Sample records for halogen spotlights reflector

  1. Spotlights Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive Office of Legacy

  2. Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spotlight: Bryant Roybal March 1, 2015 Champion chile New Mexico's first green chile stew champion, Bryant Roybal, is proud to add first prize at the First Annual Great Bowls of...

  3. Spotlight: Jenna Casias

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryant Roybal AlumniSpotlight:

  4. Spotlight: Christopher Lee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryant Roybal Alumni

  5. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate...

  6. Spotlight, March 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Kansas Lawrence Campus. Energy Solutions Professionals (ESP), an Overland Park?based energy service company, and the KU Center for Sustainability are coordinating the competition to see which building can save the most energy over a twelve?week period... the results can be found at www.energy.ku.edu/lightsout/. Page 2 KU Center for Sustainability Sustainability Spotlight March 2012 1) Green Hall 13.5% 2) Bailey Hall 8.7% 3) Summerfield Hall 6.8% Building Overall Savings The Deans of the participating schools go toe...

  7. Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryant Roybal Alumni Link:

  8. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist'sScientists in the Spotlight

  9. Los Alamos Lab: MPA: Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spotlight on our people Jonathan Betts, MPA-NHMFL Jonathan Betts could be considered a jack-of-all-trades. The English native has gone from wiring thermometers for a small company...

  10. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  11. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  12. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryant RoybalSpotlights Archive

  13. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards Newsletter highlights the...

  14. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy...

  15. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on...

  16. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette...

  17. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors...

  18. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  19. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S. (Windsor, CO)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  20. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  1. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  2. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advance Manufacture of Reflectors fact sheet describes a SunShot Initiative project being conducted research team led by the University of Arizona, which is working to develop a novel method for shaping float glass. The technique developed by this research team can drastically reduce the time required for the shaping step. By enabling mass production of solar concentrating mirrors at high speed, this project should lead to improved performance and as much as a 40% reduction in manufacturing costs for reflectors made in very high volume.

  3. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive Office of

  4. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive Office ofJanuary

  5. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive Office

  6. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive OfficeApril 8, 2014

  7. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive OfficeApril 8,

  8. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive OfficeApril 8,April

  9. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySiteCarollm/spotlights-archive OfficeApril

  10. MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION PRODUCTS FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudbo, Aa. S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS RECE1VED Aa. S. Sudbo, P. A.FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS LBL-6966 Aa. S. Sudbo, t P. A.

  11. SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology) Undergraduate Hometown.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis in nanotechnology. Lindsay stands out as a very well-balanced student

  12. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local...

  13. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, Roger [University of Arizona

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of each reflected beam from the paraboloid focus give a direct measure of surface slope error. Key findings • A gravity sag method for large (2.5 m2) second surface glass solar reflectors has been developed and demonstrated to a uniquely high level of accuracy. Mirror surface slope accuracy of 0.65 mrad in one dimension, 0.85 mrad in 2 dimensions (point focus) has been demonstrated by commercial partner REhnu using this process. This accuracy exceeds by a factor of two current solar reflector accuracy. Our replicas meet the Sunshot accuracy objective of 2 mrad optical, which requires better than 1 mrad rms slope error. • Point-focus as well as line-focus mirrors have been demonstrated at 1.65 m x 1.65 m square – a unique capability. • The new process using simple molds is economical. The molds for the 1.65 m square reflectors are bent and machined steel plates on a counter-weighted flotation support. To minimize thermal coupling by radiative heat transfer, the mold surface is grooved and gilded. The molds are simple to manufacture, and have minimal thermal stresses and distortion in use. Lapping and bending techniques have been developed to obtain better than 1 mrad rms surface mold accuracy. Float glass is sagged into the molds by rapid radiative heating, using a custom high power (350 kW) furnace. The method of manufacture is well suited for small as well as large volume production, and as it requires little capital investment and no high technology, it could be used anywhere in the world to make solar concentrating reflectors. • A novel slope metrology method for full 1.65 aperture has been demonstrated, with 25 mm resolution across the face of the replicas. The method is null and therefore inherently accurate: it can easily be reproduced without high-tech equipment and does not need sophisticated calibration. We find by cross calibration with reference trough reflectors from RioGlass that our null-test laser system yields a measurement accuracy better than 0.4 mrad rms slope error. Our system is inexpensive and could have broad application for test

  14. SCHOLAR SPOTLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL STAFF IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    can student teachers and school social worker interns learn to support their students' social-service training in SEL for UIC students that focused on race and class. The group training occurred over sixMarch 2014 SCHOLAR SPOTLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL STAFF IN SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING Introduction How

  15. Children's School March 2012 Research Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School March 2012 Research Spotlight The Fish Game Dr. Anna Fisher is investigating, attention, processing speed, executive function, and language ability. In this "fish game", graduate children are presented with a series of fish similar to the ones pictured below. Children are told

  16. Children's School December 2013 Undergraduate Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School December 2013 Undergraduate Spotlight Arielle Cohen has always loved working with children and is so happy to be working with the wonderful group of children at the Children's School! She of a national non-profit that aims to help disadvantaged high school students through the college application

  17. Children's School February 2014 Undergraduate Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the Children's School. ! Child Development Interns Dr. Carver has five interns in her Practicum in ChildChildren's School February 2014 Undergraduate Spotlight Rafael McCauley started working at the Children's School midway through the first semester, and already knows it's the best job a student can have

  18. Children's School February 2012 Undergraduate Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at an elementary school, Esther taught robotics workshops for middle school students throughout her time in high to know the friends at the Childrens School. Esther is also taking Dr. Carvers course, Principles of ChildChildren's School February 2012 Undergraduate Spotlight Esther de la Torre is an assistant

  19. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  20. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods 1 Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives With support from the U.S. Energy Department's Better Buildings...

  1. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better...

  2. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  3. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (El Sobrante, CA); Page, Erik (Berkeley, CA); Gould, Carl T. (Medford, OR)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  4. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  5. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Sumner, Thomas L. (Wheaton, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  6. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  7. Spotlighting Howard University | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverviewEnergySpotlighting Howard

  8. 2, 14571486, 2005 Halogens in peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 1457­1486, 2005 Halogens in peat porewater H. Biester et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Halogens in porewater of peat bogs ­ the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter H. Biester 1 , D. Selimovi´c 1 , S. Hemmerich 1

  9. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  10. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In case you missed it, last Thursday's White House Solar Champions of Change and Solar Summit shed a spotlight on all the amazing work that solar innovators around country are...

  11. SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering Hometown: La Mirada, CA Involvement at USC: Society of Women Engineers- Corporate Affairs Committee member, Institute of Industrial Engineers- President, Viterbi Graduate Admissions Office- student staff member, Song Girl 2007 Favorite

  12. in the spotlight: can our excited synapses comprehendthem? s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve

    in the spotlight: can our excited synapses comprehendthem? s Patricia C. Salinas is in the Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW8 2AZ, UK. e-mail: p.salinas

  13. Development and Testing of Solar Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C.; Terwilliger, K.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To make concentrating solar power technologies more cost competitive, it is necessary to develop advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The Advanced Materials Team performs durability testing of candidate solar reflectors at outdoor test sites and in accelerated weathering chambers. Several materials being developed by industry have been submitted for evaluation. These include silvered glass mirrors, aluminized reflectors, and front-surface mirrors. In addition to industry-supplied materials, NREL is funding the development of new, innovative reflectors, including a new commercial laminate reflector and an advanced solar reflective mirror (ASRM). To help commercialize the ASRM, a cost analysis was performed; it shows the total production cost could meet the goal. The development, performance, and durability of these candidate solar reflectors and cost analysis results will be described.

  14. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  15. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  16. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  17. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  18. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Halogens, dioxins/Halogens, dioxins/furansfurans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .153 Halogens in fossil fuels (mg/kg)Halogens in fossil fuels (mg/kg) (listed as F, Cl, Br) Coal*, lignite 20 OrimulsionTM ~700 Petroleum coke, "petcoke" ~ 300 Natural gas - * Iodine 0.5 - 1.5 mg/kg #12;HELSINKI-related corrosion #3 Corrosion rateCorrosion rate versusversus chlorine in coalchlorine in coal #12;HELSINKI

  19. Crystallographic studies on enzymatic halogenation of natural products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasiak, Leah Cameron

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated natural products are common and serve roles as hormones, pesticides, antibiotics, and anti-tumor agents. The incorporation of a halogen atom into an organic scaffold can tune the molecule's potency and selectivity, ...

  20. anesthesiques halogenes pendant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry...

  1. active halogen species: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry...

  2. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  3. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin (Stillwater, MN); Janikowski, Stuart Kevin (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  4. Halogenation of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids. Thermodynamics Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imidazolium cations are promising for anion exchange membranes, and electrochemical applications and gas capture. They can be chemically modified in many ways including halogenation. Halogenation possibilities of the imidazole ring constitute a particular interest. This work investigates fluorination and chlorination reactions of all symmetrically non-equivalent sites of the imidazolium cation. Halogenation of all carbon atoms is thermodynamically permitted. Out of these, the most favorable site is the first methylene group of the alkyl chain. In turn, the least favorable site is carbon of the imidazole ring. Temperature dependence of enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy at 1 bar is discussed. The reported results provide an important guidance in functionalization of ionic liquids in search of task-specific compounds.

  5. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, Richard H. (Schenectady, NY); Zdeb, John J. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  6. Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ?100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

  7. Thermoelectric Research Takes Spotlight Improvements in Efficiency Help Fuel Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoelectric Research Takes Spotlight Improvements in Efficiency Help Fuel Results m i c h i g of alternative energy sources, thermoelectrics may not immediately come to mind, but MSU and the College interest in alternative energy sources certainly has helped to bring thermoelectrics into the limelight

  8. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  9. Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

  10. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Proctor, Larry Duane [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  11. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  12. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Drexler, Robert L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hunt, Robert N. M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  13. Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

    1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

  14. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  15. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 1 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -

  16. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 10 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -0

  17. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter

  18. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter2

  19. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight

  20. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'

  1. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'3

  2. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'34

  3. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  4. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  5. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  6. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight28 Workers'

  7. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 9 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  8. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, Walter L. (Royal Oak, MI); Catherino, Henry A. (Rochester, MI); Kotch, Richard J. (Mt. Clemens, MI)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  9. Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

  10. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Faraj, Bahjat (Lithonia, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  11. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  12. IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive of a tree can mean to different social groups. The organizers see this "citizen science" (one definition

  13. ______________________~~-www.lejacq.com ID:8430 SPOTLIGHT ON HEART FAILURE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    ______________________~~-www.lejacq.com ID:8430 SPOTLIGHT ON HEART FAILURE TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH of atherosclerotic plaque as well as infarct size associated with ischemic heart injury.2 An unexpected finding, how

  14. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  15. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  16. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K. (Birmingham, MI)

    1983-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  17. Compact directed percolation with movable partial reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronald Dickman; Daniel ben-Avraham

    2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a version of compact directed percolation (CDP) in one dimension in which occupation of a site for the first time requires that a "mine" or antiparticle be eliminated. This process is analogous to the variant of directed percolation with a long-time memory, proposed by Grassberger, Chate and Rousseau [Phys. Rev. E 55, 2488 (1997)] in order to understand spreading at a critical point involving an infinite number of absorbing configurations. The problem is equivalent to that of a pair of random walkers in the presence of movable partial reflectors. The walkers, which are unbiased, start one lattice spacing apart, and annihilate on their first contact. Each time one of the walkers tries to visit a new site, it is reflected (with probability r) back to its previous position, while the reflector is simultaneously pushed one step away from the walker. Iteration of the discrete-time evolution equation for the probability distribution yields the survival probability S(t). We find that S(t) \\sim t^{-delta}, with delta varying continuously between 1/2 and 1.160 as the reflection probability varies between 0 and 1.

  18. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  19. Imaging with Spherically Bent Crystals or Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts: Part I describes the working principle of a recently developed x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, where the astigmatism of spherically bent crystals is being used with advantage to record spatially resolved spectra of highly charged ions for Doppler measurements of the ion-temperature and toroidal plasmarotation- velocity profiles in tokamak plasmas. This type of spectrometer was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, and its concept was recently adopted for the design of the ITER crystal spectrometers. Part II describes imaging schemes, where the astigmatism has been eliminated by the use of matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or reflectors. These imaging schemes are applicable over a wide range of the electromagnetic radiation, which includes microwaves, visible light, EUV radiation, and x-rays. Potential applications with EUV radiation and x-rays are the diagnosis of laserproduced plasmas, imaging of biological samples with synchrotron radiation, and lithography.

  20. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  1. Optical Durability of Candidate Solar Reflectors for Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C. E.; Terwilliger, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use large mirrors to collect sunlight to convert thermal energy to electricity. The viability of CSP systems requires the development of advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The long-standing goals for a solar reflector are specular reflectance above 90% into a 4 mrad half-cone angle for at least 10 years outdoors with a cost of less than $13.8/m{sup 2} (the 1992 $10.8/m{sup 2} goal corrected for inflation to 2002 dollars) when manufactured in large volumes. Durability testing of a variety of candidate solar reflector materials at outdoor test sites and in laboratory accelerated weathering chambers is the main activity within the Advanced Materials task of the CSP Program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Test results to date for several candidate solar reflector materials will be presented. These include the optical durability of thin glass, thick glass, aluminized reflectors, front-surface mirrors, and silvered polymer mirrors. The development, performance, and durability of these materials will be discussed. Based on accelerated exposure testing the glass, silvered polymer, and front-surface mirrors may meet the 10 year lifetime goals, but at this time because of significant process changes none of the commercially available solar reflectors and advanced solar reflectors have demonstrated the 10 year or more aggressive 20 year lifetime goal.

  2. Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) in the Norwestern Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pangallo, Kristin C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a distinctive class of marine organic compounds. They are naturally produced, they have a unique carbon structure, they are highly halogenated, and they bioaccumulate in ...

  3. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Abstract: We describe a solid state Br atom source for...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - agents anesthesiques halogenes Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry 17 Incompatible Chemicals -Partial list Chemical Incompatibilities Summary: , carbon tetrachloride or other chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, halogens Ammonia...

  5. Space Reflector Materials for Prometheus Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Nash; V. Munne; LL Stimely

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two materials studied in depth which appear to have the most promise in a Prometheus reflector application are beryllium (Be) and beryllium oxide (BeO). Three additional materials, magnesium oxide (MgO), alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were also recently identified to be of potential interest, and may have promise in a Prometheus application as well, but are expected to be somewhat higher mass than either a Be or BeO based reflector. Literature review and analysis indicates that material properties for Be are largely known, but there are gaps in the properties of Be0 relative to the operating conditions for a Prometheus application. A detailed preconceptual design information document was issued providing material properties for both materials (Reference (a)). Beryllium oxide specimens were planned to be irradiated in the JOY0 Japanese test reactor to partially fill the material property gaps, but more testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) test reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was expected to be needed. A key issue identified for BeO was obtaining material for irradiation testing with an average grain size of {approx}5 micrometers, reminiscent of material for which prior irradiation test results were promising. Current commercially available material has an average grain size of {approx}10 micrometers. The literature indicated that improved irradiation performance could be expected (e.g., reduced irradiation-induced swelling) with the finer grain size material. Confirmation of these results would allow the use of historic irradiated materials test results from the literature, reducing the extent of required testing and therefore the cost of using this material. Environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with manufacturing are significant but manageable for Be and BeO. Although particulate-generating operations (e.g., machining, grinding, etc.) involving Be-bearing materials require significant controls, handling of clean, finished products requires only modest controls. Neither material was initially considered to be viable as a structural material, however, based on improved understanding of its unirradiated properties, Be should be evaluated due to having potentially acceptable structural properties in the unirradiated condition, i. e., during launch, when loads might be most limiting. All three of the alternative materials are non-hazardous, and thus do not engender the ES&H concerns associated with use of Be or BeO. Aluminum oxide is a widely available ceramic material with well characterized physical properties and well developed processing practices. Although the densest (3.97 g/cm{sup 3} versus Be: 1.85, BeO: 3.01, MgO: 3.58, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: 3.60, all theoretical density), and therefore the heaviest, of all the materials considered for this application, its ease of fabrication, mechanical properties, availability and neutronic characteristics warrant its evaluation. Similarly, MgO is widely used in the refractory materials industry and has a large established manufacturing base while being lighter than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Most of the commercially available MgO products incorporate additives or a second phase to avoid the formation of Mg(OH){sub 2} due to spontaneous reaction with ambient humidity. The hygroscopicity of MgO makes it a more difficult material to work with than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnesium aluminate spinel, although not as widely available as either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO, has the advantage of a density almost as low as MgO without being hygroscopic, and shares comparable neutronic performance characteristics in the reflector application.

