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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

AC Loss Reduction in Filamentized YBCO Coated Conductors with Virtual Transverse Cross-cuts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO)-based coated conductors under dc currents has improved significantly in recent years, filamentization is being investigated as a technique to reduce ac loss so that the 2nd generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) wires can also be utilized in various ac power applications such as cables, transformers and fault current limiters. Experimental studies have shown that simply filamentizing the superconducting layer is not effective enough to reduce ac loss because of incomplete flux penetration in between the filaments as the length of the tape increases. To introduce flux penetration in between the filaments more uniformly and further reduce the ac loss, virtual transverse cross-cuts were made in superconducting filaments of the coated conductors fabricated using the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method. The virtual transverse cross-cuts were formed by making cross-cuts (17 - 120 {micro}m wide) on the IBAD (ion beam assisted deposition)-MgO templates using laser scribing followed by depositing the superconducting layer ({approx} 0.6 {micro}m thick). AC losses were measured and compared for filamentized conductors with and without the cross-cuts under applied peak ac fields up to 100 mT. The results were analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of filament decoupling and the feasibility of using this method to achieve ac loss reduction.

Zhang, Yifei [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Ha, Tam T [ORNL; List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL; Chen, Y [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; X, Xiong, [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

Frazer, J.W.

1962-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

3

Aerogel-supported filament  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA); Johnson, III, Coleman V. (Dallas, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Aerogel-supported filament  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces. 6 Figs.

Wuest, C.R.; Tillotson, T.M.; Johnson, C.V. III

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Filament wound structure and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

Dritt, William S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gerth, Howard L. (Knoxville, TN); Knight, Jr., Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Pardue, Robert M. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Method for forming hermetic coatings for optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming hermetic coatings on optical fibers by hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition advantageously produces a desirable coating while maintaining the pristine strength of the pristine fiber. The hermetic coatings may be formed from a variety of substances, such as, for example, boron nitride and carbon.

Michalske, Terry A. (P.O. Box 1042, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rye, Robert R. (1304 Espanola NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Smith, William L. (9916 Fostoria Rd., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Studies on the dynamics of limited filaments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study on the dynamics of filaments in the presence of a diagnostic, conductive limiter is presented. Plasma filaments are coherent structures present in many fusion devices and transport a significant amount of particles ...

Bonde, Jeffrey David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Process for making silver metal filaments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for making filaments of metal compounds and more particularly to a process for making silver metal filaments. The United States Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC05-8421400 with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. awarded by the US Department of Energy.

Bamberger, C.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemical vapor deposition thin films as biopassivation coatings and directly patternable dielectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organosilicon thin films deposited by pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) were investigated as potential biopassivation coatings for neural probes. ...

Pryce Lewis, Hilton G. (Hilton Gavin), 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion Scientists Discover Secrets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion Scientists Discover Secrets of Turbulent Edge Transport American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: Plasma Blobs and Filaments: Fusion...

11

Filamentation laser femtoseconde IR : Interaction de deux filaments et Source de rayonnement secondaire longue distance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Les lasers femtoseconde amplifiés permettent grâce à leur très grande puissance d'étudier de nouveaux phénomènes physiques tels que la filamentation laser, le faisceau laser se… (more)

Durand, Magali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Experimental study of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect

The filamentation instability can lead to regions of increased laser intensity when a spatially nonuniform laser beam interacts with a plasma. An experimental technique will be described which identifies the density perturbation produced by filaments. The growth of filaments has been investigated and, when the laser intensity is large enough, the transverse density profile of the filament can be measured. Evidence of filament growth influenced by plasma flow and density gradients is presented. 19 refs., 4 figs.

Young, P.E.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000/sup 0/C with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

Riley, R.E.; Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

1979-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Preparation and uses of amorphous boron carbide coated substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cloth is coated at a temperature below about 1000.degree. C. with amorphous boron-carbon deposits in a process which provides a substantially uniform coating on all the filaments making up each yarn fiber bundle of the cloth. The coated cloths can be used in the as-deposited condition for example as wear surfaces where high hardness values are needed; or multiple layers of coated cloths can be hot-pressed to form billets useful for example in fusion reactor wall armor. Also provided is a method of controlling the atom ratio of B:C of boron-carbon deposits onto any of a variety of substrates, including cloths.

Riley, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

SOLAR MAGNETIZED 'TORNADOES': RELATION TO FILAMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar magnetized 'tornadoes', a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but are rooted in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar 'tornadoes' (two papers which focused on different aspects of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters and Nature, respectively, during the revision of this Letter). A detailed case study of two events indicates that they are rotating vertical magnetic structures probably driven by underlying vortex flows in the photosphere. They usually exist as a group and are related to filaments/prominences, another important solar phenomenon whose formation and eruption are still mysteries. Solar tornadoes may play a distinct role in the supply of mass and twists to filaments. These findings could lead to a new explanation of filament formation and eruption.

Su Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela [IGAM-Kanzelhoehe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Wang Tongjiang [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gan Weiqun, E-mail: yang.su@uni-graz.at [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture  

SciTech Connect

An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

Johnson, Edward A. (Bedford, MA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bioactive Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Tailoring the Surface Properties of Parylene Biocompatible Coating: Martina Cihova1; Quoc Nguyen2; Varshni Singh2; 1Karlsruhe Institute of ...

18

Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo M. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttram, Malcolm T. (Sandia Park, NM); Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Helgeson, Wesley D. (Albuquerque, NM); O' Malley, Martin W. (Edgewood, NM); Hjalmarson, Harold P. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Chow, Weng W. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Intergalactic Filaments as Isothermal Gas Cylinders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a cosmological simulation at redshift 5, we find that the baryon-rich cores of intergalactic filaments radiating from galaxies commonly form isothermal gas cylinders. The central gas density is typically about 500 times the cosmic mean total density, and the temperature is typically 1-2 times 10^4 K, just above the Lyman alpha cooling floor. These findings argue that the hydrodynamic properties of the gas are more important than the dark matter in determining the structure. Filaments form a major pipeline for the transport of gas into the centers of galaxies. Since the temperature and ionization state of the gas completely determine the mass per unit length of an isothermal gas cylinder, our findings suggest a constraint upon gas transport into galaxies by this mechanism.

Harford, A Gayler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Environmental Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009... thermal cycle lifetime when compared to conventional EB-PVD coatings. ... widely used on turbine engine blades/vanes as stand-alone overlayers. .... thin film provides a flexible, low-cost platform for surface engineering.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Plasma planar filament instability and Alfven waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inhomogeneous plasmas filaments instabilities are investigated by using the techniques of classical differential geometry of curves where Frenet torsion and curvature describe completely the motion of curves. In our case the Frenet frame changes in time and also depends upon the other coordinates taking into account the inhomogeneity of the plasma. The exponential perturbation method so commonly used to describe cosmological perturbatons is applied to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma equations to find longitudinal modes describing Alfven waves propagation modes describing plasma waves in the medium. Stability is investigated in the imaginary axis of the spectra of complex frequencies ${\\omega}$ or $Im(\\omega)\

Garcia de Andrade

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kinesin-8 motors affect the length of dynamic microtubules in cells is less clear. We study the more biologically realistic problem of microtubule dynamic instability modulated by a motor-dependent increase in the filament catastrophe frequency. This leads to a significant decrease in the mean filament length and a narrowing of the filament length distribution. The results improve our understanding of the biophysics of length regulation in cells.

Hui-Shun Kuan; M. D. Betterton

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Effect of filament power removal on a fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques are used to measure the effects of removing the filament power from a two-lamp, F-40, rapid-start fluorescent lamp system. The changes are measured for a standard CBM core-coil ballast and for a solid-state ballast operating the lamp at high frequency. There is a 4 tp 6% increase in system efficacy when the filament power is removed. Removal of filament power also decreases filament temperature from 1000/sup 0/C to below 700/sup 0/C in lamps operated at 60 Hz, and from above 600/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C in lamps operated at high frequency. The study shows that the arc current and anode fall also determine filament temperature.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14 Compositions of unmelted frit batches for high-temperature service silicate-based coatings...Sodium nitrate 5.0 4.0 4.4 . . . 3.8 . . . . . . Fluorspar 4.5 3.2 2.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . . . Tricobalt tetroxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.5 . . . . . . Nickel oxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.6 . . . . . . Manganese dioxide 1.8 . . . 1.1 . . . 1.1 . . . . . . Barium carbonate . . . . . . . . . 26.3 . . . 56.6 56.6...

25

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

27

Investigation of thermal filamentation instability over Gakona, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal filamentation instability has been invoked to explain the formation of parallel plate waveguides in mid-latitude ionospheric plasmas during Arecibo, Puerto Rico heating experiments in 1997. The geometry of the ...

Cohen, Joel (Joel A.), S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Paint Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Test requirements and time to failure of various coatings...20â??30 0.8â??1.2 150 200â??500 Light zinc phosphate+lacquer paint 23â??28 0.9â??1.1 120 150â??250 Dry film lubrication, air cured 8â??13 0.3â??0.5 â?¦ 50â??100 Heavy zinc phosphate+dry film lubrication, baked 12â??25 0.5â??1.0 100 500â??1000 CARC topcoat 46â??56 1.8â??2.2 â?¦ 25â??50 Light zinc phosphate+CARC primer+topcoat 76â??127 3â??5...

29

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and particularly to the surface of the coating. The pinning action keeps the oil from leeching out of the coating, even when the ...

30

Evolution of Genes and Gene Networks in Filamentous Fungi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pezizomycotina, commonly known as the filamentous fungi, are a diverse group of organisms that have a major impact on human life. The filamentous fungi diverged from a common ancestor approximately 200 – 700 million years ago. Because of the diversity and the wealth of biological and genomic tools for the filamentous fungi it is possible to track the evolutionary history of genes and gene networks in these organisms. In this dissertation I focus on the evolution of two genes (lolC and lolD) in the LOL secondary metabolite gene cluster in Epichloë and Neotyphodium genera, the evolution of the MAP kinase-signaling cascade in the filamentous fungi, the regulation of the gene networks involved in asexual development in Neurospora crassa, and the identification of two genes in the N. crassa asexual development gene network, acon-2 and acon-3. I find that lolC and lolD originated as an ancient duplication in the ancestor of the filamentous fungi, which were later recruited in the LOL gene cluster in the fungal endophyte lineage. In the MAP kinase-signaling cascade, I find that the MAPK component is the most central gene in the gene network. I also find that the MAPK signaling cascade originated as three copies in the ancestor to eukaryotes, an arrangement that is maintained in filamentous fungi. My observations of gene expression profiling during N. crassa asexual development show tissue specific expression of genes. Both the vegetative mycelium and the aerial hyphae contribute to the formation of macroconidiophores. Also, with the help of genomic tools recently developed by researchers in the filamentous fungal community, I identified NCU00478 and NCU07617 as the genes with mutations responsible for two aconidial strains of N. crassa, acon-2 and acon-3 respectively.

Greenwald, Charles Joaquin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Apparatus for coating powders  

SciTech Connect

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and resistant to environmental damage from ingested sand particles ( categorized ... A Study on the Hot Corrosion Resistance of Metal-cemet-glass Coating on ...

33

Intensity clamping in the filament of femtosecond laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

We have studied numerically the evolution of the light field intensity and induced refractive index of a medium upon filamentation of femtosecond laser radiation in air. It is shown that the intensity clamping results from the dynamic balance of optical powers of nonlinear lenses, induced by radiation due to the Kerr nonlinearity of air, and laser plasma produced during photoionisation. We have found the relation between the peak values of the light field intensity and the electron density in laser-produced plasma, as well as the transverse sizes of the filament and the plasma channel. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

Kandidov, V P; Fedorov, V Yu; Tverskoi, O V; Kosareva, O G; Chin, S L

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Zipping mechanism for force-generation by growing filament bundles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the force generation by polymerizing bundles of filaments, which form because of short-range attractive filament interactions. We show that bundles can generate forces by a zipping mechanism, which is not limited by buckling and operates in the fully buckled state. The critical zipping force, i.e. the maximal force that a bundle can generate, is given by the adhesive energy gained during bundle formation. For opposing forces larger than the critical zipping force, bundles undergo a force-induced unbinding transition. For larger bundles, the critical zipping force depends on the initial configuration of the bundles. Our results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

Torsten Kuehne; Reinhard Lipowsky; Jan Kierfeld

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

35

Zipping mechanism for force-generation by growing filament bundles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the force generation by polymerizing bundles of filaments, which form because of short-range attractive filament interactions. We show that bundles can generate forces by a zipping mechanism, which is not limited by buckling and operates in the fully buckled state. The critical zipping force, i.e. the maximal force that a bundle can generate, is given by the adhesive energy gained during bundle formation. For opposing forces larger than the critical zipping force, bundles undergo a force-induced unbinding transition. For larger bundles, the critical zipping force depends on the initial configuration of the bundles. Our results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

Kuehne, Torsten; Kierfeld, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Time-dependent simulations of filament propagation in photoconducting switches  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a model for investigating filamentary structures observed in laser-triggered photoswitches. The model simulates electrons and holes in two-dimensional cylindrical (r-z) geometry, with realistic electron and hole mobilities and field dependent impact ionization. Because of the large range of spatial and temporal scales to be resolved, they are using an explicit approach with fast, direct solution of the field equation. A flux limiting scheme is employed to avoid the time-step constraint due to the short time for resistive relaxation in the high density filament. Self-consistent filament propagation with speeds greater than the carrier drift velocity are observed in agreement with experiments.

Rambo, P.W.; Lawson, W.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Capps, C.D.; Falk, R.A. [Boeing Defense & Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

UT-B ID 201002370 06.2012 Technology Summary Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and ...

38

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

39

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

40

Coating Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Powder  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a method of modifying existing coating techniques to include a bonded superhydrophobic outer coating layer. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Structural and mechanical properties of intermediate filaments under extreme conditions and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected ...

Qin, Zhao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Closed-loop controlled filament stretching and break-up of polymer solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constant true (radial) strain rate filament stretching experiment has been the Holy Grail of extensional rheological studies. These experiments are performed on a Filament Stretching Extensional Rheometer (FiSER). A ...

Yeh, Roger, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of five different types, NIF possess common structural features, including a conserved alpha-helical central rod domain of NIF in the presence of NF-L (Zackroff et al., 1982; Hisanaga and Hirokawa, 1988; Balin and Lee, 1991

Goldman, Robert D.

46

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

47

X-ray and Optical Filaments in M87  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare a very deep X-ray image of M87, at the center of the Virgo Cluster, to high-quality optical images of the low excitation emission-line gas in the same region. There are striking coincidences of detail between the two. We explore the possiblity that this represents a thermal interaction between hot gas at 10^7 K and warm gas at 10^4 K. We find two temperatures are present in the X-ray gas, with the lower more prevelant in the vicinity of the optical filaments. Electron conduction from the hot phase to the cooler one provides a quantitatively acceptable energy source for the optical filaments, and we show additionally that it can do so for the brightest X-ray cluster, Perseus. If operative, conduction in the presence of gas-rich galaxy mergers, may explain the presence of "cool cores" in clusters of galaxies.

William B. Sparks; Megan Donahue; Andres Jordan; Laura Ferrarese; Patrick Cote

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tag: coat drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 49

    Recent Approaches and Challenges in Smart Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Self-healing coatings -Self-cleaning and superhydrophobic coatings - Chemical Conversion Coatings - Nano- and Micro-capsules Based Polymer Coatings

    50

    Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source  

    SciTech Connect

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Wells, Russell P. (Kensington, CA); Craven, Glen E. (Fremont, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    51

    Field Guide: Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has numerous products to help plant personnel meet the challenges of working with aging systems, structures, and components, but none that comprehensively address protective coatings and linings. This field guide provides a compilation of protective coating and lining information in a form that allows the user to have a ready reference available during condition assessment of the various protective coatings and linings used in the plant.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    52

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    53

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    54

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes assessments of ceramic and thermal spray coatings that have advanced significantly or recently been marketed for use in the utility boiler industry to reduce slagging, mitigate fireside corrosion and potentially, circumferential cracking due to cyclic temperature variations. These innovations promise to enhance coating quality as well as reduce time and labor required to protect large areas of the boiler waterwalls. Coatings may also enable plants to improve production rates; thereb...

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    55

    Polymeric and Conversion Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Ongoing research reveals that the search for appropriate conversion ... of the coated alloy was ~ 250 mV more noble compared to bare alloy.

    56

    Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

    57

    COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    58

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59

    Alternate Coating Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The cold spray process can prepare thick coatings (> 1 cm) with many ... protection, thermal insulation, thermal dissipation, wear resistance, ...

    60

    Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    61

    Thermal barrier coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    62

    Chemical Conversion Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 16   Applications of aluminum using chemical conversion coatings...doors 6063 Acrylic paint (b) Cans 3004 Sanitary lacquer Fencing 6061 None applied Chromate conversion coatings Aircraft fuselage skins 7075 clad with 7072 Zinc chromate primer Electronic chassis 6061-T4 None applied Cast missile bulkhead 356-T6 None applied Screen 5056 clad with 6253 Clear varnish...

    63

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    64

    Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    65

    LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    66

    Laser Processing and Hard Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013 ... Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II: Laser Processing and Hard Coatings Sponsored by: TMS Materials ...

    67

    Rotating-filaments-pairs in a hexagonal superlattice state in dielectric barrier discharge  

    SciTech Connect

    Rotating-filaments-pairs in a hexagonal superlattice state (HSS) are studied in a dielectric barrier discharge system. The evolution and phase diagrams of HSS are given. The wavelength of HSS and the mean diameter of the two rotating filaments all decrease with the increase of applied voltage. The instantaneous orientations of rotating-filaments-pairs are equal probability approximately. There is a larger peak and a smaller one in both the probability density functions of the rotation speed ({omega}) of rotating filaments and that of the distance (D) between two rotating filaments. According to the fitting curves of ln{omega}{sup 2} vs. lnD, {omega}{sup 2} is inversely proportional to D{sup 7}. The rotation of filaments is discussed theoretically by the force among surface charges.

