaturation units per 1000 molecular weight of said resin, and (B) between about 3 and about 97 weight percent vinyl monomers polymerizable with said resin upon exposure to radiation, characterized in that said vinyl monomers include N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in an amount of from about 3 and up to about 10 weight percent based on the total weight of (A) and (B). The flexible coating exhibits excellent physical qualtities and good adhesion to a variety of substrates being particularly suitable for use on vinyl chloride fabric, wherein it is discoloration resistant after heat aging. Preferred articles bearing such a coating, which may comprise large amounts of pigment, are preferably cured by exposure to electron beam radiation.

    Cassatta, J.C.; Garrett, D.L. Jr.; Van Oene, H.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    236

    Remote generation of high-energy terahertz pulses from two-color femtosecond laser filamentation in air  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We experimentally investigated the dynamic behavior of remote terahertz (THz) generation from two-color femtosecond laser-induced filamentation in air. A record-high THz pulse energy of 570 nJ at frequency below 5.5 THz was measured by optimizing the pump parameters at a controllable remote distance of 16 m, while super-broadband THz (<300 THz) pulse energy was up to 2.8 {mu}J. A further energy-scaling possibility was proposed. By analyzing simultaneously the fluorescence from both neutral N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}{sup +} in the filament, we found that the enhancement of THz radiation was due principally to guiding of the weak second-harmonic pulse inside the filament of the first strong fundamental pulse.

    Wang, T.-J.; Daigle, J.-F.; Yuan, S.; Chin, S. L. [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Theberge, F.; Chateauneuf, M.; Dubois, J.; Roy, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada-Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Boulevard North, Quebec, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada); Zeng, H. [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    237

    Observational evidence of torus instability as trigger mechanism for coronal mass ejections: the 2011 August 4 filament eruption  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar filaments are magnetic structures often observed in the solar atmosphere and consist of plasma that is cooler and denser than their surroundings. They are visible for days -- and even weeks -- which suggests that they are often in equilibrium with their environment before disappearing or erupting. Several eruption models have been proposed that aim to reveal what mechanism causes (or triggers) these solar eruptions. Validating these models through observations represents a fundamental step in our understanding of solar eruptions. We present an analysis of the observation of a filament eruption that agrees with the torus instability model. This model predicts that a magnetic flux rope embedded in an ambient field undergoes an eruption when the axis of the flux rope reaches a critical height that depends on the topology of the ambient field. We use the two vantage points of SDO and STEREO to reconstruct the three-dimensional shape of the filament, to follow its morphological evolution and to determine its...

    Zuccarello, Francesco P; Mierla, Marilena; Poedts, Stefaan; Rachmeler, Laurel A; Romano, Paolo; Zuccarello, Francesca

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    238

    Assessment of ceramic coatings for metal fuel melting crucible  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels during the manufacturing of SFR fuels. Refractory coatings were applied to niobium substrates by vacuum plasma-spray coating method. Melt dipping tests conducted were the coated rods lowered into the fuel melt at 1600 C. degrees, and withdrawn and cooled outside the crucible in the inert atmosphere of the induction furnace. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods indicated that plasma-sprayed Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating doesn't form significant reaction layer between fuel melt and coating layer. Melt dipping tests of the coated Nb rods showed that TiC, TaC, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings exhibited the promising performance among other ceramic coatings. These materials could be promising candidate materials for the reusable melt crucible of metal fuel for SFR. In addition, in order to develop the vacuum plasma-spray coating method for re-usable crucible of metal fuel slugs to be overcome the issue of thermal expansion mismatch between coating material and crucible, various combinations of coating conditions were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. It is observed that most coating methods maintained sound coating state in U-Zr melt. (authors)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    239

    Intensity clamping measurement of laser filaments in air at 400 and 800 nm  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecular N{sub 2} fluorescence excited by laser filaments formed from laser pulses at 400 and 800 nm propagating in air is investigated. A comparison showed that, when excited with 400 nm photons, the fluorescence from the first negative band of N{sub 2}{sup +} was enhanced by a factor of 6.4 while that of the second positive band of neutral N{sub 2} remained relatively constant. The enhanced N{sub 2}{sup +} signal is attributed to a more efficient inner-shell multiphoton process (to the B{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +} state) at 400 nm leaving a larger population of N{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the excited state. On the other hand, the stable fluorescence from neutral N{sub 2} is due to the fact that the plasma density is more or less the same at both wavelengths. Using these results, a theoretical model is developed to determine the clamped intensities of the laser filaments at 400 and 800 nm.

    Daigle, J.-F.; Hosseini, S.; Wang, T.-J.; Kamali, Y.; Chin, S. L. [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Jaron-Becker, A.; Becker, A. [JILA and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States); Roy, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada-Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Boulevard North, Quebec, Quebec G3J 1X5 (Canada)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    240

    Oil filaments produced by an impeller in a water stirred thank  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this video, the mechanism followed to disperse an oil phase in water using a Scaba impeller in a cylindrical tank is presented. Castor oil (viscosity = 500 mPas) is used and the Reynolds number was fixed to 24,000. The process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Initially, the oil is at the air water interface. At the beginning of the stirring, the oil is dragged into the liquid bulk and rotates around the impeller shaft, then is pushed radially into the flow ejected by the impeller. In this region, the flow is turbulent and exhibits velocity gradients that contribute to elongate the oil phase. Viscous thin filaments are generated and expelled from the impeller. Thereafter, the filaments are elongated and break to form drops. This process is repeated in all the oil phase and drops are incorporated into the dispersion. Two main zones can be identified in the tank: the impeller discharge characterized by high turbulence and the rest of the flow where low velocity gradients appear. In this region surface f...

    Sanjuan-Galindo, Rene; Ascanio, Gabriel; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    241

    Fused-filament 3D printing (3DP) for fabrication of tablets  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract The use of fused-filament 3D printing (FF 3DP) to fabricate individual tablets is demonstrated. The technology permits the manufacture of tablets containing drug doses tailored to individual patients, or to fabrication of tablets with specific drug-release profiles. Commercially produced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) filament was loaded with a model drug (fluorescein) by swelling of the polymer in ethanolic drug solution. A final drug-loading of 0.29% w/w was achieved. Tablets of PVA/fluorescein (10 mm diameter) were printed using a 3D printer. It was found that changing the degree of infill percentage in the printer software varied the weight and volume of the printed tablets. The tablets were mechanically strong and no significant thermal degradation of the active occurred during printing. Dissolution tests were conducted in modified Hank’s buffer. The results showed release profiles were dependent on the infill percentage used to print the tablet. The study indicates that FF 3DP has the potential to offer a new solution for fabricating personalized-dose medicines or unit dosage forms with controlled-release profiles. In addition, the low cost of FDM printers means the paradigm of extemporaneous or point-of-use manufacture of personalized-dose tablets is both feasible and attainable.

    Alvaro Goyanes; Asma B.M. Buanz; Abdul W. Basit; Simon Gaisford

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    242

    A theoretical study of the incandescent filament lamp performance under voltage flicker  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incandescent filament lamp flicker, produced by voltage fluctuation, is a power quality problem that caused engineering concern since the onset of electrical illumination technology. The flicker phenomenon was analyzed and explained in early studies. Standards dealing with acceptable flicker levels are well known, nevertheless, today the discussion about flicker continues to be a top priority topic due to the fact that steady-state and transient voltage waveform distortion is a growing problem in low and medium voltage systems. In many situations voltage flicker is caused by subharmonics and interharmonics of voltage. Cycloconverters, welders and arc furnaces, eccentrically operating tools and integral cycle controlled power equipment are notorious for producing voltage flicker. The goal of this paper is to provide solid mathematical basis for the analytical modeling of incandescent filament lamp flicker when the voltage is nonsinusoidal. A mathematical model that enables the evaluation of the luminous flux modulation caused by noninteger harmonics (subharmonics and interharmonics) is presented. Three situations are detailed: square-wave voltage modulation, sinusoidal modulation and the case of noninteger harmonics with nearly contiguous frequencies.

    Peretto, L. [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)] [Univ. of Bologna (Italy); Emanuel, A.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States)] [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    243

    B2223 High Temperature Superconductor Wires in Silver Sheath, Filament Diameter Effect on Critical Temperature and Current Density  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    B2223 High Temperature Superconductor (HTSC) has been prepared as a pellet by solid state reaction. Then, HTSC wires were fabricated from the prepared superconductor using powder in tube (PIT) method utilizing silver as the tube material. Superconductor powder was packed in the pure silver tube of about 4.5 mm diameter, and 50 mm long. The prepared wires are of three types; with monofilament MOF, 9 multifilament core (9MF) and 81 filaments core(81MF). Several cycles of mechanical are drawing and rolling process performed to the starting silver tube of 0.4 cm diameter and 5 cm length and 0.35 mm thickness to minimize the filament diameter. The average filament diameter of MoC with 0.7 mm SC core which was produce by the first step of drawing, the second 9 MF wire with nine multifilament wire of 0.175 mm diameter for each filament,while the 81MFC wire filament diameter was about 25 ?m for each filament measured with an optical microscope. All the three types of wires were with same outer diameter of 0.9 mm. Tc critical temperature for superconductivity is measured for the pellet and wires using four point probes techniques. The critical temperature for the pellet is 110 °K, for the monofilament MOF is 112.5 °K and for 9 filaments 9MF was found is 117°K; while the Tc the 81MF was 119.5°K. The critical current density for the 9MF and 81MF wires were found higher than that of the monofilament MOF in spite of the smaller filament diameters of the 9 MF and 81MF. X-ray diffraction pattern shows the high Tc phase of B2223 compounds in addition to low phase, of B2212 compounds. The I-V curves for the three different wires show higher current density for 81 MF wire, while the optical microscope picture shows more grains alignment . MOC and 9 MF wires show misalignment grains.

    Akram R. Jabur

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    244

    An investigation of evaluation methods for internal FBE pipe coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The corrosivity of CO{sub 2}-containing water used for injection into formations is very high. One of the means for mitigating this corrosion is through the use of internal Fusion Bonded Epoxy (FBE) pipe coatings. However, these are very demanding services for coatings. Pressures and temperatures are high enough in some cases to severely stress the coating. Most FBE coatings are permeated by CO{sub 2}, and when pressures are released, blistering of the coating may occur. This compromises the integrity of the coating which may result in premature failure of the coating followed by corrosion of the pipe metal. The identification of coatings with good performance is absolutely essential. The failure of the coating alone can result in great losses due to the initial cost of the coating application, plus potential operating problems. When corrosive penetrations of the pipe occur, the costs escalate even higher as a result of required maintenance and down time. This paper describes the test work conducted to determine how to evaluate coatings for such services, and to determine which coatings will give successful, long-term performance. Test methods contained in an industry standard have been validated, and suitable coatings identified. Future test work needed to add to these findings has also been recommended. Although this work was designed for CO{sub 2} services, it does give valuable insight into tests that are required to properly qualify FBE coatings for non-CO{sub 2} services.

    Thompson, S.P. [Thompson (Stanley P.), Paris, TX (United States); Varughese, K. [Al-Qahtani Pipe Coating Terminal, Dammam (Saudi Arabia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    245

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, June 1, 1996--July 31, 1996  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An improved thermal barrier coating system with good reliability and thermal performance is described. The report discusses the coating process, manufacturing, repair, deposition, and microstructure of the coatings.

    NONE

    1996-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    246

    E-Print Network 3.0 - alcan-aasf50-ferric coated activated Sample...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Particulate Coating Processes Spray coating of particulate materials... is commonplace in industry. For example, most pharmaceutical tablets are coated for either aesthetic... or...

    247

    Model Studies of Pore Stability and Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs)  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Katz, “Advanced Ceramics: Thermal Barrier Coatings BeatConductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier CoatingsFatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings,” NASA/

    Glaeser, A M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    248

    ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cobalt and chromium. Ceramic or thermal barrier coatings canin fuel usage. Also, ceramic or thermal barrier coatings~n Oslo developed ceramic or thermal barrier coatings that

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    249

    UHV-ERDA investigation of NEG coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings are widely used in large vacuum systems such as particle accelerators. Since NEG coatings produced at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have a finite thickness of typically 1 ?m, ion beam analysis techniques such as ERDA and RBS are the methods of choice to study element and depth-resolved evolution of the getter film during gas pumping. The film thickness and stoichiometry can be determined by RBS while ERDA is sensitive to lighter elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, the main residual gas components of a vacuum environment. In this work we first present exsitu and insitu measurements of NEG thin films using ERDA. For the investigation of the pumping speed and capability of the getter films, we have used a vacuum test chamber where getter coated samples can be activated and saturated in a very controlled way. Afterwards, depth distributions of the pumped gas components have been measured using ERDA. To study the gas components in NEG coatings online, i.e., during activation or pumping, we have set up an ERDA system working at vacuum pressures down to 10 - 11 mbar . A special target heater system allows to activate the getter coatings insitu at typical temperatures between 180 and 300 °C in a UHV environment with tolerable influence to the total and partial gas pressure. With this UHV-ERDA setup, a temperature dependent diffusion process of gas components into the getter material could be analyzed for the first time.