  6. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  7. Neutronic evaluation of GCFR core diluents and reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kun, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials are evaluated for use as in-core diluents and as peripheral reflectors for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) service, using coupled Monte Carlo (MCNP) and isotopics (ORIGEN) codes. The principal performance indices ...

  8. Solar cell comprising a plasmonic back reflector and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, I-Kang; Zhu, Jia; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael David

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a solar cell having a plasmonic back reflector is disclosed. The method includes the formation of a nanoimprinted surface on which a metal electrode is conformally disposed. The surface structure of the nanoimprinted surface gives rise to a two-dimensional pattern of nanometer-scale features in the metal electrode enabling these features to collectively form the plasmonic back reflector.

  9. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E. (Middleton, WI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  10. Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

  11. Application of the OPTEX method for computing reflector parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, A. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079 suce. Centre-Ville, Montreal QC. H3C 3A7 (Canada); Leroyer, H. [EDF - R and D, SINETICS, 1 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are investigating the OPTEX reflector model for obtaining few-group reflector parameters consistent with a reference power distribution in the core. In our study, the reference power distribution is obtained using a 142,872-region calculation defined over a 2D eighth-of-core pressurized water reactor and performed with the method of characteristics. The OPTEX method is based on generalized perturbation theory and uses an optimization algorithm known as parametric linear complementarity pivoting. The proposed model leads to few-group diffusion coefficients or P1-weighted macroscopic total cross sections that can be used to represent the reflector in full-core calculations. These few-group parameters can be spatially heterogeneous in order to correctly represent steel baffles present in modern pressurized water reactors. The optimal reflector parameters are compared to those obtained with a flux-volume weighting of the reflector cross sections recovered from the reference calculation. Important improvements in full-core power distribution are observed when the optimal parameters are used. (authors)

  12. Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture Spotlight on Rutgers NJAES EcoComplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture April 2009 Spotlight on Rutgers NJAES Eco and economic growth," notes David Specca, assistant director for bioenergy technologies and controlled-environment agriculture at the EcoComplex. "By offering services and resources to entrepreneurs that are not available

  13. A SPOTLIGHT SEARCH METHOD FOR MULTI-CRITERIA OPTIMIZATION PROBLEMS Jung-Ho Lewe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    -criteria optimization (MCO) prob- lem, in general, is a difficult practice. Numerous meth- ods have been proposed and applied to various applica- tions over the past few decades. This paper introduces a new MCO method suitable for continuous, nonlinear MCO problems. The concept of the proposed method, a spotlight search

  14. A powerful reflector in relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yibing, E-mail: caoyibing@nint.ac.cn; Sun, Jun; Teng, Yan; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Lijun; Shi, Yanchao; Ye, Hu; Chen, Changhua [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved TM{sub 021} resonant reflector is put forward. Similarly with most of the slow wave structures used in relativistic backward wave oscillator, the section plane of the proposed reflector is designed to be trapezoidal. Compared with the rectangular TM{sub 021} resonant reflector, such a structure can depress RF breakdown more effectively by weakening the localized field convergence and realizing good electrostatic insulation. As shown in the high power microwave (HPM) generation experiments, with almost the same output power obtained by the previous structure, the improved structure can increase the pulse width from 25?ns to over 27?ns and no obvious surface damage is observed even if the generated HPM pulses exceed 1000 shots.

  15. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  16. Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li Lithium-halogen exchange reactions are essentially inert. 2 t-BuLi t-BuI + RLi t-BuLi isobutene + isobutane + LiI Lithium-halogen exchange reactions, and lithium iodide. H OEtBr H H OEtLi H1.1 eq n-BuLi Et2O, !80 °C Lau, K. S.; Schlosser, M. J. Org. Chem. 1978

  17. Steam-circuit Model for the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector , G. L. Morrison1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steam-circuit Model for the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector Prototype J. D. Pye1 , G. L. Morrison1.pye@student.unsw.edu.au Abstract The Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) is a linear-concentrating solar thermal energy system The Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) was first conceived of in 1992-1993 and was patented in 1995

  18. Birefringent omnidirectional reflector Kate Kaminska and Kevin Robbie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbie, Kevin

    silica Ref. 4 multilayer structures and in the near infrared with amorphous silicon silica Ref. 5 and Ga, and expensive. We demonstrate an omnidirectional reflector operat- ing at near-infrared wavelengths, made reflection of radiation at 1.1 m for all incidence angles and polarizations. The thin-film device

  19. Spotlight: Two Los Alamos scientists honored with E.O. Lawrence Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 Special Report:Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

  20. Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for CSP Collectors Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors Oak Ridge National Laboratory logo The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  1. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  2. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  3. Catalytic, Asymmetric r-Halogenation Harald Wack, Andrew E. Taggi, Ahmed M. Hafez,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lectka, Thomas

    reported "relay" deprotonation strategy,5 in which protons are shuttled from the chiral amine catalyst Phenylacetyl chloride 1a was used as a test substrate to screen the various halogenating agents using 10 mol

  4. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  5. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  6. DISSERTATION ELECTRON-REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    DISSERTATION ELECTRON-REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted by Kuo-Jui Hsiao ELECTRON- REFLECTOR STRATEGY FOR CdTe THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS-FILM SOLAR CELLS The CdTe thin-film solar cell has a large absorption coefficient and high theoretical

  7. What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    What is a seismic reflector like? Nathalie Favretto-Cristini1 , Paul Cristini1 , and Eric de of reflectors from a seismic viewpoint. This region is repre- sented by a volume of integration of medium and syncline type. The maximum vertical extent might be larger than the seismic wavelengths for subcritical

  8. Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Manufacture of Second-Surface, Silvered Glass Reflectors for High-Performance, Low-Cost CSP Collector Systems

  9. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  10. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  11. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  12. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

  13. Design and fabrication of highly efficient electrooptic modulators using bragg grating reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -directional coupling that includes an attenuation coefficient. The Bragg grating spectral characteristics are exploited to fabricate distributed Bragg feedback modulators (DBFM) and Bragg reflector Fabry-Perot modulators (BFPM). The sharp cut-off in transmission...

  14. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF and Photon Science Directorate often

  15. Employee Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening aStructureStudent ProgramsMekenaZobrist

  1. Photodetector with absorbing region having resonant periodic absorption between reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Brennan, T.M.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector is disclosed that is responsive to a wavelength or wavelengths of interest which have heretofore been unrealized. The photodetector includes a resonant cavity structure bounded by first and second reflectors, the resonant cavity structure being resonant at the wavelength or wavelengths of interest for containing a plurality of standing waves therein. The photodetector further includes a radiation absorbing region disposed within the resonant cavity structure, the radiation absorbing region including a plurality of radiation absorbing layers spaced apart from one another by a distance substantially equal to a distance between antinodes of adjacent ones of the standing waves. Each of radiation absorbing layers is spatially positioned at a location of one of the antinodes of one of the standing waves such that radiation absorption is enhanced. The radiation absorbing layers may be either bulk layers or quantum wells includes a plurality of layers, each of which is comprised of a strained layer of InGaAs. Individual ones of the InGaAs layers are spaced apart from one another by a GaAs barrier layer. 11 figs.

  2. GREEN LIVING Replace incandencent and halogen light bulbs with LED and CLFs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    GREEN LIVING GUIDE ENERGY TRAVEL FOOD sustain yosef WATER Replace incandencent and halogen light for your laundry RESIST THAT SWITCH! Use natural light during the day, and no lights when you are gone USE MORE THAN YOU CAN EAT, reduce your waste stream DRINK FAIR TRADE COFFEE - Check out Conrad

  3. Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compounds; Groundwater management; Drinking water. Introduction Approximately one-half of the U and Hitt 2006 , or more complex process-based analyses utilizing groundwater models Eberts et al. 2005Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater: Use in Vulnerability

  4. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  5. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - CEP 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  6. Spotlight SAR interferometry for terrain elevation mapping and interferometric change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichel, P.H.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we employ an approach quite different from any previous work; we show that a new methodology leads to a simpler and clearer understanding of the fundamental principles of SAR interferometry. This methodology also allows implementation of an important collection mode that has not been demonstrated to date. Specifically, we introduce the following six new concepts for the processing of interferometric SAR (INSAR) data: (1) processing using spotlight mode SAR imaging (allowing ultra-high resolution), as opposed to conventional strip-mapping techniques; (2) derivation of the collection geometry constraints required to avoid decorrelation effects in two-pass INSAR; (3) derivation of maximum likelihood estimators for phase difference and the change parameter employed in interferometric change detection (ICD); (4) processing for the two-pass case wherein the platform ground tracks make a large crossing angle; (5) a robust least-squares method for two-dimensional phase unwrapping formulated as a solution to Poisson`s equation, instead of using traditional path-following techniques; and (6) the existence of a simple linear scale factor that relates phase differences between two SAR images to terrain height. We show both theoretical analysis, as well as numerous examples that employ real SAR collections to demonstrate the innovations listed above.

  7. Long-range, full-duplex, modulated-reflector cell phone for voice/data transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-range communications apparatus utilizing modulated-reflector technology is described. The apparatus includes an energy-transmitting base station and remote units that do not emit radiation in order to communicate with the base station since modulated-reflector technology is used whereby information is attached to an RF carrier wave originating from the base station which is reflected by the remote unit back to the base station. Since the remote unit does not emit radiation, only a low-power power source is required for its operation. Information from the base station is transmitted to the remote unit using a transmitter and receiver, respectively. The range of such a communications system is determined by the properties of a modulated-reflector half-duplex link.

  8. Halogen emissions from a small volcanic eruption: Modeling the peak concentrations, dispersion, and volcanically induced ozone loss in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    , with lesser quantities of H2S, H2 and CO. Volcanic emissions also often include halogen-bearing species, and the greater water vapor content in the lower troposphere at tropical latitudes, which enhance removal

  9. Oxidative halogenation of cisplatin and carboplatin: synthesis, spectroscopy, and crystal and molecular structures of Pt(IV) prodrugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Sarah M.

    A series of Pt(IV) prodrugs has been obtained by oxidative halogenation of either cisplatin or carboplatin. Iodobenzene dichloride is a general reagent that cleanly provides prodrugs bearing axial chlorides without the ...

  10. Wafer-Bonded Internal Back-Surface Reflectors for Enhanced TPV Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'Brien; D.A. Shiau; A.C. Anderson; Z.L. Liau; D.M. Depoy; G. Nichols

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses recent efforts to realize GaInAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR). The cells are fabricated by wafer bonding the GaInAsSb/GaSb device layers to GaAs substrates with a dielectric/Au reflector, and subsequently removing the GaSb substrate. The internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This approach is compatible with monolithic integration of series-connected TPV cells and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control.

  11. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  12. Method of increments for the halogen molecular crystals: Cl, Br, and I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, Krista G. [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand); Gaston, Nicola [MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6012 (New Zealand); Müller, Carsten; Paulus, Beate [Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of increments (MI) calculations reveal the n-body correlation contributions to binding in solid chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Secondary binding contributions as well as d-correlation energies are estimated and compared between each solid halogen. We illustrate that binding is entirely determined by two-body correlation effects, which account for >80% of the total correlation energy. One-body, three-body, and exchange contributions are repulsive. Using density-fitting (DF) local coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples for incremental calculations, we obtain excellent agreement with the experimental cohesive energies. MI results from DF local second-order Mřller-Plesset perturbation (LMP2) yield considerably over-bound cohesive energies. Comparative calculations with density functional theory and periodic LMP2 method are also shown to be less accurate for the solid halogens.

  13. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cartoni, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.cartoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Universitŕ di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, Roma 00185 (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Universitŕ di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, Roma 00185 (Italy); Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) 00015 (Italy)] [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) 00015 (Italy)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4?n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  14. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Clerc; Alain Hébert; Hadrien Leroyer; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Bertrand Bouriquet; Agélique Ponçot

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using reflectors computed with the proposed computational scheme, and the $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operator enables additional improvements.

  15. A SOLAR STILL AUGMENTED WITH A FLAT-PLATE COLLECTOR AND A REFLECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SOLAR STILL AUGMENTED WITH A FLAT-PLATE COLLECTOR AND A REFLECTOR A. Saleh A. Badran Mechanical ­ Jordan Amman ­ Jordan e-mail: asaleh@philadelphia.edu.jo e-mail: badran@ju.edu.jo ABSTRACT A solar distillation system was built and tested to study the effect of increasing the solar radiation incident

  16. DESIGN AND TESTING FOR NOVEL JOINT FOR WAVE REFLECTORS James Tedd1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tests. This is a steel bar reinforced concrete tank with the dimensions 15.7 m long, 8.5 m wide and 1DESIGN AND TESTING FOR NOVEL JOINT FOR WAVE REFLECTORS James Tedd1 , Erik Friis-Madsen2 , and Peter of the Wave Dragon has begun. This paper describes the design and testing process behind this. Tests conducted

  17. Deployable Tensegrity Reflectors for Small Satellites1 A.G. Tibert2 and S. Pellegrino3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, U.K. Abstract Future small satellite missions require low-cost, precision reflector structures with large aperture that can be packaged in a small envelope. Existing that deploys two identical cable nets (front and rear nets) interconnected by tension ties; the reflecting mesh

  18. Reflector modelling of small high leakage cores making use of multi-group nodal equivalence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theron, S. A. [South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa), PO Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Reitsma, F. [Calvera Consultants, PO Box 150, Strubensvallei, 1735 (South Africa)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on modelling reflectors in typical material testing reactors (MTRs). Equivalence theory is used to homogenise and collapse detailed transport solutions to generate equivalent nodal parameters and albedo boundary conditions for reflectors, for subsequent use in full core nodal diffusion codes. This approach to reflector modelling has been shown to be accurate for two-group large commercial light water reactor (LWR) analysis, but has not been investigated for MTRs. MTRs are smaller, with much larger leakage, environment sensitivity and multi-group spectrum dependencies than LWRs. This study aims to determine if this approach to reflector modelling is an accurate and plausible homogenisation technique for the modelling of small MTR cores. The successful implementation will result in simplified core models, better accuracy and improved efficiency of computer simulations. Codes used in this study include SCALE 6.1, OSCAR-4 and EQUIVA (the last two codes are developed and used at Necsa). The results show a five times reduction in calculational time for the proposed reduced reactor model compared to the traditional explicit model. The calculated equivalent parameters however show some sensitivity to the environment used to generate them. Differences in the results compared to the current explicit model, require more careful investigation including comparisons with a reference result, before its implementation can be recommended. (authors)

  19. Comparison of fixed asymmetrical and symmetrical reflectors for evacuated tube solar receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, D.R.; Monger, A. (Univ. of Sydney (Australia)); Morrison, G.L. (Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer simulation of the relative performance of certain truncated symmetrical and asymmetrical fixed reflector designs for solar energy collection was performed. The comparison was on the basis of annual energy delivered to a circular cylindrical evacuated tube receiver per unit of mirror area, but seasonal load information was also included to determine possible seasonal load matching advantages of one type of collector over another when storage is employed. Circumsolar radiation models based on recent correlations in the literature was included. Major conclusions were that: (1) Annual solar fractions of between 80% and 95% seem to be feasible with a load matching collector used with moderate energy storage, with 80-90% being a likely optimum; (2) CPC reflectors always gave the best annual output performance per unit of mirror area, and the lowest receiver area for situations of constant annual load, regardless of whether the storage is included in the system; (3) Asymmetrical concentrator are more cost-effective for strongly seasonally asymmetrical load patterns; (4) Fixed parabolic systems required much more receiver area than the symmetrical CPC and asymmetrical system investigated; (5) Concentration levels utilizable in fixed systems are higher than previously supposed, with 3.5:1 in an asymmetrical reflector being optimal or nearly optimal for the domestic load pattern used in the study; (6) Using a load matched reflector, the amount of storage required to achieve solar fractions of total thermal energy (space heating, water heating, clothes drying) above 90% in a residence appears to be much lower than previously thought.