    Dong Lifang; Yang Yujie; Li Ben; Fan Weili; Song Qian [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China) and Hebei Key Laboratory of Optic-electronic Information Materials, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    68

    Structure and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline filaments  

    SciTech Connect

    The formation of stable freely suspended filaments is an interesting peculiarity of some liquid crystal phases. So far, little is known about their structure and stability. Similarly to free-standing smectic films, an internal molecular structure of the mesophase stabilizes these macroscopically well-ordered objects with length to diameter ratios of 10{sup 3} and above. In this paper, we report observations of smectic liquid crystal fibers formed by bent-shaped molecules in different mesophases. Our study, employing several experimental techniques, focuses on mechanical and structural aspects of fiber formation such as internal structure, stability, and mechanical and optical properties.

    Eremin, Alexey; Nemes, Alexandru; Stannarius, Ralf; Schulz, Mario; Nadasi, Hajnalka; Weissflog, Wolfgang [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, FNW/ IEP/ ANP, Postfach 4120, D-39016 Magdeburg (Germany); LKA Sachsen-Anhalt, Postfach 180165, D-39028 Magdeburg (Germany); Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Muehlpforte 1, D-06108 Halle (Germany)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    69

    Simulation of filamentation instability of a current-carrying plasma by particle in cell method  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma in the diffusion frequency region is studied using particle in cell simulation. The effects of electron thermal motion and ion-neutral collision on the evolution of this instability in the nonlinear stage of the filaments coalescence are discussed. It is found that the coalescence of the current filaments is enhanced by increasing the temperature and is delayed by increasing the collision frequency.

    Niknam, A. R.; Mostafavi, P. S.; Komaizi, D.; Salahshoor, M. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    70

    Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    71

    Topological Defects, Surface Geometry and Cohesive Energy of Twisted Filament Bundles  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Cohesive assemblies of filaments are a common structural motif found in diverse contexts, ranging from biological materials such as fibrous proteins, to artificial materials such as carbon nanotube ropes and micropatterned filament arrays. In this paper, we analyze the complex dependence of cohesive energy on twist, a key structural parameter of both self-assembled and fabricated filament bundles. Based on the analysis of simulated ground states of cohesive bundles, we show that the non-linear influence of twist derives from two distinct geometric features of twisted bundles: (i) the geometrical frustration of inter-filament packing in the bundle cross-section; and (ii) the evolution of the surface geometry of bundles with twist, which dictates the cohesive cost of non-contacting filaments at the surface. Packing frustration in the bundle core gives rise to the appearance of a universal sequence of topological defects, excess 5-fold disclinations, with increasing twist, while the evolution of filament contact at the surface of the bundle generically favors twisted geometries for sufficiently long filaments. Our analysis of both continuum and discrete models of filament bundles shows that, even in the absence of external torque or intrinsic chirality, cohesive energy universally favors twisted ground states above a critical (length/radius) aspect ratio and below a critical filament stiffness threshold.

    Isaac R. Bruss; Gregory M. Grason

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    72

    Dust-acoustic filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The thermal motion effect of charged particles in the filamentation of a current-driven dusty plasma in the dust-acoustic frequency region is investigated by using the Lorentz transformed conductivity of the dusty plasma components and the total dielectric permittivity tensor of the dusty plasma in the laboratory frame. Obtaining the dispersion relation for dust-acoustic waves and considering the filamentation instability, the establishment time of the filamentation structure and the instability development threshold are derived. Moreover, it is shown that the current layer divides into separate current filaments.

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Haghtalab, T. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand, 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran, 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    73

    Tailoring the filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses with periodic lattices  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We show numerically that by using periodic lattices the filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses, otherwise a result of competing nonlinear effects, can be well controlled with respect to its properties. The diffraction induced by the lattice provides a regularizing mechanism to the nonlinear self-action effects involved in filamentation. We demonstrate a new propagation regime of intense lattice solitons bridging the field of spatial solitons with that of femtosecond laser filamentation. The effective filamentation control is expected to have an important impact on numerous applications.

    Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Efremidis, N. K. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    74

    CAN OVERTURNING MOTIONS IN PENUMBRAL FILAMENTS BE DETECTED?  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Numerical simulations indicate that the filamentation of sunspot penumbrae and the associated systematic outflow (the Evershed effect) are due to convectively driven fluid motions constrained by the inclined magnetic field. We investigate whether these motions, in particular the upflows in the bright filaments and the downflows at their edges, can be reliably observed with existing instrumentation. We use a snapshot from a sunspot simulation to calculate two-dimensional maps of synthetic line profiles for the spectral lines Fe I 7090.4 A and C I 5380.34 A. The maps are spatially and spectrally degraded according to typical instrument properties. Line-of-sight velocities are determined from line bisector shifts. We find that the detectability of the convective flows is strongly affected by spatial smearing, particularly so for the downflows. Furthermore, the line-of-sight velocities are dominated by the Evershed flow unless the observation is made very near the disk center. These problems may have compromised recent attempts to detect overturning penumbral convection. Lines with a low formation height are best suited for detecting the convective flows.

    Bharti, Lokesh; Schuessler, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Rempel, Matthias, E-mail: bharti@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    75

    Superhydrophic Coatings - ORNL  

    The result is a coating which causes liquids to “bead up” on the surface of a ... Brian R. D’Urson and John T. Simpson, ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC

    76

    Coating Manufacturing Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 30, 2013 ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low emissivity ... Finally, specific functional applications such as electrical contact and coatings on ... The study is supported by RFBR, research project No.

    77

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    78

    Spin coating apparatus  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

    Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    79

    METAL COATING BATHS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    80

    Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    81

    Actin filament segmentation using spatiotemporal active- surface and active-contour models  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We introduce a novel algorithm for actin filament segmentation in a 2D TIRFM image sequence. We treat the 2D time-lapse sequence as a 3D image volume and propose an over-grown active surface model to segment the body of a filament on all slices simultaneously. ...

    Hongsheng Li; Tian Shen; Dimitrios Vavylonis; Xiaolei Huang

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    82

    Three-halves harmonic emission from a laser filament in a plasma channel  

    SciTech Connect

    A self-trapped laser filament is susceptible to decay-producing radially localized Langmuir waves. A nonlinear interaction of the pump wave with the density oscillation at the Langmuir frequency gives rise to three-halves harmonic emissions. Using a basis-function expansion technique, the emitted power in the backward direction is obtained. It decreases with the increasing size of the filament.

    Mishra, G.; Talukdar, I.; Tripathi, V.; Tripathi, V.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    83

    Powering The Intra-cluster Filaments in Cool-Core Clusters of Galaxies  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The first radio surveys of the sky discovered that some large clusters of galaxies contained powerful sources of synchrotron emission. Optical images showed that long linear filaments with bizarre emission-line spectra permeated the intra-cluster medium. Recent observations in the infrared and radio show that these filaments have very strong emission lines of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The mass of molecular material is quite large, the gas is quite warm, and the filaments have not formed stars despite their ~Gyr age. I will discuss the general astrophysical context of large clusters of galaxies and how large masses of molecular gas can be heated to produce what we observe. The unique properties of the filaments are a result of the unique environment. Magnetically confined molecular filaments are surrounded by the hot intra-cluster medium. Thermal particles with keV energies enter atomic and molecular regions and produce a shower of secondary nonthermal electrons. These secondaries collisionally h...

    Ferland, Gary J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    84

    Formation and evolution of interstellar filaments; Hints from velocity dispersion measurements  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We investigate the gas velocity dispersions of a sample of filaments recently detected as part of the Herschel Gould Belt Survey in the IC5146, Aquila, and Polaris interstellar clouds. To measure these velocity dispersions, we use 13CO, C18O, and N2H+ line observations obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. Correlating our velocity dispersion measurements with the filament column densities derived from Herschel data, we show that interstellar filaments can be divided into two regimes: thermally subcritical filaments, which have transonic velocity dispersions (c_s ~dispersions scaling roughly as the square root of column density (\\sigma_tot ~ \\Sigma^0.5), and are self-gravitating. The higher velocity dispersions of supercritical filaments may not directly arise from supersonic interstellar turbulence but may be driven by gravitational contraction/accretion...

    Arzoumanian, Doris; Peretto, Nicolas; Konyves, Vera

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    85

    Filament and Flare Detection in H{\\alpha} image sequences  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Solar storms can have a major impact on the infrastructure of the earth. Some of the causing events are observable from ground in the H{\\alpha} spectral line. In this paper we propose a new method for the simultaneous detection of flares and filaments in H{\\alpha} image sequences. Therefore we perform several preprocessing steps to enhance and normalize the images. Based on the intensity values we segment the image by a variational approach. In a final postprecessing step we derive essential properties to classify the events and further demonstrate the performance by comparing our obtained results to the data annotated by an expert. The information produced by our method can be used for near real-time alerts and the statistical analysis of existing data by solar physicists.

    Riegler, Gernot; Pötzi, Werner; Veronig, Astrid

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    86

    Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

    Splettstoesser, Thomas [University of Heidelberg; Holmes, Kenneth [Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg, Germany; Noe, Frank [DFG Research Center Matheon, FU Berlin, Germany; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    87

    METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    88

    Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    89

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    90

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    91

    Nontoxic foul-release coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at Daytona Beach, Florida. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    92

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    93

    EVIDENCE OF FILAMENT UPFLOWS ORIGINATING FROM INTENSITY OSCILLATIONS ON THE SOLAR SURFACE  

    SciTech Connect

    A filament footpoint rooted in an active region (NOAA 11032) was well observed for about 78 minutes with the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory on 2009 November 18 in H{alpha} {+-}0.75 A. This data set had high cadence ({approx}15 s) and high spatial resolution ({approx}0.''1) and offered a unique opportunity to study filament dynamics. As in previous findings from space observations, several dark intermittent upflows were identified, and they behave in groups at isolated locations along the filament. However, we have two new findings. First, we find that the dark upflows propagating along the filament channel are strongly associated with the intensity oscillations on the solar surface around the filament footpoints. The upflows start at the same time as the peak in the oscillations, illustrating that the upflow velocities are well correlated with the oscillations. Second, the intensity of one of the seven upflows detected in our data set exhibits a clear periodicity when the upflow propagates along the filament. The periods gradually vary from {approx}10 to {approx}5 minutes. Our results give observational clues on the driving mechanism of the upflows in the filament.

    Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R. [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd., Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Ning, Zongjun; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92316 (United States); Ji Haisheng, E-mail: wcao@bbso.njit.ed [Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    94

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    95

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

    96

    Superhydrophobic Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Technology Marketing Summary ORNL researchers have developed a variety of materials and processes to produce coatings with superhydrophobic properties ...

    97

    Understanding Compatibilities between Advanced Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    98

    Coating method for graphite  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    99

    Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

    SciTech Connect

    Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    100

    Measurements of the Motion of Plasma Filaments in a Plasma Ball  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Measurements were made of the motion of the filamentary structures in a plasma ball using high speed cameras and other optical detectors. These filaments traverse the ball radially at ~106 cm/sec at the driving frequency of ~26 kHz, and drift upward through the ball at ~1 cm/sec. Varying the applied high voltage and frequency caused the number, length, and diameter of the filaments to change. A custom plasma ball was constructed to observe the effects of varying gas pressure and species on the filament structures.

    M. Campanell, J. Laird, T. Provost, S. Vasquez, S.J. Zweben

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    101

    Boundary-induced orientation of dynamic filament networks and vesicle agglomerations  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We find a statistical mechanism that can adjust orientations of intracellular filaments to cell geometry in absence of organizing centers. The effect is based on random and isotropic filament (de-)polymerization dynamics and is independent of filament interactions and explicit regulation. It can be understood by an analogy to electrostatics and appears to be induced by the confining boundaries; for periodic boundary conditions no orientational bias emerges. Including active transport of particles, the model reproduces experimental observations of vesicle accumulations in transected axons.

    Philip Greulich; Ludger Santen

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    102

    Formation of Solar Filaments by Steady and Nonsteady Chromospheric Heating  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    It has been established that cold plasma condensations can form in a magnetic loop subject to localized heating of the footpoints. In this paper, we use grid-adaptive numerical simulations of the radiative hydrodynamic equations to parametrically investigate the filament formation process in a pre-shaped loop with both steady and finite-time chromospheric heating. Compared to previous works, we consider low-lying loops with shallow dips, and use a more realistic description for the radiative losses. We demonstrate for the first time that the onset of thermal instability satisfies the linear instability criterion. The onset time of the condensation is roughly \\sim 2 hr or more after the localized heating at the footpoint is effective, and the growth rate of the thread length varies from 800 km hr-1 to 4000 km hr-1, depending on the amplitude and the decay length scale characterizing this localized chromospheric heating. We show how single or multiple condensation segments may form in the coronal portion. In th...

    Xia, C; Keppens, R; van Marle, A J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    103

    Patterns and intrinsic fluctuations in semi-dilute motor-filament systems.  

    SciTech Connect

    We perform Brownian dynamics simulations of molecular motor-induced ordering and structure formations in semi-dilute cytoskeletal filament solutions. In contrast to the previously studied dilute case where binary filament interactions prevail, the semi-dilute regime is characterized by multiple motor-mediated interactions. Moreover, the forces and torques exerted by motors on filaments are intrinsically fluctuating quantities. We incorporate the influences of thermal and motor fluctuations into our model as additive and multiplicative noises, respectively. Numerical simulations reveal that filament bundles and vortices emerge from a disordered initial state. Subsequent analysis of motor noise effects reveals: (i) Pattern formation is very robust against fluctuations in motor force; (ii) bundle formation is associated with a significant reduction of the motor fluctuation contributions; (iii) the time scale of vortex formation and coalescence decreases with increases in motor noise amplitude.

    Swaminathan, S.; Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.; Karpeev, D.; Northwestern Univ.; UMR CNRS Gulliver

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    104

    Nonlinear competition between asters and stripes in filament-motor-systems  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A model for polar filaments interacting via molecular motor complexes is investigated which exhibits bifurcations to spatial patterns. It is shown that the homogeneous distribution of filaments, such as actin or microtubules, may become either unstable with respect to an orientational instability of a finite wave number or with respect to modulations of the filament density, where long wavelength modes are amplified as well. Above threshold nonlinear interactions select either stripe patterns or periodic asters. The existence and stability ranges of each pattern close to threshold are predicted in terms of a weakly nonlinear perturbation analysis, which is confirmed by numerical simulations of the basic model equations. The two relevant parameters determining the bifurcation scenario of the model can be related to the concentrations of the active molecular motors and of the filaments respectively, which both could be easily regulated by the cell.

    Falko Ziebert; Walter Zimmermann

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    105

    The splitted laser beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The splitted beam filamentation in interaction of laser and an exponential decay inhomogeneous underdense plasma is investigated. Based on Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation and paraxial/nonparaxial ray theory, simulation results show that the steady beam width and single beam filamentation along the propagation distance in paraxial case is due to the influence of ponderomotive nonlinearity. In nonparaxial case, the influence of the off-axial of {alpha}{sub 00} and {alpha}{sub 02} (the departure of the beam from the Gaussian nature) and S{sub 02} (the departure from the spherical nature) results in more complicated ponderomotive nonlinearity and changing of the channel density and refractive index, which led to the formation of two/three splitted beam filamentation and the self-distortion of beam width. In addition, influence of several parameters on two/three splitted beam filamentation is discussed.

    Xia Xiongping; Yi Lin [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu Bin [Department of Mathematics and Information Sciences, North China Institute of Water Conservancy and Hydroelectric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Lu Jianduo [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    106

    EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL  

    SciTech Connect

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Organization ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Okamoto, T. J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Otsuji, K., E-mail: lites@ucar.ed [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    107

    Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

    108

    Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    109

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is well known that fireside corrosion of waterwall panels in coal-fired boilers increased with the introduction of low NOx combustion systems since the early 1980s. This report describes ongoing work to evaluate protective coating solutions used to mitigate the wastage due to corrosion, and to determine which provide the greatest resistance to the circumferential cracking phenomena. It includes recent laboratory corrosion assisted thermal fatigue tests and analyses of field-exposed samples of ...

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    110

    Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    111

    UV Curable Coatings -- Marketing Kit  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Ultra violet (UV) curable coatings are being successfully applied to electric motors, metal shafts, cell phones, printing, plastic packaging, and wood laminates. Demand is expected to expand to an even greater number of end products as issues related to environmental well-being, finish quality, cost reductions, and manufacturing efficiencies drive this market. This UV Curable Coatings-Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel present UV curable coating opportunities to custo...

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    112

    Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods  

    SciTech Connect

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    113

    Thermal and Cold Sprayed Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013... Coating Evaluated by Micro and Nano Indentation: Meysam Keshavarz1; Mohd Hasbullah bin Hj.Idris1; 1UTM,Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

    114

    Carbonaceous film coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    115

    Coated ceramic breeder materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A lithium containing ceramic breeder material is described which is coated with a neutron multiplier such as Beryllium (Be), Beryllium Oxide (BeO), or other material having a higher thermal conductivity than the lithium ceramic material itself. In addition to exhibiting certain thermal conductivity properties, the neutron multiplier must be capable of withstanding the high temperatures (700/sup 0/ to 1300/sup 0/K) experienced in a breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. State of the art considerations have indicated several possible configurations for the lithium containing ceramic breeders, including a sphere-pac arrangement or sintered pellets or blocks. When one adds a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO into a sphere-pac bed of lithium containing ceramic breeders, current concepts include mixing the neutron multiplier randomly into the sphere-pac bed in the form of small spheres of a size comparable to that of the lithium ceramic particles. The present invention shows that a sphere-pac bed of breeder particles coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be and BeO has an improved thermal conductivity when compared with that of a bed of uncoated breeder particles randomly mixed with Be or BeO spheres having the same breeder/multiplier composition ratio.

    Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1986-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    116

    SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS OF LARGE-AMPLITUDE LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN A SOLAR FILAMENT  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We present the first Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of the large-amplitude longitudinal (LAL) oscillations in the south and north parts (SP and NP) of a solar filament on 2012 April 7. Both oscillations are triggered by flare activities close to the filament. The period varies with filamentary threads, ranging from 44 to 67 minutes. The oscillations of different threads are out of phase, and their velocity amplitudes vary from 30 to 60 km s{sup -1}, with a maximum displacement of about 25 Mm. The oscillations of the SP repeat for about four cycles without any significant damping and then a nearby C2.4 flare causes the transition from the LAL oscillations of the filament to its later eruption. The filament eruption is also associated with a coronal mass ejection and a B6.8 flare. However, the oscillations of the NP damp with time and die out at last. Our observations show that the activated part of the SP repeatedly shows a helical motion. This indicates that the magnetic structure of the filament is possibly modified during this process. We suggest that the restoring force is the coupling of the magnetic tension and gravity.

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    117

    Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    118

    Thin film ion conducting coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    119

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings | Department...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV)...

    120

    Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... This brief article covers the uses of abradable coatings, their development and their function. Wear at high speed, effect of tip width and coating ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    121

    Solar selective absorption coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron ...

    122

    Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments | U.S. DOE Office  

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Genetic Regulation of Differentiated Microbial Filaments Discovering how a microbe makes complex structures to perform complex functions. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

    123

    Self-compression by femtosecond pulse filamentation: Experiments versus numerical simulations  

    SciTech Connect

    We analyze pulse self-compression in femtosecond filaments, both experimentally and numerically. We experimentally demonstrate the compression of 45 fs pulses down to a duration of 7.4 fs at millijoule pulse energies. This sixfold compression in a self-generated filament does not require any means for dispersion compensation and is highly efficient. We compare our results to numerical simulations, providing a complete propagation model that accounts for full dispersion, pressure variations, Kerr nonlinearity and plasma generation in multiphoton and tunnel regimes. The equations are numerically integrated and allow for a quantitative comparison with the experiment. Our experiments and numerical simulations reveal a characteristic spectrotemporal structure of the self-compressed pulses, consisting of a compressible blue wing and an incompressible red pedestal. We explain the underlying mechanism that leads to this structure and examine the scalability of filament self-compression with respect to pulse energy and gas pressure.

    Skupin, Stefan; Berge, Luc [Departement de Physique Theorique et Appliquee, CEA-DAM/Ile de France, B.P. 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Stibenz, Gero; Sokollik, Thomas; Schnuerer, Matthias; Zhavoronkov, Nickolai; Steinmeyer, Guenter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Lederer, Falk [Institute for Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    124

    Mesoscopic model for filament orientation in growing actin networks: the role of obstacle geometry  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Propulsion by growing actin networks is a universal mechanism used in many different biological systems. Although the core molecular machinery for actin network growth is well preserved in most cases, the geometry of the propelled obstacle can vary considerably. In recent years, filament orientation distribution has emerged as an important observable characterizing the structure and dynamical state of the growing network. Here we derive several continuum equations for the orientation distribution of filaments growing behind stiff obstacles of various shapes and validate the predicted steady state orientation patterns by stochastic computer simulations based on discrete filaments. We use an ordinary differential equation approach to demonstrate that for flat obstacles of finite size, two fundamentally different orientation patterns peaked at either +35/-35 or +70/0/-70 degrees exhibit mutually exclusive stability, in agreement with earlier results for flat obstacles of very large lateral extension. We calculat...

    Weichsel, Julian; 10.1088/1367-2630/15/3/035006

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    125

    Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits.

    Im, Kwan H. (Naperville, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Burr Ridge, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    126

    Heat transfer mechanism with thin filaments including ceramic high temperature heat exchanger  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A radiative heat transfer mechanism in a furnace is described having burners through which pulverized coal and air are burned producing combustion gases and contaminants. A plurality of elongated conduits are positioned inside the furnace proximate to the burners generally parallel to the flow of combustion gases in the furnace. A plurality of thin filaments are inside each of the elongated hollow conduits, the filaments having diameters in the range of from about 1 micrometer to about 1,000 micrometers and having an infrared radiation cross-section sufficient to cause the filaments to heat upon exposure to infrared radiation. Blower mechanism is associated with the elongated conduits for limiting the amount of soot and ash which deposit on the conduits to preserve the radiative and convective transfer of heat energy from the combustion gases to the conduits. 7 figs.

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    127

    NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE MODELING OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A SOLAR FILAMENT  

    SciTech Connect

    We present a striking filament pattern in the nonlinear force-free (NLFF) chromospheric magnetic field of the active region NOAA 10956. The NLFF chromospheric field is extrapolated from the Hinode high-resolution photospheric vector magnetogram using the weighted optimization method. The modeled structure is characterized by a highly sheared field with strong horizontal magnetic components and has a virtually identical shape and location as the filament seen in H{alpha}. The modeled field strength agrees with the recent He I 10830 A observations by Kuckein et al.. The unequivocal resemblance between the NLFF extrapolation and the H{alpha} observation not only demonstrates the ability of the NLFF field to reproduce chromospheric features, but also provides a valuable diagnostic tool for the filament magnetic fields.

    Jing Ju; Yuan Yuan; Xu Yan; Liu Rui; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Wiegelmann, Thomas, E-mail: ju.jing@njit.ed, E-mail: yy46@njit.ed, E-mail: yx2@njit.ed, E-mail: rui.liu@njit.ed, E-mail: haimin@flare.njit.ed, E-mail: wiegelmann@linmpi.mpg.d [Max Planck Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    128

    Ceramic composite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    129

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1989-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    130

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    131

    Fe XII STALKS AND THE ORIGIN OF THE AXIAL FIELD IN FILAMENT CHANNELS  

    SciTech Connect

    Employing Fe XII images and line-of-sight magnetograms, we deduce the direction of the axial field in high-latitude filament channels from the orientation of the adjacent stalklike structures. Throughout the rising phase of the current solar cycle 24, filament channels poleward of latitude 30 Degree-Sign overwhelmingly obeyed the hemispheric chirality rule, being dextral (sinistral) in the northern (southern) hemisphere, corresponding to negative (positive) helicity. During the deep minimum of 2007-2009, the orientation of the Fe XII stalks was often difficult to determine, but no obvious violations of the rule were found. Although the hemispheric trend was still present during the maximum and early declining phase of cycle 23 (2000-2003), several high-latitude exceptions were identified at that time. From the observation that dextral (sinistral) filament channels form through the decay of active regions whose Fe XII features show a counterclockwise (clockwise) whorl, we conclude that the axial field direction is determined by the intrinsic helicity of the active regions. In contrast, generation of the axial field component by the photospheric differential rotation is difficult to reconcile with the observed chirality of polar crown and circular filament channels, and with the presence of filament channels along the equator. The main role of differential rotation in filament channel formation is to expedite the cancellation of flux and thus the removal of the transverse field component. We propose further that, rather than being ejected into the heliosphere, the axial field is eventually resubmerged by flux cancellation as the adjacent unipolar regions become increasingly mixed.

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Stenborg, G., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mil [George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    132

    Numerical studies of third-harmonic generation in laser filament in air perturbed by plasma spot  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Third-harmonic emission from laser filament intercepted by plasma spot is studied by numerical simulations. Significant enhancement of the third-harmonic generation is obtained due to the disturbance of the additional plasma. The contribution of the pure plasma effect and the possible plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility on the third-harmonic generation enhancement are compared. It is shown that the plasma induced cancellation of destructive interference [Y. Liu et al., Opt. Commun. 284, 4706 (2011)] of two-colored filament is the dominant mechanism of the enhancement of third-harmonic generation.

    Feng Liubin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Lu Xin; Liu Xiaolong; Li Yutong; Chen Liming; Ma Jinglong; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Xi Tingting [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas of the Ministry of Education of China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He Duanwei [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    133

    Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation under anomalous dispersion in fused silica. Part 1. Numerical investigation  

    SciTech Connect

    We report the results of investigation of femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in fused silica by varying the wavelength in the range from 800 to 2300 nm. It is shown that in the case of the anomalous group-velocity dispersion, a sequence of 'light bullets' with a high spatial and temporal localisation of the light field is formed along the filament. The relation of the formation and propagation of light bullets with the formation of an isolated anti-Stokes wing of the supercontinuum spectrum is established. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

    Smetanina, E O; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Kandidov, V P

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    134

    Four-dimensional visualization of single and multiple laser filaments using in-line holographic microscopy  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is shown, both through simulations and experiments, that the in-line holographic microscopy technique can be used to retrieve very small refractive-index perturbations caused during the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses. This technique provides the possibility of having spatially and temporally (four dimensions) resolved measurements of refractive-index changes, down to 10{sup -4}, from objects with diameters as small as 10 {mu}m. Moreover, we demonstrate the power of the technique in discriminating multiple filaments in a precise quantitative way.

    Abdollahpour, Daryoush [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Papazoglou, Dimitrios G.; Tzortzakis, Stelios [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    135

    Nonlinear theory of kinetic Alfven waves propagation and multiple filament formation  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In this paper, the filamentation of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) has been studied by assuming that the incident Gaussian beam of KAWs may not remain Gaussian during the filament formation. The solution of the nonlinear dynamical equation of KAWs has been obtained by developing the semi-analytical approach in solar wind plasma. Magnetic field structures of the KAW have been presented in x-z plane. The analytical theory using eikonal approximation has been used beyond the paraxial domain. The effect on spectral index of the turbulence has also been studied.

    Sharma, R. P.; Malik, M.; Singh, H. D. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, 110016 (India)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    136

    Analysis of copper ion filaments and retention of dual-layered devices for resistance random access memory applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    For improvement of switching uniformity, we propose a dual-layer structure with different resistance values in each layer. During the forming process, a current path is created in a high-resistance region which localizes filament formation in ultra-thin ... Keywords: Copper filament, Dual-layer, Resistance random access memory (ReRAM)

    Jaesik Yoon; Joonmyoung Lee; Hyejung Choi; Ju-Bong Park; Dong-jun Seong; Wootae Lee; Chunhum Cho; Seonghyun Kim; Hyunsang Hwang

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    137

    Evidence for long range movement of Bi-2212 within the filament bundle on melting and its significant effect on J  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    . The measurement of the Ag area (the white fraction of the images) for each sample was made by image analysisEvidence for long range movement of Bi-2212 within the filament bundle on melting and its.1088/0953-2048/24/7/075016 Evidence for long range movement of Bi-2212 within the filament bundle on melting and its significant

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    138

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    139

    Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air Yohann Brelet1  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    1 Tesla coil discharges guided by femtosecond laser filaments in air Yohann Brelet1 , Aurélien, Palaiseau, France A Tesla coil generator was designed to produce high voltage pulses oscillating at 100 k experiments of laser guided discharges obtained in air by high voltage bursts delivered by a compact Tesla

    140

    Heat transfer in sunspot penumbrae. Origin of dark-cored penumbral filaments  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Context: Observations at 0.1" have revealed the existence of dark cores in the bright filaments of sunspot penumbrae. Expectations are high that such dark-cored filaments are the basic building blocks of the penumbra, but their nature remains unknown. Aims: We investigate the origin of dark cores in penumbral filaments and the surplus brightness of the penumbra. To that end we use an uncombed penumbral model. Methods: The 2D stationary heat transfer equation is solved in a stratified atmosphere consisting of nearly horizontal magnetic flux tubes embedded in a stronger and more vertical field. The tubes carry an Evershed flow of hot plasma. Results: This model produces bright filaments with dark cores as a consequence of the higher density of the plasma inside the tubes, which shifts the surface of optical depth unity toward higher (cooler) layers. Our calculations suggest that the surplus brightness of the penumbra is a natural consequence of the Evershed flow, and that magnetic flux tubes about 250 km in diameter can explain the morphology of sunspot penumbrae.

    B. Ruiz Cobo; L. R. Bellot Rubio

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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    141

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    142

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    143

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    144

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    145

    OBSERVATIONS FROM SDO, HINODE, AND STEREO OF A TWISTING AND WRITHING START TO A SOLAR-FILAMENT-ERUPTION CASCADE  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We analyze data from SDO (AIA, HMI), Hinode (SOT, XRT, EIS), and STEREO (EUVI) of a solar eruption sequence of 2011 June 1 near 16:00 UT, with an emphasis on the early evolution toward eruption. Ultimately, the sequence consisted of three emission bursts and two filament ejections. SDO/AIA 304 A images show absorbing-material strands initially in close proximity which over {approx}20 minutes form a twisted structure, presumably a flux rope with {approx}10{sup 29} erg of free energy that triggers the resulting evolution. A jump in the filament/flux rope's displacement (average velocity {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) and the first burst of emission accompanies the flux-rope formation. After {approx}20 more minutes, the flux rope/filament kinks and writhes, followed by a semi-steady state where the flux rope/filament rises at ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) for {approx}10 minutes. Then the writhed flux rope/filament again becomes MHD unstable and violently erupts, along with rapid (50 km s{sup -1}) ejection of the filament and the second burst of emission. That ejection removed a field that had been restraining a second filament, which subsequently erupts as the second filament ejection accompanied by the third (final) burst of emission. Magnetograms from SDO/HMI and Hinode/SOT, and other data, reveal several possible causes for initiating the flux-rope-building reconnection, but we are not able to say which is dominant. Our observations are consistent with magnetic reconnection initiating the first burst and the flux-rope formation, with MHD processes initiating the further dynamics. Both filament ejections are consistent with the standard model for solar eruptions.

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L. [Space Science Office, ZP13, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Hara, Hirohisa, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov, E-mail: hirohisa.hara@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    146

    Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders  

    SciTech Connect

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    147

    Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

    148

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet ...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet...

    149

    Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    150

    Dielectric Coatings for IACT Mirrors  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy need mirror with high reflectance roughly in the wavelength between 300 and 550 nm. The current standard reflective layer of such mirrors is aluminum. Being permanently exposed to the environment they show a constant degradation over the years. New and improved dielectric coatings have been developed to enhance their resistance to environmental impact and to extend their possible lifetime. In addition, these customized coatings have an increased reflectance of over 95% and are designed to significantly lower the night-sky background contribution. The development of such coatings for mirrors with areas up to 2 m2 and low application temperatures to suite the composite materials used for the new mirror susbtrates of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the results of extensive durability tests are presented.

    Förster, A; Chadwick, P; Held, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    151

    Spatial and temporal evolution of filamentation instability in a current-carrying plasma  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the nonlinear regime. Using the magnetohydrodynamic equations, a nonlinear diffusion equation for the magnetic field in the plasma is obtained. This nonlinear equation is numerically solved and the spatiotemporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields and the electron density distribution are plotted. It is shown that as the time passes, the profile of the electric and magnetic fields changes from a sinusoidal shape to a saw-tooth one and the electron density distribution becomes very steepened. Also, the mechanism of the filament formation is then discussed. Furthermore, the effects of the thermal motion, collisions, and ion mass on growth rate of filaments as well as the saturation time are argued. Finally, it is found that the energy dissipation is associated with the aforementioned effects and strong plasma density gradient.

    Mohammadhosseini, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    152

    Spindles and active vortices in a model of confined filament-motor mixtures  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Robust self-organization of subcellular structures is a key principle governing the dynamics and evolution of cellular life. In fission yeast cells undergoing division, the mitotic spindle spontaneously emerges from the interaction of microtubules, motor proteins and the confining cell walls, and asters and vortices have been observed to self-assemble in quasi-two dimensional microtubule-kinesin assays. Their is no clear microscopic picture of the role of the active motors driving this pattern formation, and the relevance of continuum modeling to filament-scale structures remains uncertain. Here we present results of numerical simulations of a discrete filament-motor protein model confined to a pressurised cylindrical box. Stable spindles, nematic configurations, asters and high-density semi-asters spontaneously emerge, the latter pair having also been observed in cytosol confined within emulsion droplets. State diagrams are presented delineating each stationary state as the pressure, motor speed and motor density are varied. We further highlight a parameter regime where vortices form exhibiting collective rotation of all filaments, but have a finite life-time before contracting to a semi-aster. Quantifying the distribution of life-times suggests this contraction is a Poisson process. Equivalent systems with fixed volume exhibit persistent vortices with stochastic switching in the direction of rotation, with switching times obeying similar statistics to contraction times in pressurised systems. Furthermore, we show that increasing the detachment rate of motors from filament plus-ends can both destroy vortices and turn some asters into vortices. Based on our findings we argue the need for a deeper understanding of the microscopic activities underpinning macroscopic self-organization in active gels and urge further experiments to help bridge these lengths.

    David A. Head; W. J. Briels; Gerhard Gompper

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    153

    Determination of the transient electron temperature in a femtosecond-laser-induced air plasma filament  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The transient electron temperature in a weakly ionized femtosecond-laser-produced air plasma filament was determined from optical absorption and diffraction experiments. The electron temperature and plasma density decay on similar time scales of a few hundred picoseconds. Comparison with plasma theory reveals the importance of inelastic collisions that lead to energy transfer to vibrational degrees of freedom of air molecules during the plasma cooling.

    Sun Zhanliang; Chen Jinhai; Rudolph, Wolfgang [University of New Mexico, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    154

    Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, amorphous silicon films by hot filament technique using ``safe`` silicon source gas  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate by flowing a stream of safe (diluted to less than 1%) silane gas past a heated filament. 7 figs.

    Mahan, A.H.; Molenbroek, E.C.; Nelson, B.P.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    155

    Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M. [LERMPS-UTBM (Site de Sevenans), 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    156

    Superhydrophobic Metal-Oxide Thin Film Coatings  

    Because of their numerous advantages and applications, considerable efforts have been expended to develop superhydrophobic (water repellant) coatings. However, traditional superhydrophobic coatings are soft in nature, with a Teflon-like surface ...