    M. Bender; H. Kollmus; M.C. Bellachioma; W. Assmann

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    250

    Erosion of hard material coating systems  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The use of coating systems to protect structural metal surfaces from elevated temperature, small solid particle erosion and erosion-corrosion can extend component life and permit operation in more severe environments. The room and elevated temperature erosion behavior of several hard material coating systems, i.e. carbides, borides and nitrides, were determined over a range of test conditions. Particle velocities from 70 to 150 m s?1 and test temperatures from 25 to 540°C were used. Mechanisms of erosion were established and related to erosion rates in a manner that defined the requirements of composition, morphology and defect levels of coating systems for long-term performance. It was determined that small grain size, low porosity and absence of cracks were the microstructural features that enhanced erosion resistance. Hardness levels and the composition and distribution of second phase, hard particles had less effect on coating performance. Angular SiC particles were considerably more erosive than either Al2O3 or chromite-mixed oxide round-shaped particles and the rankings of the coatings' performance were different for each erodent and set of test conditions.

    Alan V. Levy; Wang Buqian

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    251

    Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project |  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project The Department of Energy is conducting research into bio-based thermochromic intelligent roof coatings. The coatings are developed from waste cooking oil. Project Description This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a waste cooking oil-based thermochromic smart roof coating technology that will adjust light transmission in response to temperature changes. This will reduce energy demands for temperature regulation. The project will also study the effects of different oil sources on coating properties. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and United Environment & Energy. Project Goals

    252

    Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamics of a vesicle as a cell mimic: Effects of interior structure, cross-membrane transport, and interaction with filaments The biological membrane is, in essence, a thermodynamically-nonequilibrium lipid bilayer [6, 30, 34, 43, 47] with a variety of molecular motors, ion pumps, or channels residing within [19

    Young, Yuan N.

    253

    Non-filamentated ultra-intense and ultra-short pulse fronts in three-dimensional Raman seed amplification  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses may be generated up to the exawatt-zetawatt regime due to parametric processes in plasmas. The minimization of unwanted plasma processes leads to operational limits which are discussed here with respect to filamentation. Transverse filamentation, which originally was derived for plane waves, is being investigated for seed pulse propagation in the so called ?-pulse limit. A three-dimensional (3D) three-wave-interaction model is the basis of the present investigation. To demonstrate the applicability of the three-wave-interaction model, the 1D pulse forms are compared with those obtained from 1D particle in cell and Vlasov simulations. Although wave-breaking may occur, the kinetic simulations show that the leading pumped pulse develops a form similar to that obtained from the three-wave-interaction model. In the main part, 2D and 3D filamentation processes of (localized) pulses are investigated with the three-wave-interaction model. It is shown that the leading pulse front can stay filamentation-free, whereas the rear parts show transverse modulations.

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)] [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    254

    Observations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams M. S. Wei,1  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be necessary for actual ignition experiments, the required laser needs to have energies of tens of kObservations of the filamentation of high-intensity laser-produced electron beams M. S. Wei,1 F. N Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 OQX, United Kingdom 5

    Strathclyde, University of

    255

    Quantum Hasimoto transformation and nonlinear waves on a superfluid vortex filament under the quantum local induction approximation  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Hasimoto transformation between the classical LIA (local induction approximation, a model approximating the motion of a thin vortex filament) and the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) has proven very useful in the past, since it allows one to construct new solutions to the LIA once a solution to the NLS is known. In the present paper, the quantum form of the LIA (which includes mutual friction effects) is put into correspondence with a type of complex nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation (PDE) with cubic nonlinearity (similar in form to a Ginsburg-Landau equation, with additional nonlinear terms). Transforming the quantum LIA in such a way enables one to obtain quantum vortex filament solutions once solutions to this dispersive PDE are known. From our quantum Hasimoto transformation, we determine the form and behavior of Stokes waves and a standing 1-soliton solution under normal and binormal friction effects. The soliton solution on a quantum vortex filament is a natural generalization of the classical 1-soliton solution constructed mathematically by Hasimoto (which motivated subsequent real-world experiments). The quantum Hasimoto transformation is useful when normal fluid velocity is relatively weak, so for the case where the normal fluid velocity is dominant we resort to other approaches. We consider the dynamics of the tangent vector to the vortex filament directly from the quantum LIA, and this approach, while less elegant than the quantum Hasimoto transformation, enables us to study waves primarily driven by the normal fluid velocity.

    Robert A. Van Gorder

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    256

    Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

    Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    257

    Protecting coatings vital to ensuring pipelines` longevity  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Today many old pipelines are being rehabilitated because of corrosion damage. A tremendous amount of time, personnel and money is invested to keep these old pipelines operating. The pipeline companies have created new departments to monitor their pipelines, one of which is the corrosion control group. This group is continuously looking for the next weak spot caused by corrosion that needs to be repaired in order to keep the pipeline from being shut down. As these groups discover the corrosion and research its cases, they have been able to teach us what not to do during pipeline construction so the coating will not be damaged. The paper discusses coating protection, types of coating protection, and choosing the best method.

    Turnage, C. [Ozzie`s Pipeline Padder, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    258

    Glass/ceramic coatings for implants  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

    Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    259

    Filamentation of magnetosonic wave and generation of magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction due to the nonlinear coupling of magnetosonic wave with ion acoustic wave in overdense plasma. For this study, dynamical equations of magnetosonic waves and the ion acoustic waves have been developed in the presence of ponderomotive force due to the pump magnetosonic wave. Slowly converging and diverging behavior has been studied semi-analytically, this results in the formation of filaments of the magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has also been carried out to study nonlinear stage. From the results, it has been found that the localized structures become quite complex in nature. Further, power spectrum has been studied. Results show that the spectral index follows (?k{sup ?2.0}) scaling at smaller scale. Relevance of the present investigation has been shown with the experimental observation.

    Modi, K. V., E-mail: kvmodi.iitd@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001 (India); Tiwary, Prem Pyari, E-mail: prempyari@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Dayal Bagh Educational Institute (Deemed University), Dayal Bagh, Agra 282005 (India); Singh, Ram Kishor, E-mail: ram007kishor@gmail.com; Sharma, R. P., E-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ac.in [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Satsangi, V. R. [Department of Physics and Computer Science, Dayal Bagh Educational Institute (Deemed University), Dayal Bagh, Agra 282005 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    260

    Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    261

    Protective properties of conversional polymer coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to the development of conversional polymer coatings deposited from aqueous solutions. A distinctive feature of such coatings is that their deposition occurs at the expense of the energy of chemical reactions on the surface of the treated metal. {open_quotes}Amchem,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}Oxy Metall,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Union Carbide Corp.{close_quotes} are leading company patentees in this field. The resistance of these coatings to the action of a salt mist lies within the range 16-500 h and depends on the nature of the latex and the composition of the compound. Below, we present results of an investigation of the protective properties of conversion polymeric coatings by different methods. The coatings were applied according to the technology developed at the Dnepropetrovsk Institute of Chemical Engineering. This technology differs from similar technologies used abroad by the utilization of products of large-scale chemical industrial production and specially synthesized stabilizers, which also play the role of cross-linking agents. The protective properties of conversional polymer coatings were studied using the pulse electrostatic method and also by simulated-service tests. As advantages of the electrostatic method over classical ac methods of corrosion testing, one can mention the possibilities of leveling the ohmic drop in a solution and measuring the values of the reaction resistance and the double-layer capacitance of a corroding electrode in the same test. The corrosion current was determined for given values of the reaction resistance and the anodic and cathodic Tafel constants, which can also be found from results of electrostatic measurements.

    Panasenko, S.A.; Mark, L.I.; Grishchuk, V.I. [Dzerzhinskii Institute of Chemical Engineering, Dnepropetrovsk (Russian Federation)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    262

    Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S. (IIT); (Vermont); (BU)

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    263

    Production of porous coating on a prosthesis  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    264

    Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    265

    Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    266

    The possibility of forming a sacrificial anode coating for Mg  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mg is the most active engineering metal, and is often used as a sacrificial anode/coating to protect other engineering metals from corrosion attack. So far no sacrificial anode coating has been developed or considered for Mg. This study explores the possibility of forming a sacrificial coating for Mg. A lithiated carbon coating and a metaphosphated coating are applied on the Mg surface, respectively, and their open-circuit-potentials are measured in saturated Mg(OH)2 solution. They exhibit more negative potentials than bare Mg. SEM reveals that the metaphosphated coating offers more effective and uniform protection for Mg than the lithiated carbon coating. These preliminary results indicate that development of a sacrificial anode coating for Mg is indeed possible.

    Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    267

    Synthesis and Characterization of Phosphate-coated Mesoporous...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phosphate-coated Mesoporous Titania and Cd-doping of Same via Ion-Exchange. Synthesis and Characterization of Phosphate-coated Mesoporous Titania and Cd-doping of Same via...

    268

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2 High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers - FY13 Q2...

    269

    Applications: Dispersions, Coatings, and Other Large Surface Area Structures  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    In the future, coatings will have improved properties due to nanoparticle incorporations and the methodology of incorporation. Coatings will also be ordered or patterned at the micro- and nano-levels. Similarl...

    P. Wiltzius; K. Klabunde

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    270

    Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    271

    Bacillus atrophaeus Outer Spore Coat Assembly and Ultrastructure  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Our previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies successfully visualized native Bacillus atrophaeus spore coat ultrastructure and surface morphology. We have shown that the outer spore coat surface is formed by a crystalline array of ?11 nm thick ...

    Marco Plomp; Terrance J. Leighton; Katherine E. Wheeler; Maurice E. Pitesky; Alexander J. Malkin

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    272

    T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

    273

    Special Coating Emission Control System At Goulds Pumps ITT Industries  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required significant changes for users of industrial paints and coatings. New York State requires users of highly volatile coatings to meet additional regulations, and apply for special permits and variances...

    Caropolo, B.; Evans, T.

    274

    Erosion studies on duplex and graded ceramic overlay coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The solid-particle erosion resistance of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is of considerable economic and industrial significance. Of additional significance to the service performance of these coatings...

    Saifi Usmani; Sanjay Sampath Ph.D.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    275

    Mechanisms Controlling Theophylline Release from Ethanol-Resistant Coated Pellets  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    To elucidate the mass transport mechanisms controlling drug release from recently proposed, ethanol-resistant, polymeric film coatings.

    Y. Rosiaux; C. Velghe; S. Muschert; R. Chokshi; B. Leclercq…

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    276

    Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAW Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings havefor Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings J.

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    277

    Vapor deposited samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao a,  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal barrier coatings The rare earth zirconates (M2Zr2O7, M=LaGd) have a low intrinsic thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability making them attractive candidates for thermal barrier coating conditions and the coating composition, structure, texture, pore morphology, and thermal conductivity

    Wadley, Haydn

    278

    Reaction, transformation and delamination of samarium zirconate thermal barrier coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cycling between 100 and 1100 °C. This cycling eventually led to delamination of the coatings, with failure thick (50­100 m) metallic "bond coat" applied to the turbine airfoil alloy to slow the kinetics of oxidation and promote TGO adherence. The bond coat has a high aluminum concentration to promote slow

    Wadley, Haydn

    279

    CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTMACROCELL TESTS  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENT­MACROCELL TESTS by Khaled Z. Kahhaleh, Enrique corrosion experimental program was conducted to study the performance of bent epoxy- coated bars. The damage. The coated bars were embedded in concrete prisms and linked electrically to uncoated bars to set up macro-corrosion

    Texas at Austin, University of

    280

    Delamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -tempera- ture exposure to oxygen, and an outer low thermal conduc- tivity ceramic coating, such as ytrriaDelamination resistance of thermal barrier coatings containing embedded ductile layers Matthew R layers upon thermal cycling delamination failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) driven by thickening

    Wadley, Haydn

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    281

    High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    282

    Air quality rules boost high-solids coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Air quality rules boost high-solids coatings ... It's been, on the horizon for a long time: Ever since California passed Rule 66, in 1966, limiting solvent emissions, and the Environmental Protection Agency tightened state requirements for air quality, industries using large quantities of coatings have known they would have to find substitutes for or ways to clean up solvent coatings emissions. ...