  20. Analysis of large reflector antennas using CSP fringe formulation and higher-order diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehorai, Arye

    Analysis of large reflector antennas using CSP fringe formulation and higher-order diffraction- tric conductor (PEC) objects when illuminated by a Complex Source Points (CSP) beam expansion (S of a CSP-expansion illumination. In this work we discuss an application of the CSP fringe formulation

  1. Design and fabrication of highly efficient electrooptic modulators using bragg grating reflectors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ryoung-Han

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bragg grating reflectors etched in amorphous silicon overlay films have been integrated with Ti:LiNbO3 optical waveguides. With a 12.5 mm long grating segment and an etch depth of ~ 93 nm in a 105 nm-thick silicon film, a narrow (0.05 nm) spectral...

  2. The end of the line? A spotlight on the historic US fishing port of Gloucester fails to capture the complexity of the fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    -abundantspecieswaspartlycausedbythe success of the schooner-based fishery, which, even though it relied on wind power, harvested enough is the story of Glouces- ter, Massachusetts, the oldest fishing port in the United States. Kurlansky spotlights fisheries regulators who cannot tell a bass from a cod. "Newlyn vessels had been landing more than

  3. Photovoltaic generator with a spherical imaging lens for use with a paraboloidal solar reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a generator for photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight into electricity. A generator according to the invention incorporates a plurality of photovoltaic cells and is intended for operation near the focus of a large paraboloidal reflector pointed at the sun. Within the generator, the entering concentrated light is relayed by secondary optics to the cells arranged in a compact, concave array. The light is delivered to the cells at high concentration, consistent with high photovoltaic conversion efficiency and low cell cost per unit power output. Light enters the generator, preferably first through a sealing window, and passes through a field lens, preferably in the form of a full sphere or ball lens centered on the paraboloid focus. This lens forms a concentric, concave and wide-angle image of the primary reflector, where the intensity of the concentrated light is stabilized against changes in the position of concentrated light entering the generator. Receiving the stabilized light are flat photovoltaic cells made in different shapes and sizes and configured in a concave array corresponding to the concave image of a given primary reflector. Photovoltaic cells in a generator are also sized and interconnected so as to provide a single electrical output that remains high and stable, despite aberrations in the light delivered to the generator caused by, for example, mispointing or bending of the primary reflector. In some embodiments, the cells are set back from the image formed by the ball lens, and part of the light is reflected onto each cell small secondary reflectors in the form of mirrors set around its perimeter.

  4. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  5. The development of large area saturable Bragg reflectors for the generation of widely-tunable ultra-short pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabanja, Sheila P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the realization of two photonic devices; 1) semiconductor lasers and 2) large area broadband Saturable Bragg Reflectors (SBRs). Semiconductor lasers explore the use of 3D and 2D quantum confinement ...

  6. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, Richard H. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape.

  7. Advanced ultraviolet-resistant silver mirrors for use in solar reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Gary J. (Pine, CO); Gee, Randy (Arvada, CO)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A silver mirror construction that maintains a high percentage of hemispherical reflectance throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors, comprising:a) a pressure sensitive adhesive layer positioned beneath a silver overlay;b) a polymer film disposed on the silver overlay;c) an adhesive layer positioned on the polymer film; andd) a UV screening acrylic film disposed on the adhesive layer.

  8. Transpolarising Trihedral Corner Reflector Characterisation Using a GB-SAR System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrer, Pere J; Aguasca, Albert; Pipia, Luca; Gonzalez-Arbesu, Jose M; Fabregas, Xavier; Romeu, Jordi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a low profile, light weight and easy to fabricate transpolarising surface placed on one side of a trihedral corner reflector (TCR) as polarimetric calibrator is presented in this letter. The transpolarising-TCR (TTCR) presents a high backscattered cross-polar response contrary to standard TCRs. The performance of this device has been tested at X-band using the UPC GB-SAR.

  9. Radar cross section of triangular trihedral reflector with extended bottom plate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trihedral corner reflectors are the preferred canonical target for SAR performance evaluation for many radar development programs. The conventional trihedrals have problems with substantially reduced Radar Cross Section (RCS) at low grazing angles, unless they are tilted forward, but in which case other problems arise. Consequently there is a need for better low grazing angle performance for trihedrals. This is facilitated by extending the bottom plate. A relevant analysis of RCS for an infinite ground plate is presented. Practical aspects are also discussed.

  10. Transpolarising Trihedral Corner Reflector Characterisation Using a GB-SAR System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pere J. Ferrer; Carlos Lopez-Martinez; Albert Aguasca; Luca Pipia; Jose M. Gonzalez-Arbesu; Xavier Fabregas; Jordi Romeu

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a low profile, light weight and easy to fabricate transpolarising surface placed on one side of a trihedral corner reflector (TCR) as polarimetric calibrator is presented in this letter. The transpolarising-TCR (TTCR) presents a high backscattered cross-polar response contrary to standard TCRs. The performance of this device has been tested at X-band using the UPC GB-SAR.

  11. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  12. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  13. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  14. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  15. Method of manufacturing large dish reflectors for a solar concentrator apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P (Tucson, AZ); Olbert, Blain H (Tucson, AZ)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing monolithic glass reflectors for concentrating sunlight in a solar energy system is disclosed. The method of manufacturing allows large monolithic glass reflectors to be made from float glass in order to realize significant cost savings on the total system cost for a solar energy system. The method of manufacture includes steps of heating a sheet of float glass positioned over a concave mold until the sheet of glass sags and stretches to conform to the shape of the mold. The edges of the dish-shaped glass are rolled for structural stiffening around the periphery. The dish-shaped glass is then silvered to create a dish-shaped mirror that reflects solar radiation to a focus. The surface of the mold that contacts the float glass preferably has a grooved surface profile comprising a plurality of cusps and concave valleys. This grooved profile minimizes the contact area and marring of the specular glass surface, reduces parasitic heat transfer into the mold and increases mold lifetime. The disclosed method of manufacture is capable of high production rates sufficiently fast to accommodate the output of a conventional float glass production line so that monolithic glass reflectors can be produced as quickly as a float glass production can make sheets of float glass to be used in the process.

  16. An Advanced Computational Scheme for the Optimization of 2D Radial Reflectors in Pressurized Water Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clerc, Thomas; Leroyer, Hadrien; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Bouriquet, Bertrand; Ponçot, Agélique

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a computational scheme for the determination of equivalent 2D multi-group heterogeneous reflectors in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The proposed strategy is to define a full-core calculation consistent with a reference lattice code calculation such as the Method Of Characteristics (MOC) as implemented in APOLLO2 lattice code. The computational scheme presented here relies on the data assimilation module known as "Assimilation de donn\\'{e}es et Aide \\`{a} l'Optimisation (ADAO)" of the SALOME platform developed at \\'{E}lectricit\\'{e} De France (EDF), coupled with the full-core code COCAGNE and with the lattice code APOLLO2. A first validation of the computational scheme is made using the OPTEX reflector model developed at \\'{E}cole Polytechnique de Montr\\'{e}al (EPM). As a result, we obtain 2D multi-group, spatially heterogeneous 2D reflectors, using both diffusion or $\\text{SP}_{\\text{N}}$ operators. We observe important improvements of the power discrepancies distribution over the cor...

  17. Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

  18. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Suntec solar collector with heat-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Suntec solar collector, with heat-formed glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  19. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  20. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  1. Seismic wave propagation in thinly-layered media with steep reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, H.L.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic waves reflected from steep reflectors in the earth`s subsurface spend a significant amount of time travelling more or less horizontally. Therefore, accurate imaging of steep geologic structure requires knowledge of the behavior of these horizontally propagating waves. In particular, the effect of tunneling on seismic waves propagating in thinly-layered media must be understood. I describe a method for modeling seismic waves traveling in thinly-layered media. This method, a frequency-wavenumber finite-difference scheme coupled with the Born approximation, is useful in studying seismic waves reflected from steep geologic structures.

  2. See-through amorphous silicon solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal back reflectors for building integrated photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yang [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); O’Brien, Paul G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada); Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Ozin, Geoffrey A., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Kherani, Nazir P., E-mail: gozin@chem.utoronto.ca, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Room GB254B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Room 140, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin semi-transparent hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC) back-reflectors are demonstrated. Short circuit current density of a 135?nm thick a-Si:H cell with a given STCPC back-reflector is enhanced by as much as 23% in comparison to a reference cell with an ITO film functioning as its rear contact. Concurrently, solar irradiance of 295?W/m{sup 2} and illuminance of 3480 lux are transmitted through the cell with a given STCPC back reflector under AM1.5 Global tilt illumination, indicating its utility as a source of space heating and lighting, respectively, in building integrated photovoltaic applications.

  3. Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

  4. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuninetti, G. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. (Ansaldo S.p.A., Genoa (Italy). Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. (Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  5. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  6. A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped engage distributors including Costco, the Home Depot, Bonneville Power Administration, and utility organizations.

  7. INCREASED CELL EFFICIENCY IN InGaAs THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS WITH DIELECTRIC AND METAL BACK REFLECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    INCREASED CELL EFFICIENCY IN InGaAs THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS WITH DIELECTRIC AND METAL BACK REFLECTORS solar cells enable very high photovoltaic efficiencies by virtue of employing different band gap materials in series- connected tandem cells to access the full solar spectrum. Researchers focused

  8. Design and performance of a low-cost acrylic reflector for a ~7x concentrating photovoltaic module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    of the prototype. The final design is an asymmetric compound parabolic concentrator mounted to an encapsulated increase in power output over an encapsulated receiver with no reflector. Keywords: compound parabolic push for drastic cost reductions in the deployment of solar electricity production has renewed interest

  9. Ultracold neutron accumulation in a superfluid-helium converter with magnetic multipole reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Zimmer; R. Golub

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze accumulation of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a superfluid-helium converter vessel surrounded by a magnetic multipole reflector. We solved the spin-dependent rate equation, employing formulas valid for adiabatic spin transport of trapped UCN in mechanical equilibrium. Results for saturation UCN densities are obtained in dependence of order and strength of the multipolar field. The addition of magnetic storage to neutron optical potentials can increase the density and energy of the low field seeking UCN produced and serves to mitigate the effects of wall losses on the source performance. It also can provide a highly polarized sample of UCN without need to polarize the neutron beam incident on the converter. This work was performed in preparation of the UCN source project SuperSUN at the ILL.

  10. New Method to Characterize Degradation of First Surface Aluminum Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, F.; Heller, P.; Meyen, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Kennedy, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Schmucker, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development of a new optical instrument capable of characterizing the aging process of enhanced first surface aluminum reflectors for concentrating solar power (CSP) application. Samples were exposed outdoors at different sites and in accelerated exposure tests. All samples exposed outdoors showed localized corrosion spots. Degradation originated from points of damage in the protective coating, but propagated underneath the protective coating. The degraded samples were analyzed with a microscope and with a newly designed space-resolved specular reflectometer (SR)2 that is capable of optically detecting and characterizing the corrosion spots. The device measures the specular reflectance at three acceptance angles and the wavelengths with spatial resolution using a digital camera's CMOS sensor. It can be used to measure the corrosion growth rate during outdoor and accelerated exposure tests. These results will allow a correlation between the degraded mirror surface and its specular reflectance.

  11. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  12. Enhanced absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with resonant back reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao, E-mail: jtliu@semi.ac.cn; Liu, Nian-Hua [Nanoscale Science and Technology Laboratory, Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Tong-Biao [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Li, Xiao-Jing [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} on top of one-dimensional photonic crystal (1DPC) or metal films with spacer layers is theoretically investigated by extracting the permittivity of monolayer MoS{sub 2} from existing experimental results [K. F. Mak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 136805 (2010)]. The absorption of graphene with 1DPC across a broad spectral range is substantially enhanced because of the photonic localization at the optical micro-cavity on top of the 1DPC or metal films. The absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} can be tuned by varying either the distance between the monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the back reflector or the thickness of the cover layers.

  13. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  14. Determination of heavy metals and halogens in plastics from electric and electronic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimitrakakis, Emmanouil [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, University Campus, 73100 Chania (Greece); Janz, Alexander; Bilitewski, Bernd [Institute for Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment, Dresden University of Technology, Pratzschwitzerstrasse 15, 01796 Pirna (Germany); Gidarakos, Evangelos [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, University Campus, 73100 Chania (Greece)], E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of hazardous substances and preparations in small waste electrical and electronic equipment (sWEEE) found in the residual household waste stream of the city of Dresden, Germany has been investigated. The content of sWEEE plastics in heavy metals and halogens is determined using handheld X-ray fluorescence analysis (HXRF), elemental analysis by means of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Mean value of results for heavy metals in samples (n = 51) by AAS are 17.4 mg/kg for Pb, 5.7 mg/kg for Cd, 8.4 mg/kg for Cr. The mass fraction of an additive as shown by HXRF (n = 161) can vary over a wide range. Precise deductions as regards sWEEE plastics content in hazardous substances and preparations cannot be made. Additional research would be expedient regarding the influence of hazardous substances to recycling processes, in particular regarding the contamination of clean fractions in the exit streams of a WEEE treatment plant. Suitable standards for calibrating HXRF for use on EEE plastics or complex electr(on)ic components do not exist and should be developed.

  15. A continuous fast-response dual-tracer analyzer for halogenated atmospheric tracer studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rydock, J.P.; Lamb, B.K. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single halogenated atmospheric tracer studies. A two-channel flow system was implemented consisting of an alumina cartridge in one channel and a glass beads cartridge of equal flow resistance in the second channel. The alumina passes only sulfur hexafluoride, while the glass beads pass both SF6 and the perfluoroarbon tracer. The SF6 is quantified directly from the electron capture detector (ECD) signal in the alumina channel, and the perfluorocarbon concentration is obtained from the difference of the ECD responses in the two channels. The dual-tracer analyzer is field portable for mobile operations or fixed-location monitoring, has a response time of 1.2 s, and has limits of detection of about 15 pptv for SF6 and 10 pptv for perfluoro-methylcyclohexane, which was the principal perfluorocarbon tracer used in this study. The present instrument configuration, which requires periodic purging of the adsorbent trap, can obtain continuous measurements for a 10-15-min segment in every half hour of operation. Dual-tracer data from a field demonstration test are presented.