    157

    Cathode Coating (IN-09-061)  

    A team of scientists at Argonne National Laboratory has developed a special coating for the cathodes used in lithium batteries. With the coating, batteries charge and discharge more quickly, without a loss in performance.

    158

    Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    159

    Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications. Author(s), Ming Fu, Roger Wustman, Jeffrey Williams, Douglas Konitzer.

    160

    Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

    SciTech Connect

    Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

    Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    161

    Coatings for SOFC Interconnects: Design, Deposition and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Engineering effective combinations of oxidation resistance, electronic conductivity and SOFC component compatibility has proven challenging for coating ...

    162

    Coatings for Corrosion and Wear Resistance Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 2, 2012 ... Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing ...

    163

    Polysilazane Based Corrosion Coatings for Magnesium  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

    164

    Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation  

    SciTech Connect

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simultaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure 12 comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets 16 is machined out to form a dimple 11. Glass microballoons, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

    Lowe, Arthur T. (Tempe, AZ); Hosford, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    165

    Method of forming metallic coatings on polymeric substrates and of forming graded polymeric coatings or films  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The invention described herein relates to methods of forming graded polymeric coatings or films on a desired substrate and of forming metallic coatings on polymeric or other nonmetallic substrates. In particular, it relates to methods of forming such coatings or films by sorption and/or diffusion of metals into coatings or films of polymeric material deposited by conventional techniques on a desired substrate.

    Liepins, R.

    1981-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    166

    Comparision of Stellite Coatings on Valve Steel Material Prepared ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    167

    Preparing of High Silicon Coating by Composite Electrodeposition in ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    168

    Improved Mechanical Properties of Cermet Coatings as a Function ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    169

    Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    170

    Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    171

    APPLIEDPHYSICAL Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    that competes with the energy- consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy-consuming desorption of coat proteins, until on the membrane into elementary coat-building units, called monomers. The membrane-bound monomers then polymerize

    Sens, Pierre

    172

    UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

    SciTech Connect

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    173

    Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

    Fan, Hongyou

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    174

    Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    175

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

    176

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    177

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    178

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    179

    Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    180

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    181

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    SciTech Connect

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    182

    COLD MOLECULAR GAS ALONG THE COOLING X-RAY FILAMENT IN A1795  

    SciTech Connect

    We present the results of interferometric observations of the cool core of A1795 at CO(1-0) using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. In agreement with previous work, we detect a significant amount of cold molecular gas (3.9 {+-} 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) in the central {approx}10 kpc. We report the discovery of a substantial clump of cold molecular gas at clustercentric radius of 30 kpc (2.9 {+-} 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), coincident in both position and velocity with the warm, ionized filaments. We also place an upper limit on the H{sub 2} mass at the outer edge of the star-forming filament, corresponding to a distance of 60 kpc (<0.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }). We measure a strong gradient in the H{alpha}/H{sub 2} ratio as a function of radius, suggesting different ionization mechanisms in the nucleus and filaments of A1795. The total mass of cold molecular gas ({approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) is roughly 30% of the classical cooling estimate at the same position, assuming a cooling time of 10{sup 9} yr. Combining the cold molecular gas mass with the UV-derived star formation rate and the warm, ionized gas mass, the spectroscopically derived X-ray cooling rate is fully accounted for and in good agreement with the cooling byproducts over timescales of {approx}10{sup 9} yr. The overall agreement between the cooling rate of the hot intracluster medium and the mass of the cool gas reservoir suggests that, at least in this system, the cooling flow problem stems from a lack of observable cooling in the more diffuse regions at large radii.

    McDonald, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wei, Lisa H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain, E-mail: mcdonald@space.mit.edu, E-mail: lisa.wei@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    183

    Mesoscopic model for filament orientation in growing actin networks: the role of obstacle geometry  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Propulsion by growing actin networks is a universal mechanism used in many different biological systems. Although the core molecular machinery for actin network growth is well preserved in most cases, the geometry of the propelled obstacle can vary considerably. In recent years, filament orientation distribution has emerged as an important observable characterizing the structure and dynamical state of the growing network. Here we derive several continuum equations for the orientation distribution of filaments growing behind stiff obstacles of various shapes and validate the predicted steady state orientation patterns by stochastic computer simulations based on discrete filaments. We use an ordinary differential equation approach to demonstrate that for flat obstacles of finite size, two fundamentally different orientation patterns peaked at either +35/-35 or +70/0/-70 degrees exhibit mutually exclusive stability, in agreement with earlier results for flat obstacles of very large lateral extension. We calculate and validate phase diagrams as a function of model parameters and show how this approach can be extended to obstacles with piecewise straight contours. For curved obstacles, we arrive at a partial differential equation in the continuum limit, which again is in good agreement with the computer simulations. In all cases, we can identify the same two fundamentally different orientation patterns, but only within an appropriate reference frame, which is adjusted to the local orientation of the obstacle contour. Our results suggest that two fundamentally different network architectures compete with each other in growing actin networks, irrespective of obstacle geometry, and clarify how simulated and electron tomography data have to be analyzed for non-flat obstacle geometries.

    Julian Weichsel; Ulrich S. Schwarz

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    184

    High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    185

    SLOW RISE AND PARTIAL ERUPTION OF A DOUBLE-DECKER FILAMENT. I. OBSERVATIONS AND INTERPRETATION  

    SciTech Connect

    We study an active-region dextral filament that was composed of two branches separated in height by about 13 Mm, as inferred from three-dimensional reconstruction by combining SDO and STEREO-B observations. This 'double-decker' configuration sustained for days before the upper branch erupted with a GOES-class M1.0 flare on 2010 August 7. Analyzing this evolution, we obtain the following main results. (1) During the hours before the eruption, filament threads within the lower branch were observed to intermittently brighten up, lift upward, and then merge with the upper branch. The merging process contributed magnetic flux and current to the upper branch, resulting in its quasi-static ascent. (2) This transfer might serve as the key mechanism for the upper branch to lose equilibrium by reaching the limiting flux that can be stably held down by the overlying field or by reaching the threshold of the torus instability. (3) The erupting branch first straightened from a reverse S shape that followed the polarity inversion line and then writhed into a forward S shape. This shows a transfer of left-handed helicity in a sequence of writhe-twist-writhe. The fact that the initial writhe is converted into the twist of the flux rope excludes the helical kink instability as the trigger process of the eruption, but supports the occurrence of the instability in the main phase, which is indeed indicated by the very strong writhing motion. (4) A hard X-ray sigmoid, likely of coronal origin, formed in the gap between the two original filament branches in the impulsive phase of the associated flare. This supports a model of transient sigmoids forming in the vertical flare current sheet. (5) Left-handed magnetic helicity is inferred for both branches of the dextral filament. (6) Two types of force-free magnetic configurations are compatible with the data, a double flux rope equilibrium and a single flux rope situated above a loop arcade.

    Liu Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Kliem, Bernhard [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Toeroek, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Liu Chang; Wang Haimin, E-mail: rui.liu@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, NJIT, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    186

    Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang [Washington University, St. Louis; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Honchak, Barbara M [Washington University, St. Louis; Karbach, Lauren E [Washington University, St. Louis; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Pierson, Beverly K [University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    187

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level 1 Coatings Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry has experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside reactor containment. Although degradation has become a concern to the industry, the industry lacked a thoroughly documented history of the degradation and its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted research to understand the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified coatings used inside containment. This report describes the ...

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    188

    Oil filaments produced by an impeller in a water stirred thank  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    In this video, the mechanism followed to disperse an oil phase in water using a Scaba impeller in a cylindrical tank is presented. Castor oil (viscosity = 500 mPas) is used and the Reynolds number was fixed to 24,000. The process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Initially, the oil is at the air water interface. At the beginning of the stirring, the oil is dragged into the liquid bulk and rotates around the impeller shaft, then is pushed radially into the flow ejected by the impeller. In this region, the flow is turbulent and exhibits velocity gradients that contribute to elongate the oil phase. Viscous thin filaments are generated and expelled from the impeller. Thereafter, the filaments are elongated and break to form drops. This process is repeated in all the oil phase and drops are incorporated into the dispersion. Two main zones can be identified in the tank: the impeller discharge characterized by high turbulence and the rest of the flow where low velocity gradients appear. In this region surface f...

    Sanjuan-Galindo, Rene; Ascanio, Gabriel; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    189

    Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semianalytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength ({lambda}=1064 nm), power flux ({approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2}), and plasma density (n/n{sub cr})=0.2; the backreflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

    Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    190

    Signatures in a Giant Radio Galaxy of a Cosmological Shock Wave at Intersecting Filaments of Galaxies  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Sensitive images of low-level, Mpc-sized radio cocoons offer new opportunities to probe large scale intergalactic gas flows outside clusters of galaxies. New radio images of high surface brightness sensitivity at strategically chosen wavelengths of the giant radio galaxy NGC 315 (Mack et al. 1997,1998) reveal significant asymmetries and particularities in the morphology, radio spectrum and polarization of the ejected radio plasma. We argue that the combination of these signatures provides a sensitive probe of an environmental shock wave. Analysis of optical redshifts in NGC 315 vicinity confirms its location to be near, or at a site of large-scale flow collisions in the 100 Mpc sized Pisces-Perseus Supercluster region. NGC 315 resides at the intersection of several galaxy filaments, and its radio plasma serves there as a `weather station' (Burns 1998) probing the flow of the elusive and previously invisible IGM gas. If our interpretation is correct, this is the first indication for a shock wave in flows caused by the cosmological large scale structure formation, which is located in a filament of galaxies. The possibility that the putative shock wave is a source of gamma-rays and ultra high energy cosmic rays is briefly discussed.

    Torsten A. Ensslin; Patrick Simon; Peter L. Biermann; Ulrich Klein; Sven Kohle; Philipp P. Kronberg; Karl-Heinz Mack

    2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    191

    Finite element analyses of continuous filament ties for masonry applications : final report for the Arquin Corporation.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Finite-element analyses were performed to simulate the response of a hypothetical vertical masonry wall subject to different lateral loads with and without continuous horizontal filament ties laid between rows of concrete blocks. A static loading analysis and cost comparison were also performed to evaluate optimal materials and designs for the spacers affixed to the filaments. Results showed that polypropylene, ABS, and polyethylene (high density) were suitable materials for the spacers based on performance and cost, and the short T-spacer design was optimal based on its performance and functionality. Simulations of vertical walls subject to static loads representing 100 mph winds (0.2 psi) and a seismic event (0.66 psi) showed that the simulated walls performed similarly and adequately when subject to these loads with and without the ties. Additional simulations and tests are required to assess the performance of actual walls with and without the ties under greater loads and more realistic conditions (e.g., cracks, non-linear response).

    Quinones, Armando, Sr. (Arquin Corporation, La Luz, NM); Bibeau, Tiffany A.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    192

    Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    193

    Sulfur-Resistant Silicone Conformal Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    194

    Coating Industry Response to Legislative Pressure  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 2   Summary of existing federal regulations affecting the coatings industry...also have their own internal regulations, directives, and guidelines

    195

    Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes ...  

    Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... The fast plasma discharge and subsequent rapid pyrolysis of an organic precursor result in a uniform coating of ...

    196

    SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of the University of California, nor any of their employees,of the University of California. The views and opinions ofof the University of California. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    197

    Protective Coatings for Molybdenum – Industrial Processing and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Symposium, Advanced Protective Coatings for Refractory Metals and Alloys ... In particular molybdenum is a state of the art structural material in glass ...

    198

    Solar Selective Absorption Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Sandia has developed a new class of solar selective absorber coatings that significantly improve the thermal conversion efficiency of solar units by reducing ...

    199

    Coating and Surface Technologies for Turbine Airfoils  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    more difficult, coatings and other surface technologies are becoming more ... to developing higher strength single crystal superalloys. Although it has been ...

    200

    ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: I - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The DARPA program in advanced thin film coatings is developing innovative technologies to eliminate volatile organic compounds, heavy metals and other ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    201

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation.

    202

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    203

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    204

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    205

    Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a ...

    206

    Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    207

    Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    208

    Study on machined thermal sprayed coatings adherence  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Thermal sprayed coatings represent a modern way of solving real important problems, like repairing worn parts working under severe wearing conditions or, ensuring efficient corrosion protection of parts used in sea, as platform, bridges, or obtaining ... Keywords: adherence, cylindrical turning, metallizing process, sample, thermal sprayed coatings, transducer

    Mihaiela Iliescu; Mihnea Costoiu; Sergiu Tonoiu

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    209

    Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    210

    Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    firing time and temperature on 6P57 coatings on Ti6Al4V and 6P50 on Co-firing time and temperature on the adhesion of coatings manufactured with glass 6P57 on Ti6Al4V and glass 6P50 on Co-

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    211

    Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    212

    Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. This invention has applications to breeding blankets for fusion reactors as well as to alkali metal thermal to electric converters.

    Park, J.H.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    213

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    214

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    215

    The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    216

    Effect of energetic electrons on dust charging in hot cathode filament discharge  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The effect of energetic electrons on dust charging for different types of dust is studied in hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma is produced by hot cathode filament discharge method in a dusty plasma device. A full line cusped magnetic field cage is used to confine the plasma elements. To study the plasma parameters for various discharge conditions, a cylindrical Langmuir probe having 0.15 mm diameter and 10.0 mm length is used. An electronically controlled dust dropper is used to drop the dust particles into the plasma. For different discharge conditions, the dust current is measured using a Faraday cup connected to an electrometer. The effect of secondary emission as well as discharge voltage on charging of dust grains in hydrogen plasma is studied with different dust.

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur 782 402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    217

    Overdensity of X-Ray sources near 3C 295: a candidate filament  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We present a statistical analysis of the Chandra observation of the source field around the 3C 295 galaxy cluster (z=0.46) aimed at the search for clustering of X-ray sources. Three different methods of analysis, namely a chip by chip logN-logS, a two dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and the angular correlation function (ACF) show a strong overdensity of sources in the North-East of the field. In particular, the ACF shows a clear signal on scales of 0.5 - 5 arcmin. This correlation angle is > 2 times higher than that of a sample of 8 ACIS-I field at the 2.5 sigma confidence level. If this overdensity is spatially associated to the cluster, we are observing a 'filament' of the large scale structure of the Universe. We discuss some first results that seem to indicate such an association.

    V. D'Elia; F. Fiore; F. Cocchia

    2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    218

    Effects of the background plasma temperature on the current filamentation instability  

    SciTech Connect

    The effects of thermal anisotropy of background plasma on the current-filamentation instability (CFI) in an asymmetric counterstreaming system are investigated with a fully relativistic kinetic model. It is found that both the temperature and the thermal anisotropy of the background plasma play important roles in the development of the CFI. It is also pointed out that the thermal anisotropy of the background plasma dominates over the space charge effect in suppressing the CFI. A parametric study of the CFI is presented in the context of fast ignition. A new way to suppress CFI and its detrimental effects on the fast electron beam divergence has been proposed. The results of the analytical estimations are verified by 2D3V particle-in-cell simulations.

    Jia Qing [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cai, Hong-bo; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Weiwu [Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 2101, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhu Shaoping [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    219

    Comparative Study of Aluminide Coatings on Mild Steel by Different ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by Release on Demand ... High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications .

    220

    Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries Title Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    221

    ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and ...  

    ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and Some Potential Applications ... (e gicing coatings on power lines, insulators, infrastructure (e.g.

    222

    Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Coatings for Oxidation ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Our protective coatings were evaluated for thermal-shock performance at the ... that our coatings provide oxidation protection of C-C composites at temperature.

    223

    Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Life Model for Coated Superalloy ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    in an aggressive combustion gas environment. Coating ..... M.I. Wood and G.F. Harrison, "Modeling The Deformation Of Coated. Superalloys Under Thermal ...

    224

    Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contacts and Cell Coatings The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide...

    225

    Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    coatings for nickel up to 1,100 C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at...

    226

    Advances in Zinc-Coated Steel Sheet: Processing and Properties  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Influences of Ni-Pretreatments on Galvanized Coatings · Surface Performance of Environment-Friendly Galvanized Sheet for Appliance · Thermal Spray Coating ...

    227

    Thick-to-Thin Filament Surface Distance Modulates Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Drosophila Flight Muscle  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The demembranated (skinned) muscle fiber preparation is widely used to investigate muscle contraction because the intracellular ionic conditions can be precisely controlled. However, plasma membrane removal results in a loss of osmotic regulation, causing abnormal hydration of the myofilament lattice and its proteins. We investigated the structural and functional consequences of varied myofilament lattice spacing and protein hydration on cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle, using x-ray diffraction to compare the lattice spacing of dissected, osmotically compressed skinned fibers to native muscle fibers in living flies. Osmolytes of different sizes and exclusion properties (Dextran T-500 and T-10) were used to differentially alter lattice spacing and protein hydration. At in vivo lattice spacing, cross-bridge attachment time (t{sub on}) increased with higher osmotic pressures, consistent with a reduced cross-bridge detachment rate as myofilament protein hydration decreased. In contrast, in the swollen lattice, t{sub on} decreased with higher osmotic pressures. These divergent responses were reconciled using a structural model that predicts t{sub on} varies inversely with thick-to-thin filament surface distance, suggesting that cross-bridge rates of force development and detachment are modulated more by myofilament lattice geometry than protein hydration. Generalizing these findings, our results suggest that cross-bridge cycling rates slow as thick-to-thin filament surface distance decreases with sarcomere lengthening, and likewise, cross-bridge cycling rates increase during sarcomere shortening. Together, these structural changes may provide a mechanism for altering cross-bridge performance throughout a contraction-relaxation cycle.