    1982-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    283

    Effect of substrate temperature on the electrospark deposition, structure, and mechanical properties of coatings. II. Coating deposition features  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The relationship between deposition temperature, coating inhomogeneity, and temperature of cathode spots is studied. It is shown that the spark deposition of coatings proceeds in the area of cathode spots; the...

    V. D. Belik; R. V. Litvin; M. S. Kovalchenko

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    284

    Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    285

    SiPMs coated with TPB : coating protocol and characterization for NEXT  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are the photon detectors chosen for the tracking readout in NEXT, a neutrinoless {\\beta}{\\beta} decay experiment which uses a high pressure gaseous xenon time projection chamber (TPC). The reconstruction of event track and topology in this gaseous detector is a key handle for background rejection. Among the commercially available sensors that can be used for tracking, SiPMs offer important advantages, mainly high gain, ruggedness, cost-effectiveness and radio-purity. Their main drawback, however, is their non sensitivity in the emission spectrum of the xenon scintillation (peak at 175 nm). This is overcome by coating these sensors with the organic wavelength shifter tetraphenyl butadienne (TPB). In this paper we describe the protocol developed for coating the SiPMs with TPB and the measurements performed for characterizing the coatings as well as the performance of the coated sensors in the UV-VUV range.

    Álvarez, V; Ball, M; Batallé, M; Bayarri, J; Borges, F I G; Bolink, H; Brine, H; Cárcel, S; Carmona, J M; Castel, J; Catalá, J M; Cebrián, S; Cervera, A; Chan, D; Conde, C A N; Dafni, T; Dias, T H V T; Díaz, J; Esteve, R; Evtoukhovitch, P; Ferrando, J; Fernandes, L M P; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Freitas, E D C; García, S A; Gil, A; Giomataris, I; Goldschmidt, A; Gómez, E; Gómez, H; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; González, K; Gutiérrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Hernando-Morata, J A; Herrera, D C; Herrero, V; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Kalinnikov, V; Labarga, L; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, J A M; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzón, G; Marí, A; Martin-Albo, J; Méndez, A M; Miller, T; Moisenko, A; Monrabal, F; Monteiro, C M B; Monzó, J M; Mora, F J; Vidal, J Muñoz; da Luz, H Natal; Navarro, G; Nebot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Palma, R; Aparicio, J L Pérez; Pérez, J; Radicioni, E; Quinto, M; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodriguez, A; Rodriguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Seguí, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Soriano, A; Spieler, H; Toledo, J F; Collell, J Torrent; Tomás, A; Tsamalaidze, Z; Vázquez, D; Velicheva, E; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R; Weber, T; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    286

    Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    287

    Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Selective Withdrawal to Coat Microparticles Itai Cohen,1 Hui Li,2 James L. Hougland,2 Milan Mrksich,2 Sidney R. Nagel1 We report a method that uses the process of selective withdrawal of one fluid a tube with its orifice slightly above a water-oil interface. Upon increasing the flow rate

    Mrksich, Milan

    288

    Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    289

    Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    290

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    291

    1.18 - Coatings by Laser Cladding  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract There are three processes, where solid feedstock materials are used for surface modification processes with a laser: cladding, dispersing and alloying. Currently, in industrial practice laser cladding with a history of about 30 years is by far the most important of these processes and is predominantly applied for wear protection of mechanical parts. For hard phase-containing coatings, laser cladding is performed as a one-step process. A metallurgical bonding of the coating to the substrate is created, but dilution of substrate elements into the coating is kept as low as possible. In the historical development different types of laser have been used, diode laser are currently the most important type. Coating properties can be improved and productivity can be increased by hybrid technologies, e.g. by the additional use of inductive heating. There are innumerable combinations of hard phases, also in respect of their concentration, size and morphology, and metallic binder alloys. However, coarse cast and spheroidized tungsten carbides and blends with Ni-based and Co-based alloys have gained the highest importance. Fine grained structures can be achieved by the use of cubic hard phases on the base of TiC and VC.

    Steffen Nowotny; Lutz-Michael Berger; Jörg Spatzier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    292

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    293

    Project Profile: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of California San Diego, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), is developing a new low-cost and scalable process for fabricating spectrally selective coatings (SSCs) to be used in solar absorbers for high-temperature CSP systems.

    294

    Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their allows. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    295

    Smart Polymeric Coatings for Surface Decontamination  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    20-26 The effectiveness of strippable coatings has been demonstrated at several nuclear facilities, including Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory,26 Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Rocky Flats. ... For safety reasons, the time spent within the facility was limited to 5 min each of the two times the technician entered. ...

    H. Neil Gray; Betty Jorgensen; Donald L. McClaugherty; Andrew Kippenberger

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70`s by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his `Adiabatic Diesel Engine` in the late 70`s. Kamo`s concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo`s work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as `convection vive.` Woschni`s work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components.

    Fairbanks, J.W.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    297

    Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic fatigue characteristics of silica fibers  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hybrid glass coatings for optical fibers: effect of coating thickness on strength and dynamic. Wojcik c , A. Walewski c a Hybrid Glass Technologies, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852, USA b Rutgers coatings. Recently developed sol-gel derived inorganic- organic hybrid materials called hybrid glass

    Matthewson, M. John

    299

    Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5070 (United States); Kulkarni, Anand [Siemens Energy, Orlando, Florida 32826-2399 (United States)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    300

    SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Performance Nanostructured High-Performance Nanostructured Coating to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Functional role of tropomyosin on thin filament activation and cross bridge kinetics in transgenic cardiac muscle: a model study  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hunter (Member) Way Kuo (Head ol Department) December 1999 Major Subject: Biomedical Engineering ABSTRACT Functional Role of Tropomyosin on Thin Filament Activation and Cross Bridge Kinetics in Transgenic Cardiac Muscle: A Model Study. (December... 1999) Gayathri Krishnamoorthy, B. E. , University of Mumbai, India Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Sohi Rastegar Dr. Mariappan Muthuchamy Regulation of contractile activity in cardiac muscle is a cooperative interaction between thick and thin...

    Krishnamoorthy, Gayathri

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    302

    Light bullets and supercontinuum spectrum during femtosecond pulse filamentation under conditions of anomalous group-velocity dispersion in fused silicalicati  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We report the results of theoretical and experimental research on spectrum transformation and spatiotemporal distribution of the femtosecond laser radiation intensity during filamentation in fused silica. The formation of light bullets with a high power density is first observed in a femtosecond laser pulse in the anomalous group velocity dispersion regime at a wavelength of 1800 nm. The minimum duration of the light bullet is about two oscillation cycles of the light field. (extreme light fields and their applications)

    Chekalin, Sergei V; Kompanets, V O; Smetanina, E O; Kandidov, V P

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    304

    Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    305

    Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    306

    Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

    Simpson, John T (Clinton, TN) [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    307

    Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    308

    High temperature low friction surface coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

    Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    309

    Sol-gel coatings for optoelectronic devices  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} prepared by a sol-gel process in form of coatings and aerogels are new materials which present interesting properties: (a) The coatings present electrochromic properties and exhibit a blue coloration under Li{sup +} insertion with 100% reversible variation of the optical transmission in the visible and near infrared range between 80% and 200% and have a high chemical stability (tested up to 2,000 cycles). (b) They are semiconductor and present a photoelectric effect when illuminating in the UV region ({lambda} < 360 nm). These films are therefore very promising to be used in electrochromic devices, as electrodes for photoelectrochemical purpose and the development of nanocrystalline solar cell. (c) When prepared in aerogel form, the high BET surface area of the powders is a promising asset to use these new materials for catalytic purposes for air pollution control.

    Avellaneda, C.O.; Macedo, M.A.; Florentino, A.O.; Aegerter, M.A. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    310

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    311

    Polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine coatings  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A new family of polyorganometallosiloxane-2- or -4-pyridine compounds are provided for corrosion resistant coatings on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. The novel compounds contain backbones modified by metal alkoxides, metallocenes and metallophthalocyanates where the metal is Zr, Ti, Mo, V, Hf, Nb, Si, B and combinations thereof. Methods of making the new compounds are also provided. 13 figs.

    Sugama, T.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    312

    North American Coating Laboratories | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Coating Laboratories American Coating Laboratories Jump to: navigation, search Name North American Coating Laboratories Address 9450 Pineneedle Drive Place Mentor, Ohio Zip 44060 Sector Services, Solar Product Consulting; Engineering/architectural/design; Manufacturing; Research and development;Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 440-357-7000 Website http://www.nacl.com Coordinates 41.70303°, -81.302082° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.70303,"lon":-81.302082,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

    313

    Molybdenum Coatings with Filtration of Plasma Flow  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deposition of molybdenum coatings in arc discharge with assistance of HF one is analyzed in this paper. To avoid substrate heating to high temperature and micro-arc formation during cleaning process, the surface cleaning was carried out with HF plasma only. For reduction of droplet fraction in plasma the 'freestanding' filter was utilized. As a filter a solenoid was used, which generated a curvilinear (with the angle of 90 deg.) transportation magnetic field. The effective crosssectional area of the plasma flow at which was observed the uniform distribution of the thickness of the applied coating, was equal to 113 sm{sup 2}. The coating on the base of arc discharge, filter and HF-biasing of substrate were deposited on different substrates, including glass and stainless steel.The optical (refractive index) properties of molybdenum films are presented. The reflective characteristics of the obtained molybdenum films in the range of wavelengths from 200 to 700 nm were measured.Molybdenum films were also investigated under the effect of the plasma emission, using an ECR discharge in a simple double-mirror magnetic trap. The time varying negative potential was supplied to sample holder what provided a wide energy distribution of ions bombarded the sample surface in range 30...1500V.

    Gasilin, V. V.; Nezovibat'ko, Y. N.; Shvets, O. M.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.; Timoshenko, A. I.; Zavaleev, V. A. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    314

    Advances in the electrospark deposition coating process  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a pulsed?arc microwelding process using short?duration high?current electrical pulses to deposit an electrode material on a metallic substrate. It is one of the few methods available by which a fused metallurgically bonded coating can be applied with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperatures. The short duration of the electrical pulse allows an extremely rapid solidification of the deposited material and results in an exceptionally fine?grained homogeneous coating that approaches (and with some materials actually is) an amorphous structure. This structure is believed to contribute to the good tribological and corrosion performance observed for hardsurfacing materials used in the demanding environments of high temperatures liquid metals and neutron irradiation. A brief historical review of the process is provided followed by descriptions of the present state of the art and of the performance and applications of electrospark deposition coating in liquid–metal?cooled nuclear reactors.

    Roger N. Johnson; G. L. Sheldon

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    315

    Phosphoric chemical conversion coating with excellent wax-repellent performance  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Wax deposition on pipelines is a serious problem for the production of crude oil. In this paper, phosphoric chemical conversion coatings were exploited to solve the problem. The chemical conversion coatings were fabricated on carbon substrate by surface modification technology at different temperature. A self-designed wax deposition apparatus based on cold-finger was used to study the wax-repellent properties of coatings, which indicated that all chemical conversion coatings showed superior wax-repellent performance to bare carbon substrate and the wax deposition reduction value of 80–95% was achieved by the chemical conversion coating obtained at room temperature. The microstructure and composition of coatings were evaluated by SEM and XRD, revealing that there existed much difference in the content of Zn3(PO4)2(H2O)4 phase and the microstructure among different coatings. The contact angle results measured on a contact angle meter showed that all coatings belonged to hydrophilic surface. And the study on the wetting behavior of Zn3(PO4)2(H2O)4 phase suggested that the water wetting property of coating was a key factor for suppressing wax deposition and the weak affinity between coating and wax also played an important role.