  16. Criticality Safety Analysis on the Mixed Be, Nat-U, and C (Graphite) Reflectors in 55-Gallon Waste Drums and Their Equivalents for HWM Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, P

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this analysis is to develop and establish the technical basis on the criticality safety controls for the storage of mixed beryllium (Be), natural uranium (Nat-U), and carbon (C)/graphite reflectors in 55-gallon waste containers and/or their equivalents in Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. Based on the criticality safety limits and controls outlined in Section 3.0, the operations involving the use of mixed-reflector drums satisfy the double-contingency principle as required by DOE Order 420.1 and are therefore criticality safe. The mixed-reflector mass limit is 120 grams for each 55-gallon drum or its equivalent. a reflector waiver of 50 grams is allowed for Be, Nat-U, or C/graphite combined. The waived reflectors may be excluded from the reflector mass calculations when determining if a drum is compliant. The mixed-reflector drums are allowed to mix with the typical 55-gallon one-reflector drums with a Pu mass limit of 120 grams. The fissile mass limit for the mixed-reflector container is 65 grams of Pu equivalent each. The corresponding reflector mass limits are 300 grams of Be, and/or 100 kilograms of Nat-U, and/or 110 kilograms of C/graphite for each container. All other unaffected control parameters for the one-reflector containers remain in effect for the mixed-reflector drums. For instance, Superior moderators, such as TrimSol, Superla white mineral oil No. 9, paraffin, and polyethylene, are allowed in unlimited quantities. Hydrogenous materials with a hydrogen density greater than 0.133 gram/cc are not allowed. Also, an isolation separation of no less than 76.2 cm (30-inch) is required between a mixed array and any other array. Waste containers in the action of being transported are exempted from this 76.2-cm (30-inch) separation requirement. All deviations from the CS controls and mass limits listed in Section 3.0 will require individual criticality safety analyses on a case-by-case basis for each of them to confirm their criticality safety prior to their deployment and implementation.

  17. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Schaut

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Alcoa began this program in March of 2008 with the goal of developing and validating an advanced CSP trough design to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) as compared to existing glass based, space-frame trough technology. In addition to showing a pathway to a significant LCOE reduction, Alcoa also desired to create US jobs to support the emerging CSP industry. Alcoa's objective during Phase I: Concept Feasibility was to provide the DOE with a design approach that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase I consisted of two major tasks; reflector surface development and system concept development. Two specific reflective surface technologies were investigated, silver metallized lamination, and thin film deposition both applied on an aluminum substrate. Alcoa prepared samples; performed test validation internally; and provided samples to the NREL for full-spectrum reflectivity measurements. The final objective was to report reflectivity at t = 0 and the latest durability results as of the completion of Phase 1. The target criteria for reflectance and durability were as follows: (1) initial (t = 0), hemispherical reflectance >93%, (2) initial spectral reflectance >90% for 25-mrad reading and >87% for 7-mrad reading, and (3) predicted 20 year durability of less than 5% optical performance drop. While the results of the reflective development activities were promising, Alcoa was unable to down-select on a reflective technology that met the target criteria. Given the progress and potential of both silver film and thin film technologies, Alcoa continued reflector surface development activities in Phase II. The Phase I concept development activities began with acquiring baseline CSP system information from both CSP Services and the DOE. This information was used as the basis to develop conceptual designs through ideation sessions. The concepts were evaluated based on estimated cost and high-level structural performance. The target criteria for the concept development was to achieve a solar field cost savings of 25%-50% thereby meeting or exceeding the DOE solar field cost savings target of $350/m2. After evaluating various structural design approaches, Alcoa down-selected to a monocoque, dubbed Wing Box, design that utilizes the reflective surface as a structural, load carrying member. The cost and performance potential of the Wing Box concept was developed via initial finite element analysis (FEA) and cost modeling. The structural members were sized through material utilization modeling when subjected to representative loading conditions including wind loading. Cost modeling was utilized to refine potential manufacturing techniques that could be employed to manufacture the structural members. Alcoa concluded that an aluminum intensive collector design can achieve significant cost savings without sacrificing performance. Based on the cost saving potential of this Concept Feasibility study, Alcoa recommended further validation of this CSP approach through the execution of Phase II: Design and Prototype Development. Alcoa Phase II objective was to provide the DOE with a validated CSP trough design that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase II consisted of three major tasks; Detail System Design, Prototype Build, and System Validation. Additionally, the reflector surface development that began in Phase I was continued in Phase II. After further development work, Alcoa was unable to develop a reflective technology that demonstrated significant performance or cost benefits compared to commercially available CSP reflective products. After considering other commercially available reflective surfaces, Alcoa selected Alano's MIRO-SUN product for use on the full scale prototype. Although MIRO-SUN has a lower specular reflectivity compared to other options, its durability in terms of handling, cleaning, and long-term reflectivity was deemed the most important attribute to successfully validate Alcoa's advanced trough archi

  18. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  19. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance of the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  20. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  1. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  2. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  3. Monte Carlo analysis of a monolithic interconnected module with a back surface reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, C.T.; Charache, G.W. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Murray, C.S. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the photon Monte Carlo code, RACER-X, was modified to include wave-length dependent absorption coefficients and indices of refraction. This work was done in an effort to increase the code`s capabilities to be more applicable to a wider range of problems. These new features make RACER-X useful for analyzing devices like monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) which have etched surface features and incorporates a back surface reflector (BSR) for spectral control. A series of calculations were performed on various MIM structures to determine the impact that surface features and component reflectivities have on spectral utilization. The traditional concern of cavity photonics is replaced with intra-cell photonics in the MIM design. Like the cavity photonic problems previously discussed, small changes in optical properties and/or geometry can lead to large changes in spectral utilization. The calculations show that seemingly innocuous surface features (e.g., trenches and grid lines) can significantly reduce the spectral utilization due to the non-normal incident photon flux. Photons that enter the device through a trench edge are refracted onto a trajectory where they will not escape. This leads to a reduction in the number of reflected below bandgap photons that return to the radiator and reduce the spectral utilization. In addition, trenches expose a lateral conduction layer in this particular series of calculations which increase the absorption of above bandgap photons in inactive material.

  4. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred Ludwig (Princeton, NJ); Hill, Kenneth Wayne (Plainsboro, NJ); Scott, Steven Douglas (Wellesley, MA); Feder, Russell (Newton, PA); Ko, Jinseok (Cambridge, MA); Rice, John E. (N. Billerica, MA); Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles (New York, NY); Jones, Frank (Manalapan, NJ)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements for the point-to-point imaging of a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and ultrasound at large angles of incidence employ matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors to eliminate astigmatic imaging errors. Matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or spherically bent multi-layers are used for X-rays and EUV radiation; and matched pairs of spherically bent mirrors that are appropriate for the type of radiation are used with microwaves, infrared and visible light, or ultrasound. The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystals/mirrors or between 0.degree. and 45.degree. on the first crystal/mirror and between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on the second crystal/mirror, where the angles of convergence and divergence are equal. For x-rays and EUV radiation, also the Bragg condition is satisfied on both spherically bent crystals/multi-layers.

  5. VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector): Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique that extends velocity measurements from single points to a line. Single-frequency argon laser light was focused through a cylindrical lens to illuminate a line on a surface. The initially stationary, flat surface was accelerated unevenly during the experiment. Motion produced a Doppler-shift of light reflected from the surface that was proportional to the velocity at each point. The Doppler-shifted image of the illuminated line was focused from the surface through a push-pull VISAR interferometer where the light was split into four quadrature-coded images. When the surface accelerated, the Doppler-shift caused the interference for each point on each line image to oscillate sinusoidally. Coherent fiber optic bundles transmitted images from the interferometer to an electronic streak camera for sweeping in time and recording on film. Data reduction combined the images to yield a continuous velocity and displacement history for all points on the surface that reflected sufficient light. The technique was demonstrated in an experiment where most of the surface was rapidly driven to a saddle shape by an exploding foil. Computer graphics were used to display the measured velocity history and to aid visualization of the surface motion. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

  7. InAlN/GaN Bragg reflectors grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hosseini, D.; Peiro, F. [Departament d'Electronica, LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Estrade, S. [Departament d'Electronica, LENS-MIND-IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); TEM-MAT, SCT-UB, Sole i Sabaris 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of ten-period lattice-matched InAlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with peak reflectivity centered around 400 nm. Thanks to the well tuned ternary alloy composition, crack-free surfaces have been obtained, as confirmed by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their good periodicity and well-defined interfaces have been confirmed by both x-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. Peak reflectivity values as high as 60% with stop bands of 30 nm have been demonstrated. Optical measurements revealed that discrepancy between the obtained (60%) and the theoretically expected ({approx}75%) reflectivity is a consequence of significant residual absorption ({approx}35%). TEM measurements revealed the coexistence of zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, as well as planar defects, mainly in GaN. These defects are suggested as the potential source of the undesired absorption and/or scattering effects that lowered the DBRs' peak reflectivity.

  8. Searching for optimal mitigation geometries for laser-resistant multilayer high-reflector coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, S. Roger; Wolfe, Justin E.; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Feit, Michael D.; Pistor, Thomas V.; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing laser damage sites on multilayer high-reflector coatings can limit mirror performance. One of the strategies to improve laser damage resistance is to replace the growing damage sites with predesigned benign mitigation structures. By mitigating the weakest site on the optic, the large-aperture mirror will have a laser resistance comparable to the intrinsic value of the multilayer coating. To determine the optimal mitigation geometry, the finite-difference time-domain method was used to quantify the electric-field intensification within the multilayer, at the presence of different conical pits. We find that the field intensification induced by the mitigation pit is strongly dependent on the polarization and the angle of incidence (AOI) of the incoming wave. Therefore, the optimal mitigation conical pit geometry is application specific. Furthermore, our simulation also illustrates an alternative means to achieve an optimal mitigation structure by matching the cone angle of the structure with the AOI of the incoming wave, except for the p-polarized wave at a range of incident angles between 30 deg. and 45 deg.

  9. Two-port multimode interference reflectors based on aluminium mirrors in a thick SOI platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fandińo, Javier S; Muńoz, Pascual

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multimode interference reflectors (MIRs) were recently introduced as a new type of photonic integrated devices for on-chip, broadband light reflection. In the original proposal, different MIRs were demonstrated based on total internal reflection mirrors made of two deep-etched facets. Although simpler to fabricate, this approach imposes certain limits on the shape of the field pattern at the reflecting facets, which in turn restricts the types of MIRs that can be implemented. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate the use of aluminium-based mirrors for the design of 2-port MIRs with variable reflectivity. These mirrors do not impose any restrictions on the incident field, and thus give more flexibility at the design stage. Different devices with reflectivities between~0~and~0.5 were fabricated in a 3~um thick SOI platform, and characterization of multiple dies was performed to extract statistical data about their performance. Our measurements show that, on average, losses both in the aluminiu...

  10. Abstract--This paper deals with halogen luminaries, ones of the main used lighting sources in residential area. The use of these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    power systems were performed to show the accuracy of developed models. Index Terms--halogen lamp, EMTP is with Schneider Electric Industries (Business Unit Power ­ Systems and Mechatronic Integration), 31 Pierre Mendes and the LV power systems. But studies regarding the power up problem of electrical lighting systems where ETs

  11. Spectroscopic Signatures of Halogens in Clathrate Hydrate Cages. 1. Bromine Galina Kerenskaya,* Ilya U. Goldschleger, V. Ara Apkarian, and Kenneth C. Janda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    , the earliest gas clathrate hydrate discovered, was first prepared by Davy in 1811;1 bromine hydrateSpectroscopic Signatures of Halogens in Clathrate Hydrate Cages. 1. Bromine Galina Kerenskaya report the first UV-vis spectroscopic study of bromine molecules confined in clathrate hydrate cages

  12. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  14. MEISPP Internship Spotlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of academic majors, such as economics, business, international relations, biology, physics, engineering, etc. All internships include paid lodging; roundtrip airfare;...

  15. Spotlight, September 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boom early in the 20th century relegated the bicycle to the role of an expensive toy, generally for recreational use only. Recently, however, the hike in gas prices, the rise in public awareness of sustainable living and need for exercise... how much ends up in the landfill. Trash to Treasure By Meredith Walrafen, Center for Sustainability Intern Intern Meredith Walrafen in front of one of the many roll-off dumpsters used in Lawrence during move-out times. 4 Page 4 KU Center...

  16. Spotlight, August 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 2012 Page 1 KU Center for Sustainability Hertz on Demand also helps save the environment while saving its members money, by lessening harmful emissions and reducing congestion. Fewer cars on the road means lower CO2 emissions.... Sustainable practices were evident in other areas as well. Solar panels were put wherever they could fit to make the most of an often evasive sun, as clouds and rain became a normalcy. Touring a local organic winery meshed the initiatives of a...

  17. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards.

  18. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ann Schlenker

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ann Schlenker, Director for the Center for Transportation Research, discusses mentoring and working at Argonne.

  19. Spotlight, June 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    notice. The Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers’ Land Use Decisions (BACC:FLUD) project has brought together an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from The University of Kansas, Kansas State University, and Emporia State University... policies that promote or restrain certain land uses; and economic factors, such as food crop prices and biofuel crop prices. These data sets will be integrated with data from other sources into a rich, longitudinal database on land use decisions...

  20. Spotlight, November 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - and water-use decisions in a changing climate,” highlighting elements of the Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers' Land Use Decisions (BACC: FLUD) project. Engineering faculty and others across multiple social and natural science disciplines from... both KU and K-State are working on this collaborative project researching farmers’ decisions to grow biofuel crops as feedstocks for renewable energy production and their adaptation to climate change. Dr. Sturm’s focus was on irrigation demands...

  1. Spotlight, October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is June 2014. Transportation: Our Transit system uses hybrid buses along its busiest routes, and we’re piloting a compressed natural gas vehicle to By Eileen Horn, Lawrence/Douglas County Sustainability Coordinator learn more about this alternative...

  2. Spotlight, May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    landscape management with a high level of diversity and practices that include maintenance and enhancement of soil carbon stocks, best practices for water-use efficiency, and integrated nutrient management through livestock manure, green manure... that are no longer needed, or just won't fit in truck of their car. The Center for Sustainability, along with KU Surplus and KU Recycling, are helping to find new homes for many of these items and continue the 3 R's cycle. This year, the Center will be working...

  3. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Schlenker

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ann Schlenker, Director for the Center for Transportation Research, discusses mentoring and working at Argonne.

  4. Robot learning [TC Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russell Louis

    Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

  5. Spotlight, April 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oread. The board hopes to revive this tradition by working with students on annual planting and tree inventory projects. Students fro m the Enviro nmental Law Society help plant a redb ud tree. Sou rce: KU Scho ol of Law. You can help fund...: Sarah Link Left: Garbage - mostly plastic - accumulates on the Damon Slough Beach in Oakland, CA. Right: Manuel Mansylla from Plastic Pollution Coalition displays the plastic waste he collected in about an hour at the beach. Source: Sarah Link...

  6. Spotlight, April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to turn off all lights and appliances when they leave a room, and plan to conduct an energy audit to analyze the effectiveness of this program. In addition, Sigma Phi Epsilon has taken environmental consideration in every facility upgrade made.... She was a founder and chairperson of the Lawrence Community Environmental School charter, a co-founder of the Lawrence Environmental Education Project, an organizer for the Ecoliteracy Book Club in Lawrence, coordinator for the St. John school...