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Miller, Mark S. (IIT); (Vermont); (BU)

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    228

    Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered a blackbody radiator.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    . 1 Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered frequency is that of infrared electromagnetic radiation, the light bulb radiates more energy in the infrared. The light from a flashlight can be considered as the emission of many photons of the same frequency

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    229

    Structural properties of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres grown by hot-filament CVD technique  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We report the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) growth of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres in the temperature range of 350-650°C only using ZnO pellets as raw material. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), ...

    R. López; T. Díaz; G. García; R. Galeazzi; E. Rosendo; A. Coyopol; M. Pacio; H. Juárez; A. I. Oliva

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    230

    Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    231

    On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating. An alternative manufacturing route is to coat the sheet metal first before forming. The change in the manufacturing sequence can potentially improve cost and reduce environmental impact. This approach, however, requires the coating to survive the deformation process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull-off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet by using a uniaxial tensile tester. Experimental results from two selected polymer coated sheet metals show that coating adhesion was affected by plastic deformation. An analytical model based on a virtual interface crack concept was developed to indicate the adhesion potential of the coating-substrate interface. From interfacial fracture mechanics, the initial adhesion potential is defined as the energy release rate characterized by the virtual interface crack and the initial pull-off stress. The analytical model was used to predict coating adhesion loss after deformation in uniaxial tension mode. The analytical model predictions agreed well with experimental results. Finite element analysis tool was applied to simulate more complex deformation modes in stamping of coated sheet meals. The stress field near the interface crack tip was used to calculate the energy release rate and predict the adhesion loss under different deformation modes. The predictions obtained from numerical method are also in good agreements with the experimental results in biaxial tension and tension-compression modes. The research has led to a better understanding of the effects of plastic deformation on coating adhesion. The developed adhesion test methods can be used to generate useful information on coating durability for diverse practical use. It is also expected that the results of the research will facilitate the development of better polymer coated sheet metal to be used in sheet metal forming processes.

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    232

    Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary  

    SciTech Connect

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    233

    METHOD OF PREPARING COATED REFRACTORY WARE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for preparing a dense, refractory coating on a vessel adapted to the handling of molten metals such as uranium and plutonium. According to the invention, the inner surface of a heat stable container formed of a refractory metal of either niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, or tungsten is coated with molten thorium within 10 minutes so as to present alloying with the refractory metal and then exposed to a reactive atmosphere of nitrogen at a temperature of about 1750 deg for 30 minutes to form a refractory thorium nitride coating.

    Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.; Weissman, S.I.

    1959-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    234

    Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

    Fan, H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    235

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level I Coatings—Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside the reactor containment. These instances of degradation became a concern to the industry, but the industry did not have a thoroughly documented history of the degradation or its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a project that conducted research to gain an understanding of the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified ...

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    236

    Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS  

    SciTech Connect

    This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    237

    Activity of tungsten and rhenium filaments in CH sub 4 /H sub 2 and C sub 2 H sub 2 /H sub 2 mixtures: Importance for diamond CVD  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The resistance R, spectral emissivity {epsilon}, and power consumption of W and Re filaments heated to 2500 {degree}C in mixtures of CH{sub 4} or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in H{sub 2} have been measured in a series of experiments focusing on the state of the filament activity, i.e., its ability to dissociate the reactant gases. It has been found that these properties of the filaments, as well as the partial pressures of CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the reaction chamber, depend critically on both the filament temperature and the reactant ratio, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}. Specifically, both W and Re filaments show sharp jumps in power consumption at essentially the same temperature, signaling strong increases in filament activity and, hence, production of atomic hydrogen. These results are proposed to be due to the removal of non-reactive carbon from the surface of the filament via etching by atomic hydrogen and are consistent with the predictions of our thermodynamic model for the C-H system. Evidence for gas phase reactions is presented and the role of thermal diffusion is discussed. The emissivities of the W and Re filaments are observed to have significantly different temperature dependences which are attributed to differences in the phase diagrams for the W-C and Re-C systems. The implications of these results for hot-filament diamond CVD are discussed.

    Sommer, M.; Smith, F.W. (Department of Physics, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    238

    Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    239

    Thin film-coated polymer webs  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    240

    OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    241

    Silica-coated liposomes for insulin delivery  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, ...

    Neelam Dwivedi; M. A. Arunagirinathan; Somesh Sharma; Jayesh Bellare

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    242

    (Ni-P) Coatings on AISI  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... investigation shows that Electroless Nickel coated AISI 1040 steel has high potential to replace hard chrome plated AISI ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray ... New Developments in High Velocity Air-Fuel Spraying.

    243

    Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    244

    Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    245

    Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    246

    Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    247

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

    Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    248

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant. 4 figs.

    Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    249

    Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

    NONE

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    250

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    251

    Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

    SciTech Connect

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    252

    Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    253

    Simulation of current-filament dynamics and relaxation in the Pegasus Spherical Tokamak  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Nonlinear numerical computation is used to investigate the relaxation of non-axisymmetric current-channels from washer-gun plasma sources into 'tokamak-like' plasmas in the Pegasus toroidal experiment [Eidietis et al. J. Fusion Energy 26, 43 (2007)]. Resistive MHD simulations with the NIMROD code [Sovinec et al. Phys. Plasmas 10(5), 1727-1732 (2003)] utilize ohmic heating, temperature-dependent resistivity, and anisotropic, temperature-dependent thermal conduction corrected for regions of low magnetization to reproduce critical transport effects. Adjacent passes of the simulated current-channel attract and generate strong reversed current sheets that suggest magnetic reconnection. With sufficient injected current, adjacent passes merge periodically, releasing axisymmetric current rings from the driven channel. The current rings have not been previously observed in helicity injection for spherical tokamaks, and as such, provide a new phenomenological understanding for filament relaxation in Pegasus. After large-scale poloidal-field reversal, a hollow current profile and significant poloidal flux amplification accumulate over many reconnection cycles.

    O'Bryan, J. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Bird, T. M. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    254

    Grain size dependent mechanical properties of nanocrystalline diamond films grown by hot-filament CVD  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films with a thickness of {approx}6 {micro}m and with average grain sizes ranging from 60 to 9 nm were deposited on silicon wafers using a hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. These samples were then characterized with the goal to identify correlations between grain size, chemical composition and mechanical properties. The characterization reveals that our films are phase pure and exhibit a relatively smooth surface morphology. The levels of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and hydrogen impurities are low, and showed a systematic variation with the grain size. The hydrogen content increases with decreasing grain size, whereas the sp{sup 2} carbon content decreases with decreasing grain size. The material is weaker than single crystalline diamond, and both stiffness and hardness decrease with decreasing grain size. These trends suggest gradual changes of the nature of the grain boundaries, from graphitic in the case of the 60 nm grain size material to hydrogen terminated sp{sup 3} carbon for the 9 nm grain size material. The films exhibit low levels of internal stress and freestanding structures with a length of several centimeters could be fabricated without noticeable bending.

    Wiora, M; Bruehne, K; Floeter, A; Gluche, P; Willey, T M; Kucheyev, S O; Van Buuren, A W; Hamza, A V; Biener, J; Fecht, H

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    255

    THE IMPACT OF THERMODYNAMICS ON GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE: FILAMENT FORMATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k{rho}{sup {Gamma}}, with both sub-isothermal exponents {Gamma} 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For {Gamma} > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For {Gamma} < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Rowan J. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Banerjee, Robi [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Sur, Sharanya, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivnagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    256

    Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    257

    EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE BARNARD 5 STAR-FORMING CORE: EMBEDDED FILAMENTS REVEALED  

    SciTech Connect

    We present {approx}6.'5 x 8' Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) mosaic observations of the NH{sub 3} (1,1) emission in the Barnard 5 region in Perseus, with an angular resolution of 6''. This map covers the coherent region, where the dense gas presents subsonic non-thermal motions (as seen from single dish observations with the Green Bank Telescope, GBT). The combined EVLA and GBT observations reveal, for the first time, a striking filamentary structure (20'' wide or 5000 AU at the distance of Perseus) in this low-mass star-forming region. The integrated intensity profile of this structure is consistent with models of an isothermal filament in hydrostatic equilibrium. The observed separation between the B5-IRS1 young stellar object (YSO), in the central region of the core, and the northern starless condensation matches the Jeans length of the dense gas. This suggests that the dense gas in the coherent region is fragmenting. The observed region displays a narrow velocity dispersion, where most of the gas shows evidence for subsonic turbulence and where little spatial variations are present. It is only close to the YSO where an increase in the velocity dispersion is found, but still displaying subsonic non-thermal motions.

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Longmore, Steven [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Street 2, 85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Goodman, Alyssa A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Arce, Hector G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Corder, Stuartt, E-mail: jaime.pineda@manchester.ac.uk [North American ALMA Science Center, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    258

    Clusters, Groups, and Filaments in the Chandra Deep Field-South up to Redshift 1  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    We present a comprehensive structure detection analysis of the 0.3 square degree area of the MUSYC-ACES field which covers the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Using a density-based clustering algorithm on the MUSYC and ACES photometric and spectroscopic catalogues we find 62 over-dense regions up to redshifts of 1, including, clusters, groups and filaments. All structures are confirmed using the DBSCAN method, including the detection of nine structures previously reported in the literature. We present a catalogue of all structures present including their central position, mean redshift, velocity dispersions, and classification based on their morphological and spectroscopic distributions. In particular we find 13 galaxy clusters and 6 large groups/small clusters. Comparison of these massive structures with published XMM-Newton imaging (where available) shows that $80\\%$ of these structures are associated with diffuse, soft-band (0.4 - 1 keV) X-ray emission including $90\\%$ of all objects classified as cluster...

    Dehghan, Siamak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    259

    Filamentation-induced third-harmonic generation in air via plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We study, both experimentally and theoretically, the underlying physics of third-harmonic generation in air by a filamented infrared femtosecond laser pulse propagating through a thin plasma channel. It is shown that the recently observed more than two-order-of-magnitude increase of the efficiency of third-harmonic generation occurs due to the plasma-enhanced third-order susceptibility. An estimate of the effective value of this susceptibility is given.

    Suntsov, S.; Abdollahpour, D.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 71110, Heraklion (Greece); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 71110, Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, 71003, Heraklion (Greece)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    260

    IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS  

    SciTech Connect

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    261

    Finite element analyses of continuous filament ties for masonry applications:final report for the Arquin Corporation.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Finite-element analyses were performed to simulate the response of a hypothetical masonry shear wall with and without continuous filament ties to various lateral loads. The loads represented three different scenarios: (1) 100 mph wind, (2) explosive attack, and (3) an earthquake. In addition, a static loading analysis and cost comparison were performed to evaluate optimal materials and designs for the spacers affixed to the filaments. Results showed that polypropylene, ABS, and polyethylene (high density) were suitable materials for the spacers based on performance and cost, and the short T-spacer design was optimal based on its performance and functionality. Results of the shear-wall loading simulations revealed that simulated walls with the continuous filament ties yielded factors of safety that were at least ten times greater than those without the ties. In the explosive attack simulation (100 psi), the simulated wall without the ties failed (minimum factor of safety was less than one), but the simulated wall with the ties yielded a minimum factor of safety greater than one. Simulations of the walls subject to lateral loads caused by 100 mph winds (0.2 psi) and seismic events with a peak ground acceleration of 1 ''g'' (0.66 psi) yielded no failures with or without the ties. Simulations of wall displacement during the seismic scenarios showed that the wall with the ties resulted in a maximum displacement that was 20% less than the wall without the ties.

    Quinones, Armando (Arquin Corporation, La Luz, NM); Bibeau, Tiffany A.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    262

    A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. I. Unusual History of an Eruptive Filament  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This is the first of four companion papers, which analyze a complex eruptive event of 18 November 2003 in AR 10501 and the causes of the largest Solar Cycle 23 geomagnetic storm on 20 November 2003. Analysis of a complete data set, not considered before, reveals a chain of eruptions to which hard X-ray and microwave bursts responded. A filament in AR 10501 was not a passive part of a larger flux rope, as usually considered. The filament erupted and gave origin to a CME. The chain of events was as follows: i) an eruption at 07:29 accompanied by a not reported M1.2 class flare associated with the onset of a first southeastern CME1, which is not responsible for the superstorm; ii) a confined eruption at 07:41 (M3.2 flare) that destabilized the filament; iii) the filament acceleration (07:56); iv) the bifurcation of the eruptive filament that transformed into a large cloud; v) an M3.9 flare in AR 10501 associated to this transformation. The transformation of the filament could be due to its interaction with the m...

    Grechnev, V V; Slemzin, V A; Chertok, I M; Filippov, B P; Rudenko, G V; Temmer, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    263

    Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project |  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project The Department of Energy is conducting research into bio-based thermochromic intelligent roof coatings. The coatings are developed from waste cooking oil. Project Description This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a waste cooking oil-based thermochromic smart roof coating technology that will adjust light transmission in response to temperature changes. This will reduce energy demands for temperature regulation. The project will also study the effects of different oil sources on coating properties. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and United Environment & Energy. Project Goals

    264

    On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma  

    SciTech Connect

    In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

    Williams, E A

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    265

    Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    266

    Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer of coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, light-weight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention. 13 figs.

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1988-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    267

    Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

    Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    268

    Figure correction of multilayer coated optics  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    269

    Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

    Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    270

    Thermomechanical behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    The effect of coating porosity and thickness on the resistance to damage of yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings in an oxidizing environment by thermal cycling was evaluated. Hardness and elastic modulus of an as-processed porous coating were lower than those of a dense coating and the porous coating failed after fewer thermal cycles. Similarly, specimen with a thicker coating failed after fewer thermal cycles than specimen with a thinner coating. The earlier failure of the porous coating is due to lower fracture toughness and enhanced oxidation of the coating/substrate interface, whereas, the earlier failure of the thick coating is due to higher thermal transient stresses that developed in the coating during thermal cycling. Generally, an increase in coating density led to initial increase in both hardness and elastic modulus with increasing thermal cycles. However, hardness and density gradually decreased as the number of thermal cycles increase because of microcracks formation and growth. Microscopic observations indicated that the formation of multiple microcracks and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to final coating failure.

    Singh, J. P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    271

    Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 deg C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 10^7 cm^(-3). With one-minute integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 10^6 cm^(-3) was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density was observed between the cells.

    V. M. Acosta; A. Jarmola; D. Windes; E. Corsini; M. P. Ledbetter; T. Karaulanov; M. Auzinsh; S. A. Rangwala; D. F. Jackson Kimball; D. Budker

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    272

    Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    273

    Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    274

    Reactor Shim Control by Coolant Passage Coating  

    SciTech Connect

    Work at North American Aviation in connection with the ReactorSafety Program has suggested the use of a poison-bearing "paint" which would coat reactor coolant channels, and provide a supplement to the control systems of the Hanford reactors. A review of Hanford operating problems indicates that this addition to the present control systems would enable an increase in annual production for each reactor of about 6% or the production equivalent of about 21 days at maximum power level. Installation and maintenance problems for this system would be minor, and development of a suitable coating material appears promising.

    Wheelock, C.W.

    1953-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    275

    Monolayer coated aerogels and method of making  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Aerogels having a monolayer coating are described. The aerogel and a monolayer forming precursor are provided in a supercritical fluid, whereupon the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor are reacted in said supercritical fluid to form a covalent bond between the aerogel and the monolayer forming precursor. Suitable aerogels are ceramic oxides such as silica, alumina, aluminosilicate, and combinations thereof. Suitable monolayer forming precursors include alkyl silanes, chlorosilanes, boranes, chloroboranes, germanes, and combinations thereof. The method may also include providing a surface preparation agent such as water, or hydroetching an aerogel to enhance the coating of the monolayer.

    Zemanian, Thomas Samuel (Richland, WA); Fryxell, Glen (Kennwick, WA); Ustyugov, Oleksiy A. (Spokane, WA)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    276

    Production of porous coating on a prosthesis  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Preselected surface areas of a prosthesis are covered by a blend of matching primary metallic particles and expendable particles. The particles are compressed and heated to assure that deformation and metallurgical bonding occurs between them and between the primary particles and the surface boundaries of the prosthesis. Porosity is achieved by removal of the expendable material. The result is a coating including discrete bonded particles separated by a network of interconnected voids presenting a homogeneous porous coating about the substrate. It has strength suitable for bone implant usage without intermediate adhesives, and adequate porosity to promote subsequent bone ingrowth.

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    277

    ALLOY COATINGS AND METHOD OF APPLYING  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing uranium articles with a pro tective coating by a single dip coating process is presented. The uranium article is dipped into a molten zinc bath containing a small percentage of aluminum. The resultant product is a uranium article covered with a thin undercoat consisting of a uranium-aluminum alloy with a small amount of zinc, and an outer layer consisting of zinc and aluminum. The article may be used as is, or aluminum sheathing may then be bonded to the aluminum zinc outer layer.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    278

    Method of applying coatings to substrates and the novel coatings produced thereby  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for applying novel coatings to substrates is provided. The ends of a multiplicity of rods of different materials are melted by focused beams of laser light. Individual electric fields are applied to each of the molten rod ends, thereby ejecting charged particles that include droplets, atomic clusters, molecules, and atoms. The charged particles are separately transported, by the accelerations provided by electric potentials produced by an electrode structure, to substrates where they combine and form the coatings. Layered and thickness graded coatings comprised of hitherto unavailable compositions, are provided. 2 figs.

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    279

    Hydrogen permeable protective coating for a catalytic surface  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating for a surface comprising a layer permeable to hydrogen, said coating being deposited on a catalyst layer; wherein the catalytic activity of the catalyst layer is preserved.

    Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golen, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    280

    Electrode coating composed of copolymers derived from diacetone acrylamide  

    SciTech Connect

    An improved electrode coating and separator coating derived from a copolymer of diacetone acrylamide and a polymerizable monomer. This invention relates to novel rechargeable electrodes, separators and processes for preparing same.

    Rampel, G.

    1985-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    281

    Biological, Electronic, and Functional Thin Films and Coatings I  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 4, 2013... scan (PPS) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). ... Eclipse Active and Passive Solar Control Coatings: Hulya ... In this paper two novel thin film coating systems will be presented for energy conservation solar ...