    Yuzhen Guo; Weiping Li; Liqun Zhu; Zhiwei Wang; Huicong Liu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    316

    The influence of coating compliance on the delamination of thermal barrier coatings Hengbei Zhao , Zhuo Yu, Haydn N.G. Wadley  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings have been deposited on NiCoCrAlY over-lay bond-coated Hastelloy-X

    Wadley, Haydn

    317

    Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game | Department of  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game March 22, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT’s twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT's twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs In honor of Women's History Month, we've brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run

    319

    Warm coats, big thanks | Y-12 National Security Complex  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community / Warm coats, big thanks Community / Warm coats, big thanks Warm coats, big thanks Posted: January 9, 2014 - 2:23pm Over the last 12 years, Y-12ers have donated almost 7000 coats, sweaters and other winter wear to the Volunteer Ministry Center. As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while, Y-12ers have shown their volunteer spirit for the twelfth straight year by helping countless people stay warm thanks to another successful United Way Coat Drive to benefit the Volunteer Ministry Center. In total, the site donated 589 coats and winter wear items, 64 pairs of gloves, 47 scarves, and 66 hats and toboggans, which VMC makes available to the public through its Knoxville office. In addition, this year's efforts were expanded to include collection of toiletries for VMC. Y-12 collected more than 20 copy paper boxes full of

    320

    Stress analysis of aspherical coated particle with inner pressure  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Coated particles used in HTR fuel element sustain the inner pressure during irradiation as a pressure vessel. In actually the coated particle is not real spherical but with some asphericity, the stress distribution in the vessel is not uniform, coated layer in aspherical particle sustain more additional stress due to the asphericity. In this paper, the geometric shape distribution is summarized based on actual coated particle statistic. A mechanical analysis model is proposed for SiC layer by geometric combinations, and stress distribution of coated particle with a flat is calculated. The results show that the local maximum stress of aspherical particle increased two times than that of ideal spherical coated particle, which increase the failure probability under irradiation and high temperature.

    Bing Liu; Lin Yang; Tongxiang Liang; Chunhe Tang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    Process for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A process is described for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal, the process comprising: (a) forming an aqueous slurry of tungsten carbide having a particle size of no greater than - 100 mesh, and zinc metal powder; (b) adding ammonia to the slurry with the amount of the ammonia being sufficient so that the slurry is basic after the subsequent addition of cobalt chloride in step c; (c) adding to the resulting ammoniated slurry, a solution of cobalt chloride with agitation, to form a coating of partially reduced cobalt on the tungsten carbide; (d) removing the resulting cobalt coated tungsten carbide from the resulting liquor; and (e) heating the cobalt coated tungsten carbide in a reducing atmosphere to effect the essentially complete reduction of the cobalt and to produce a cobalt metal coating on the tungsten carbide, the coating making up no greater than about 15% of weight of the tungsten carbide.

    Ritsko, J.E.; Lee, J.S.

    1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

    Hirayama, Chikara (Murrysville, PA); Wagner, George R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    324

    Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

    Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC)...

    327

    Evaluation of Perfluoropolyether Coatings for Environmental Protection of Stone.  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ??The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS) as an environmentally safe coating process. RESS allows… (more)

    Harris, Robert Bryan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    328

    Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

    Yi, Min [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Shen, Zhigang, E-mail: shenzhg@buaa.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhao, Xiaohu [Plasma Laboratory, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liang, Shuaishuai [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Lei [Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Technology Research and Development, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Femtosecond Laser Damage Resistance of Optical Coating Materials  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    On the basis of recent experiments and published results we investigate the Laser Induced Damage Threshold of optical coatings materials (oxides, fluorides, mixture materials) with...

    Gallais, Laurent; Commandré, Mireille

    330

    A millimeter-wave antireflection coating for cryogenic silicon lenses  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We have developed and tested an antireflection (AR) coating method for silicon lenses at cryogenic temperatures and millimeter wavelengths. Our particular application is a measurement of the cosmic microwave background. The coating consists of machined pieces of Cirlex glued to the silicon. The measured reflection from an AR coated flat piece is less than 1.5% at the design wavelength. The coating has been applied to flats and lenses and has survived multiple thermal cycles from 300 to 4 K. We present the manufacturing method, the material properties, the tests performed, and estimates of the loss that can be achieved in practical lenses.

    J. M. Lau; J. W. Fowler; T. A. Marriage; L. Page; J. Leong; E. Wishnow; R. Henry; E. Wollck; M. Halpern; D. Marsden; G. Marsden

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    331

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    332

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    OPTI 577-Advanced Optical Interference Coatings Course Description  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to current market design, optical characterization and post-process analysis software. Prerequisite: OPTI 575, inhomogeneity. Electrochromic Coatings. Introduction to Chemical Vapor Deposition and Coater #4. Refinement

    Arizona, University of

    334

    Project Profile: Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    these novel optical coatings on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of concentrating solar power (CSP) system in field trials. Innovation The durability and cleanability, in...

    335

    Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    336

    Plasma parameters in electrospark deposition of silver coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Spectroscopic measurements and mathematical simulations are conducted to study the composition and parameters of spark discharge in depositing coatings with silver electrodes using an Élitron-22 generator. The...

    V. D. Kurochkin; L. P. Kravchenko; L. O. Kryachko…

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    337

    Optimal design of antireflection coatings with different metrics  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roles in laser technology, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, solar energy, and many other fields of applied optics. The most common optical coatings are those ...

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    338

    Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    339

    MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATERIALS, INTERFACES, AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PHENOMENA Hydrophilic Zeolite Coatings for Improved Heat the system, decreases the oper- ation noise and the pumping cost. Another major consideration for a heat

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    340

    Colored solar-thermal absorbing coatings with high absorptance  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    It's difficult to obtain different color appearance and keep high absorptance simultaneously. We introduced AR films into solar-thermal absorbing coatings to tune the color appearance...

    Wang, Shao-Wei; Chen, Feiliang; Liu, Xingxing; Wang, Xiaofang; Yu, Liming; Lu, Wei

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings  

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, and new lubricants.

    342

    Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

    Kniseley, Richard N. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Merkle, Brian D. (Ames, IA)

    1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    343

    Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Report: Development of Advanced Window Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Advanced fenestration technologies for light and thermal management in building applications are of great recent research interest for improvements in energy efficiency. Of these technologies, there is specific interest in advanced window coating technologies that have tailored control over the visible and infrared (IR) scattering into a room for both static and dynamic applications. Recently, PNNL has investigated novel subwavelength nanostructured coatings for both daylighting, and IR thermal management applications. Such coatings rese still in the early stages and additional research is needed in terms of scalable manufacturing. This project investigates aspects of a potential new methodology for low-cost scalable manufacture of said subwavelength coatings.

    Bolton, Ladena A.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    24 SOLUTIONS! for People, Processes and Paper COATING TECHNOLOGY  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is available on www.tappi.org · See references at the end of this article NEW CURTAIN COATING TECHNOLOGY OFFERS

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    345

    HA-Coated Implant: Bone Interface in Total Joint Arthroplasty  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Several hydroxyapatite application techniques on metallic substrates have been described. Traditionally, bioactive osteoconductive coatings are done by the plasma-spray technique. Newer pyroprocessing and hydroco...

    Henrik Daugaard MD; PhD; Joan E. Bechtold…

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    346

    Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    347

    Coated glass in the automotive industry  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Inorganic coatings on glasses have reached the level where they will certainly be applied in the automotive industry in order to solve such glazing problems as heat load, heat loss, glare, UV adsorption, disturbed reflections, electromagnetic influence and thermal insulation. Their widespread use will depend on optimising the solution to problems of solar control and heatable glasses while the glass is also capable of the other functions required of it, thus justifying the relatively high cost that is predicted. There remain unsolved problems in optical limits and colour matching. When these are solved solar control glasses are likely to give real advantages in terms of air conditioning and comfort, and heatable glasses will be used in association with electrical power for demisting and deicing. Particular attention is being directed to a class of infrared reflecting and heatable glasses, obtained by selectively coating transparent plastic films that are embedded or bonded in laminated or tempered glasses. Fabricating this type of glasses has mainly been useful for two reasons: (I) to develop versatile techniques to make solar control IR reflecting and heatable glasses for all kinds and dimensions of vehicle glazing; and (2) to assess whether these glasses are really feasible alternatives to directly coated glasses. This paper describes results of some solar control experiments in Fiat cars: to ascertain the actual internal temperature differences found when glazing vehicles with the absorbing and reflecting IR glasses currently available; and to obtain results with a similar purpose using heatable glasses. There is also discussion of how the glasses could be used in glazing all or parts of a car's windows / especially addressing problems of glare. Suggestions are made of the directions of this research in the future.

    G. Manfre

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    348

    Nanocrystalline carbon coatings and powders for medicine  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    All the allotropic forms of carbon, i.e., diamond, graphite and carbine, find applications in different areas of medicine, but diamond is specifically preferred. The unique properties of thin diamond layers, due to the highest biocompatibility of carbon resulting from the presence of this element in human body, make them candidates for producing biomaterials. Especially carbon in the form of a nanocrystalline diamond film has found industrial applications in the area of medical implants. Diamond Powder Particles (DPP), as an extended surface NCD, are useful for medical examinations. Different medical implants are covered with Nanocrystalline Diamond Coatings (NCD). NCD forms a diffusion barrier between implant and human environment.

    Katarzyna Mitura; Anna Karczemska; Piotr Niedzielski; Jacek Grabarczyk; Witold Kaczorowski; Petr Louda; Stanislaw Mitura

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    Fabrication and testing of corrosion resistant coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The susceptibility of SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub n} to sodium corrosion mandates that corrosion resistant coatings be developed to protect silicon-based turbine engine components. Materials with good corrosion resistance and thermal expansions that nearly match SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have been identified. Corrosion testing of hot-pressed pellets of these compounds has identified the most promising materials. Development of chemical vapor deposition system to apply these materials has been initiated. 20 refs., 3 figs.

    Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Riester, L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    350

    Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

    Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

    352

    Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    353

    Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that will be able to withstand a few MW proton beam and hopefully will be able to be used after possible future upgrades to the SNS to greater than a 3MW beam.

    Vispute, R D [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Ermer, Henry K [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Sinsky, Phillip [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Seiser, Andrew [Blue Wave Semiconductors; Shaw, Robert W [ORNL; Wilson, Leslie L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    354

    Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

    Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

    2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    355

    Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    356

    Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    358

    Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    yttria-stabilized zir- conia (YSZ) is then applied to provide thermal insulation [1]. This ceramic layer]. The thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer has been found to depend on the pore morphology within a coatingMorphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings Hengbei Zhao a

    Wadley, Haydn

    359

    'Smart Coatings' Research Shows The Virtues of Superficiality  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    ...rich—high-tech protective paints and varnishes look poised to become...into the fabric. Microscopic robots that make repairs with tools...looks and behaves like a normal paint or varnish at room temperature...become as common as a coat of paint. * Fourth Annual Smart Coatings...

    John Bohannon

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Wear resistance optimisation of composite coatings by computational microstructural modelling  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract The wear resistance of components can be changed remarkably by surface coatings. New processing methods offer many possibilities to tailor the wear resistance of surfaces to match design criteria. Computational modelling and simulation is a systematic approach to optimise the wear performance. Modelling of physical surface phenomena can be carried out on all spatial scale levels, from sub-atomic one to macrolevel and for the various stages in material development, from material processing to structures, properties and performance. The interactions between the coating matrix, the reinforced particles, degraded material phases and defects like pores, cracks and voids are of crucial importance for the wear performance of composite coatings. This has been modelled by synthetic artificial models to find general design rules and by real image based models to find out the wear behaviour of specific coatings. The effect of particle size, morphology, clusters, mean free path and porosity was simulated for thermal spray WC–CoCr coatings. Four main very typical mechanisms for crack initiation resulting in surface failure have been identified: brittle carbide fracture, ductile binder cracking, interface failure, and cracking from pre-existing porosities and defects. The most important coating properties having a crucial effect on coating wear resistance are defects in the coating structure as they can create detrimental stress peaks and high strain levels, particle clustering is most critical for the durability of the structure, the elasticity of the particle is of great importance as well as matrix hardness and particle morphology.

    Kenneth Holmberg; Anssi Laukkanen; Erja Turunen; Tarja Laitinen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$ Nils D. Hoivika of thin-®lm materials to protect MEMS devices from electrical breakdown, mechanical wear and stiction. Electrostatic testing of the coated MEMS cantilever beams revealed that the ALD Al2O3 ®lms prevented electrical

    George, Steven M.

    362

    Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Posted By Office of Public Affairs Warm coats, big thanks As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while,

    363

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    364

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    365

    Durable polymer-aerogel based superhydrophobic coatings, a composite material  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Provided are polymer-aerogel composite coatings, devices and articles including polymer-aerogel composite coatings, and methods for preparing the polymer-aerogel composite. The exemplary article can include a surface, wherein the surface includes at least one region and a polymer-aerogel composite coating disposed over the at least one region, wherein the polymer-aerogel composite coating has a water contact angle of at least about 140.degree. and a contact angle hysteresis of less than about 1.degree.. The polymer-aerogel composite coating can include a polymer and an ultra high water content catalyzed polysilicate aerogel, the polysilicate aerogel including a three dimensional network of silica particles having surface functional groups derivatized with a silylating agent and a plurality of pores.