  7. Spotlight, March 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce environmental impacts and create a more sustainable workplace. Participants in the program must complete an application that identifies specific actions their offices are taking. The list includes strategies for cutting energy consumption..., reducing waste and making environmentally preferable purchases. Green 4 Page 4 KU Center for Sustainability March 2013 Last year’s competition led to a combined energy savings of 14.3%, and was equivalent to the electric use of 10.4 homes for a...

  8. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo StatesEmployeeHumanAlessandro

  9. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo StatesEmployeeHumanAlessandroBryant

  10. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwo

  11. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015 A gift

  12. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015 A

  13. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015

  14. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015Michael

  15. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10,

  16. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10,Ron Barber

  17. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist's

  18. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist'sScientists in the

  19. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist'sScientists in theScientists

  20. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist'sScientists in

  1. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearchPhysics Lab Scientist'sScientists inScientists In

  2. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurity /MaterialsPKGWhereAlessandro

  3. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurity

  4. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller Dave Keller-Sleepless

  5. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller Dave

  6. Employee Spotlight: Jason Halladay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller DaveCareer Jobs»

  7. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller DaveCareer Jobs»Jon

  8. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller DaveCareerKristen

  9. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller

  10. Employee Spotlight: Michelle Ferran

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave KellerCareer Jobs» Career

  11. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave KellerCareer Jobs»

  12. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave KellerCareer Jobs»Ron Barber

  13. Employee Spotlight: Sim Balkey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave KellerCareer Jobs»Ron

  14. 1 5-9.2002 . We report the core and reflector design parameters of reactor PIK needed for neutronic calculations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    PIK, needed for the reactor neutronic calculation. All up-to-date design modifications are taken÷òåíû ïîñëåäíèå èçìåíåíèÿ â êîíñòðóêöèè. Abstract We report the core and reflector design parameters of reactor PIK needed for neutronic calculations. The recent changes are taken into account. Ïðåïðèíò ¹2472, 12

  15. Broadband absorption enhancement in ultra-thin crystalline Si solar cells by incorporating metallic and dielectric nanostructures in the back reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Samart; Miljkovic, Vladimir D; Dmitriev, Alexamder; Trompoukis, Christos; Gordon, Ivan; van Dorpe, Pol; Daif, Ounsi El

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a back-reflecting scheme in order to enhance the maximum achievable current in one micron thick crystalline silicon solar cells. We perform 3-dimensional numerical investigations of the scattering properties of metallic nanostructures located at the back side, and optimize them for enhancing absorption in the silicon layer. We validate our numerical results experimentally and also compare the absorption enhancement in the solar cell structure, both with quasi-periodic and random metallic nanostructures. We have looked at the interplay between the metallic nanostructures and an integrated back-reflector. We show that the combination of metallic nanoparticles and a metallic reflector results in significant parasitic absorption. We compared this to another implementation based on titanium dioxide nanoparticles which act as a lambertian reflector of light. Our simulation and experimental results show that this proposed configuration results in reduced absorption losses and in broadband enhancement of a...

  16. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  17. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  18. Discovery, SAR, and Radiolabeling of Halogenated Benzimidazole Carboxamide Antagonists as Useful Tools for (alpha)4(beta)1 Integrin Expressed on T- and B-cell Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R D; Natarajan, A; Lau, E Y; Andrei, M; Solano, D M; Lightstone, F C; DeNardo, S J; Lam, K S; Kurth, M J

    2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The cell surface receptor {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} integrin is an attractive yet poorly understood target for selective diagnosis and treatment of T- and B-cell lymphomas. This report focuses on the rapid microwave preparation of medicinally pertinent benzimidazole heterocycles, structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel halobenzimidazole carboxamide antagonists 3-6, and preliminary biological evaluation of radioiodinated agents 7, 8, and 18. The I-125 derivative 18 had good tumor uptake (12 {+-} 1% ID/g at 24 h; 4.5 {+-} 1% ID/g at 48 h) and tumor:kidney ratio ({approx}4:1 at 24 h; 2.5:1 at 48 h) in xenograft murine models of B-cell lymphoma. Molecular homology models of {alpha}{sub 4}{beta}{sub 1} integrin have predicted that docked halobenzimidazole carboxamides have the halogen atom in a suitable orientation for halogen-hydrogen bonding. These high affinity ({approx} pM binding) halogenated ligands are attractive tools for medicinal and biological use; the fluoro and iodo derivatives are potential radiodiagnostic ({sup 18}F) or radiotherapeutic ({sup 131}I) agents, whereas the chloro and bromo analogues could provide structural insight into integrin-ligand interactions through photoaffinity cross-linking/mass spectroscopy experiments, as well as co-crystallization X-ray studies.

  19. Focusing electrode and coaxial reflector used for reducing the guiding magnetic field of the Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Junpu; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao, E-mail: hejuntao12@163.com; Wang, Lei; Deng, Bingfang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the theoretical analysis of the intense relativistic electron beam propagation in the coaxial drift-tube, a focusing electrode and a coaxial reflector is proposed to lessen the demand of the coaxial Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator (TTO) for the guiding magnetic field. Moreover, a Ku-band TTO with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is designed and studied by particle in cell simulation. When the diode voltage is 390 kV, the beam current 7.8 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.3 T, the device can output 820 MW microwave pulse at 14.25 GHz by means of the simulation. However, for the device without them, the output power is only 320 MW. The primary experiments are also carried out. When the guiding magnetic field is 0.3 T, the output power of the device with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is double that of the one without them. The simulation and experimental results prove that the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector are effective on reducing the guiding magnetic field of the device.

  20. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflectors lamps, as issued by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on April 11, 2014.

  1. GaN-based two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    GaN-based two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg 14 December 2007; published online 11 January 2008 GaN-based two-dimensional 2D surface-emitting photonic crystal PC lasers with AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors are fabricated and demonstrated

  2. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  3. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 739-756, December 2006 Velocity Structure in Marine Sediments with Gas Hydrate Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Sediments with Gas Hydrate Reflectors in Offshore SW Taiwan, from OBS Data Tomography Win-Bin Cheng 1 be considered a result of local shallowing of the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, caused by ascending structure was ob- served and could be associated with the phenomenon of hydrate/gas phase boundary

  4. Efficient directional spontaneous emission from an InGaAs/InP heterostructure with an integral parabolic reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gfroerer, T.H.; Cornell, E.A. [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309-0440 (United States)] [JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, 80309-0440 (United States); Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, 80401 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to increase the radiative efficiency and directivity of spontaneous emission from a lattice-matched InGaAs/InP heterostructure, we have polished the substrate into a parabolic reflector. We combine optical and thermal measurements to obtain the absolute external efficiency over a wide range of carrier densities. Using a simple model, the measurement is used to determine interface, radiative, and Auger recombination rates in the active material. At the optimal density, the quantum efficiency exceeds 60{percent} at room temperature. The divergence of the emitted light is less than 20{degree}. In fact, the beam profile is dominated by a 6{degree} wide lobe that can be swept across the field of emission by changing the excitation position. This suggests a way to create an all-electronic scanned light beam. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. One-wave optical time-reversal mirror by actively coupling arbitrary light fields into a single-mode reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, KyeoReh; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomena made possible by the wave property of light. To exploit this phenomenon, many diverse research fields have pursed the realization of an ideal phase conjugation mirror, but the ideal phase conjugation mirror - an optical system that requires a single-input and a single-output beam, like natural conventional mirrors - has never been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical time-reversal mirror using a spatial light modulator and a single-mode reflector. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing unlimited power throughput in the time reversed wave, which have not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput time-reversal full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  6. Electromagnetic modeling of the energy distribution of a metallic cylindrical parabolic reflector covered with a magnetized plasma layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir; Khajehmirzaei, M. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, GC, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoudi-Rahaghi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Jazi, B.; Abdoli-Arani, A. [Department of Laser and Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy distribution along the focal axis of a long metallic cylindrical parabolic reflector with a plasma layer on its surface in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. The effects of some physical parameters, such as the plasma frequency, the wave frequency and the thickness of plasma layer on the energy distribution and the reflected and transmitted electromagnetic fields, are simulated. These investigations for both S- and P-polarizations have been done separately. It is found that the maximum value of the reflected intensity increases by increasing the incident wave frequency and by decreasing the plasma layer thickness and the plasma frequency for both polarizations. Furthermore, the results show that the increase of the magnetic field strength can cause an increase in the reflected intensity for S-polarization and a slight decrease for P-polarization.

  7. Optimal design of one-dimensional photonic crystal back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu, E-mail: gfhou@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang, Jianjun, E-mail: jjzhang@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying [Institute of Photoelectronics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic Thin-film Devices and Technique, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC), a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) is a good back reflector (BR) because it increases the total internal reflection at the back surface. We used the plane-wave expansion method and the finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate and analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG), the reflection and the absorption properties of a 1D PC and to further explore the optimal 1D PC design for use in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. With identified refractive index contrast and period thickness, we found that the PBG and the reflection of a 1D PC are strongly influenced by the contrast in bilayer thickness. Additionally, light coupled to the top three periods of the 1D PC and was absorbed if one of the bilayers was absorptive. By decreasing the thickness contrast of the absorptive layer relative to the non-absorptive layer, an average reflectivity of 96.7% was achieved for a 1D PC alternatively stacked with a-Si:H and SiO{sub 2} in five periods. This reflectivity was superior to a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structure with 93.5% and an Ag film with 93.4%. n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells with an optimal 1D PC-based BR offer a higher short-circuit current density than those with a DBR-based BR or an AZO/Ag-based BR. These results provide new design rules for photonic structures in TFSC.

  8. STARTUP REACTIVITY ACCOUNTABILITY ATTRIBUTED TO ISOTOPIC TRANSMUTATIONS IN THE IRRADIATED BERYLLIUM REFLECTOR OF THE HIGH FLUX ISTOTOPE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, David [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. The computer program SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  9. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector with 0. 125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector, with 0.125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  10. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  11. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  12. Polarity dependence of the electrical characteristics of Ag reflectors for high-power GaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jae-Seong; Seong, Tae-Yeon, E-mail: tyseong@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jaecheon [Department of LED Business, Chip Development Group, LG Innotek, Paju 413-901 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun-Seok [School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the polarity dependence of the electrical properties of Ag reflectors for high-power GaN-based light-emitting diodes. The (0001) c-plane samples become ohmic after annealing in air. However, the (11–22) semi-polar samples are non-ohmic after annealing, although the 300?°C-annealed sample shows the lowest contact resistivity. The X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the Ga 2p core level for the c-plane samples experiences larger shift toward the valence band than that for the semi-polar samples. The XPS depth profile results show that unlike the c-plane samples, the semi-polar samples contain some amounts of oxygen at the Ag/GaN interface regions. The outdiffusion of Ga atoms is far more significant in the c-plane samples than in the semi-polar samples, whereas the outdiffusion of N atoms is relatively less significant in the c-plane samples. On the basis of the electrical and XPS results, the polarity dependence of the electrical properties is described and discussed.

  13. Silvered polymer reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schissel, P.; Neidlinger, H.H.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal objectives of the Solar Thermal Research Program is to develop silvered polymer films for constructing durable, low-cost, lightweight concentrating collectors for high temperature solar thermal systems. The mirrors are characterized for their solar-weighted (air mass 1.5) reflectance and exposed to environmental degradation. Photodegradation of polymers has also been studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy supplemented with surface analysis characterization. Results are discussed for extruded films, ultraviolet effects, metallization, and the effects of polymer additives. (LEW)

  14. Extreme ultraviolet reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newnam, Brian E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted mirror forms a retroreflector for a resonator loop in a free electron laser (FEL) operating in the XUV (.lambda.=10-100 nm). The number of facets is determined by the angle-of-incidence needed to obtain total external reflectance (TER) from the facet surface and the angle through which the FEL beam is to be turned. Angles-of-incidence greater than the angle for TER may be used to increase the area of the beam incident on the surface and reduce energy absorption density. Suitable surface films having TER in the 10-100 nm range may be formed from a variety of materials, including Al, single-crystal Si, Ag, and Rh. One of the facets is formed as an off-axis conic section to collimate the output beam with minimum astigmatism.

  15. Employee Spotlights | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ----Lithium-ion batteries ----Lithium-air batteries ----Sodium batteries --Electricity transmission --Smart Grid -Energy economy --Energy policy Environment -Biology...

  16. Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

  17. StudentSpotlight January 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    3150 #12;October 30th 2008 marked the third anniversary of the fire that destroyed the Mountbatten a phoenix from the ashes of its predecessor," said Head of ECS, Professor Harvey Rutt "It provides

  18. GaInAsSb/A1GaAsSb/Sb Thermophotovoltaic Devices With an Internal Back-Surface Reflector Formed by Wafer Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Wang; R.K. Huang; D.A. Shiau; M.K. Connors; P.G. Murphy; P.W. O'brien; A.C. Anderson; D.M. DePoy; G. Nichols; M.N. Palmasiano

    2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel implementation for GAInAsSb/AlGaAsSb/GaSb TPV cells with an internal back-surface reflector (BSR) formed by wafer bonding to GaAs is demonstrated. The SiO{sub x}/Ti/Au internal BSR enhances optical absorption within the device, while the dielectric layer provides electrical isolation. This configuration has the potential to improve TPV device performance; is compatible with monolithic series-interconnection of TPV cells for building voltage; and can mitigate the requirements of filters used for front-surface spectral control. At a short-circuit density of 0.4 A/cm{sup 2}, the open-circuit voltage of a single TPV cell is 0.2 V, compared to 0.37 and 1.8 V for 2- and 10-junction series-interconnected TPV cells, respectively.

  19. An efficient light trapping scheme based on textured conductive photonic crystal back reflector for performance improvement of amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu, E-mail: gfhou@nankai.edu.cn; Huang, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jianjun, E-mail: jjzhang@nankai.edu.cn; Ni, Jian; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photoelectronic Thin-Film Devices and Technique, Institute of Photoelectronics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Fan, QiHua [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, South Dakota State University, Brookings, South Dakota 57007 (United States)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient light trapping scheme named as textured conductive photonic crystal (TCPC) has been proposed and then applied as a back-reflector (BR) in n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell. This TCPC BR combined a flat one-dimensional photonic crystal and a randomly textured surface of chemically etched ZnO:Al. Total efficiency enhancement was obtained thanks to the sufficient conductivity, high reflectivity and strong light scattering of the TCPC BR. Unwanted intrinsic losses of surface plasmon modes are avoided. An initial efficiency of 9.66% for a-Si:H solar cell was obtained with short-circuit current density of 14.74?mA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor of 70.3%, and open-circuit voltage of 0.932?V.

  20. Laser damage study of nodules in electron-beam-evaporated HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng Xinbin; Shen Zhengxiang; Jiao Hongfei; Zhang Jinlong; Ma Bin; Ding Tao; Lu Jiangtao; Wang Xiaodong; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive electron beam evaporation process was used to fabricate 1.064 {mu}mHfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} high reflectors. The deposition process was optimized to reduce the nodular density. Cross-sectioning of nodular defects by a focused ion-beam milling instrument showed that the nodule seeds were the residual particles on the substrate and the particulates from the silica source ''splitting.'' After optimizing the substrate preparation procedure and the evaporation process, a low nodular density of 2.7/mm{sup 2} was achieved. The laser damage test revealed that the ejection fluences and damage growth behaviors of nodules created from deep or shallow seeds were totally different. A mechanism based on directional plasma scald was proposed to interpret observed damage growth phenomenon.