    282

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Diamond-like Coating Improves...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    News Feature Archive Diamond-like Coating Improves Electron Microscope Images By Mike Ross November 26, 2012 Coating the surface of a material with a single layer of diamond-like...

    283

    Atomic layer deposition for the conformal coating of nanoporous materials  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is ideal for applying precise and conformal coatings over nanoporous materials. We have recently used ALD to coat two nanoporous solids: anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silica aerogels. AAO possesses hexagonally ordered ...

    Jeffrey W. Elam; Guang Xiong; Catherine Y. Han; H. Hau Wang; James P. Birrell; Ulrich Welp; John N. Hryn; Michael J. Pellin; Theodore F. Baumann; John F. Poco; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    284

    Polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for medical imaging  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    One of the most versatile and safe materials used in medicine are polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. This dissertation describes several formulations for in vivo imaging applications. The paramagnetic polymer-coated ...

    Chen, Suelin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    285

    Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low ...

    286

    Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

    Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

    287

    Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A Slag Management System for Gasification Operations · Advanced Conductive Coating Performance under Long-term SOFC Operating Conditions · Advanced ...

    288

    Graphene Coated with Titanium Nitride as Electrode Materials for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , 2013 and Beyond: Flexible Electronics. Presentation Title, Graphene Coated ...

    289

    High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings. Presentation ...

    290

    Chromium-free Conversion Coatings for Aerospace Aluminum Alloys  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Predicting and Combating Corrosion and Degradation of New Coating and ...

    291

    Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings ...  

    ... Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Ion beam assisted deposition of thermal barrier coatings - Energy Innovation Portal on Delicious ...

    292

    ZnO Nanorods as Antireflective Coatings for Single Crystalline ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Graphene Coating-enabled Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission and Optical Diode ... Synthesis of Monolithic Iron Incorporated Silica Aerogels by Ambient ...

    293

    Superhydrophobic Coatings Using Double-Silane Treated Silica ...  

    Disclosure Number 201202928 Technology Summary This invention relates to superhydrophobic coatings and more specifically to durability improvements. ...

    294

    Coatings and Surface Treatments for Application on a Martensitic ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

    295

    RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Technology Marketing Summary The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh ...

    296

    Change of Stress-Strain Behaviors in EB-PVD TBC Coating Systems ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... coating system, axial stress born by applied external condition changes from compression to tension. ... Aerospace Coatings via Directed Vapor Deposition.

    297

    IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Solid alcohol fuel with hydration inhibiting coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This patent describes a process for preparing a solid alcohol fuel. It comprises: mixing an alcohol solution with a cellulose derivative having a hydration inhibiting coating thereby forming a slurry and then adding an effective amount sufficient to increase the pH level above 8, of a caustic material so as to effect hydration and solidification.

    Gartner, S.

    1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    299

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    300

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

    Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    302

    Surface coating for prevention of crust formation  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

    Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    304

    Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    305

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    306

    Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

    Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    307

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

    SciTech Connect

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    308

    Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

    Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Long, Jr., Ernest L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beatty, Ronald L. (Wurlingen, CH)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    309

    Testing of coatings for the nuclear industry  

    SciTech Connect

    Coatings for commercial nuclear power plants need to withstand humidity, radiation exposure, and LOC accident conditions; they also must be decontaminable. Tests for decontaminability, radiation stability, and design-basis-accident (DBA) resistance are described. An irradiation test facility using spent fuel assemblies and a spray loop for simulating a DBA are described. A sample test report sheet is presented. (DLC)

    Goldberg, G.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    310

    CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    on the following six RD&D program areas: · Residential and Commercial Building End-Use Energy EfficiencyCORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Environmentally

    311

    KINEMATICS AND EXCITATION OF THE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPED IONIZED GAS FILAMENTS IN THE COMA CLUSTER OF GALAXIES  

    SciTech Connect

    We present the results of deep imaging and spectroscopic observations of very extended ionized gas (EIG) around four member galaxies of the Coma Cluster of galaxies: RB 199, IC 4040, GMP 2923, and GMP 3071. The EIGs were serendipitously found in an H{alpha} narrowband imaging survey of the central region of the Coma Cluster. The relative radial velocities of the EIGs with respect to the systemic velocities of the parent galaxies from which they emanate increase almost monotonically with the distance from the nucleus of the respective galaxies, reaching {approx} - 400 to - 800 km s{sup -1} at around 40-80 kpc from the galaxies. The one-sided morphologies and the velocity fields of the EIGs are consistent with the predictions of numerical simulations of ram pressure stripping. We found a very low velocity filament (v{sub rel} {approx} -1300 km s{sup -1}) at the southeastern edge of the disk of IC 4040. Some bright compact knots in the EIGs of RB 199 and IC 4040 exhibit blue continuum and strong H{alpha} emission. The equivalent widths of the H{alpha} emission exceed 200 A and are greater than 1000 Angstrom-Sign for some knots. The emission-line intensity ratios of the knots are basically consistent with those of sub-solar abundance H II regions. These facts indicate that intensive star formation occurs in the knots. Some filaments, including the low-velocity filament of the IC 4040 EIG, exhibit shock-like emission-line spectra, suggesting that shock heating plays an important role in ionization and excitation of the EIGs.

    Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Furusawa, Hisanori [Astronomical Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hattori, Takashi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'Ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Okamura, Sadanori, E-mail: yoshidam@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    312

    Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W. (Vermont)

    2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    313

    High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A ceramic article which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body.

    Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    314

    Gaseous modification of MCrAlY coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The present invention generally describes methods for modifying MCrAlY coatings by using gaseous carburization, gaseous nitriding or gaseous carbonitriding. The modified MCrAlY coatings are useful in thermal barrier coating systems, which may be used in gas turbine engines.

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    315

    High Temperature coatings based on {beta}-NiAI  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    High temperature alloys are reviewed, focusing on current superalloys and their coatings. The synthesis, characerization, and oxidation performance of a NiAl–TiB{sub 2} composite are explained. A novel coating process for Mo–Ni–Al alloys for improved oxidation performance is examined. The cyclic oxidation performance of coated and uncoated Mo–Ni–Al alloys is discussed.

    Severs, Kevin

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    316

    FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS  

    SciTech Connect

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    317

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes work to develop new thermal barrier coating systems, which will be essential to the operation of the ATS engine which is under development. Work is at the stage of process improvement and bond coat improvement, along with proof testing of the coatings under thermal conditions typical of what can be expected in the ATS engine.

    NONE

    1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

    Ludwig, Frank A. (Irvine, CA); Higley, Lin R. (Santa Ana, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    319

    Thermal Sprays and Ceramic Coatings Assessments: Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Ceramic and Thermal Sprays Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report includes assessments of Ceramic and Thermal Spray coatings both by laboratory evaluation and analysis of field samples. The field samples are presented as case studies describing the condition of the material solution applied. Several thermal sprays and ceramic coatings were tested and analyzed for their ability to mitigate fireside corrosion, reduce slagging and it's propensity to have circumferential cracking occur due to cyclic temperature variations. In addition, the case studies provide ...

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    320

    Method For Improving The Oxidation Resistance Of Metal Substrates Coated With Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described. A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

    Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

    2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    323

    The Ecological Genomics of Fungi: Repeated Elements in Filamentous Fungi with a Focus on Wood-Decay Fungi  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the last decade, the genome of several dozen filamentous fungi have been sequenced. Interestingly, vast diversity in genome size was observed (Fig. 2.1) with 14-fold differences between the 9 Mb of the human pathogenic dandruff fungus (Malassezia globosa; Xu, Saunders, et al., 2007) and the 125 Mb of the ectomycorrhizal black truffle of P rigord (Tuber melanosporum; Martin, Kohler, et al., 2010). Recently, Raffaele and Kamoun (2012) highlighted that the genomes of several lineages of filamentous plant pathogens have been shaped by repeat-driven expansion. Indeed, repeated elements are ubiquitous in all prokaryote and eukaryote genomes; however, their frequencies can vary from just a minor percentage of the genome to more that 60 percent of the genome. Repeated elements can be classified in two major types: satellites DNA and transposable elements. In this chapter, the different types of repeated elements and how these elements can impact genome and gene repertoire will be described. Also, an intriguing link between the transposable elements richness and diversity and the ecological niche will be highlighted.

    Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Payen, Thibaut [INRA, Nancy, France; Petitpierre, Denis [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    324

    SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    High-Performance Nanostructured High-Performance Nanostructured Coating to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Performance Nanostructured Coating on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

    325

    Coated armor system and process for making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    327

    Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

    Byrnes, Larry Edward (Rochester Hills, MI); Kramer, Martin Stephen (Clarkston, MI); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    328

    Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation. 17 figs.

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Is it possible to check microcomponent coatings?  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Optical microcomponents are increasingly used in laser optical systems because of their many and novel industrial applications. These components are coated in order to enhance their optical performance, but optical characterizations are very difficult due to the shapes and small size. Thus, to perform this kind of measurement, special devices are needed. It is difficult to check component optical responses after manufacturing. Thus a new method, developed by the French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, is proposed to fill this gap.

    Piombini, Herve; Voarino, Philippe; Lemarchand, Fabien

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    330

    Pratt and Whitney thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. They are used in aircraft engines and have accumulated millions upon millions of reliable hours. Differences in the duty cycles of the aircraft and industrial gas turbines are recognized as is the marked differences in environmental operational envelope. At the completion of this program the TBCs best suited to meet the needs of the ATS program will have been identified, tested, and confirmed.

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    331

    North American Coating Laboratories | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    American Coating Laboratories American Coating Laboratories Jump to: navigation, search Name North American Coating Laboratories Address 9450 Pineneedle Drive Place Mentor, Ohio Zip 44060 Sector Services, Solar Product Consulting; Engineering/architectural/design; Manufacturing; Research and development;Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 440-357-7000 Website http://www.nacl.com Coordinates 41.70303°, -81.302082° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.70303,"lon":-81.302082,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

    332

    Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials  

    SciTech Connect

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

    Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    333

    TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    334

    Wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    High interfacial stresses and coating failure are expected when a hard coating protects a more-compliant substrate in applications involving high-stress wear contact. Assuming that small differences in stiffness (or modulus) between the coating and substrate are required for a wear-resistant coating in such applications, four approaches have been taken to develop such coatings for cobalt-base alloys. Hardness, scratch adhesion, and nano-indentation testing identified the most promising candidates for cobalt-base alloys: A thin coating with hard Cr{sub 2}N and less-stiff Cr-N(ss) layers; a thick, four-layered coating with a 4{mu}m inner layer of Cr-N(ss)/ 1 {mu}m layer of Cr{sub 2}N/4 {micro}m layer of Cr-N(ss)/1 {micro} outer layer of Cr{sub 2}N; a duplex approach of ion nitriding to harden the subsurface,followed by application of a dual-layered Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating; and ion nitriding alone. The low scratch adhesion values and high modulus/hardness values indicate that ZrN, TiN, and plasma carburized coatings represent less beneficial approaches. Two different cobalt-base alloys were studied in this work: Haynes 25 and Stellite 3 (Stoody Deloro Stellite). Based on weight change, profilometry measurements, and metallographic and SEM examinations after four-ball wear testing, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/CrN(ss) coated coupons exhibited a significantly lower wear rate than the uncoated Haynes 25 coupons. Of greater importance, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coatings were adherent on the Stellite 3 intermediate balls and Haynes 25 cups, and prevented the wear of the cobalt-base substrate. based on these results, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating was the best coating candidate, and this coating could result in a reduced wear rate and less cobalt wear debris. The ion nitrided coupons exhibited slightly higher wear than the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coated coupons, while the wear of the thin duplex coated coupons was the highest. However, the nitride layer was adherent and protected the Haynes 25 substrate. Therefore, modification of the ion nitriding conditions or surface lapping after nitriding are approaches that may improve the wear resistance of the ion nitriding and duplex coatings.

    Cockeram, B.V.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    335

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game March 22, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT’s twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT's twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs In honor of Women's History Month, we've brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run

    336

    Warm coats, big thanks | Y-12 National Security Complex  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Community / Warm coats, big thanks Community / Warm coats, big thanks Warm coats, big thanks Posted: January 9, 2014 - 2:23pm Over the last 12 years, Y-12ers have donated almost 7000 coats, sweaters and other winter wear to the Volunteer Ministry Center. As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while, Y-12ers have shown their volunteer spirit for the twelfth straight year by helping countless people stay warm thanks to another successful United Way Coat Drive to benefit the Volunteer Ministry Center. In total, the site donated 589 coats and winter wear items, 64 pairs of gloves, 47 scarves, and 66 hats and toboggans, which VMC makes available to the public through its Knoxville office. In addition, this year's efforts were expanded to include collection of toiletries for VMC. Y-12 collected more than 20 copy paper boxes full of

    337

    Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

    Hirayama, Chikara (Murrysville, PA); Wagner, George R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    338

    Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

    Chan, Kwai S. (San Antonio, TX); Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry (San Antonio, TX); Liang, Wuwei (Austin, TX)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    339

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

    Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    340

    Optical interference coatings for improved luminaire performance. Final report  

    SciTech Connect

    An interior broadbeam HID uplight and an upstream roadway luminaire were developed to demonstrate that optical coated luminaire components can improve the visual effectiveness and energy efficiency of a lighting system. Optical coated reflectors and flat lens covers were very effective in the development of new improved lighting techniques. The coatings reduce reflection and transmission losses, opening the door to new design options for improving lighting performance and saving energy.

    Rubins, H.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    High temperature ceramic articles having corrosion resistant coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A ceramic article is disclosed which includes a porous body of SiC fibers, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers, SiC coated fibers or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} coated fibers, having at least one surface, the article having a coating of AlN adherently disposed throughout at least a portion of the porous body. 1 fig.

    Stinton, D.P.; Lee, W.Y.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    342

    VINYL COATING OF GRAPHITE PLATES FOR ULTRASONIC INSPECTION  

    SciTech Connect

    A process has been developed for application of a thin, adherent vinyi plastic coating to graphite plates to prevent absorption of coupling fluids'' used in ultrasonic inspection. The plates are preheated and dipped mechanically in a fluid plastisol, and the resulting coating is fused in an infra-red heater. No significant attenuation of ultrasonic impulse results from presence of the coating. After inspection, the vinyl sheath may be easily stripped from the plate. (auth)

    Church, J.S.; Bell, J.H. Jr.; Donahoe, J.K.; Faussone, R.A.; Rogers, G.B.; Rowen, J.T.

    1958-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    343

    METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    345

    In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Annika Mosier, graduate student from Stanford University presents a talk titled "In Situ Expression of Acidic and Thermophilic Carbohydrate Active Enzymes by Filamentous Fungi" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

    Mosier, Annika [Stanford University

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    346

    Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion  

    SciTech Connect

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    347

    Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes ...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

    348

    Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010...

    349

    Challenges in Applying Diamond Coatings to Carbide Twist Drills  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Despite of the attractive advantage of applying diamond coating to drills, ... Investigation of a Hybrid Cutting Tool Design for Shearing Operations of Sheet Metals.

    350

    Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Heat Exchangers in Heat Storage ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Inorganic salt hydrate PCMs have a number of advantages in comparison to ... Al -Si-Fe coatings on 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Cold Metal Transfer Technique.

    351

    Preparation of Polymer-Coated Functionalized Ferrimagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles*  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A simple chemical method to synthesize PMAA coated maghemite nanoparticles is described. Monomer methacrylic acid molecules were absorbed onto the synthesized ferrimagnetic nanoparticles followed by polymerization. The ...

    Yu, Shi

    352

    Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    353

    Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    354

    Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation-The Ohio State University Background When coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) is used in place of natural...

    355

    Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed Inconel Coating. Author(s), Sofiane Djeraf, Yamina Mebdoua, Hadj Lahmar, Rachid Lakhdari.

    356

    Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    May 1, 2007 ... Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites by Bianhua Han, Tianjiao Luo, Chunlin Liang,Guangchun Yao, ...

    357

    Effect of copper coatings on the interfacial between short carbon ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract Scope, Short carbon fiber reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites were prepared by stir casting. The fibers were coated copper by electroless ...

    358

    High-temperature Erosion Behavior of Aluminide-coated Turbine ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The high-temperature erosion behavior of an aluminide-coated turbine blade ... The Tensile Property Of A Gas Turbine Engine Fan Blade And Casing Material.

    359

    ARTICLE: Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... Topic Title: ARTICLE: Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency Topic Summary: F. Ghasripoor et. al. article from Materials ...

    360

    Protective coatings for front surface reflectors. Phase I, final report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicone resins were evaluated as protective coatings for front surface aluminum and silver reflectors. The solar weighted hemispherical reflectances and specular reflectances of float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum and protected with silicone coatings were measured. The float glass squares metallized with silver and aluminum were highly reflective. The total reflectances of the silver samples were 5 to 7% higher than the aluminized samples. The resin coated aluminum samples were much more specular than the silver samples. Coupling agents used to improve the adhesion of the protective silicone resin coating to the silver surface adversely affected the specularities.

    Dennis, W.E.

    1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.  

    SciTech Connect

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    362

    DISSERTATION: Mechanical Behavior of Gas Turbine Coatings - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... ABSTRACT: Coatings are frequently applied on gas turbine components in order to restrict surface degradation such as corrosion and ...

    363

    Mechanical Behavior of Technological Coatings and Thin Films  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    New “green” coatings made from renewable materials or using green manufacturing processes are sought in addition to traditional ... Just click on the button.

    364

    Behavior of Corrosion Prevention in Self-Healing Polymer Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    However, once the polymer coating has been breached, for example due to cracking ... Hysteretic Behavior of Concrete Cylinders Confined by Active Confining ...

    365

    Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Novel Current Activated Tip-based Sintering (CATS) of Advanced Materials · Preparation and Degradation Orgnic of Tio2 Coated on Light Ceramic Surface.