    Kissel, David J; Brinker, Charles Jeffrey

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    366

    Thailand's gas line underway: coating a major achievement  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Using primarily local personnel and materials, Bredero Price International's Thai pipe-coating plant has prepared some 374 miles of 34 and 28-in. pipe for service in the Gulf of Thailand gas-pipeline project. The enamel-coating shop cleaned, primed and coated all the pipe with coal-tar enamel, glass-fiber mat, felt, and a kraft-paper outer wrap; the cement-coating facility then added a concrete-weight coating to the portion of the pipe earmarked for offshore duty. Scheduled for a 1981 completion, the pipeline will initially carry 250 million CF/day to power-generating plants in Bangpakong and South Bangkok; the volume transported will eventually reach 500 million CF/day when addition offshore production is tied in to the line and an offshore compressor station added.

    Hale, D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    367

    Influence of insulating coating on aluminum wire explosions  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Single wire explosions are widely used in understanding the early stages of z-pinch experiments. This paper presents a serial of experiments conducted on the pulse power generator with ?1?kA peak current and ?10?ns rising time in Xi'an Jiao Tong University. Polyimide coated aluminum wires and uncoated ones were tested under three different voltages to analyze the effect of insulating coating. Experimental results showed that insulating coating can increase the energy deposition 10%?30% in aluminum wires by delaying the voltage collapse and raising the maximum load resistance. The substantial energy deposition resulted in about 20% faster expansion rates for coated wires. Experimental evidence that plasma channel shunts the current from the wire core was observed by streak camera and schlieren graphs. This paper also briefly discussed the influence of nonuniform coating on the morphology of wire expansion.

    Li, Yang; Wu, Jian, E-mail: jxjawj@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Sheng, Liang; Zhao, Jizhen; Zhang, Mei; Yuan, Yuan; Peng, Bodong [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulse Radiation of Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Li, Xingwen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    368

    Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

    Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Vernon, Milton E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wright, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    369

    Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    Thermal Barrier Coatings Chemically and Mechanically Resistant to High Temperature Attack by Molten Ashes.  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?? Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are ceramic coatings used on component in the hottest sections of gas turbine engines, used for power generation and aviation.… (more)

    Gledhill, Andrew Dean

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous boron coatings Sample Search...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , S. Li et al., "Microstructure and deposition mechanism of CVD amorphous boron carbide coatings... ., "Preparation of pure boron coating film and its characterization by...

    372

    E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum strand coating Sample Search Results  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaporate nickel and aluminum and then reactively deposit NiAl bond coats... coat's oxidation resistance is achieved by the use of sufficient aluminum to result in the...

    373

    Cryogenic far-infrared laser absorptivity measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating...

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    374

    Cathodic disbondment resistance with reactive ethylene terpolymer blends and composite coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CD Propagation for RET-Nanoclay Composite Coatings on Silanefor RET/Nanoclay Composites …………………………………………………… Table 6.3:CD Propagation for RET-Nanoclay Composite Coatings on Silane

    Love, Corey T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    Simplification of Diesel Emission Control System Packaging Using SCR Coated on DPF  

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Study demonstrates high NOx conversion with SCR coated on DPF. Optimization of catalyst washcoat and coating process minimizes back-pressure while maintaining good performance.

    376

    Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic top coat to  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research: A typical thermal barrier coating consists of two layers over the substrate: 1) a ceramic-level understanding of the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic interfaces present in thermal barrier coatings. We have interfaces weaken as the ceramic thickens. This provides atomic-level insight as to why thermal barrier

    Carter, Emily A.

    377

    Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition to the Bond Coat Alloy  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition engine turbine blades can shield the temperature to which the underlying superalloy is exposed modifications that should inhibit the failure of these jet engine turbine thermal barrier coatings. Research

    Carter, Emily A.

    378

    The radial velocity profile of the filament galaxies in the vicinity of the Virgo cluster as a test of gravity  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The radial velocities of the galaxies in the vicinity of a massive cluster shows deviation from the pure Hubble flow due to their gravitational interaction with the cluster. According to a recent study of Falco et al. with a high-resolution N-body simulation based on General Relativity (GR), the radial velocity profile of the galaxies located at distances larger than three times the virial radius of a neighbour cluster has a universal shape and could be reconstructed from direct observables provided that the galaxies are distributed along one dimensional filament. Analyzing the narrow filamentary structure identified by Kim et al. in the vicinity of the Virgo cluster from the NASA-Sloan-Atlas catalog, we reconstruct the radial velocity profile of the Virgo filament galaxies and compare it with the universal formula derived by Falco et al. It is found that unless the virial mass of the Virgo cluster exceeds $10^{15}\\,h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ the universal formula fails to describe the reconstructed radial velocity pro...

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    379

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Element One, Inc. Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 191524 likes Element One, based in Boulder, Colorado, has created the only available coatings that change color when detecting hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks, either reversibly or non-reversibly, to provide both current and historical information about leaks. Element One's patented gas indicators and sensors use catalyzed thin films or nanoparticles of a transition metal oxide to create very low cost sensors for use in industrial and consumer environments, greatly reducing the potential for undetected leaks and their cost and safety implications. This technology is also being integrated for use in refineries, industry gas and fuel cells systems and was developed using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

    380

    Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    382

    Current status and future development of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The coated particles were first invented by Roy Huddle in Harwell 1957. Through five decades of development, the German UO2 coated particle and US LEU UCO coated particle represent the highly successful coated particle designs up to now. In this paper, current status as well as the failure mechanisms of coated particle so far is reviewed and discussed. The challenges associated with high temperatures for coated particles applied in future VHTR are evaluated. And future development prospects of advanced coated particle suited for higher temperatures are presented. According to the past coated fuel particle development experience, it is unwise to make multiple simultaneous changes in the coated particle design. Two advanced designs which are modifications of standard German UO2 coated particle (UO2? herein) and US UCO coated particle (TRIZO) are promising and feasible under the world-wide cooperations and efforts.

    X.W. Zhou; C.H. Tang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    383

    Assessment of strippable coatings for decontamination and decommissioning  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strippable or temporary coatings were developed to assist in the decontamination of the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) reactor. These coatings have become a viable option during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of both US Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial nuclear facilities to remove or fix loose contamination on both vertical and horizontal surfaces. A variety of strippable coatings are available to D and D professionals. However, these products exhibit a wide range of performance criteria and uses. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) was commissioned to perform a 2-year investigation into strippable coatings. This investigation was divided into four parts: (1) identification of commercially available strippable coating products; (2) survey of D and D professionals to determine current uses of these coatings and performance criteria; (3) design and implementation of a non-radiological testing program to evaluate the physical properties of these coatings; and (4) design and implementation of a radiological testing program to determine decontamination factors and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Activities during fiscal year 1997 are described.

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    384

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    385

    Ultraviolet antireflection coatings for use in silicon detector design  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    We report on the development of coatings for a charged-coupled device (CCD) detector optimized for use in a fixed dispersion UV spectrograph. Because of the rapidly changing index of refraction of Si, single layer broadband antireflection (AR) coatings are not suitable to increase quantum efficiency at all wavelengths of interest. Instead, we describe a creative solution that provides excellent performance over UV wavelengths. We describe progress in the development of a coated CCD detector with theoretical quantum efficiencies (QEs) of greater than 60% at wavelengths from 120 to 300 nm. This high efficiency may be reached by coating a backside-illuminated, thinned, delta-doped CCD with a series of thin film AR coatings. The materials tested include MgF{sub 2} (optimized for highest performance from 120-150 nm), SiO{sub 2} (150-180 nm), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (180-240 nm), MgO (200-250 nm), and HfO{sub 2} (240-300 nm). A variety of deposition techniques were tested and a selection of coatings that minimized reflectance on a Si test wafer were applied to functional devices. We also discuss future uses and improvements, including graded and multilayer coatings.

    Hamden, Erika T.; Greer, Frank; Hoenk, Michael E.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    386

    Interdiffusion Behavior of Aluminide Coatings on Fe-Base Alloys  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    One of the potential degradation modes of oxidation-resistant iron aluminide coatings is the loss of Al from the coatings into Fe-base substrate alloys that typically contain no Al. To address this issue, interdiffusion between aluminide coatings and steel substrates was studied for times up to 10,000 h in the temperature range of 500-800 C. Coatings were synthesized in a laboratory chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor on representative commercial ferritic alloy Fe-9Cr-1Mo and type 304L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructural and compositional changes after diffusion anneals were examined in detail. An initial attempt to model the interdiffusion behavior was carried out by applying an existing software program COSIM (coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model). Complementary work was conducted using a simple mathematic model developed by Heckel et al. Reasonable agreement was observed between the simulated and experimental composition profiles for the aluminide coatings on ferritic alloys. Model results were then applied to predict coating lifetime.

    Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Liu, A. P. [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    387

    Recent RHIC in-situ coating technology developments  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    To rectify the problems of electron clouds observed in RHIC and unacceptable ohmic heating for superconducting magnets that can limit future machine upgrades, we started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for $in-situ$ coating of the RHIC 316LN stainless steel cold bore tubes based on staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of Cu followed by amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. The Cu coating reduces wall resistivity, while a-C has low SEY that suppresses electron cloud formation. Recent RF resistivity computations indicate that 10 {\\mu}m of Cu coating thickness is needed. But, Cu coatings thicker than 2 {\\mu}m can have grain structures that might have lower SEY like gold black. A 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed and fabricated, after which, 30 cm long samples of RHIC cold bore tubes were coated with various OFHC copper thicknesses; room temperature RF resistivity measured. Rectangular stainless steel and SS discs were Cu coated. SEY of rectangular samples were measured at ro...

    Hershcovitch, A; Brennan, J M; Chawla, A; Fischer, W; Liaw, C-J; Meng, W; Todd, R; Custer, A; Erickson, M; Jamshidi, N; Kobrin, P; Laping, R; Poole, H J; Jimenez, J M; Neupert, H; Taborelli, M; Yin-Vallgren, C; Sochugov, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    388

    Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    389

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    390

    Development of Sol–Gel Icephobic Coatings: Effect of Surface Roughness and Surface Energy  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Development of Sol–Gel Icephobic Coatings: Effect of Surface Roughness and Surface Energy ... ‡ Energy

    Qitao Fu; Xinghua Wu; Divya Kumar; Jeffrey W. C. Ho; Pushkar D. Kanhere; Narasimalu Srikanth; Erjia Liu; Peter Wilson; Zhong Chen

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    391

    Efficient 3D characterization of raised topological defects in smooth specular coatings  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Many smooth, highly specular coatings, such as automotive paints and appliance coatings, are subjected to considerable performance demands and manufacturers spend significant sums each year to monitor and repair coating surface quality. Additionally, ... Keywords: Camera calibration, Defect characterization, Surface quality of specular coatings, Surface reflectance model

    Pradeep Gnanaprakasam; Johné M. Parker; Subburengan Ganapathiraman; Zhen Hou

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    392

    In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

    Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    393

    13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006.  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006. The size of each also use transparent paper or film, overlay the paper on each image, and mark the locations carefully

    394

    Genetically engineered phage fibers and coatings for antibacterial applications  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multifunctionality can be imparted to protein-based fibers and coatings via either synthetic or biological approaches. Here, we demonstrate potent antimicrobial functionality of genetically engineered, phage-based fibers ...

    Mao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

    Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    396

    Global optimization of silicon photovoltaic cell front coatings  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The front-coating (FC) of a solar cell controls its efficiency, determining admission of light into the absorbing material and potentially trapping light to enhance thin absorbers. Single-layer FC designs are well known, ...

    Ghebrebrhan, Michael

    397

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications vari- ous nanoparticles onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Charged and nonagglomerated aerosol unique hybrid nanostructures at- tractive for various energy applications. DOI: 10

    Chen, Junhong

    398

    Impact of graphene coating on the atom-plate interaction  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using the recently proposed quantum electrodynamical formalism, we calculate the Casimir-Polder free energies and forces between the ground state atoms of Rb, Na, Cs and He${}^{\\ast}$ and the plates made of Au, Si, sapphire and fused silica coated with a graphene sheet. It is shown that the graphene coating has no effect on the Casimir-Polder interaction for metallic plates, but influences significantly for plates made of dielectric materials. The influence of graphene coating increases with decreasing static dielectric permittivity of the plate material and the characteristic frequency of an atomic dynamic polarizability. Simple analytic expressions for the classical limit of the Casimir-Polder free energy and force between an atom and a graphene-coated plate are obtained. From the comparison with the results of numerical computations, the application region of these expressions is determined.

