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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

GREEN LIVING Replace incandencent and halogen light bulbs with LED and CLFs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREEN LIVING GUIDE ENERGY TRAVEL FOOD sustain yosef WATER Replace incandencent and halogen light bulbs with LED and CLFs TURN YOUR COMPUTER OFF! Any time you will be gone for an hour or more for your laundry RESIST THAT SWITCH! Use natural light during the day, and no lights when you are gone USE

Thaxton, Christopher S.

2

Synoptic Interpretation of Measurements from HALOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degree to which the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex is isolated against horizontal (isentropic) mixing is investigated using data from the Halogen Occulation Experiment (HALOE), U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) potential vorticity (PV), and ...

M. Bithell; L. J. Gray; J. E. Harries; J. M. Russell III; A. F. Tuck

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Jacketed lamp bulb envelope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Gaithersburg, MD); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Smith, Malcolm (Alexandria, VA); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Wiring Switches to Light Bulbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given n buttons and n bulbs so that the ith button toggles the ith bulb and at most two other bulbs, we compute the sharp lower bound on the number of bulbs that can be lit regardless of the action of the buttons.

Buckley, Stephen M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sales of specialty incandescent bulbs decline despite ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs. Several manufacturers offer CFL three-way bulbs to replace incandescent three-way bulbs. LEDs, ...

6

Bulb mounting of solar cell  

SciTech Connect

An energy converting assembly is provided for parasiting of light from a fluorescent light bulb utilizing a solar cell. The solar cell is mounted on a base member elongated in the dimension of elongation of the fluorescent bulb, and electrical interconnections to the cell are provided. A flexible sheet of opaque material having a flat white interior reflective surface surrounds the fluorescent bulb and reflects light emitted from the bulb back toward the bulb and the solar cell. The reflective sheet is tightly held in contact with the bottom of the bulb by adhesive, a tie strap, an external clip, or the like.

Thompson, M.E.

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs Can I recycle light bulbs? It depends what type of bulbs you have for the `hazardous' symbol on the packaging or on the light bulb (crossed out wheelie bin symbol). How can I recycle light bulbs? Standard filament bulbs Put in the waste bin (landfill waste) as these are not classified

Melham, Tom

8

Sales of specialty incandescent bulbs decline despite ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... like three-way bulbs and appliance bulbs, are exempted from congressionally-legislated energy efficiency standards.

9

Metal halogen electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

1988-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lamp bulb with integral reflector  

SciTech Connect

An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); Shanks, Bruce (Gaithersburg, MD); Sumner, Thomas L. (Wheaton, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nuclear Halos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s?wave neutrons (or single s?wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the “thickness” of the nuclear surface in the mean?free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are

Erich Vogt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Information Resources: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs This September 23, 2008 webcast provided an overview of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) technology competition. The L Prize calls for super-efficient SSL products to replace two of the most common light bulbs used today: the 60-watt incandescent and the PAR-38 halogen reflector. Kelly Gordon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, kicked off the webcast with an overview of the competition requirements, evaluation process, and opportunities for promotion of the winning products. Mary Matteson Bryan, Pacific Gas & Electric, and Liesel Whitney-Schulte, Wisconsin Focus on Energy, followed with a look at the role of L Prize partners and plans for their organizations to support the winning products through demonstrations, education, promotions, and other collaborative efforts.

13

Looking for Light Bulbs Elements of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Looking for Light Bulbs Elements of a Great Business Idea Mike Panesis #12;Housekeeping Register · Elevator Pitch Social,Wed, Nov 28, 6pm Introductions 2 #12;Looking for Light Bulbs Properties of a Great

14

Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

HALOGEN COLLECTOR TEST PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency tests of removal of radioactive iodine from an air stream were performed on the following halogen collectors: a silver-plated copper-ribbon bed: activatedcharcoal beds, 0.5 and l.0 in. deep: a molecular-sieve bed; and a sodium thiosulfate bed. The tests were conducted at 70 and 160 deg F and at 70 and 95% relative humidity. Only the activated-charcoal collectors achieved a high iodineremoval efficiency over a sustained period at the various operating conditions. (C.J.G.)

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents July 29, 2012 - 6:25pm Addthis...