    366

    Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate Based Bio-ceramic Coatings on ... of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions.

    367

    Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc-nickel  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Chromium-free Conversion Coating for Electroplated Zinc- nickel. Author(s), Melissa L. Klingenberg, Clayton Drees, Elizabeth Berman, ...

    368

    Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 2, 2012 ... Symposium, Development of Advanced Alloys and Coating Systems for Demanding Oil and Gas Applications. Sponsorship. Organizer(s), Julio ...

    369

    Coating crystalline nuclear waste forms to improve inertness  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Crystalline waste forms of high simulated waste loading were successfully coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Sol-gel technology was used to produce microspheres that contained simulated waste. A separate process for cesium immobilization was developed, which loads 5 wt % Cs onto zeolite particles for subsequent coating. The chemical vapor deposition process was developed for depositing thin layers of carbon and silicon carbide onto particles in a fluidized-bed coater. Pyrolytic carbon-coated particles were extremely inert in numerous leach tests. Aqueous leach test results of coated waste forms were below detection limits of such sensitive analytical techniques as atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission.

    Stinton, D.P.; Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    370

    Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization  

    SciTech Connect

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL'Â?s feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

    Dr. Jose Nainaparampil

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    371

    Spark Plasma Sintering of Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrate  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present work, we will discuss the results of deposition of amorphous coatings on metallic substrates using spark plasma sintering method. The influence of ...

    372

    Development of Improved Bond Coat for Enhanced Turbine Durability  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    combustion gas was contaminated with sea salt and a second hold temperature of ..... J.H Wood and E.H. Goldman, “Protective Coatings”,. Superalloys II, ed.

    373

    Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    374

    Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

    Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    375

    Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated Conductor ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Phase Relation Studies of Energy Materials for Coated ... global energy demand and the need for improved efficiency of energy usage.

    376

    Formation of Vanadate Conversion Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present investigation, a chromate-free, corrosion-resistant conversion coating using vanadium based solution was applied to AZ31 magnesium alloy.

    377

    Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations ...

    378

    Water Phobic Powder Coatings Promise Breakthrough in Energy Saving ...  

    of algae on the surfaces of water systems. Water repellent coatings can be advantageously applied to large-scale structures, such as boat hulls,

    379

    Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

    For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

    380

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In the present investigation, HVAS process has been used to deposit coating on steel substrates.The oxidation behavior of HVAS sprayed (FeCr)-based ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    Hybrid Polymer/Nanoparticle Multi-Functional Optical Coatings ...  

    This unique capability of Sandia’s multifunctional coatings expands the potential applications into a variety of new markets. Benefits ... Department of Energy ...

    382

    Wear- and Corrosion-resistant Coatings for Oil and Chemical ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Wear- and Corrosion-resistant Coatings for Oil and ... and reactors for refinery processing, require protection against abrasion, friction, erosion ...

    383

    REPORT: Aluminide Coatings for Power-Generation Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the ...

    384

    Advanced Conductive Coating Process for Planar SOFC Stacks  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Advanced Conductive Coating Process for Planar SOFC Stacks. Author(s), Jung Pyung Choi, Jeffry W Stevenson, Eric M Riel, Jeff F. Bonnett, ...

    385

    Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Manganese Cobalt Spinel Oxide Based Coatings for SOFC Interconnects. Author(s), Jeffrey W. Fergus, Yingjia Liu, Yu Zhao. On-Site Speaker ...

    386

    Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects. Author(s), Heather McCrabb, Tim Hall, Junwei Wu, Hui Zhang, Xingbo Liu, ...

    387

    (DLC) Coatings: Part 1-Deposition and - Programmaster.org  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Thick TiSiCN and TiCrSiCN Nanocomposite Coatings and ... Functional Composites: Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes in Silica Aerogel.

    388

    HIGH SURFACE AREA SILICON CARBIDE-COATED CARBON AEROGEL ...  

    Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicon carbide, improving the thermal stability of the carbon ae ...

    389

    Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested ...

    390

    COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    OAK A271 COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF STRONG GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER COATINGS. An investigation of the chemical composition and structure of strong glow discharge (GDP) polymer shells made for cryogenic experiments at OMEGA is described. The investigation was carried out using combustion and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The strongest coatings were observed to have the lowest hydrogen content or hydrogen/carbon H/C ratio, whereas the weakest coatings had the highest hydrogen content or H/C ratio. Chemical composition results from combustion were used to complement FTIR analysis to determine the relative hydrogen content of as-fabricated coatings. Good agreement was observed between composition results obtained from combustion and FTIR analysis. FTIR analysis of coating structures showed the strongest coatings to have less terminal methyl groups and a more double bond or olefinic structure. Strong GDP coatings that were aged in air react more with oxygen and moisture than standard GDP coatings. In addition to a more olefinic structure, there may also be more free-radial sites present in strong GDP coatings, which leads to greater oxygen uptake.

    CZECHOWICZ, DG; CASTILLO, ER; NIKROO, A

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    391

    Cathode Coating (IN09-061) - Argonne National Laboratory  

    A cathode coating that leads to faster battery charging and discharging without a loss ... Charge and discharge capacity of pristine, 250ºC dry air and

    392

    Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Ultrathin Alumina Coated Carbon Nanotubes as Anodes for High Capacity Li-Ion Battery. Author(s), Indranil Lahiri, Wonbong Choi. On-Site ...

    393

    Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Feb 1, 2001 ... TMS: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Home ... Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming Alloys by Stela ...

    394

    JOM 0601: Recent Progress in the Coating Protection of Gamma ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Recent Progress in the Coating Protection of Gamma Titanium-Aluminides. C. LEYENS, R. BRAUN, M. FRÖHLICH, and P. EH. HOVSEPIAN ...

    395

    Superhydrophobic Coating for Evaporative Purification and Minerals Extraction  

    Researchers at ORNL are using their superhydrophobic coating technology to tackle the age-old problem of obtaining potable water. In the process, they ...

    396

    Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    397

    Corrosion Control by Natural Alkaloids in Silicone Coatings on Mild ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Author(s), Sandy Tran, James Calvin Earthman. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Sandy Tran. Abstract Scope, Protective coatings are typically applied to improve

    398

    Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

    Kniseley, Richard N. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Merkle, Brian D. (Ames, IA)

    1990-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    399

    Thermal barrier coating resistant to sintering  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A device (10) having a ceramic thermal barrier coating layer (16) characterized by a microstructure having gaps (18) with a sintering inhibiting material (22) disposed on the columns (20) within the gaps (18). The sintering resistant material (22) is stable over the range of operating temperatures of the device (10) and is not soluble with the underlying ceramic layer (16). For a YSZ ceramic layer (16) the sintering resistant layer (22) may preferably be aluminum oxide or yttrium aluminum oxide, deposited as a continuous layer or as nodules.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Orlando, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    400

    Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry  

    SciTech Connect

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Thermal barrier coating having high phase stability  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A device (10) comprising a substrate (22) having a deposited ceramic thermal barrier coating characterized by a microstructure having gaps (28) where the thermal barrier coating comprises a first thermal barrier layer (40), and a second thermal barrier layer (30) with a pyrochlore crystal structure having a chemical formula of A.sup.n+.sub.2-x B.sup.m+.sub.2+x O.sub.7-y, where A is selected from the group of elements consisting of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and mixtures thereof, where B is selected from the group of elements consisting of Zr, Hf, Ti and mixtures thereof, where n and m are the valence of A and B respectively, and for -0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5, ##EQU1## and excluding the following combinations for x=0, y=0: A=La and B=Zr; A=La and B=Hf; A=Gd and B=Hf; and A=Yb and B=Ti.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    402

    Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    403

    Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    404

    Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Berning, Douglas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Atcher; Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Schmidt, Jurgen G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    405

    Advances in Coatings Technologies for Corrosion and Wear ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    N.R. Sorensen and F.M. Hosking. Pulsed Ion Beam ... Chromate-Free Corrosion Resistant Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys R.G. Buchhiet ... Corrosion Inhibition Mechanisms in Polymer Systems for Compliant Coatings Technologies ... C.R. Aita. High Energy Ion Processing of Materials for Improved Hardcoatings

    406

    Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    407

    Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    408

    Role of surface coating on cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Surface coating of cathode materials has been widely investigated to enhance the life and rate capability of lithium-ion batteries. The surface coating discussed here was divided into three different configurations which are rough coating, core shell structure coating and ultra thin film coating. The mechanism of surface coating in achieving improved cathode performance and strategies to carry out this surface modification is discussed. An outlook on atomic layer deposition for lithium ion battery is also presented.

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Amine, K.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Hanyang Univ.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    409

    Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration collects nearly 600 coats | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Y-12 collects nearly 600 coats Posted By Office of Public Affairs Warm coats, big thanks As East Tennessee faces the coldest temperatures seen in a long while,

    410

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    411

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics | Department of  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics Photovoltaic Electrical Contact and Cell Coating Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation. Electrical Contacts Electrical contacts are essential to PV cells because they bridge the connection between the semiconductor material and the external electrical load, such as a light bulb. The back contact of a cell-the side away from the incoming sunlight-is relatively simple. It usually consists of a layer of aluminum or molybdenum metal. Illustration of a cutaway of a typical solar cell. The layers, from top to bottom, include a cover glass, transparent adhesive, antireflection coating, front contact, n-type semiconductor, p-type seminconductor, and back contact.

    412

    Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to advance the knowledge of ceramic coatings for components in the hot gas-path of advanced, low-emission gas-fired turbine engines. The ceramic coating systems being studied by NDE include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades and combustor liners to allow hotter gas path temperatures and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Data provided by NDE methods will be used to: (a) provide data to assess reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages (c) track growth rates of defects during use in engines and (d) allow rational judgement for replace/repair/re-use decisions of components.

    Sun, J. G. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    Applications of coatings in coal-fired energy systems  

    SciTech Connect

    Corrosion and erosion of metallic structural materials at elevated temperatures in complex multicomponent gas environments that include particulates are potential problems in many fossil energy systems, especially those using coal as a feedstock. The use of appropriate corrosion-resistant coatings on metallic components offers an avenue to minimize material degradation and extend component life. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of coating performance in environments typical of pulverized-coal-fired boilers, coal gasification, fluidized-bed combustion, and gas turbines. The paper discusses the complexity of environments in different systems and the coating requirements for acceptable performance. Examples illustrate the morphology and corrosion/erosion performance of coating/structural alloy combinations exposed in some of these systems. La addition, future research and development needs are discussed for coating applications in several coal-fired systems.

    Natesan, K.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    414

    ADVANCED ELECTRON BEAM TECHNIQUES FOR METALLIC AND CERAMIC PROTECTIVE COATING SYSTEMS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    W. Fairbanks, "Advanced Gas Turbine Coatings for MinimallyResistance Coatings for Gas Turbine Airfoils, 11 Finaltion of Super alloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J, Metals,

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Element One, Inc. Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 191524 likes Element One, based in Boulder, Colorado, has created the only available coatings that change color when detecting hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks, either reversibly or non-reversibly, to provide both current and historical information about leaks. Element One's patented gas indicators and sensors use catalyzed thin films or nanoparticles of a transition metal oxide to create very low cost sensors for use in industrial and consumer environments, greatly reducing the potential for undetected leaks and their cost and safety implications. This technology is also being integrated for use in refineries, industry gas and fuel cells systems and was developed using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

    416

    Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

    Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    418

    Carbon coated textiles for flexible energy storage  

    SciTech Connect

    This paper describes a flexible and lightweight fabric supercapacitor electrode as a possible energy source in smart garments. We examined the electrochemical behavior of porous carbon materials impregnated into woven cotton and polyester fabrics using a traditional printmaking technique (screen printing). The porous structure of such fabrics makes them attractive for supercapacitor applications that need porous films for ion transfer between electrodes. We used cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study the capacitive behaviour of carbon materials using nontoxic aqueous electrolytes including sodium sulfate and lithium sulfate. Electrodes coated with activated carbon (YP17) and tested at 0.25 A$g1 achieved a high gravimetric and areal capacitance, an average of 85 F$g1 on cotton lawn and polyester microfiber, both corresponding to 0.43 F$cm2.

    Jost, Kristy [Drexel University; Perez, Carlos O [ORNL; Mcdonough, John [Drexel University; Presser, Volker [ORNL; Heon, Min [Drexel University; Dion, Genevieve [Drexel University; Gogotsi, Yury [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    Interface Science of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The drive for greater efficiency in propulsion and industrial/power production machinery has pushed metallurgy to develop ever better alloys and taken existing metallic components to their reliability threshold. Nowhere is that better illustrated than in turbine engine materials. The nickel-based superalloys currently in use for the most demanding areas of the engines melt at 1230-1315 aC and yet see combustion environments >1600 aC. The result is that these components require thermal protection to avoid failure from phenomena such as melting, creep, oxidation, thermal fatigue, and so on [1]. The stakes are high as the equipment must remain reliable for thousands of take-offs and landings for aircraft turbine engines, and up to 40,000 hours of operation in power generating land-based gas turbines [2, 3]. One of the most critical items that see both the greatest temperatures and experience the highest stresses is the hot-section turbine blades. Two strategies have been adopted to help the superalloy turbine blades survive the demanding environment: Active air cooling and ceramic thermal protection coatings, which together can reduce metal surface temperatures by >300 aC.[2]. The combination of turbine blade external film cooling and internal air cooling requires an exceptionally complex structure with flow passages and sets of small holes in the blades where air bled from a matching stage of the compressor is directed over the surface. Stecura [4] was among the first to describe a successful coating system, and today s the ceramic insulating layer alone is credited with reducing metal temperatures as much as 165 aC [1, 5].

    Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Emissivity enhancement coatings for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Ten emissivity enhancing coatings (ZrO{sub 2} + 18% TiO{sub 2} + 10% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrC, Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, ZrTiO{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2} + 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2% HfO{sub 2}, TiC, TiC + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 5% TiO{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2} + 10% MoSi{sub 2}) deposited on Mo, Nb, and Haynes 230 substrates were evaluated for potential use in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) radiator applications. Emissivity testing of as-coated and annealed coupons indicate that 5 of the 10 Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) coating candidates have promise (ZrO{sub 2} + 18% TiO{sub 2} + 10% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrC, Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, ZrTiO{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2} + 8% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 2% HfO{sub 2}). Four of the ten coatings have emissivity values that are too low to be of further interest (TiC, TiC + 5% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 5% TiO{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2} + 10% MoSi{sub 2}). The final coating was mostly Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and exhibited excessive evaporation during vacuum annealing with a significant decrease in emissivity. Base metal powder, which was added to the bond layer of all coatings to improve coating adhesion, was detected in the top layer of the coatings. Differences in reactive interaction between the base metal powder and coating during vacuum annealing produced varying changes in emissivity. A small decrease in emissivity was observed for the ZrC coating deposited on niobium, which agrees with the limited interaction between the niobium base metal particles and the ZrC coating detected in SEM/EDS examinations. A large decrease in emissivity was observed for the ZrC coating deposited on Haynes 230, and significant interaction between the base metal particles and ZrC coating was observed.

    Yue, J.J.; Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    Complete genome sequence of the filamentous gliding predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus type strain (114-95T)  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Herpetosiphon aurantiacus Holt and Lewin 1968 is the type species of the genus Herpetosiphon, which in turn is the type genus of the family Herpetosiphonaceae, type family of the order Herpe- tosiphonales in the phylum Chloroflexi. H. aurantiacus cells are organized in filaments which can rapidly glide. The species is of interest not only because of its rather isolated position in the tree of life, but also because Herpetosiphon ssp. were identified as predators capable of facultative pre- dation by a wolf pack strategy and of degrading the prey organisms by excreted hydrolytic en- zymes. The genome of H. aurantiacus strain 114-95T is the first completely sequenced genome of a member of the family Herpetosiphonaceae. The 6,346,587 bp long chromosome and the two 339,639 bp and 99,204 bp long plasmids with a total of 5,577 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2005.

    Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nett, Markus [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Domin, Nicole [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Martin, Karin [Hans Knöll Institute, Jena, Germany; Maresca, Julia A. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Berry, Kerrie W. [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bryant, Donald A. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    423

    Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO{sub 3} and WO{sub x} phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO{sub 2} and NiWO{sub 4} were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO{sub x} was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO{sub 3} oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E{sub a} = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E{sub a} {approx} 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO{sub 2}, and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO{sub 4} for W-N-Ni coatings.

    Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica-Polo II, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling  

    SciTech Connect

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    425

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders  

    SciTech Connect

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    426

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    427

    Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

    Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    428

    Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Pulse Electroplated Ni/nano-Al2O3 Composite Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Ni/nano-Al2O3 composite coatings were prepared by pulse electro-plating. The experiments of corrosion resistance were carried for 304 stainless steel, pure Ni coating and Ni/nano-Al2O3 composite coating in 3.5% NaCl and 10% HCl solutions. The microstrcuture ... Keywords: pulse electro-plating, composite coating, microhardness, corrosion resistance

    Hu Bin-Liang, Tan Yuan-Qiang

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Laser-deposited Calcium Phosphate based Bio-Ceramic Coatings ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This presentation will focus on a new class of bio-ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphate (CaP), that have been applied to the surface of titanium alloy

    430

    Tribological Study of Plasma Sprayed Wear Resistant Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Higher quality coatings are by and large achieved using high energy air plasma spraying system. Cr2O3.2TiO2 is ideal for hard chrome replacement.As sprayed  ...

    431

    Cold Spray Process as an Alternative for Bioactive Coatings for ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... Templates Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Improving the Resistance of Ceramic Surfaces to Biofilm Formation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on 316L ...

    432

    Biological Properties of Zinc Oxide-Coated Anodized Aluminum Oxide  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    We used agar diffusion assays to evaluate the activity of zinc oxide-coated ... Zirconia Stabilisation Nano-Confined by Using Electroless Nickel Cladding .... Metal Oxide Nanofibers Produced by a ForceSpinning Method for Battery Electrodes.