    G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    399

    Micro-arc oxidation coatings on Mg-Li alloys  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) method was used for the...in-situ fabricated on the Mg-Li alloy. The morphology feature, phase composition, and corrosion-resistance of the formed ceramic coatings were studied by SEM, X...

    Yongjun Xu; Kang Li; Zhongping Yao; Zhaohua Jiang; Milin Zhang

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    400

    Bacillus atrophaeus Outer Spore Coat Assembly and Ultrastructure  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Our previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies successfully visualized native Bacillus atrophaeus spore coat ultrastructure and surface morphology. We have shown that the outer spore coat surface is formed by a crystalline array of {approx}11 nm thick rodlets, having a periodicity of {approx}8 nm. We present here further AFM ultrastructural investigations of air-dried and fully hydrated spore surface architecture. In the rodlet layer, planar and point defects, as well as domain boundaries, similar to those described for inorganic and macromolecular crystals, were identified. For several Bacillus species, rodlet structure assembly and architectural variation appear to be a consequence of species-specific nucleation and crystallization mechanisms that regulate the formation of the outer spore coat. We propose a unifying mechanism for nucleation and self-assembly of this crystalline layer on the outer spore coat surface.

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Pitesky, M E; Malkin, A J

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Oxidation resistance of composite silicide coatings on niobium  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This paper reports the oxidation of NbSi/sub 2/-MoSi/sub 2/ composite silicide coatings produced by diffusive siliconizing of molybdenum films on a niobium surface. Molybdenum-coated niobium was siliconized and an x-ray microspectral analysis of the composite silicide coating showed the phase composition to be an ca 80-um-thick outer molybdenum disilicide film with a characteristic coarsely crystalline columnar structure, and inner ca 20-um film of niobium disilicide consisting of the tiny columnar crystals, and a substrate/coating interface comprising a thin, 2-3 um film of lower silicide, i.e., Nb/sub 5/Si/sub 3/. The average grain sizes, unit cell parameters, and x-ray determined densities of the Mo films obtained by various methods are shown.

    Gloshko, P.I.; Kurtsev, N.F.; Lisichenko, V.I.; Nadtoka, V.N.; Petrenko, M.I.; Zmii, V.I.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power...  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    at T>500 C. (NREL) * Annealing studies of Ti:Si films undertaken. 36:64 composition film stable up to T 1150 C. * Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) was calculated from...

    403

    Formation and study of electrospark coatings based on titanium aluminides  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Coatings containing Ti-Al intermetallics are fabricated by the electrospark deposition of titanium on aluminum and aluminum on...3 intermetallic independent of the duration and frequency of discharge pulses. The ...

    S. A. Pyachin; A. A. Burkov; V. S. Komarova

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    404

    Wear-Resistant Coatings with Engineered Structure by Laser Cladding  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Several types of wear-resistant and/or low-friction coefficient coatings with engineered structure (e.g., metal matrix composites, MMC) have been produced by coaxial laser cladding. The MoS2 graded layer is creat...

    A. Yakovlev; P. Bertrand; I. Smurov

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    405

    Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    406

    Edible Coating Development for Fresh-cut Cantaloupe  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The effect of different coating compositions and their concentrations on a product's chemical properties and quality attributes was studied. A set of solutions containing chitosan, beta-cyclodextrin, trans-cinnamaldehyde, pectin and calcium chloride were used...

    Martinon Gaspar, Mauricio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    407

    Platinum- and Platinum Alloy-Coated Palladium and Palladium Alloy...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Platinum- and Platinum Alloy-Coated Palladium and Palladium Alloy Particles and Uses Thereof...

    408

    Carbon Hard Coatings of Al-Alloys for UHV Application  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The investigations were focused on properties of Me-C:H coatings (where Me — Ti, Cr, W) produced by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering (RMS) and Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition (CAPD) methods on aluminium alloys substr...

    W. Precht; A. Czyzniewski; P. My?li?ski…

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    409

    Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Use of refractory coatings on linings of electric resistance furnaces  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the reduction of power consumption in furnaces with a lining covered by IVAKS-2 and IVA-2 intensifying refractory coatings are presented. The heating curves o...

    A. V. Aksenov; V. A. Belyakov

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    411

    Sustainable Films and Coatings from Hemicelluloses: A Review  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Sustainable Films and Coatings from Hemicelluloses: A Review ... Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P. O. Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark ... The integration of agro-energy crops and biorefinery manufg. ...

    Natanya M. L. Hansen; David Plackett

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    412

    Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    Effects of the dipolar interaction on the equilibrium morphologies of a single supramolecular magnetic filament in bulk  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study the equilibrium morphologies of a single supramolecular magnetic filament in a three-dimensional system as a function of the effective strength of the magnetic dipolar interactions. The study is performed by means of Langevin dynamics simulations with a bead-spring chain model of freely rotating dipoles. We demonstrate the existence of three structural regimes as the value of the dipolar coupling parameter is increased: a coil compaction regime, a coil expansion regime and a closed chain regime in which the structures tend progressively to an ideal ring configuration. We discuss the governing effects of each regime, the structural transition between open and closed morphologies, and the reasons why we see no multiloop configurations that have been observed in two-dimensional systems under similar conditions.

    Pedro A. Sánchez; Joan J. Cerdà; Tomás Sintes; Christian Holm

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    414

    A general formulation of Bead Models applied to flexible fibers and active filaments at low Reynolds number  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This contribution provides a general framework to use Lagrange multipliers for the simulation of low Reynolds number fiber dynamics based on Bead Models (BM). This formalism provides an efficient method to account for kinematic constraints. We illustrate, with several examples, to which extent the proposed formulation offers a flexible and versatile framework for the quantitative modeling of flexible fibers deformation and rotation in shear flow, the dynamics of actuated filaments and the propulsion of active swimmers. Furthermore, a new contact model called Gears Model is proposed and successfully tested. It avoids the use of numerical artifices such as repulsive forces between adjacent beads, a source of numerical difficulties in the temporal integration of previous Bead Models.

    Delmotte, Blaise; Plouraboue, Franck

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    X-ray Filament with a Strong 6.7 keV Line in the Galactic Center Region  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An elongated X-ray source with a strong K-shell line from He-like iron (Fe XXVI) is found at (RA, Dec)_{J2000.0}=(17h44m00s.0, -29D13'40''.9) in the Galactic center region. The position coincides with the X-ray thread, G359.55+0.16, which is aligned with the radio non-thermal filament. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted with an absorbed thin thermal plasma (apec) model. The best-fit temperature, metal abundance, and column density are 4.1^{+2.7}_{-1.8} keV, 0.58^{+0.41}_{-0.32} solar, and 6.1^{+2.5}_{-1.3}x10^{22} cm^{-2}, respectively. These values are similar to those of the largely extended Galactic center X-ray emission.

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Nakashima, Shinya; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    416

    Critical current densities and magnetic hysteresis losses in submicron filament bronze-processed Sb,Sn wires  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    This paper reports on submicron filament bronze-processed multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn wires with Cu-5at%Sn matrix and Nb or Nb alloy cores. The Nb alloy cores contained each of 1at%Zr, Ti, Hf or Ta. Among the peripheral Cu stabilizer type wires, the Nb-1Ta core wire showed the highest non Cu area critical current density Jc of 3 {times} 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} at 12 T after an optimum heat treatment, in spite of its relatively low Sn concentration in the matrix. The deformation of Nb cores into ribbon like shapes was apparently suppressed by the 1 at% addition of Ti, Hf or Ta. The values of Jc per unit magnetic hysteresis loss for the Ti, Hf and Ta alloyed Nb core wires have been evaluated to be higher than that for the pure Nb core wire.

    Kamata, K.; Sakai, S. (Hitachi Cable, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Tachikawa, K.; Taniquchi, T.; Ajioka, T. (Tokai Univ., 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken 259-12 (JP)); Hatakeyama, H. (Engineering Research Association for Superconductive Generation Equipment and Materials, Umeda UN Bldg., 5-14-10 Nishitenma, Kita-ku, Osaka-shi 530 (JP))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Farnum, E.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Vitkovski, I.V. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). MHD-Machines Lab.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

    TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Process for producing a corrosion-resistant solid lubricant coating  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A corrosion-resistant surface formed of a sulfide-forming metal, in particular nickel, is first subjected to an electric plasma in an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide to form an adherent sulfide on said surface. The sulfided surface is then exposed to simultaneous cathodic sputtering of at least one solid lubricant which is a chalcogen compound of layer structure, in particular MoS/sub 2/, and at least one hydrophobic solid polymer, in particular PTFE. The coating thus formed is a composite coating in which the particles of the chalcogen compound are coated by the polymer. When the surface of the part to be coated does not consist of a corrosion-resistant sulfide-forming metal, a layer of such a metal is first deposited by cathodic sputtering. The composite coating withstands a wet oxidizing atmosphere, contrary to a coating of MoS/sub 2/ alone, and the method is applicable to any mechanical part intended to rub on other surfaces, such as a watch balance wheel staff and ball or roller bearings.

    Niederhaeuser, P.; Hintermann, H.E.; Maillat, M.

    1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

    Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA)

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    423

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    425

    Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    Experiments and modeling of multilayered coatings and membranes : application to thermal barrier coatings and reverse osmosis membranes  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this thesis, I developed a novel methodology for characterizing interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coatings. The proposed methodology involves novel experiments-plus numerical simulations in order to determine ...

    Luk-Cyr, Jacques

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    427

    Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    428

    Vaporization of bulk metals into single-digit nanoparticles by non-thermal plasma filaments in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract A compact, inexpensive and simple dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) design is presented with related electro-thermal properties for the production of metal nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation and growth mechanisms are depicted from size distributions and chemical analyses of particles collected just after the 70 kHz DBD in nitrogen. At first, it is confirmed that the initial local vapor flux is produced from the spots of interaction between plasma filaments and different metal electrodes (Au, Ag, and Cu). Amorphous and crystalline pure metal primary nanoparticles with diameters below 5 nm are then produced by physical nucleation in expanding vapors jets. Finally, some small agglomerates with diameters still below 5 nm are also formed by ballistic agglomeration of a fraction of these primary particles. This happens at the end of the vapor jet expansion, as well as after the production during the transit between subsequent filaments in the DBD. The first local agglomeration step can be limited at reduced energy per filament by lowering the initial vapor flux in smaller gaps, while the second growth step depends on the transit time in the DBD. Hence, such “low” energy plasma filaments (up to a few tens of µJ) lower the initial vapor flux to control the agglomeration. DBD were thus successfully tested for the production of tailored nanoparticles with tunable size, controlled morphology of spherical agglomerates and the same composition as the metal electrode. The production per unit energy (mol J?1) is related to both plasma and material properties. Besides, neglecting vapor and nanoparticles losses, the mass production rate (g s?1) depends on the input power related to the product of the energy controlling the production per filament times the number of filaments per second, for any given material. This non-thermal plasma process presents great potentialities for nano-technologies since it is performed at atmospheric pressure and can be used to reach size-dependent properties of nano-materials, without any gaseous precursor or solvent.

    J.-P. Borra; N. Jidenko; J. Hou; A. Weber

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    430

    Modelling and simulation of nutrient dispersion from coated fertilizer granules  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The usage of Controlled-Release Fertilizer (CRF) is essential in plants and crops to fulfill the need and requirement for the modern agriculture which now feeds 6 billion people. Therefore modeling and simulation of nutrient release from coated fertilizer has become the best method to study the behavior of some parameters toward water saturation in and nutrient release from the coated-fertilizer granule. This paper is the improvement development of modeling and computer simulation by Basu [1] which include some of the factors affecting the water saturation time and nutrient release time from a coated-fertilizer. The effect of granule radius the diffusivity of water and nutrient the temperature of surrounding the contact areas and the characteristic of the coating are studied and the simulation was developed using MATLAB software. The studies and understanding of this project is very important and useful especially to determine the important parameters in the manufacturing process of the coated-fertilizer granule and also will be useful for the farmers/users in the selection of the best fertilizers for their crops.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    Dynamics, crystallization and structures in colloid spin coating  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spin coating is an out-of-equilibrium technique for producing polymer films and colloidal crystals quickly and reproducibly. In this review, we present an overview of theoretical and experimental studies of the spin coating of colloidal suspensions. The dynamics of the spin coating process is discussed first, and we present insights from both theory and experiment. A key difference between spin coating with polymer solutions and with monodisperse colloidal suspensions is the emergence of long range (centimeter scale) orientational correlations in the latter. We discuss experiments in different physical regimes that shed light on the many unusual partially-ordered structures that have long-range orientational order, but no long-range translational order. The nature of these structures can be tailored by adding electric or magnetic fields during the spin coating procedure. These partially-ordered structures can be considered as model systems for studying the fundamentals of poorly crystalline and defect-rich solids, and they can also serve as templates for patterned and/or porous optical and magnetic materials.