17

Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides...

18

100 Prisoners and A light Bulb Yisong Song  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 Prisoners and A light Bulb Yisong Song 1. Introduction The article represent three different protocols for solving the "100 Prisoners and a Light Bulb" riddle, including the explicit computations only a light bulb with a toggle switch. The prisoner will be able to observe the current state

Morrow, James A.

19

The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb November 22, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis History of the Light Bulb Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist What are the key facts? Like all great inventions, the light bulb can't be credited to one inventor. It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today. Learn more about the history of the incandescent light bulb. Explore the history of fluorescent lights, from the Geissler tube to CFLs. Read about the advancements in LED lights. More than 150 years ago, inventors began working on a bright idea that would have a dramatic impact on how we use energy in our homes and offices.

20

The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb November 22, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis History of the Light Bulb Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist What are the key facts? Like all great inventions, the light bulb can't be credited to one inventor. It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today. Learn more about the history of the incandescent light bulb. Explore the history of fluorescent lights, from the Geissler tube to CFLs. Read about the advancements in LED lights. More than 150 years ago, inventors began working on a bright idea that would have a dramatic impact on how we use energy in our homes and offices.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents July 29, 2012 - 6:25pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available today and could save you about $50 per year in energy costs when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Compared to traditional incandescents, energy-efficient lightbulbs such as energy-saving incandescents, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the following advantages: Typically use about 25%-80% less energy, saving you money

22

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and important halogen is chlorine. In nature, fluorine is mainly found in minerals such as CaF2 and Na2AlF6 for the other halogens - see Table 7.1. Natural gas and oil-derived fuels contain very small amounts of halogens Natural gas - * Iodine 0.5 - 1.5 mg/kg In biomasses, especially straw, the presence of halogens is largely

Zevenhoven, Ron

23

METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

Frazer, J.W.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

LED LAMP OR BULB WITH REMOTE PHOSPHOR AND DIFFUSER ...  

An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor ...

25

Light bulb standards begin taking effect in 2012 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On January 1, 2012, efficiency standards will start taking effect for brighter, higher-wattage general service bulbs. Based on its light output of ...

26

Halo Star Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this review, I will discuss a few problems which point to the need for improved stellar evolution models of halo stars. Current stellar evolution models do not match the observed $^7$Li abundance patterns, suggesting that the input physics and/or the assumptions used in constructing the models are in need of revision. It appears that all halo stars have suffered some $^7$Li depletion, implying that the primordial $^7$Li abundance is higher than that presently observed in hot halo stars. Observations of abundances of various elements in globular cluster giant branch stars have suggested for some time now that some form of deep mixing, which is not present in theoretical models, occurs in halo stars. The driving mechanism for this mixing, and its incorporation into stellar models remain one of the key problems in stellar modeling. Current theoretical isochrones are able to provide a good match to observed colour-magnitude diagrams. However, there is some evidence that the theoretical luminosity functions are in disagreement with observations. This is an area which requires further study, as it suggests that the relative main sequence/giant branch lifetimes predicted by the models are incorrect. A discussion of some of the uncertainties involved in determining the ages of globular clusters is presented. The absolute ages of globular clusters provide a lower bound to the age of the universe, and so are of great interest to cosmologists. Unfortunately, present uncertainties in stellar models lead to a rather large range in the inferred ages of globular clusters of 11 -- 18 Gyr.

Brian Chaboyer

1995-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tweeting halo: clothing that tweets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People often like to express their unique personalities, interests, and opinions. This poster explores new ways that allow a user to express her feelings in both physical and virtual settings. With our Tweeting Halo, we demonstrate how a wearable ... Keywords: microblogging, personal halo, personal projector, social networking, wearable interfaces

Wai Shan (Florence) Ng; Ehud Sharlin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Geoeffectiveness of halo CMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) originating from regions close to the center of the Sun are likely to be geoeffective. Assuming that the shape of HCMEs is a cone and they propagate with constant angular widths and velocities, at least in their early phase, we have developed a technique (Michalek et al. 2003) which allowed us to obtain the space speed, width and source location. We apply this technique to obtain the parameters of all full HCMEs observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) experiment until the end of 2002. Using this data we examine which parameters determine the geoeffectiveness of HCMEs. We show that in the considered period of time only fast halo CMEs (with the space velocities higher than $\\sim 1000{km\\over s}$ and originating from the western hemisphere close to the solar center could cause the severe geomagnetic storms. We illustrate how the HCME parameters can be used for space weather forecast. It is also demon...