  1. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Sun, Fengqiang, E-mail: fqsun@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, South China Normal University (China); Exhibition Base of Production, Study and Research on New Polymer Materials and Postgraduate Students’ Innovation Training of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes (China); Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. • They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. • Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. • Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  2. Recent developments in Tropospheric Halogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Glasow, Roland

    that have been published in the last few years. Platt and Hönninger (2003) and von Glasow and Crutzen (2007 these ODEs were linked to the presence of bromine compounds (Barrie et al. 1988) and Hausmann and Platt (1994 termed the "bromine explosion" (Platt and Janssen, 1995). Mercury depletion events in the Arctic were

  3. Project Summary Report 0-4958-S PROJECTSUMMARYREPORT CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    light source were implemented using halogen lamps, laser line projectors, and LED arrays. As a result with Specially Designed Reflector The researchers chose a 300-watt halogen lamp as a light source and designed lane pavement inspection, two units were required. 3. High-Intensity LED Array An array of LED diodes

  4. Deployable Synthetic Aperture Radar Reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    ) satellite. The structure consists of four cylindrical surfaces formed from thin sheets of carbon-fibre-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) connected by flexible hinges along the edges. The key to forming a cylindrical surface with any. At full scale the reflective surface will be 7.9 m long by 3.2 m wide, and it has been estimated

  5. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Best Practices Series...

  6. Doe Sustainability SPOtlight - 2014 Sustainability Awards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The joint collaboration between LLNL's Weapons and Complex Integration's High Performance Computing data center and the laboratory's Operations & Business' enterprise data center...

  7. Employee Spotlight: Lydia Finney | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lydia Finney Share Topic Community Education Postdoctoral Program Operations Human Resources Diversity Programs Synchrotron radiation Argonne physicist Lydia Finney talks about her...

  8. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    bottom-line savings for businesses in the community. A local energy services company (ESCO), 1 MacDonald-Miller Facility Solutions, identified an opportunity for energy...

  9. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Powertrain research --Building...

  10. Sambamurti Memorial Lecture: Spotlight on the Gluon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Begelas

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Begel uses results from the Fermilab D0 and E706 experiments to explain how the production rate and energy spectrum of photons produced during proton collisions helped to clarify how the energy inside the proton is shared between quarks and gluons.

  11. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  12. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (Courtesy of Michael Bacchler) Alexis Powers EDITOR'S NOTE: Originally posted on the Solar Decathlon News Blog on September 19, 2011. Editor's Note: This post is one of a series...

  13. Children's School February 2012 Research Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    questions about several stories that he or she heard during the fall semester. For example, if your child two dolls, Susan and Ann, playing with a marble. Susan places the marble in her basket. Then, Susan and your child either watch or cover their eyes while Ann moves the marble from the basket to a box sitting

  14. NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synchrophasor technology to new levels and Snohomish County Public Utility District's energy challenge for small commercial businesses in recent issues of its monthly magazine....

  15. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  16. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nanocomposite coatings, as well as a range of novel nanolubricants and lubrication additives, have been hailed as major breakthroughs in the field. Erdemir's research is...

  17. griculture is in the spotlight as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . These "crite- ria pollutants" are ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2 to a particle of water. Equivalent spherical diameter (ESD) -- A term that categorizes the properties

  18. Employee Spotlight: Lydia Finney | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lydia Finney March 16, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Lydia Finney is an Argonne physicist working at the Advanced Photon Source, a large X-ray synchrotron that provides scientists and...

  19. Spotlight on Faculty Series Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    conceptualize the subject of their interest. It argues for the infusion of postcolonial imaginative literatures

  20. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles...

  1. Employee Spotlight: Beth Drewniak | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles...

  2. In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP » Important TrinityEnergyIn SituIn TheIn

  3. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseCElizabethTwoJanice Lovato March 10, 2015 AJosé

  4. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition oftheLightingResearchSaves Money,

  5. Workers' Spotlight Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThePatricia Hoffman isThe MetalsNewsletters Available

  6. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-State HybridizationSecurityDave Keller DaveCareer

  7. A Study of Contacts and Back-Surface Reflectors for 0.6eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 Thermophotovoltaic Monolithically Interconnected Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Carapella, J. J.; Ward, J. S.; Webb, J. D.; Wanlass, M. W.

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have recently rekindled a high level of interest for a number of applications. In order to meet the requirement of low-temperature ({approx}1000 C) TPV systems, 0.6-eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 TPV monolithically interconnected modules (MIMs) have been developed at the National Renewable energy Laboratory (NREL)[1]. The successful fabrication of Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 MIMs depends on developing and optimizing of several key processes. Some results regarding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiO2 insulating layer, selective chemical etch via sidewall profiles, double-layer antireflection coatings, and metallization via interconnects have previously been given elsewhere [2]. In this paper, we report on the study of contacts and back-surface reflectors. In the first part of this paper, Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contact to n-InAs0.32P0.68and p-Ga0.32In0.68As are investigated. The transfer length method (TLM) was used for measuring of specific contact resistance Rc. The dependence of Rc on different doping levels and different pre-treatment of the two semiconductors will be reported. Also, the adhesion and the thermal stability of Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contacts to n-InAs0.32P0.68and p-Ga0.32In0.68As will be presented. In the second part of this paper, we discuss an optimum back-surface reflector (BSR) that has been developed for 0.6-eV Ga0.32In0.68As/InAs0.32P0.68 TPV MIM devices. The optimum BSR consists of three layers: {approx}1300{angstrom} MgF2 (or {approx}1300{angstrom} CVD SiO2) dielectric layer, {approx}25{angstrom} Ti adhesion layer, and {approx}1500{angstrom} Au reflection layer. This optimum BSR has high reflectance, good adhesion, and excellent thermal stability.

  8. Effect of the photon lifetime on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors and an oxide current aperture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrov, M. A.; Blokhin, S. A., E-mail: blokh@mail.ioffe.ru; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Maleev, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Blokhin, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Zadiranov, Yu. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the photon lifetime in an optical microcavity on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and an oxide current aperture is studied. The photon lifetime in the microcavity is controlled by varying the upper DBR reflectance. It is found that the speed of VCSELs with a current-aperture diameter of 10 ?m is mainly limited by the self-heating effect, despite an increase in the relaxation-oscillation damping coefficient with increasing photon lifetime in the microcavity. At the same time, the higher level of internal optical loss in lasers with a current-aperture diameter of 1.5 ?m leads to dominance of the effect of relaxation-oscillation damping independently of the radiation output loss. In the case of devices with a current-aperture diameter of 5.5 ?m, both mechanisms limiting the speed operate, which allow an increase in the VCSEL effective modulation frequency from 21 to 24 GHz as the photon lifetime decreases from 3.7 to 0.8 ps.

  9. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szyszka, A., E-mail: szyszka@ihp-microelectronics.com, E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Lupina, L.; Lupina, G.; Schubert, M. A.; Zaumseil, P. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B. [Siltronic, Hanns-Seidel-Platz 4, 81737 München (Germany); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated that—with respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBR—the insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  10. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic...

  11. Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

  12. Laser having a nonlinear phase conjugating reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, V.; Yariv, A.

    1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is described which self-corrects for distortions introduced into the laser beam wavefronts by aberrations and time-varying phenomena internal to the laser. The improved laser includes a partially transmissive first reflecting element, an aperture stop, a lasing medium and a nonlinear phase conjugate reflecting device as the second reflecting element. During laser operation, aberrated wavefronts impinging upon the second reflecting element are reflected as the phase conjugate waveform thereof. The aperture stop restricts laser operation to the fundamental mode which allows only corrected, unaberrated waves to pass through the aperture stop and to subsequently exit the laser. Four embodiments are described utilizing stimulated brillouin scattering (Sbs), four-wave mixing, three-wave mixing and photon echo devices as the second reflecting element.

  13. Ideal light concentrators with reflector gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, R.

    1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical or trough-like radiant energy concentration and collection device is provided. The device includes an energy absorber, a glazing enveloping the absorber and a reflective wall. The ideal contour of the reflective wall is determined with reference to a virtual absorber and not the actual absorber cross section.

  14. Correlated-Intensity velocimeter for Arbitrary Reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhehui (Los Alamos, NM); Luo, Shengnian (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, Cris W. (Arlington, VA); Paul, Stephen F. (West Orange, NJ)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocimetry apparatus and method comprising splitting incoming reflected laser light and directing the laser light into first and second arms, filtering the laser light with passband filters in the first and second arms, one having a positive passband slope and the other having a negative passband slope, and detecting the filtered laser light via light intensity detectors following the passband filters in the first and second arms

  15. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, Petr Martin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.AC02-05CH11231, grant number NNSA LB06-316-PD05 / NN2001000.

  16. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kardauskas, Michael J. (Billerica, MA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  17. The Sandia Wave Reflector - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth's LowerFacilityTheSandia Hand Features

  18. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE IV C2-823 Colloque C2, suppl. au Journal de Physique 11, Vol. 1, septembre 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    has enabled the production of high performance circuits with gate delays below 30ps. The high emitter to block minority carrier injection and produce high gain. The future production of high speedlhigh gain sides using tungsten-halogen lamps with a total power of 18kW. White ceramic reflector plates

  19. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    applications as HF, used in the glass industry, as UF6 used in separating 235 U and 238 U isotopes compound CCl4. Fluorine is mainly found as HF in some fossil fuel-derived gases or when processing glass

  20. Learning in a Studio Mode, Spotlighting Teamwork and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    students supported by one instructor, 2 TF's, and 2 LA's" Focus on teamwork & active engagement" Learning student-centered active learning. 3/7/14Learning in a Studio Mode Why do Studio? Better learning overall Students like it better #12;3 Class design: Lecture 3/7/14Learning in a Studio Mode Lecture

  1. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    systems through increased mainline air venting, radiator vent replacement, and boiler control system upgrades. Likewise, the team developed a best practice resource for...

  2. McGuffey Art Center Spotlight Series SCIENCE & ART PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    the psychological effects of social and political trauma, natural disaster or illness on individuals, families, China, Israel, Malaysia, South #12;Korea, New Zealand, Japan, Canada and Taiwan. To learn more, visit as a like-minded community using psychodrama, shamanic energy medicine, and art therapy. #12;

  3. Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John T. Murphy Share Topic Operations Human Resources Programs Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling, simulation, & visualization Security Decision science Public...

  4. Cancer Cell of Origin: Spotlight on Luminal Progenitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaffer, Christine L.

    Does basal type breast cancer arise from oncogenic transformation of a basal cell type? In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Molyneux et al. (2010) investigate the provenance of the basal-type BRCA1 breast carcinoma and come ...

  5. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods 1 June 2012 Financing and Incentives Key Takeaways Maintain a base level of demand in the absence of rebates by providing mul-...

  6. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    checklist, which includes questions to qualify customers interested in upgrades, and a template proposal that emphasizes assessing homeowner needs and interests, rather than...

  7. Children's School January 2014 Family Spotlight: Nurturing Capable Children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , graph, sew, cook, hammer and drill. They experimented with technology, learned that their input's emotions more than we knew. Mae learned about the preciousness of water, its cycle and its different states. And by enacting the Native American "three sisters" farming practice, she will always know that beans were planted

  8. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    address their concerns, collect input on program ideas, and obtain real-time feedback on what is and is not working in the field. This strategy allowed for program...

  9. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Provide a regular forum for contractors to obtain program information, offer feedback, and build relationships with one another Reduce the startup cost barrier for...

  10. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Refrigeration Institute certificate, and any other documentation (i.e. load calculation, test reports, andor drawings from contractor as needed) 3) Verify the...

  11. Celebrity Power: Spotlighting and Persuasion in the Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Mark A.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As technological and business demands have transformed the operation and demands on news and entertainment media, celebrity activists have proliferated. Only a few years ago, the notion that these celebrities were anything ...

  12. 572 Public Administration Review July | August 2010 Spotlight on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    examines public management issues such as performance, homeland security, citizen participation, election in January 2001, would "usher in a new, more corporate era of management" (CNNfn 2001). "President Bush manage- ment," said a feature article in the New York Times Magazine. "If someone has to run things

  13. BOWHUNTER OBSERVATIONS VERSUS SPOTLIGHTING AS AN INDEX TO DEER ABUNDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New York State since 1970 (Davis 1975, Winchcombe 1993). The objective and observations of deer by bowhunters) were used at the MFCA to assess effectiveness in reaching the objective

  14. FROM THE ARCHIVES: SPOTLIGHT ON REGENTS Theodore Roosevelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    in African studies from How- ard University and taught at Sidwell Friends School and the University directed her energies towards volunteer work when she started her family. Clark first volunteered; and public outreach. She also was a member and chair of the Board's Audit and Review Committee from 1985

  15. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Working from Davis Energy Group's 20 years of experience with energy measure optimization, ARBI applies advanced modeling and analysis techniques to identify optimal,...

  16. FE SPOTLIGHT Cognitive dysfunction and risk assessment by prey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    of polar ice caps, changes in sea level and changing patterns and intensity of weather events (e.g. Reaser focused on the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on mean global tem- perature and the resulting melting impossible to predict how cognitive dysfunction will affect complex marine ecosystems. This is especially

  17. September 2009 Spotlight on Energy & the Environment Discovery Tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    of the farm's energy use is provided by more than 400 solar panels on the southern roof of his turkey barn role that Rutgers plays in environmental innovation. The tour began with a visit to Lee Turkey Farm of agriculture in New Jersey and guided a tour of his 54-acre farm, which is nestled in the arms of suburbia

  18. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green372 RoomforinDepartment of Energy

  19. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation and PARR |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green372 RoomforinDepartment of

  20. Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment of Energy

  1. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008 TBD-0075 -In the Matter

  2. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| DepartmentofofDepartment

  3. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained Coordination Better Buildings andofto a

  4. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained Coordination Better Buildings andofto

  5. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained Coordination Better Buildings

  6. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained Coordination Better BuildingsDeveloping

  7. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained Coordination Better

  8. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future ofHydronic Heating in

  9. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Driving Demand The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is part of the national Better Buildings Initiative led by the...