    Moorthi Pichumani; Payam Bagheri; Kristin M. Poduska; Wenceslao Gonzalez-Vinas; Anand Yethiraj

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    432

    15 - Processing of Refractory Carbides and Nitrides (Coatings)  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Publisher Summary This chapter reviews the coating processes of refractory carbides and nitrides. Coatings of refractory carbides and nitrides have great industrial importance with a wide range of applications in semiconductors and other electronic components, in cutting tools, gas-turbine vanes and blades, precision bearings, punch sets, extruders, prostheses, and many other products. The surface of a material may be exposed to wear, corrosion, radiation, electrical or magnetic fields, and other phenomena and hence, it must have the ability to withstand these environments. This can be accomplished by coating the base material to obtain a composite in which the surface properties may be considerably different from those of the substrate. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) belong to the class of vapor-transfer processes, which are atomistic in nature—that is, the deposition species are atoms or molecules or a combination of these. The coatings are also commonly known as thin-films when their thickness is less than 10 ?m. CVD is a versatile process that is well adapted to the production of all the refractory carbides and nitrides, not only as coatings but also as powders, bulk/monolithic components, and fibers. It may be defined as the deposition of a solid on a heated surface from a chemical reaction in the vapor phase.

    Hugh O. Pierson

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    433

    Oxidation resistant coatings for CoSb3  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Doped cobalt antimonides are used as components of thermoelectric devices at temperatures not exceeding 450 °C because of poor thermal and chemical stability. In absence of oxygen they degrade by sublimation of antimony while in air they easily oxidize to form volatile antimony oxides and non-volatile thick double oxide scales [1]. In both cases protective coatings are indispensable to ensure safe performance of thermoelectric devices over extended times. The most promising solution reported so far is a thick aerogel coating which practically stops antimony loss by sublimation. The assessment of coating effectiveness is generally based on thermogravimetric tests in vacuum so permeability of oxygen and protection from oxidation cannot be evaluated. The paper presents investigations on the development of protective coatings which would prevent oxidation of CoSb3. Two types of coatings were applied: magnetron sputtered Cr-Si thin layers [2] and thick enamel layers. Testing involved interrupted oxidation in air for 20-80 h at 500 °C and 600 °C. The Cr-Si thin layers appeared oxygen-tight at 500 °C while the enamel layers - even at 600 °C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    434

    Calcium orthophosphate coatings on magnesium and its biodegradable alloys  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Biodegradable metals have been suggested as revolutionary biomaterials for bone-grafting therapies. Of these metals, magnesium (Mg) and its biodegradable alloys appear to be particularly attractive candidates due to their non-toxicity and as their mechanical properties match those of bones better than other metals do. Being light, biocompatible and biodegradable, Mg-based metallic implants have several advantages over other implantable metals currently in use, such as eliminating both the effects of stress shielding and the requirement of a second surgery for implant removal. Unfortunately, the fast degradation rates of Mg and its biodegradable alloys in the aggressive physiological environment impose limitations on their clinical applications. This necessitates development of implants with controlled degradation rates to match the kinetics of bone healing. Application of protective but biocompatible and biodegradable coatings able to delay the onset of Mg corrosion appears to be a reasonable solution. Since calcium orthophosphates are well tolerated by living organisms, they appear to be the excellent candidates for such coatings. Nevertheless, both the high chemical reactivity and the low melting point of Mg require specific parameters for successful deposition of calcium orthophosphate coatings. This review provides an overview of current coating techniques used for deposition of calcium orthophosphates on Mg and its biodegradable alloys. The literature analysis revealed that in all cases the calcium orthophosphate protective coatings both increased the corrosion resistance of Mg-based metallic biomaterials and improved their surface biocompatibility.

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    435

    Friction and wear tests on some coatings for a titanium riser  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Three types of coatings have been tested for their suitability for use on a titanium riser to be pulled through a `J` tube. The purpose of the coatings was to provide thermal insulation to the riser and galvanically isolate it from the steel `J` tube. The coatings tested were; polypropylene, polychloroprene and polychloroprene with PTFE overlay. The coatings were selected for their low friction, toughness and thermal insulation properties. The wear and friction coefficients of each coating has been measured in a test simulating the forces and environment which the riser would experience during the pull-in. All three coating performed satisfactorily.

    Baxter, C.F. [Carl Baxter and Associates, East Horsley (United Kingdom); Lassen, S. [Inst. for Product Development, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Creep and Corrosion Testing of Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Substrates  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pack and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings on commercial ferritic-martensitic Fe-9Cr-2W steel are being investigated by creep and corrosion testing at 650 C. Results from different coating thicknesses show that the coated region makes no contribution to the creep strength. The creep behavior of uncoated material was studied after various heat treatments to simulate the coating process and typical secondary heat treatments. Alternating creep and corrosion exposures showed little effect on the creep strength of uncoated material but coated materials became progressively weaker. The coatings were protective in wet air at 650 C after creep testing.

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    437

    Effect on Intimal Hyperplasia of Dexamethasone Released from Coated Metal Stents Compared with Non-Coated Stents in Canine Femoral Arteries  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purpose: Polymer-coated, dexamethasone (DXM)-releasing stents were tested in order to assess the efficacy of DXM released locally for the prevention of stent restenosis due to intimal hyperplasia. Methods: Strecker stents coated with a biodegradable membrane containing DXM were implanted percutaneously into the femoral artery in 14 dogs. The contralateral artery received a conventional non-coated stent serving as control. The drugs are eluted by degradation of the carrier membrane. Follow-up intraarterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was obtained at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 weeks with subsequent autopsy. Specimens for gross and microscopic pathology were obtained and histomorphometry was performed. Results: Four of 14 DXM-coated stents showed thrombotic occlusion within the first 3 weeks; ten DXM-coated stents remained patent. At follow-up DSA, DXM-coated stents showed a significantly wider lumen than the non-coated stents. At morphometry there was less intimal hyperplasia over DXM-coated stents than over non-coated stents (p < 0.05). Conclusion: DXM-coated stents reduce neointimal hyperplasia in dogs when compared with non-coated stents.

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gabelmann, Andreas [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Boos, Irene [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lucas, Christopher [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 366, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Xu, Zhongying [Department of Radiology, Diakonissen-Hospital, Diakonissenstrasse 28, D-76199 Karlsruhe (Germany); Haberstroh, Joerg [Department of Surgical Research, University Hospital, Breisacher Strasse 64, D-79108 Freiburg (Germany); Freudenberg, Nicolaus [Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Albertstrasse 19, D-79002 Freiburg (Germany); Stricker, Helmut [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 366, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Langer, Mathias [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Betz, Eberhard [Department of Physiology, University Tuebingen, Gmelinstrasse 5, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    1998-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hyde, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    439

    STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC.  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER-OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-94GO 10029 W(A)-95-018; CH-0863 The Petitioner, Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Electrochromics Windows Program." The objective of the cooperative agreement is to develop and demonstrate a thin-film electrochronic switching technology suitable for commercialization in the fenestration industry. The agreement comprises three phases including, respectively, development, demonstration, and market deployment. In Phase I, a viable electrochromic window system wilh a transmittance

    440

    Zirconia coating on stainless steel sheets from organozirconium compounds  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The stability and the coating characteristics of a variety of organozirconium compounds have been investigated to coat ZrO/sub 2/ films on stainless steel sheets for the improvement of heat resistance against oxidation. Zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The authors discuss how the compounds were found to be more stable than zirconium alkoxides in an ambient atmosphere. The ZrO/sub 2/ films from zirconium alkoxides became white and discontinuous when the thickness of the films exceeded about 200 A (20nm). On the other hand, transparent ZrO/sub 2/ films were obtained from zirconium tetraoctylate and zirconium tetrakis(acetylacetonate). The IR spectra of the films showed that the heat treatment at 400{sup 0}C for 5 min produced organic-free ZrO/sub 2/ films. The heat resistance of stainless steel sheets against oxidation was improved by the ZrO/sub 2/ coating, depending on the film thickness.

    Izumi, K.; Murakami, M.; Deguchi, T.; Morita, A. (Nisshin Steel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Tohge, N.; Minami, T. (Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Osaka Prefecture, Mozu-Umekmachi, Sakai-Shi, Osaka- Fu 591 (JP))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    Laser ablation analysis of novel perfluoroalkyl-coated aluminum nanocomposites  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The evolution and decay of aluminum and aluminum monoxide emission signatures following a laser ablation event were used to compare the relative reaction rates of three aluminum based materials. Time-resolved emission results of oxide-free, C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H-passivated materials were compared with uncoated, oxide passivated aluminum nanoparticles and those coated with the same acid used in for passivation C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H. Excited state Al and AlO emission is reduced in time for the oxide free material when compared to coated, 50 nm, oxide passivated particles mixed on an equal active Al: C{sub 13}F{sub 27}CO{sub 2}H ratio. This is interpreted as an increase in the reaction rate afforded by the elimination of the oxide coating and proximity of oxidizing species in the SAM-based nanocomposite.

    Jouet, R. Jason; Carney, Joel R.; Lightstone, James M.; Warren, Andrea D. [Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, IHDIV, Naval Surface Warfare Center 4104 Evans Way, Suite 102 Indian Head MD 20640-5102 (United States)

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    442

    Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    443

    Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

    Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    444

    Lithium Surface Coatings for Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and frequent benefits from lithium coatings applied to plasma facing components. Lithium pellet injection on NSTX introduced lithium pellets with masses 1 to 5 mg via He discharges. Lithium coatings have also been applied with an oven that directed a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Benefits from the lithium coating were sometimes, but not always seen. These improvements sometimes included decreases plasma density, inductive flux consumption, and ELM frequency, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and periods of MHD quiescence. In addition, reductions in lower divertor D, C, and O luminosity were measured.

    Kugel, H W; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaye, S; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    445

    Fretting wear of coated magnesium and steel couples  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    An experimental procedure is undertaken to establish the effect of design parameters upon the severity of fretting wear caused by steel (AMS 6265) rubbing on magnesium (AMS 4439), and to determine the ability of selected coatings to delay wear induced failure. The procedure consists of two major tasks as follows: The design, construction and operation of a suitable fretting wear machine, and an experimental set-up to systematically evaluate the relevant wear controlling parameters and surface treatment. Several wear tests were performed under different operating and surface conditions, and the results are presented in some detail. It was found that magnaplated coated magnesium samples offer the best wear resistance as compared to Xylan coated and plain samples. Slip amplitude was found to be the most dominant parameter that contributed mainly to fretting wear as compared to other wear parameters such as frequency of oscillation, test duration, and contact load.

    A.H. Elkholy

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    446

    Coatings for the protection of turbine blades from erosion  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Many types of turbines, including aircraft gas turbines, steam turbines, and power recovery turbines, suffer from solid particle erosion caused by a variety of materials ingested into the machines. Utilization of various laboratory erosion tests tailored to the specific application by using various erodents, temperatures, velocities, and angles of impact, have been shown to be effective in the development and selection of coatings for the erosion protection of turbine blades and other components. Detonation gun coatings have demonstrated their efficacy in providing substantial protection in many situations. It has now been shown that several tungsten carbide and chromium carbide Super D-Gun{trademark} coatings not only have better erosion resistance than their D-Gun analogs, but cause little or no degradation of the fatigue properties of the blade alloys. Nonetheless, caution should be employed in the application of any laboratory data to a specific situation and additional testing done as warranted by the turbine designer.

    Walsh, P.N.; Quets, J.M.; Tucker, R.C. Jr. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    447

    Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    448

    3.07 - TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel Performance  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel is used in all current and planned high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The robustness of this fuel, coupled with the high heat capacity of graphite, has led to the development of modular \\{HTGRs\\} with a high degree of passive safety. In this chapter, the irradiation and accident performance of modern TRISO-coated particle fuel around the world are reviewed. For all HTGRs, TRISO-coated particle fuel forms the heart of the concept. Such fuels have been studied extensively over the past four decades around the world, for example, in countries including the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, the United States, Russia, China, and more recently, South Africa.