Michalek, G; Lara, A; Yashiro, S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Geoeffectiveness of halo CMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) originating from regions close to the center of the Sun are likely to be geoeffective. Assuming that the shape of HCMEs is a cone and they propagate with constant angular widths and velocities, at least in their early phase, we have developed a technique (Michalek et al. 2003) which allowed us to obtain the space speed, width and source location. We apply this technique to obtain the parameters of all full HCMEs observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) experiment until the end of 2002. Using this data we examine which parameters determine the geoeffectiveness of HCMEs. We show that in the considered period of time only fast halo CMEs (with the space velocities higher than $\\sim 1000{km\\over s}$ and originating from the western hemisphere close to the solar center could cause the severe geomagnetic storms. We illustrate how the HCME parameters can be used for space weather forecast. It is also demonstrated that the strength of a geomagnetic storm does not depend on the determined width of HCMEs. This means that HCMEs do not have to be very large to cause major geomagnetic storms.

G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; A. Lara; S. Yashiro

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs July 12, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Last month, the Federal Trade Commission announced that light bulbs will have a brand new style of packaging, starting in 2011. This is super exciting news! Well, all right, maybe "exciting" is a bit of a stretch, but it's certainly useful if you're thinking in terms of saving money and energy. Which is, I hope, one of the reasons people come to this blog. Example of the Lighting Facts label. The new form is based on a simple idea: There's an absolute ton of different kinds of lighting out there, but for most lights, the only information on the package is the wattage-the amount of power it draws.

32

Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs July 12, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Last month, the Federal Trade Commission announced that light bulbs will have a brand new style of packaging, starting in 2011. This is super exciting news! Well, all right, maybe "exciting" is a bit of a stretch, but it's certainly useful if you're thinking in terms of saving money and energy. Which is, I hope, one of the reasons people come to this blog. Example of the Lighting Facts label. The new form is based on a simple idea: There's an absolute ton of different kinds of lighting out there, but for most lights, the only information on the package is the wattage-the amount of power it draws.

33

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

34

Crystallographic studies on enzymatic halogenation of natural products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenated natural products are common and serve roles as hormones, pesticides, antibiotics, and anti-tumor agents. The incorporation of a halogen atom into an organic scaffold can tune the molecule's potency and selectivity, ...

Blasiak, Leah Cameron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Predicting Substructure in CDM Haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Observations of multiple-image gravitational lens systems suggest that the projected mass distributions of galaxy haloes may contain substantial inhomogeneities. The fraction of the halo mass in dense substructure is still highly uncertain, but could be as large as a few percent. While halo substructure is seen in numerical simulations of CDM haloes, little of this substructure survives in the innermost regions of haloes, and thus the observational claims for substructure at small projected radii are slightly surprising. There is evidence, however, that even the highest-resolution simulations published to-date are still limited by numerical effects that heat and disrupt substructure artificially in high-density regions. By comparing numerical and semi-analytic (SA) models of halo substructure, we show that current simulations probably underestimate the mass fraction in substructure at small projected radii, by a factor of at least 2–3. We discuss the prospects for using lensing observations as a fundamental test of the nature of dark matter. 1. Introduction: The

James E. Taylor; Arif Babul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources  

SciTech Connect

Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

Falkenstein, Zoran (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CFL Bulbs: Good or Bad for the Environment? Q: I've heard that CFL bulbs contain mercury and that mercury is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mercury, a tiny amount primarily in vapor form. It is what makes the bulb give off light determines the color of the light that you see. The amount of mercury involved in a typical CFL bulb is 5, there is nothing "magic" about CFL bulbs in this regard. This is exactly how regular fluorescent light tubes work

38

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | December 1, 2010 What to Do if a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or Fluorescent Tube Light Bulb Breaks in Your Home1 Fluorescent light bulbs contain a small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing. When a fluorescent bulb breaks in your home, some of this mercury is released as mercury vapor. The broken bulb can continue to release

McConnell, Terry

39

Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L Prize(tm): The Race for Super L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs

40

DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another October...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wet-Bulb Temperature from Relative Humidity and Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An equation is presented for wet-bulb temperature as a function of air temperature and relative humidity at standard sea level pressure. It was found as an empirical fit using gene-expression programming. This equation is valid for relative ...