  10. DISCUSSIONSUndergraduate Research Journal of CWRU Faculty Spotlight: Mary Holmes 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    They Matter 10 A New Approach to Ohio Pig Farming 20 The GM Crop Network: An Overview of the Environmental

  11. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1A Potential Path toDepartment ofTechnology

  12. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz!NREL partnered withSee

  13. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz!NREL partnered

  14. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz!NREL partneredDepartment of

  15. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz!NREL partneredDepartment

  16. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy Completing theWhiz!NREL partneredDepartmentSee

  17. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving,Response3.pdfNovember 7,3GrandARPA-E TO HOLD

  18. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition oftheLightingResearchSaves Money,Awards

  19. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 14 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThePatricia Hoffman isThe Metals Plant

  20. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThePatricia Hoffman isThe Metals

  1. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 14 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters | DepartmentKavitaEnergy Safely Tear Down

  2. Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReview | Department ofTechnicalPRODUCTION

  3. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 BudgetGoalsHealth and ProductivityHey There.Presenter:

  4. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTime

  5. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTimeof

  6. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015Program Reach |

  7. A study of contacts and back-surface reflectors for 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} thermophotovoltaic monolithically interconnected modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Carapella, J.J.; Ward, J.S.; Webb, J.D.; Wanlass, M.W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems have recently rekindled a high level of interest for a number of applications. In order to meet the requirement of low-temperature ({approximately}1000&hthinsp;{degree}C) TPV systems, 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} TPV monolithically interconnected modules (MIMs) have been developed at the National Renewable energy Laboratory (NREL) [1]. The successful fabrication of Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} MIMs depends on developing and optimizing of several key processes. Some results regarding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiO{sub 2} insulating layer, selective chemical etch via sidewall profiles, double-layer antireflection coatings, and metallization via interconnects have previously been given elsewhere [2]. In this paper, we report on the study of contacts and back-surface reflectors. In the first part of this paper, Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contact to n-InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} and p-Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As are investigated. The transfer length method (TLM) was used for measuring of specific contact resistance R{sub c}. The dependence of R{sub c} on different doping levels and different pre-treatment of the two semiconductors will be reported. Also, the adhesion and the thermal stability of Ti/Pd/Ag and Cr/Pd/Ag contacts to n-InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} and p-Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As will be presented. In the second part of this paper, we discuss an optimum back-surface reflector (BSR) that has been developed for 0.6-eV Ga{sub 0.32}In{sub 0.68}As/InAs{sub 0.32}P{sub 0.68} TPV MIM devices. The optimum BSR consists of three layers: {approximately}1300 {Angstrom} MgF{sub 2} (or {approximately}1300 {Angstrom} CVD SiO{sub 2}) dielectric layer, {approximately}25 {Angstrom} Ti adhesion layer, and {approximately}1500 {Angstrom} Au reflection layer. This optimum BSR has high reflectance, good adhesion, and excellent thermal stability. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Manganese Porphyrins Catalyze Selective C-H Bond Halogenations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a manganese porphyrin mediated aliphatic C?H bond chlorination using sodium hypochlorite as the chlorine source. In the presence of catalytic amounts of phase transfer catalyst and manganese porphyrin Mn(TPP)Cl 1, reaction of sodium hypochlorite with different unactivated alkanes afforded alkyl chlorides as the major products with only trace amounts of oxygenation products. Substrates with strong C?H bonds, such as neopentane (BDE =?100 kcal/mol) can be also chlorinated with moderate yield. Chlorination of a diagnostic substrate, norcarane, afforded rearranged products indicating a long-lived carbon radical intermediate. Moreover, regioselective chlorination was achieved by using a hindered catalyst, Mn(TMP)Cl, 2. Chlorination of trans-decalin with 2 provided 95% selectivity for methylene-chlorinated products as well as a preference for the C2 position. This novel chlorination system was also applied to complex substrates. With 5?-cholestane as the substrate, we observed chlorination only at the C2 and C3 positions in a net 55% yield, corresponding to the least sterically hindered methylene positions in the A-ring. Similarly, chlorination of sclareolide afforded the equatorial C2 chloride in a 42% isolated yield. Regarding the mechanism, reaction of sodium hypochlorite with the Mn{sup III} porphyrin is expected to afford a reactive Mn{sup V}?O complex that abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, resulting in a free alkyl radical and a Mn{sup IV}—OH complex. We suggest that this carbon radical then reacts with a Mn{sup IV}—OCl species, providing the alkyl chloride and regenerating the reactive Mn{sup V}?O complex. The regioselectivity and the preference for CH{sub 2} groups can be attributed to nonbonded interactions between the alkyl groups on the substrates and the aryl groups of the manganese porphyrin. The results are indicative of a bent [Mn{sup v}?O---H---C] geometry due to the C—H approach to the Mn{sup v}?O (d??p?)* frontier orbital.

  9. Halogens in volcanic systems A. Aiuppa a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , Universitŕ di Palermo, Via archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo, Italy b Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Geofisica e Vulcanologia, sezione di Roma, Via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy e Department of Earth

  10. Toward the photo-induced reductive elimination of halogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manke, David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-driven energy conversion schemes have been proposed as alternative energy to fossil fuels. The target fuel of these schemes is hydrogen. For photocatalytic hydrogen production to be feasible, it must be performed on ...

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  14. Origin of Halogens and Nitrogen in Enstatite Chondrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Alan E.; Choi, Byeon-Gak

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Bischoff, J. Zipfel, Mineralogy of the Neuschwanstein (minmag.1997.061.408.09 A.E. Rubin, Mineralogy of meteoriteBuseck, E.F. Holdsworth, Mineralogy and petrology of the

  15. Origin of Halogens and Nitrogen in Enstatite Chondrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Alan E.; Choi, Byeon-Gak

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holdsworth, Mineralogy and petrology of the Yilmia enstatiteD.W. Mittlefehldt, I. Casanova, Petrology, chemistry and

  16. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  17. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  18. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  19. Transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy of hydrated halogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elles, Christopher G.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Crowell, Robert A.; Arms, Dohn A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to observe the transient species generated by one-photon detachment of an electron from aqueous bromide. The K-edge spectrum of the short-lived Br(0) atom exhibits a resonant 1s-4p transition...

  20. Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIV and evolutionSite

  1. Barber, Whitesides I Redut'tiLleClearage of Carhon-Halogen Bonds ReductiveCleavageof Carbon-HalogenBondsby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    halogenatom abstractionfrom thc alkyl halideby a nragnesiumatom (eq 2). c R -X * Ms, [R-X]-. sfcr + Me(l)- R

  2. Optical and Mechanical Effects of Elastomeric Distributed Bragg Reflectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamita, Gen

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .59) will give the true stress t: t1 = t2 = F A = piR2?P 2piRH = R?P 2H . (2.60) Equation 2.60 can be used to analyse the stress and strain of spherical balloons, or of any thin membrane/wall with a spherical curvature under pressure difference, including boilers...

  3. MODELLING OF CAVITY RECEIVER HEAT TRANSFER COMPACT LINEAR FRESNEL REFLECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This approach allows an affordable entry into renewable energy for existing coal-power producers, and allows them to meet the mandatory renewable energy targets set by the government of New South Wales . (Hu et) linear absorbers, achieving higher ground area efficiency. · Receiver is an inverted, trapezoidal, linear

  4. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  5. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  6. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors- FY12 Q4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  7. Development of Advanced Polymeric Reflector for CSP Applications - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treglio, Richard, T; Boyle, Keith, A; Henderson, Hildie

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project attempted to deposit extremely thick and dense protective barrier onto a mirror film stack with a PET substrate. The target thickness was very high for thin film products; particularly since large areas and long production lengths of film are needed to make the final product economic. The technical investigations in this project centered on maintaining a quality barrier (i.e. dense film) while evaporating alumina with a high deposition rate onto a low cost PET substrate. The project found that the proposed configuration, particularly direct ion bombardment, provides too narrow a solution space to effectively and economically produce the ASRM attempted. The initial project goals were met when depositing on a limited width and at a modest rate. However, expanding to wide deposition at aggressive deposition rates did not produce consistent film quality. Economic viability drives the process to maximize deposition rate. The current system configuration has a limiting upper rate threshold that does not appear economically viable. For future work, alternate approaches seem needed to address the challenges encountered in the scale-up phase of this project.

  8. Enhancing cholesteric liquid crystal laser performance using a cholesteric reflector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    laser based on a free- standing film of photo polymerized cholesteric liquid crystal," Appl. Phys. Lett as an optic fiber-based temperature sensor," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 2691-2693 (2004). 15. Y. Huang, Y. Zhou

  9. The Effect of Reflectors and Delamping Upon Light Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pashkevich, P. A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    raging from 52 percent between rows to 80 percent under rows for an average of nearly 70 percent. Light levels in rooms with fixtures on an even grid spacing ranged from 73 percent between fixtures to 86 percent under fixtures for room averages of 75...

  10. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors- FY13 Q1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Project Profile: Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlantLong IslandDepartment

  12. Project Profile: Advanced Polymeric Reflector for CSP Applications |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | Department ofPlantLong IslandDepartmentDepartment

  13. Project Profile: High Performance Reflector Panels for CSP Assemblies |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergy MITis PVSalts forDepartment

  14. The Spotlight Effect Revisited: Overestimating the Manifest Variability of Our Actions and Appearance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Champaign and Victoria Husted Medvec Northwestern University Received August 25, 2000; revised April 19, 2001; accepted of Illinois at Urbana­Champaign, 603 East Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820; or Victoria Husted Medvec, J. L

  15. oday the spotlight in the United States is on the increasing world demand for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . Future of agriculture: supply of food fiber and bio-fuels. Forest Residues Agricultural Crops Aquatic sources, such as bio fuels, forests, wind, solar and animal manure. While demand for hydrocarbon energy of energy from biomass, including trees, agricultural crops, animal manure and municipal solid waste

  16. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainabil...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sam McCord, Ralph Wrons, Sean Naegle, Debra Clifford, Ben St. Clair, Lynda Innis, Charles Snider, Chadwick Johnson, Matthew Smith, Jason Loyd, and Gabe Arrillaga. Jun 15, 2015 at 1...

  17. Student Spotlight Liberal Arts students are making a difference as they venture out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Hamburger conducted research in Colorado State's Restoration Ecology lab to find a shrub species that can tolerate high zinc concentrations for use in the restoration of mining sites. She worked as an intern

  18. "Weird Machines" in ELF: A Spotlight on the Underappreciated Metadata Rebecca Shapiro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Sean W.

    setup stages as well as any time the RTLD is invoked. 1 Introduction The great threat model change/shellcode into the target system and tricks the target into passing control into it) to "malicious computation" driven terms to describe the execution model and computational power of these exploit programming techniques

  19. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Energy Program, and State Energy Program to help Tribes tap into their abundant renewable energy resources. Webinar attendees will also hear about Montana's Confederated...

  20. Shifting the spotlight of attention: evidence for discrete computations in cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Our thoughts have a limited bandwidth; we can only fully process a few items in mind simultaneously. To compensate, the brain developed attention, the ability to select information relevant to the current task, while ...

  1. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for its broader potential. Other finalists were recognized for enhancing veterans' health care, boosting national security, saving lives during emergencies, advancing...

  2. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and concluded that mini-split heat pumps present a viable retrofit opportunity for some low-rise to midrise multifamily buildings. ARIES is currently planning projects with HFH...

  3. INDEXING DEER NUMBERS WITH SPOTLIGHTING: A LONG-TERM STUDY OF A MANAGED DEER POPULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -access program has been employed to manage deer at the Mary Flagler Cary Arboretum (MFCA) in southeastern New at the MFCA to assess the effectiveness of these controlled-access hunts in reaching that objective. #12

  4. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VIENNA – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has kept the United States at the forefront of characterization, remediation, and end-state reuse of uranium millsites around the world.

  5. Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight Issue 14 October, November, December 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssue 15

  6. Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight, July, August, September 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssue 15Issue 14

  7. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The Big Green372 RoomforinDepartment of Energy Advanced

  8. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future ofHydronic Heating in MultifamilyFieldChallengeDepartment

  9. EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah RiverSustainability | Department of

  10. #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|IdahotheWhat is the FOIARenewable Energy1pm

  11. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11

  12. ORNL, Industry Collaboration Puts Spotlight on Solar T DOING BUSINESS WITH ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, GiriDa Vinci

  13. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLS Experimental RunProcedureofUW Madison

  14. Under the OWASS Spotlight: Interview with Paul Azunre | MIT-Harvard Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |FrankUltrafastHydrogenTecnica)Nationalfor

  15. The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48H TreatmentEnergy TestTexasTheNation |The

  16. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRAM-04-07 Audit Report: OAS-M-04-07 September7-06,Shipments | Department

  17. C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . C l a r k CC. JeffreyR.

  18. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial ColdEnergySavvy HomeLaunch Home

  19. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2, 2015 The StatusAprilMarchEnergy AnLeadAj.Shipments |

  20. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOE FYAffairs,AssessmentInteractive Graphic Home EnergyPast

  1. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTime |

  2. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTime |Time |

  3. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015 JuneSpinningTime |Time

  4. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State|Special3020-2015

  5. Full Core, Heterogeneous, Time Dependent Neutron Transport Calculations with the 3D Code DeCART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hursin, Mathieu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tubes and baffle and radial reflector. Axially, there are 22Mesh c) Baffle and Radial Reflector Mesh d) Axial Reflector

  6. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University of Tennessee Knoxville in DOE's .EDUconnections Spotlight by Kathy Chambers on Tue, 4 Sep, 2012 University of Tennessee Knoxville Science is always in the spotlight at...

  7. Focus Series: Maine-Residential Direct Install Program | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable...

  8. Slide22 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spotlighting: .EDUconnections http:www.osti.govEDUconnections * OSTI "spotlights" individual universities and community colleges committed to supporting and advancing the U.S....

  9. Top Stories | Articles | Product News | Events | New Technologies | Newsletters | Forums | Videos Biocompare > News >

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosselin, Frédéric

    | Forums | Videos Biocompare > News > Tech Spotlight Efficiency Reigns In Protein Discovery More Spotlights way that understanding visual processing in honeybees has led to the development of flying robots

  10. Halogen-elimination photochemistry and oxygen-activation chemistry of late transition-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teets, Thomas S. (Thomas Sebastian)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-electron reaction chemistry, from both ground- and excited-state species, is at the heart of many topics in renewable energy and catalysis. In this thesis, two classes of reactions central to the themes of energy ...

  11. Gold and gold-graphene used as cathodic interfaces for scission of carbon-halogen bonds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Application to the building of anthraquinone-Au electrodes. Jacques Simonet a * and Viatcheslav Jouikov b a as cathode material. This first work points out the immobilization of anthraquinone (AQ) in organic polar.12.024 #12;2 Graphical Abstract Key Words: Graphene; 2-Bromomethylanthraquinone; Anthraquinone electrodes

  12. Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe): the tropical North Atlantic experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. , Hebestreit, K. , and Platt, U. : Short-lived alkylR. , Lawrence, M. G. , Platt, U. , ,and Crutzen, P. J. :Peleg, M. , Luria, M. , and Platt, U. : DOAS measurements of

  13. Halogen diffusion in a basaltic melt Marina Alletti a,*, Don R. Baker b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    , Montreal, Quebec, Canada c Sezione di Sismologia e Tettonofisica, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e

  14. Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface Interactions in Fluorocarbon Etching of Silicon2706. Xu, S.L. , et al. , Fluorocarbon polymer formation,

  15. Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe): the tropical North Atlantic experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    close to or East of the Canary Islands, before arriving atpassing near to the Canary Islands on its way to Cape Verde.passing close to the Canary islands before approaching Cape

  16. Supplementary material for ACP manuscripts "A chemical probe technique for the determination of reactive halogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and the sample was saturated with sodium sulfate and extracted twice with 5.0 mL of ethyl acetate. The extracts-linear inverse plots and the influence of allyl alcohol in bromide solutions The kinetic derivation that describes the non-linear inverse plots (e.g., Figure 2 in Part 1), and the effect that allyl alcohol has

  17. The Halogenation of Oils with Special Attention to the Method of Wijs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Edmund Oliver

    1913-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the separation of iodine when various substances were treated with Wijs1 solution and offered the following suggestions as to the causes: !• The addition of chlorine by the substance, and liberation of free iodine, but this does not explain the formation... of experiments in which varying time was used, 44 Eh c CO o a •H Eh «.H O +> O

  18. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  19. Remedial extraction and catalytic hydrodehalogenation for treatment of soils contaminated by halogenated hydrophobic organic compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Hun Young

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for the extraction of 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzne (TeCB) or pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soil. Palladium-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation (HDH) was applied for destroying TeCB or PCP in mixtures of water and ethanol in a batch mode. The experimental results...