    D.A. Petti; P.A. Demkowicz; J.T. Maki; R.R. Hobbins

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    449

    Functionalized chitosan-based coatings for active corrosion protection  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract Chitosan-based coatings were suggested in this work as a “green” alternative for active corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) was used here as an efficient corrosion inhibitor for AA2024. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has demonstrated a strong inhibiting action of MBT showing no corrosion attack even after one week in full immersion tests when MBT-loaded chitosan coatings are applied. The surface properties of the chitosan coatings were improved by chemical grafting with poly(ethylene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PEMA) and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) (POMA), aiming at increasing hydrophobicity that is crucial for corrosion protection in atmospheric conditions. The high contact angles, in the range of 140°, were obtained on the MBT-containing chitosan films.

    J. Carneiro; J. Tedim; S.C.M. Fernandes; C.S.R. Freire; A. Gandini; M.G.S. Ferreira; M.L. Zheludkevich

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    450

    Erosion-corrosion of thermal sprayed coatings in FBC boilers  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Varieties of bed ash and fly ash were retrieved from operating fluidized bed combustor (FBC) boilers firing different fuels in North America and Europe. Using these ashes, the relative erosion-corrosion resistances of HVOF Cr3C2?NiCr coating and several other thermal sprayed coatings were determined in an elevated temperature blast nozzle erosion tester. Test conditions attempted to simulate erosive conditions found at the refractory—waterwall interface and in the convection pass region in tubular heat exchangers of FBC boilers. Erosion-corrosion (E-C) wastage mechanisms of the structural metals (AISI 1018, ASTM SA213-T22) were discussed and compared with the E-C wastage of HVOF Cr3C2?NiCr cermet coatings. The relatively different erosivities of ashes retrieved from North America and from Europe were also discussed.

    Buqian Wang

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    451

    Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibiting effect of polyaniline coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A series of electrochemical measurements, including corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), corrosion current (i{sub corr}), Tafel`s constants and polarization resistance (R{sub p}), have been made on polyaniline-coated cold rolled steel specimen under various conditions. Both the base and acid-doped forms of polyaniline were studied. The base form of polyaniline was found to offer good corrosion protection. This phenomenon may not originate merely from the barrier effect of the coatings, because the nonconjugated polymers such as polystyrene and epoxy did not show the same electrochemical behavior. The polyaniline base with zinc nitrate plus epoxy topcoat appeared to give better overall protection relative to other coating systems in this study.

    Wei, Yen; Wang, Jianguo; Jia, Xinru [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    452

    Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating  

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

    Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    453

    Influence of Electrolyte Chemistry on Morphology and Corrosion Resistance of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings Deposited on Magnesium  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    In the present work, micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings were synthesized on magnesium...2SiO3), potassium hydroxide (KOH), and sodium aluminate (NaAlO2). The resultant coatings were subjected to coating thickness...

    L. Rama Krishna; G. Poshal; G. Sundararajan

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    454

    Electrospark alloying for deposition on aluminum surface of Al-Sn coatings and their wear resistance under dry friction  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Some aspects of coating deposition on aluminum substrate by electrospark alloying with toolelectrode from Al-Sn alloy...2 nanofibers formation in coatings have been studied. Wear resistance of such coatings, unde...

    V. I. Agafii; V. I. Petrenko; V. M. Fomichev…

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    455

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    456

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    457

    Assessing thermal barrier coatings by eddy-current inversion  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of high-temperature coatings is one of the important factors in achieving a high level of structural integrity in advanced gas turbines. In this paper we demonstrate that sophisticated eddy-current techniques can be utilized to measure the thickness and remaining-life of high-temperature coatings. We discuss the difficult in-service case in which the time-temperature exposure of the combustion turbine blade has created a four-layered system in addition to the base metal.

    Harold A. Sabbagh; Elias H. Sabbagh; R. Kim Murphy; John Nyenhuis

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    458

    Dots, Clumps, and Filaments: The Intermittent Images of Synchrotron Emission in Random Magnetic Fields of Young Supernova Remnants  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Nonthermal X-ray emission in some supernova remnants originates from synchrotron radiation of ultrarelativistic particles in turbulent magnetic fields. We address the effect of a random magnetic field on synchrotron emission images and spectra. A random magnetic field is simulated to construct synchrotron emission maps of a source with a steady distribution of ultrarelativistic electrons. Nonsteady localized structures (dots, clumps, and filaments), in which the magnetic field reaches exceptionally high values, typically arise in the random field sample. These magnetic field concentrations dominate the synchrotron emission (integrated along the line of sight) from the highest energy electrons in the cutoff regime of the distribution, resulting in an evolving, intermittent, clumpy appearance. The simulated structures resemble those observed in X-ray images of some young supernova remnants. The lifetime of X-ray clumps can be short enough to be consistent with that observed even in the case of a steady particle distribution. The efficiency of synchrotron radiation from the cutoff regime in the electron spectrum is strongly enhanced in a turbulent field compared to emission from a uniform field of the same magnitude.

    Andrei M. Bykov; Yury A. Uvarov; Donald C. Ellison

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    459

    Complete genome sequence of the filamentous gliding predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus type strain (114-95T)  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herpetosiphon aurantiacus Holt and Lewin 1968 is the type species of the genus Herpetosiphon, which in turn is the type genus of the family Herpetosiphonaceae, type family of the order Herpe- tosiphonales in the phylum Chloroflexi. H. aurantiacus cells are organized in filaments which can rapidly glide. The species is of interest not only because of its rather isolated position in the tree of life, but also because Herpetosiphon ssp. were identified as predators capable of facultative pre- dation by a wolf pack strategy and of degrading the prey organisms by excreted hydrolytic en- zymes. The genome of H. aurantiacus strain 114-95T is the first completely sequenced genome of a member of the family Herpetosiphonaceae. The 6,346,587 bp long chromosome and the two 339,639 bp and 99,204 bp long plasmids with a total of 5,577 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2005.

    Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nett, Markus [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Domin, Nicole [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Martin, Karin [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Maresca, Julia A. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Kerrie W. [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bryant, Donald A. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    460

    Long-lived filaments in fusion plasmas: review of observations and status of hypothesis of microdust-assembled skeletons  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A brief review is given of the progress in studying the long-lived filaments (LLFs) in fusion plasmas (tokamaks, Z-pinch, plasma focus). The paper reports on (i) resolving the fine structure of LLFs, and (ii) verification of our hypothesis (1998) which suggested the LLFs to possess a microsolid skeleton. The recent proof-of-concept studies showed the presence of tubular and cartwheel-like structures in (i) various dust deposits in tokamak T-10, in the range 10 nm - 10 mcm, and (ii) visible light images of plasma, in the range 100 mcm - 10 cm, at initial stage of discharge (e.g., before appearance of discharge electric current) in tokamak, plasma focus and vacuum spark. The topological similarity of the above structures (especially, "cartwheels") and the observed trend of assembling bigger tubules from smaller ones (i.e. the self-similarity) allow to draw a bridge between the microdust skeletons in the dust deposits and the centimeter scale LLFs in fusion plasmas.

    A. B. Kukushkin; V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov

    2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    Enhanced corrosion protective PANI-PAA/PEI multilayer composite coatings for 316SS by spin coating technique  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Abstract In the present study, polyaniline-polyacrylic acid/polyethyleneimine (PANI-PAA/PEI) composite coatings with a multilayer structure for corrosion protection of 316 stainless steels (316SS) were prepared by an alternate deposition. Spin coating combined with heating assists a removal of residual water that result in a linear increase in thickness with layer number (n). The combination of PANI-PAA composite with PEI and their multilayer structure provides a synergistic enhancement of corrosion resistance properties as determined by electrochemical measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution. Importantly, the PANI-PAA/PEI coating with an optimized layer number of n = 20 shows improved corrosion protection. The superior performance was attributed to the formation of an interfacial oxide layer as well as the multilayer structure that extend the diffusion pathway of corrosive ions

    Junaid Ali Syed; Hongbin Lu; Shaochun Tang; Xiangkang Meng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    462

    T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits 0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks September 19, 2011 - 8:45am Addthis PROBLEM Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks. PLATFORM: All versions of Director prior to 5.5.2.3 are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. reference LINKS: Blue Coat Advisories ID: SA62 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026061 Blue Coat Director 510 Blue Coat SGME 5 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: An attacker can use the HTTP TRACE method to echo malicious script back to the client as part of a Cross Site Scripting (XSS) attack. No

    463

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, August 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Objectives of this program are to provide an advanced thermal barrier coating system with improved reliability and temperature capability. This report describes the coating/deposition process, repair, and manufacturing.

    NONE

    1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    464

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Objectives of this program are to provide a thermal barrier coating system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art systems. This report describes the bond coat deposition process, manufacturing, and repair.

    NONE

    1996-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    465

    T-651: Blue Coat ProxySG Discloses Potentially Sensitive Information...  

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1: Blue Coat ProxySG Discloses Potentially Sensitive Information in Core Files T-651: Blue Coat ProxySG Discloses Potentially Sensitive Information in Core Files June 21, 2011 -...

    466

    Hygienic coatings by UV curing of diacrylic oligomers with added triclosan  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    Hygienic coatings have been obtained by UV photopolymerization of mixtures of urethane-diacrylate, tri-propylene-glycol diacrylate and 2,4,4?-trichloro-2?-hydroxydiphenylether (Triclosan). UV-dried coatings conta...

    Giuseppe Gozzelino…

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    467

    An X-ray study of residual macrostresses in protective coatings for gas-turbine blades  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    The x-ray method is used to determine residual macrostresses in the surface layer of protective coatings on high-temperature alloys. Coatings deposited by the high-energy vacuum-plasma (HEVP) method were subje...

    Yu. D. Yagodkin; K. M. Pastukhov; E. V. Milyaeva…

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    468

    Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion...

    469

    Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries....

    470

    Variation in Morphology, Hygroscopicity, and Optical Properties of Soot Particles Coated by Dicarboxylic Acids  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    particles upon coating with succinic and glutaric acids. The effective densities, fractal dimensions and dynamic shape factors of fresh and coated soot aerosol particles have been determined. Significant size-dependent increases of soot particle mobility...

    Xue, Huaxin

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    471

    Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    472

    E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced structural coatings Sample Search...  

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Materials Science 59 Nanoindentation and adhesion of sol-gel-derived hard coatings on polyester Summary: structure of the coatings. It is well known that the addi- tion of...

    473

    Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs  

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    474

    Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate Blends  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formation of Biomimetic Porous Calcium Phosphate Coatings on Surfaces of Polyethylene/Zinc Stearate phosphate coating, polyethylene Abstract Studies were undertaken investigating improvements presented in this paper concentrated on adding zinc stearate to polyethylene. Important potential benefits

    Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

    475

    Preparation and oxidation resistance of mullite/SiC coating for carbon materials at 1150 °C  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    To protect carbon materials from oxidation, mullite/SiC coatings were prepared on graphite by chemical vapor reaction (CVR) and slurry sintering. The XRD analyses show that the phase of the outer-layer coating is composed of SiO2 and mullite, and the inner-layer coating is mainly composed of ?-SiC. The anti-oxidation behavior of the coating and the Rockwell hardness (HRB) of the coating after oxidation were investigated. The oxidation test shows that the as-prepared multi-layer coating exhibits excellent anti-oxidation and thermal shock resistance at high temperature. After oxidation at 1150 °C for 109 h and thermal shock cycling between 1150 °C and room temperature for 12 times, the mass gain of the coated sample is 0.085%. Meanwhile, the indentation tests also demonstrate that the as-prepared coating has good bonding ability between the layers.

    Xin YANG; Zhe-an SU; Qi-zhong HUANG; Li-yuan CHAI

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    476

    Evidence of a bacterial carbonate coating on plaster samples subjected to the Calcite Bioconcept biomineralization technique  

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evidence of a bacterial carbonate coating on plaster samples subjected to the Calcite Bioconcept plaster samples. This substrate was chosen in order to unambiguously detect the bacterial carbonate production. Keywords: Coating; bioremediation; carbonate production; plaster; grazing incidence; X

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    477

    Tribological behavior of plasma spray coatings for marine diesel engine piston ring and cylinder liner  

    Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

    High-temperature wear characteristics between plasma spray coated piston rings and cylinder liners were investigated to find the optimum combination of coating materials using the disc-on-plate reciprocating w...

    Jong-Hyun Hwang; Myoung-Seoup Han…

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z