Roland Stull

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, Hann S. (Darien, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran3 John Reif3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran3 John Reif3 Univ. of California, San Diego Univ. of Pennsylvania Duke University 1 #12;Running Title: The Light Bulb Problem, 1985 and 1988: We have a sequence of n random light bulbs each of which is either on or off with equal

Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

46

How Many CASTLE Bulbs Would You Need To Match the Brightness of the Sun?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million miles), so if we were to try to build the Sun out of light bulbs, we'd need a bunch! But, how many objects: the Sun, and a CASTLE light bulb. What do we mean by "brightness?" The electromagnetic (EM radiation, while the more efficient fluorescent bulb emits only visible light. Everyone knows

Collar, Juan I.

47

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi 2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran 3 John Reif 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi 2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran 3 John Reif 3 Univ. of California, San Diego Univ. of Pennsylvania Duke University 1 #12; Running Title: The Light Bulb Problem, 1985 and 1988: We have a sequence of n random light bulbs each of which is either on or o# with equal

Reif, John H.

48

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran3 John Reif3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE LIGHT BULB PROBLEM 1 Ramamohan Paturi2 Sanguthevar Rajasekaran3 John Reif3 Univ. of California Title: The Light Bulb Problem Corresponding Author: Ramamohan Paturi Department of Computer Science Mail correlational learning problem due to L. G. Valiant, 1985 and 1988: We have a sequence of n random light bulbs

Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

49

Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a , Inês L considerably. To quantify the influence of factors that drive consumer choices for light bulbs, we conducted incandescent bulbs. About half of the total lighting service (in terms of lumens) was provided by incandes

Michalek, Jeremy J.

50

Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

Halogen Free Flame Retardant for ABS Composite with Oxides ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The irrevocable finality from flame retardant is fires protection to help safeguard of ... the oxides particles on obtain the ABS with halogen free flame retardant.

52

How to upgrade your incandescent light bulbs Many people are choosing replacements for their standard incandescent light bulbs to save money or energy, because they've heard of new LED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to upgrade your incandescent light bulbs Many people are choosing replacements for their standard incandescent light bulbs to save money or energy, because they've heard of new LED options for replacement light bulbs, you probably noticed that you have many options and the alternative bulbs are more

Bystroff, Chris

53

Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products August 6, 2010 - 4:26pm Addthis The Department has issued Notices of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company determining, based on corrected test data provided by Westinghouse, that the incandescent reflector lamps listed below are compliant with the federal energy conservation standard and may be sold in the United States. These 11 Westinghouse brand lamps, usually used in recessed light fixtures, correspond to 7 basic models, which are manufactured in China by Fuzhou. DOE had previously issued Notices requiring Fuzhou and Westinghouse to

54

The Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey I: New upper limits on radio halos and mini-halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fraction of galaxy clusters host diffuse radio sources called radio halos, radio relics and mini-halos. We present the sample and first results from the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS)- an extension of the GMRT Radio Halo Survey (GRHS, Venturi et al. 2007, 2008). It is a systematic radio survey of galaxy clusters selected from the REFLEX and eBCS X-ray catalogs . Analysis of GMRT data at 610/ 235/ 325 MHz on 12 galaxy clusters are presented. We report the detection of a newly discovered mini-halo in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021 at 610 MHz. A small scale relic (~200 kpc) is suspected in the cluster Z348. We do not detect cluster-scale diffuse emission in 11 clusters. Robust upper limits on the detection of radio halo of size of 1 Mpc are determined. We also present upper limits on the detections of mini-halos in a sub-sample of cool-core clusters. The upper limits for radio halos and mini-halos are plotted in the radio power- X-ray luminosity plane and the correlations are discussed. Diffuse extended e...