    433

    Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    070103 (36 Months Duration) 546,000 Total Contract Value (546,000 DOE) Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings for Industrial Gas-Turbine Engines Using a Novel Solution-Precursor...

    434

    Hydrophobic Polycationic Coatings Disinfect Poliovirus and Rotavirus Solutions  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Coating surfaces with N-alkylated polyethylenimines (PEIs), namely branched N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI via covalent attachment to glass or linear N,N-dodecyl,methyl-PEI by physical deposition (“painting”) onto polyethylene, ...

    Larson, Alyssa Maxine

    435

    Palladium Coated Kieselghuhr for Simultaneous Separation and Storage of Hydrogen  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This paper will discuss characteristics of the palladium-coated kieselguhr or diatomaceous earth, design and operation of the FTB, and results of performance tests such as separation efficiency, hydrogen storage capacity and system heat transfer characteristics.

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Ceria-Based High-Temperature Coatings for Oxidation Prevention  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... over alloy additions with respect to their low cost, relative ease of application, ... using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis ... coating follow a general trend in their performance of 321 > 316 > 347 > 304.

    437

    Strategies for incorporating functional block copolymers into polyelectrolyte multilayer coatings  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    This thesis explores the creation of thin film responsive hydrogel coatings via Layer-by Layer assembly (LbL) of temperature (T) responsive block copolymer - polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). First, the LbL conditions ...

    Tan, Wui Siew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    438

    Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    439

    Effect of Lithium PFC Coatings on NSTX Density Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Lithium coatings on the graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) in NSTX are being investigated as a tool for density profile control and reducing the recycling of hydrogen isotopes. Repeated lithium pellet injection into Center Stack Limited and Lower Single Null Ohmic Helium Discharges were used to coat graphite surfaces that had been pre-conditioned with Ohmic Helium Discharges of the same shape to reduce their contribution to hydrogen isotope recycling. The following deuterium NBI reference discharges exhibited a reduction in density by a factor of about 3 for limited and 2 for diverted plasmas respectively, and peaked density profiles. Recently, a lithium evaporator has been used to apply thin coatings on conditioned and unconditioned PFCs. Effects on the plasma density and the impurities were obtained by pre-conditioning the PFCs with ohmic helium discharges, and performing the first deuterium NBI discharge as soon as possible after applying the lithium coating.

    Kugel, H W; Bell, M G; Bush, C; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Mansfield, D; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Zakharov, L

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    440

    Progress in short period multilayer coatings for water window applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    mirrors for the water window,” Optics Letters, Volume 28,K alpha Line in the Water Window Region,” Applied Optics,coatings for water window applications E.M. Gullikson, F.

    Gullikson, E.M.; Salmassi, F.; Aquila, A.L.; Dollar, F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    Genetically engineered phage fibers and coatings for antibacterial applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Multifunctionality can be imparted to protein-based fibers and coatings via either synthetic or biological approaches. Here, we demonstrate potent antimicrobial functionality of genetically engineered, phage-based fibers ...

    Mao, Joan Y

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    442

    A method of fabricating coated splices for oilfield applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    A method is needed to make a critical splice for a downhole tool in the petroleum industry. The goal is to connect two wires, cover the connection with a protective coating, and then assess the integrity of the finished ...

    Killian, Lauren A. (Lauren Ashley), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    443

    High Performance Polymer Composite Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post Combustion CO 2 Capture and Separation From Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational...

    444

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The cold sprayed Al-BMG coating revealed a very dense structure with nearly zero ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    445

    Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    446

    Bonding Mechanism of Cold Spray Coating on Magnesium Alloys  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

    447

    Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a ...

    448

    Advanced thermal barrier coating system development: Technical progress report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Objectives are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability. Such coating systems are essential to the ATS engine (gas turbine) meeting its objectives.

    NONE

    1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    449

    Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

    SciTech Connect

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    450

    Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    451

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993  

    SciTech Connect

    Twelve weld overlay hardfacing alloys have been selected for preliminary erosion testing based upon a literature review. Four of the selected coatings were deposited on a 1018 steel substrate using plasma arc welding process. During the past quarter, the remaining eight coatings were deposited in the same manner. Ten samples from each coatings were prepared for erosion testing. Microstructural characterization of each coating is in progress. This progress report describes coating deposition and sample preparation procedures. Relation between coatings hardness and formation of cracks in coatings is discussed.

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    452

    Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    453

    Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets  

    SciTech Connect

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Farnum, E.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Vitkovski, I.V. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). MHD-Machines Lab.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    454

    Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    455

    Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles  

    SciTech Connect

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    456

    Durability of Hydrophobic Coatings for Superhydrophobic Aluminum Oxide  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Robust and easily produced Superhydrophobic surfaces are of great interest for mechanical applications, including drag reduction and MEMS. We produce novel superhydrophobic surfaces with several different coatings and tested the durability of each of these coatings with respect to long term immersion in water in order to determine the most long-lasting surface preparation. A pair of combinations of spin on polymers, surface features, and adhesion promoters was found that provide long term durability.

    Jenner, Elliot [University of Pittsburgh; Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; D'Urso, Brian R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    457

    In Situ Temporary Repair of Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The durability of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on combustion turbine blades and vanes is a critical issue in the power generation industry. Degradation of TBCs occur by the spallation of the ceramic layer — partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) — that resides on the Al2O3-covered MCrAlY bondcoat. In the event of such local failures of the TBC, a quick in-situ technique to repair the coating would be desirable.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    458

    Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers  

    SciTech Connect

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    459

    Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    460

    Protective coatings and sealants for solar applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    An aging study has been completed which evaluated a number of polymeric materials for potential use as (1) protective coatings for back surfaces of mirrors and (2) solar heliostat edge seals. These investigations were conducted in an artificial weathering chamber that accelerated thermal cycling. The primary mirror failure mode was observed to be silver corrosion resulting from moisture exposure. To increase mirror longevity in current heliostat designs, intimate bonding at all the composite interfaces is essential to minimize moisture pathways to the silvered surface. If any voids or delaminations are present, mirror degradation will eventually occur. Delaminations can also occur as the result of mechanical stresses brought about by mismatches in the various materials coefficients of thermal expansion. If good bonding cannot be achieved or mechanical stresses avoided, then improved moisture barriers must be designed to assure mirror longevity. With good adhesion, a KRATON rubber was found to exhibit superior back surface mirror protection (12 months in environmental chamber with no corrosion). An ultraviolet stabilized butyl rubber appeared to be the best edge seal. All heliostats edge sealed with silicones showed silver corrosion which indicated either poor bonding or moisture permeation.

    Wischmann, K. B.; Gonzales, M. H.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen-infrared coated filament" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    Abrasion resistant coating and method of making the same  

    SciTech Connect

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al--Cu--Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

    Sordelet, Daniel J. (Ames, IA); Besser, Matthew F. (Urbandale, IA)

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    462

    Abrasion Resistant Coating and Method of making the same  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An abrasion resistant coating is created by adding a ductile phase to a brittle matrix phase during spray coating where an Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline phase (brittle matrix) and an FeAl intermetallic (ductile phase) are combined. This composite coating produces a coating mostly of quasicrystal phase and an inter-splat layer of the FeAl phase to help reduce porosity and cracking within the coating. Coatings are prepared by plasma spraying unblended and blended quasicrystal and intermetallic powders. The blended powders contain 1, 5, 10 and 20 volume percent of the intermetallic powders. The unblended powders are either 100 volume percent quasicrystalline or 100 volume percent intermetallic; these unblended powders were studied for comparison to the others. Sufficient ductile phase should be added to the brittle matrix to transform abrasive wear mode from brittle fracture to plastic deformation, while at the same time the hardness of the composite should not be reduced below that of the original brittle phase material.

    Sordelet, Daniel J.; Besser, Matthew F.

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    463

    Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figures.

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1991-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    464

    DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES  

    SciTech Connect

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice`s interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas. 2 figs.

    Flynn, P.L.; Giammarise, A.W.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    466

    Apparatus for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance to erosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA); Giammarise, Anthony W. (Erie, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    467

    Process for depositing hard coating in a nozzle orifice  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention is directed to a process for coating the interior surfaces of an orifice in a substrate that forms a slurry fuel injection nozzle. In a specific embodiment, the nozzle is part of a fuel injection system for metering a coal-water slurry into a large, medium-speed, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In order to retard erosion of the orifice, the substrate is placed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reaction chamber. A reaction gas is passed into the chamber at a gas temperature below its reaction temperature and is directed through the orifice in the substrate. The gas reaction temperature is a temperature at and above which the reaction gas deposits as a coating, and the reaction gas is of a composition whereby improved resistance toerosion by flow of the particulates in the slurry fuel is imparted by the deposited coating. Only the portion of the substrate in proximity to the orifice to be coated is selectively heated to at least the gas reaction temperature for effecting coating of the orifice's interior surfaces by the vapor deposited coating formed from the reaction gas.

    Flynn, Paul L. (5139 Fox Park Dr., Fairview, PA 16415); Giammarise, Anthony W. (527 Lincoln Ave., Erie, PA 16505)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    468

    Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    469

    Fine uniform filament superconductors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

    Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Antaya, Peter D. (Sutton, MA); Seuntjens, Jeffrey M. (Singapore, SG); Hancock, Steven (Worcester, MA); DeMoranville, Kenneth L. (Jefferson, MA); Christopherson, Craig J. (Worcester, MA); Garrant, Jennifer H. (Natick, MA); Craven, Christopher A. (Bedford, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    470

    Breakup of Liquid Filaments  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    fields of view: a Nikkor 18-55 mm for 15×15 cm2, and a macro Tamron SP AF90 for 5×5 cm2. In drop-on-demand ink-jet printing, the speed of the jet is mainly controlled by the amplitude of the first volt- age peak, and its diameter by the duration...

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J.R.; Hutchings, I.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    471

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    472

    Effect of Grit Blasting on Substrate Roughness and Coating Adhesion  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughnesses produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel with different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using a Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those on substrates prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

    Dominic Varacalle; Donna Guillen; Doug Deason; William Rhodaberger; Elliott Sampson

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    473

    Measurement of thermal noise in multilayer coatings with optimized layer thickness  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

    Villar, Akira E.; Black, Eric D.; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G.; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 264-33, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbaune (France); Waves Group, University of Sannio at Benevento, Benevento, Italy, INFN and LSC (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    474

    Micro X-ray Radiography for the Coating Thickness Measurement in the Simulated TRISO-coated Fuel Particle  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    TRISO(Tri-Isotropic)-coated fuel particle is utilized owing to its higher stability at a high temperature and its efficient retention capability for fission products in the HTGR(high temperature gas-cooled reactor). The typical spherical TRISO-coated fuel particle with a diameter of about 1 mm is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The outer coating layers consist of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, an inner PyC(I-PyC) layer, a SiC layer, and an outer PyC(O-PyC) layer. Most of the inspection items for the TRISO-coated fuel particle depend on the destructive methods. Recently, X-ray radiography or X-ray CT methods are being applied to nondestructively measure the thickness of the coating layers at the relevant research organizations in the world. The destructive method is very accurate, but it is difficult to prepare test samples. Above all, the number of destructive test samples must be minimized during the fabrication process due to the generation of radioactive wastes during the test procedures. The thickness of the coating layers of the TRISO fuel particle can be nondestructively measured by the X-ray radiography without generating radioactive wastes. In this study, the thickness of coating layers for a simulated TRISO-coated fuel particle with a ZrO{sub 2} kernel instead of a UO{sub 2} kernel was measured by using micro-focus X-ray radiography. The used X-ray system is the Harmony 130 developed at DRGEM Corporation in Korea. The maximum tube voltage/current of the X-ray generator is 130 kV/400 {mu}A. The focus spot size of the X-ray generator is 5 {mu}m. The resolution of the used electronic X-ray detector is 48 {mu}m. The number of pixels is 1024 x 1024. And, the intensity resolution of a pixel is 12 bit (4096 gray levels). The tube voltage/current was 40 kV/100 {mu}A under the inspection condition. Here, the distance from the source to the detector was 397 mm, and the distance from the source to the center of the object ranged from 10 to 50 mm. The exposure time was adjusted to acquire images with a good quality of the boundaries. The radiographic image was also enhanced by an image processing technique to acquire clear boundary lines between the coating layers. The boundary lines were detected on the enhanced image. The thickness of the coating layers was computed by measuring the distance between the boundary lines. The thickness of the coating layers was effectively measured by applying the micro-focus X-ray radiography by using the precise X-ray generator and the electronic detector with a high resolution. The inspection process for the TRISO-coated fuel particles will be improved by the developed micro-focus X-ray radiography technology. (authors)

    Woong Ki, Kim; Young Woo, Lee; Ji Yeon, Park [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Duk-jin Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwan Woo, Lee; Jung Byung, Park [DRGEM Corp. 388-1, Asan Medical Center, Songpa, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung Woong, Ra [Chungnam National University, 220 Goong Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    475

    STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC.  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER-OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-94GO 10029 W(A)-95-018; CH-0863 The Petitioner, Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Electrochromics Windows Program." The objective of the cooperative agreement is to develop and demonstrate a thin-film electrochronic switching technology suitable for commercialization in the fenestration industry. The agreement comprises three phases including, respectively, development, demonstration, and market deployment. In Phase I, a viable electrochromic window system wilh a transmittance

    476

    Splice Resistance Measurements in 2G YBCO Coated Conductor  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Abstract The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating the electrical splice resistance of second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor. The purpose of the experimental investigation is to study the splice resistance of 2G YBCO coated conductor as a function of: a) operating temperature, b) magnetic field strength (B-field), and c) magnetic field orientation ( ). Understanding the splice resistance with its corresponding variation as a function of surface preparation and operating conditions is essential to the practical implementation of electric utility devices; e.g., motors, generators, transformers, cables, and fault-current limiters, etc. Preliminary test results indicate that the 2G YBCO splice resistance shows a weak temperature dependence and a significantly stronger dependence upon magnetic field strength and magnetic field orientation. Surface preparation conditions are also briefly discussed. Index Terms coated conductor, splice, critical current, YBCO

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Zhang, Yifei [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    477

    Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

    Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    478

    COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    479

    Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating  

    SciTech Connect

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

    Waldrop, Forrest B. (Powell, TN); Jones, Edward (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    480

    PATCHY SILICA-COATED SILVER NANOWIRES AS SERS SUBSTRATES  

    SciTech Connect

    We report a class of core-shell nanomaterials that can be used as efficient surface-enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. The core consists of silver nanowires, prepared through a chemical reduction process, that are used to capture 4- mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA), a model analyte. The shell was prepared through a modified Stöber method and consists of patchy or full silica coats. The formation of silica coats was monitored via transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy and phase-analysis light scattering for measuring effective surface charge. Surprisingly, the patchy silica coated silver nanowires are better SERS substrate than silver nanowires; nanomolar concentration of 4-MBA can be detected. In addition, “nano-matryoshka” configurations were used to quantitate/explore the effect of the electromagnetic field at the tips of the nanowire (“hot spots”) in the Raman scattering experiment.

    Murph, S.; Murphy, C.

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

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    481

    Durability testing of antireflection coatings for solar applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Antireflection (AR) coatings can be incorporated into highly transmitting glazings that, depending on their cost, performance, and durability of optical properties, can be economically viable in solar collectors, agricultural greenhouses, and PV systems. A number of AR-coated glazings have been prepared under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Durability of Materials for Solar Thermal Collectors. The AR coatings are of two types, including (1) various sol-gels applied to glass and (2) an embossed treatment of sheet acrylic. Typically, for unweathered glazings, a 4%--5% increase in solar-weighted transmittance has been achieved. For AR-coated glass, reflectance values as low as 0.5%--0.7% at selected wavelengths (680--720 nm) were obtained. To determine the durability of the hemispherical transmittance, several collaborating countries are testing these materials both outdoors and in accelerated weathering chambers. All materials exposed outdoors are affixed to mini-collector boxes to simulate flat-plate collector conditions. Results for candidate AR coatings weathered at geographically disperse outdoor test sites exhibit changes in spectral transmittance primarily in the high visible range (600--700 nm). Accelerated testing at measured levels of simulated solar irradiance and at different constant levels of temperature and relative humidity have been performed in different countries. Parallel testing with different levels of laboratory-controlled relevant stress factors permits the time-dependent performance of these materials to be compared with measured results from in-service outdoor exposure conditions. Coating adhesion and performance loss resulting from dirt and dust retention are also discussed.

    Jorgensen, G.; Brunold, S.; Koehl, M.; Nostell, P.; Roos, A.; Oversloot, H.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    482

    Substrate recovery of Mo-Si multilayer coated optics  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Imaging optics in a soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) system must meet stringent requirements to achieve high throughput and diffraction limited performance. Errors in the surface figure must be kept to less than {approximately}1 nm and the rms surface roughness must be less than 0.1 nm. The ML coatings must provide high reflectivity (> 60%) at wavelengths in the vicinity of 13 nm. The reflectivity bandpasses of the optics must be aligned within 0.05 nm. Each coating must be uniform across the surface of the optic to within 0.5%. These specifications challenge the limits of the current capabilities in optics fabrication and ML deposition. Consequently a set of qualified SXPL imaging optics is expected to be expensive, costing in the range of 100--250 k$. If the lifetime of the imaging optics is short, the replacement cost could significantly impact the economic competitiveness of the technology. The most likely failure modes for the imaging optics are mechanisms that degrade the ML coatings, but which leave the substrates intact. A potentially low cost solution for salvaging the imaging optics could be to strip the damaged ML coating to recover the substrate and then deposit a new coating. In this paper the authors report on the use of reactive ion etching (RIE) to remove Mo-Si ML coatings from precision optical substrates. The goal of this work was to characterize the etching process both in the ML film and at the substrate, and to determine the effects of the etching on the surface figure and finish of the substrate.

    Stearns, D.G.; Baker, S.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z