  20. Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe): the tropical North Atlantic experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    105, 24191–24204, 2000. Allan, B. J. , Plane J. M. C. , andlayer, Geophys. Res. Lett. , Allan, J. D. , Topping, D. O. ,1,2 , G. McFiggans 3 , J. D. Allan 3,4 , A. R. Baker 5 , S.

  1. Supramolecular self-assembled network formation containing NBr halogen bonds in physisorbed overlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Adam Y.; Sacchi, Marco; Parker, Julia E.; Truscott, Chris L.; Jenkins, Steve; Clarke, Stuart M.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    adsorbed on graphite, Mol. Phys., 1991, 72, 395-411. 24 A. Inaba, H. Chihara, S. M. Clarke and R. K. Thomas, The structure and heat capacity of fluoromethane monolayers adsorbed on graphite, Mol. Phys., 1991, 72, 109-120. 25 R. Gutzler, O. Ivasenko, C... . This sharp transition is indicative of a mixed co-layer (rather than solid solution) that underwent incongruent melting to form crystalline BPY and liquid DBTFB, with a melting point of ~275 K. This compares with the bulk melting point of 383 – 388 K 35...

  2. Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulloch, Daryl Neil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wastewater contaminants in biosolids destined for landin water, soil, sediment, and biosolids by HPLC/MS/MS. 2007,the organic carbon content of biosolids in wastewater can

  3. Investigating the biosynthesis of halogenated meroterpenoid natural products from marine actinomycetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jaclyn Marie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following conditions: 40 ml of 20% acetonitrile:water, 60ml of 40% acetonitrile:water, 60ml of 60% acetonitrile:water, 60 ml of 80% acetonitrile:

  4. Investigating the Biosynthesis of Halogenated Meroterpenoid Natural Products from Marine Actinomycetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jaclyn Marie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following conditions: 40 ml of 20% acetonitrile:water, 60ml of 40% acetonitrile:water, 60ml of 60% acetonitrile:water, 60 ml of 80% acetonitrile:

  5. Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factorial Design .in the fractional factorial design Table 2: Design matrixetch data from the full factorial design, including starting

  6. Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulloch, Daryl Neil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and biological treatments for wastewater decontamination- Atreatment involves biological degradation of organic wastewaterBiological effects of transformation products. The extent of attenuation of PPCPs through wastewater treatment

  7. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. WhiteOptics' Low-Cost Reflector Composite Boosts LED Fixture Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, WhiteOptics has developed a composite coating that can be used to improve efficiency in backlit, indirect, and cavity-mixing LED luminaire designs by maximizing light reflection and output. The highly diffuse coating, which is based on a novel high-reflectance particle technology, allows for uniform distribution of light without exaggerating the point-source nature of the LEDs, and is intended to offer an overall system cost-improving solution for LED optics.

  9. Algorithms for Rapid Characterization and Optimization of Aperture and Reflector Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densmore, Arthur Charles

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integer z_lda, z_ldb, z_ldc; lapack::doublecomplex * z_a, *b, &z_ldb, z_beta, z_c, & z_ldc ); zgesv_( &z_n, &z_nrhs, z_doublecomplex *c, int *ldc, int transa_len, int transb_len);

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of Uranium Metal Annuli and Cylinders with Beryllium Reflectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive series of delayed critical experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility using enriched uranium metal during the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. These experiments were designed to evaluate the storage, casting, and handling limits of the Y-12 Plant and to provide data for the verification of cross sections and calculation methods utilized in nuclear criticality safety applications. Many of these experiments have already been evaluated and included in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook: unreflected (HEU-MET-FAST-051), graphite-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-071), and polyethylene-reflected (HEU-MET-FAST-076). Three of the experiments consisted of highly-enriched uranium (HEU, ~93.2% 235U) metal parts reflected by beryllium metal discs. The first evaluated experiment was constructed from a stack of 7-in.-diameter, 4-1/8-in.-high stack of HEU discs top-reflected by a 7-in.-diameter, 5-9/16-in.-high stack of beryllium discs. The other two experiments were formed from stacks of concentric HEU metal annular rings surrounding a 7-in.diameter beryllium core. The nominal outer diameters were 13 and 15 in. with a nominal stack height of 5 and 4 in., respectively. These experiments have been evaluated for inclusion in the ICSBEP Handbook.

  11. Project Profile: Predictive Physico-Chemical Modeling of Intrinsic Degradation Mechanisms for Advanced Reflector Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NREL, under the Physics of Reliability: Evaluating Design Insights for Component Technologies in Solar (PREDICTS) Program will be developing a physics-based computational degradation model to assess the kinetic oxidation rates; realistic model light attenuation and transport; and multi-layer treatment with variable properties Simulation based experimental design.

  12. MICROMORPH n-i-p TANDEM CELLS WITH ASYMMETRIC INTERMEDIATE REFLECTORS F.-J. Haug1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    (EPFL), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue A.-L. Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland 2 now at University of New South Wales, School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering with size of typically 0.25 cm2 . The best cell among an array of 16 devices on the 4x4 cm2 sample area

  13. A Novel Leaky-Wave Retrodirective Reflector Using Short/Matched Terminations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itoh, Tatsuo

    of heterodyne mixing to reflect the signal to any arbitrary angle by varying the LO frequency of the mixer [6 This section presents mono-static (Rx and Tx antennas collocated) transmission (S21) measurements of the RCS

  14. Project Profile: Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermalDepartment

  15. Project Profile: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of Energy TEES logo TexasEnergy SNL

  16. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurvesSpeedingScientificof ScientificQ LA-UR-RaymondConnect

  17. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1BP-14 PowerAdvanced ModelingNuclear ReactorIdeally, we

  18. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|

  19. Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidet, Florent

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surrounded by a thin radial reflector followed by a shield –Radial shield Enriched fuel Large radial reflector Radialshield Small radial reflector Radial blanket Enriched fuel

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculations, it was predicted that at typical plasma reactorof calculation. The etch rate of HfO 2 in this reactor at -calculation to be valid, it must also be assumed that at the operating conditions of the ICP reactor,

  1. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model for Si etching by fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal Ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal ofwith inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas." Journal of

  2. Recovery of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) from Ralstonia eutropha cultures with non-halogenated solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedel, Sebastian L.

    Reduced downstream costs, together with high purity recovery of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), will accelerate the commercialization of high quality PHA-based products. In this work, a process was designed for effective ...

  3. Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other Halogenated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other, California 94305-4020 Enhanced in-situ transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was observed under anoxic Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)with one or two carbon atoms are widely used as solvents, degreasing

  4. Fluids and halogens at the diagenetic-metamorphic boundary: evidence from veins in continental basins, western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    basins, western Norway H. SVENSEN1 , B. JAMTVEIT1 , D. A. BANKS2 AND D. KARLSEN1 1 Department of Geology, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway; 2 School of Earth Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, Kvamshesten and Solund basins) in western Norway. These include calcite-, quartz- and epidote-dominated veins

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    initialize(int part_type,double enrgy) int j; type =part_type; energy = enrgy; //coutenrgy, double Ion_yield[NO_ION_

  6. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. , Chang, J.P. , “Feature Profile Evolution: From Plasmasurface kinetics and feature profile evolution in chlorineet al. (2008). "Feature profile evolution during shallow

  8. Body burdens of brominated flame retardants and other persistent organo-halogenated compounds and their descriptors in US girls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windham, Gayle C., E-mail: gayle.windham@cdph.ca.gov [CA Department of Public Health, DEODC, 850 Marina Bay Pkwy, Bldg. P, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Pinney, Susan M. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Sjodin, Andreas [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)] [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Lum, Raymond [Impact Assessment Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)] [Impact Assessment Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Jones, Richard S.; Needham, Larry L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)] [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States); Biro, Frank M. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Hiatt, Robert A. [University of California Medical School, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [University of California Medical School, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kushi, Lawrence H. [Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Levels of brominated flame retardants are increasing in US populations, yet little data are available on body burdens of these and other persistent hormonally active agents (HAAs) in school-aged children. Exposures to such chemicals may affect a number of health outcomes related to development and reproductive function. Objective: Determine the distribution of biomarkers of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organo-chlorinated pesticides (OCPs), such as DDT/DDE, in children, and their variation by key descriptor variables. Methods: Ethnically diverse cohorts of girls 6-8 y old at baseline are being followed for growth and pubertal development in a multi-site, longitudinal study. Nearly 600 serum samples from the California and Ohio sites were analyzed for lipids, 35 PCB congeners, 11 PBDE congeners, and 9 OCPs. The biomarker distributions were examined and geometric means compared for selected analytes across categories of age, race, site, body mass index (BMI), parental education, maternal age at delivery, and breast feeding in adjusted models. Results: Six PBDE congeners were detected among greater than 70% of samples, with BDE-47 having the highest concentration (median 42.2, range 4.9-855 ng/g lipid). Girls in California had adjusted geometric mean (GM) PBDE levels significantly higher than girls in Ohio. Furthermore, Blacks had significantly higher adjusted GMs of all six PBDE congeners than Whites, and Hispanics had intermediate values. GMs tended to be lower among more obese girls, while other variables were not strongly associated. In contrast, GMs of the six PCB congeners most frequently detected were significantly lower among Blacks and Hispanics than Whites. PCBs and the three pesticides most frequently detected were also consistently lower among girls with high BMI, who were not breast-fed, whose mothers were younger, or whose care-givers (usually parents) were less educated. Girls in California had higher GMs than in Ohio for the pesticides and most PCB congeners, but the opposite for CB-99 and -118. Conclusions: Several of these potential HAAs were detected in nearly all of these young girls, some at relatively high levels, with variation by geographic location and other demographic factors that may reflect exposure pathways. The higher PBDE levels in California likely reflect differences in fire regulation and safety codes, with potential policy implications.

  9. Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchack, Nathan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fit”. 2) Press “Normal fit” several time until the resultfinal.mat (Cauchy fit) 2. Fit 1) Press “Window” and select “thickness. Check the “Fit” box, and press “OK”. 2. For

  10. Experimental and Computational Study of Flame Inhibition Mechanisms of Halogenated Compounds in C1-C3 Alkanes Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osorio Amado, Carmen H

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    suppressants on ignition and laminar flame propagation of C_(1)-C_(3) alkanes premixed mixtures, as good representatives of flammable gas fires (Class B fires). This methodology integrates model formulations and experimental designs in order to examine both...

  11. Gas Phase Reactions between Fuel Molecules and Halogens: A Review of the Reaction between Atomic Chlorine and Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF GGary M. MignognaEstimatesGas

  12. Integration of Self-Assembled Porous Alumina and Distributed Bragg Reflector for Light Trapping in Si Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Xing

    Light trapping is an important issue for thin film silicon photovoltaic cells due to the limited absorption coefficient for near infrared light. In this letter, we present a photonic structure that combines porous anodic ...

  13. Happening Now

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Spotlight Every Second Saturday Saturday, March 14, 11 AM-1 PM Join us at the Museum every second Saturday of the month for a program called Scientist in the Spotlight...

  14. M.A. Wright Investment Fund February 7, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    performance against benchmark - Sector updates - Portfolio management process enhancement - Senior analyst: Industrials / Materials ­ Wesley Lantrip, Senior Analyst · Analyst Group Spotlight: Energy / Utilities ­ Jay ­ Wesley Lantrip, Senior Analyst · Analyst Group Spotlight: Energy / Utilities ­ Jay Zeidman, Senior

  15. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pitch 30 x Rod Diameter Radial reflectors 2 assembly rows (?mechanical movement of a radial reflector [16]. In the early

  16. 3/30/10 10:43 AMElectrospinning self-healing polymer coating systems Page 1 of 2http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=15547.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    bioethanol production from woods Posted: Mar 25th, 2010 Images from the nanotechnology universe Posted: Mar

  17. Speaker biographies for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar titled Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis Â… Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideos Solid-State| Department of EnergyMatthew

  18. Jennifer Hong Zheng | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  19. Philippe Noirot | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  20. Ozgenur Kahvecioglu Feridun | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  1. LaVaun Bowling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  2. JoAnn "Joni" Garcia | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  3. Marvin Cummings | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities...

  4. Dynamic cell and microparticle control via optoelectronic tweezers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mercury or halogen lamp or LED). Fig. 5. Collection of 25-µa mercury or halogen lamp or a LED (Fig. 4). In addition, we

  5. Universitt Bern, Chemikaliensammelstelle, November 2012 dm Notice on toxic waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    , Hexane, Methanol, Toluol, Xylol, Alcohols, Petrol, Petrolether etc. Mixed, non halogenated solvents

  6. Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Peter Bernath University of York Satellite Observations of Halogen-Containing Molecules NE/I022663/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Peter Bernath University of York, Ice and Super-cooled Water Particles. NE/I023058/1 Gareth Chisham NERC British Antarctic Survey The University of Manchester Effects of a warming climate on the key organic carbon cycle processes

  7. I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

  8. Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wei

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

  9. Reactive halogens (BrO and OClO) detected in the plume of Soufričre Hills Volcano during an eruption hiatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Amy; Tsanev, Vitchko; Oppenheimer, Clive; Edmonds, Marie

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    published data from petrological studies of SHV. Pumiceous clasts with high vesicularity at SHV have higher Cl and Br content than dome rocks, and both spe- cies appear to have similar degassing behaviors [Villemant et al., 2008] (using whole-rock Br content... , the work of Bobrowski et al. [2003] and that of Villemant et al. [2008], and compare this with results from the experimental petrology literature. The decrease of Br relative to Cl suggests that the relative partition- ing of Cl and Br into the fluid phase...

  10. Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wei

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Mineralogy and Petrology 23(2): 117-127. Moore, G. F. ,to Mineralogy and Petrology 76(1): 17-23. Miyashiro, A. ,to Mineralogy and Petrology 138(3): 265-283. Peacock, S.

  11. Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT): Overview of a wintertime air chemistry field study in the front range urban corridor of Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to local emissions from oil and gas activities. Citation:NO x emissions in 2006), oil and gas wells, and largein Denver, and emissions from oil and gas development in the

  12. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98.

  13. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales toReformulated, Average0.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table98.B39.

  14. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  15. Interest in phased array technology, well suited for tracking satellites, has grown in recent years. However, electronically steered arrays are expensive compared to reflector antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iqbal, Sheikh Sharif

    are investigated in this article. The proposed magnetized semiconductor phase shifter is a potential low cost extraordinary wave resonance of the magnetized semiconductor material. The losses in these regions in the propagating plane. Finally, the phase shift per unit length of a magnetized semiconductor phase shifter

  16. Experimental demonstration of a broadband all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflector Parikshit Moitra, Brian A. Slovick, Zhi Gang Yu, S. Krishnamurthy, and Jason Valentine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    -silicon metamaterial with hyperbolic transition in near infrared Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 021905 (2013); 10 a correlation between the degree of disorder and the reduction in reflectance. It is shown that near-unity reflection is preserved as long as resonator interaction is avoided. Realization of near-unity reflection

  17. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 55, NO. 6 (JUNE 1990); P. 67Ck.681, 11 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Physical properties of deep crustal reflectors in southern California from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is made to invert for the individual modulus or density contrasts. By examining only gross amplitude a constant noise level at large time then corrected for spherical diver- gence. Gross AVO trends gas would produce a remarkable decrease in Poisson's ratio in compar- ison to surrounding unproductive

  18. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: AAI solar collector with pressure-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhance oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the AAI solar line-focusing slat-type collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  19. Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector Development of a Low Cost Ultra Specular Advanced Polymer Film Solar Reflector This presentation was...

  20. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700?°C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bale, Hrishikesh A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B. [Teledyne Scientific Company, Thousand Oaks, California 91360 (United States); Ritchie, Robert O., E-mail: roritchie@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300?°C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750?°C.