Kale, R; Giacintucci, S; Dallacasa, D; Cassano, R; Brunetti, G; Macario, G; Athreya, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tired of changing light bulbs AND want to save money? Still using 100 year-old technology? TAKE THE COMPACT FLUORESCENT LIGHT BULB CHALLENGE! · A 23 W Compact bulb gives the same light as a 100W regular are you waiting for? Count up the number of light bulbs in your home and go out and replace them

56

Nuclear halo and its scaling laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have proposed a procedure to extract the probability for valence particle being out of the binding potential from the measured nuclear asymptotic normalization coefficients. With this procedure, available data regarding the nuclear halo candidates are systematically analyzed and a number of halo nuclei are confirmed. Based on these results we have got a much relaxed condition for nuclear halo occurrence. Furthermore, we have presented the scaling laws for the dimensionless quantity $/R^{2}$ of nuclear halo in terms of the analytical expressions of the expectation value for the operator $r^{2}$ in a finite square-well potential.

Z. H. Liu; X. Z. Zhang; H. Q. Zhang

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? June 1, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Earlier this week, Eric Barendsen posted about the differences in costs between traditional and energy efficient light bulbs. Several people already chimed in on the original post. (Thanks a bunch for sharing!) But for today's question of the week, we're wondering: What light bulbs do you use in your own home? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Are You Prepared for a Blackout? Lighting Choices Save You Money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes.

58

Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

Fong, Walter L. (Royal Oak, MI); Catherino, Henry A. (Rochester, MI); Kotch, Richard J. (Mt. Clemens, MI)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE's federal efficiency requirements and for the sale of at...

60

Incandescent bulbs still play a role in the future of lighting ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) mandates longer lasting, more efficient light bulbs for general service. Detailed results from ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The bias field of dark matter haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a stochastic approach to the clustering evolution of dark matter haloes in the Universe. Haloes, identified by a Press-Schechter-type algorithm in Lagrangian space, are described in terms of `counting fields', acting as non-linear operators on the underlying Gaussian density fluctuations. By ensemble averaging these counting fields, the standard Press-Schechter mass function as well as analytic expressions for the halo correlation function and corresponding bias factors of linear theory are obtained, thereby extending the recent results by Mo and White. The non-linear evolution of our halo population is then followed by solving the continuity equation, under the sole hypothesis that haloes move by the action of gravity. This leads to an exact and general formula for the bias field of dark matter haloes, defined as the local ratio between their number density contrast and the mass density fluctuation. Besides being a function of position and `observation' redshift, this random field depends upon the mass and formation epoch of the objects and is both non-linear and non-local. The latter features are expected to leave a detectable imprint on the spatial clustering of galaxies, as described, for instance, by statistics like bispectrum and skewness. Our algorithm may have several interesting applications, among which the possibility of generating mock halo catalogues from low-resolution N-body simulations.

P. Catelan; F. Lucchin; S. Matarrese; C. Porciani

1997-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

65

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? June 1, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Earlier this week, Eric Barendsen posted about the differences in costs between traditional and energy efficient light bulbs. Several people already chimed in on the original post. (Thanks a bunch for sharing!) But for today's question of the week, we're wondering: What light bulbs do you use in your own home? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Are You Prepared for a Blackout? Do You Have Windows That Need Replacing? By taking simple steps to improve your home's energy efficiency, you can save up to 30 percent on your energy bill. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity.

67

DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs January 26, 2010 - 11:41am Addthis Washington, DC - On January 25th, the General Counsel notified 25 manufacturers that the Department of Energy has withdrawn their right to use the Energy Star label on 34 different models of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs). The Department took this action after its off-the-shelf testing revealed that the affected models do not last as long in regular use as Energy Star certification would require. As a result, these manufacturers have been informed that they can no longer ship or sell any of the 34 models of CFLs bearing the Energy Star label on the bulb or its packaging. All compact fluorescent light bulbs use about 75 percent less energy and

68

Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85 – 90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams.

Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion cycles. They are also useful benchmark systems for the comparison to current theoretical methods where they provide insight into the dynamics occurring beyond the Franck-Condon region. These systems are studied using velocity map ion imaging, a technique that measures velocity and angular information simultaneously. Photofragment species are state-selectively ionized for detection using 2+1 REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization). The instrumentation employs a molecular beam of the XO radicals formed using pyrolitic and photolytic methods. The current work involves the measurement of fundamental physical constants of the XO species. The bond dissociation energy of IO is measured. Vibrational level dependent correlated final state branching ratios of the predissociation of the A(^2 II_3/2) state of ClO and BrO are reported, and comparison to theoretical methods is discussed.

Dooley, Kristin S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, Gong-Bo [National Astronomy Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China)] [National Astronomy Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Baojiu [Institute of Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Koyama, Kazuya, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions August 4, 2011 - 3:09pm Addthis This 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on) could save the nation about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity or $3.9 billion in one year and avoid 20 million metric tons of carbon emissions if every 60-watt incandescent bulb in the U.S. was replaced with the L Prize winner. | Photo Courtesy of Philips Lighting North America This 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on) could save the nation about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity or $3.9 billion in one year and avoid 20 million metric tons of carbon emissions if every 60-watt incandescent bulb in the U.S. was replaced with the L Prize winner.

72

Ensure Long Lifetimes from Electrolytic Capacitors: a Case Study in LED Light Bulbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Electrolytic capacitors are notorious for short lifetimes in high-temperature applications such as LED light bulbs. The careful selection of these devices with proper interpretation of their specifications is essential to ensure that they do not compromise the life of the end product. This application note discusses this problem with electrolytic capacitors in LED light bulbs and provides an analysis that shows how it is possible to use electrolytics in such products. A similar version of this article appeared on EDN, April 6, 2013. Hot LEDs and Short-Lived Electrolytic Capacitors Several years ago, I worked on a few designs for LED light bulbs. Very early on, it became clear that the temperatures of components in such light bulbs can get quite high. I personally measured component temperatures as high as +130°C in light bulbs purchased at local retail stores. Now admittedly, these were early LED bulb designs. Manufacturers now understand that, even though these LED bulbs consume substantially lower power than those they would replace, they still must have good thermal engineering. This is the only way to get the lifetime of the electronics to match the lifetime of the LEDs themselves. I found it disturbing that many of these hot designs contained electrolytic capacitors, which are notorious

Mark Fortunato; Senior Principal; Member Technical Staff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) in the Norwestern Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a distinctive class of marine organic compounds. They are naturally produced, they have a unique carbon structure, they are highly halogenated, and they bioaccumulate in ...

Pangallo, Kristin C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE 600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE 600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE November 18, 2010 - 10:30am Addthis Ingrid Kolb Director of the Office of Management Starting in September, the Department of Energy has been steadily replacing all 600 light fixtures under our Washington, D.C., Forrestal North Building canopy with state of the art Light Emitting Diode (LED) fixtures. Every new bulb now uses just 23 watts instead of 205 watts. That translates into almost half a million kilowatts hours saved every year. and will cut annual energy consumption at the Department of Energy Headquarters by about 1%. The final new LED fixture under the canopy was installed on October 28, but these lights are just part of a full program to reduce energy consumption

76

Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations December 13, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy has successfully resolved the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE's federal efficiency requirements and for the sale of at least 29,000 general service fluorescent and medium base compact fluorescent lamps that used more energy than permitted by law. This case reflects DOE's renewed commitment to enforce the federal efficiency requirements systematically and fairly to level the competitive playing field and to ensure that American consumers are buying products that

77

DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another October 18, 2010 - 10:27am Addthis As a part of DOE's continuing enforcement action against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, the company must cease sales of two light bulb models - medium based CFL basic model 15GLOBE/65/2 (Westinghouse product code 3800400) and general service fluorescent lamp model F40T12/CWE (Westinghouse product code 07521000) - because they do not meet DOE's energy efficiency standards. Based on test data provided by Westinghouse for basic model 15GLOBE/65/2, DOE has issued a Notice of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, requiring Westinghouse to halt sales and notify all

78

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet-Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet-bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at elevations up to 4500 m above MSL was developed. This methodology was ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A critical period for activity-dependent synaptic development during olfactory bulb adult neurogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New neurons integrate in large numbers into the mature olfactory bulb circuit throughout life. The factors controlling the synaptic development of adult-born neurons and their connectivity remain essentially unknown. We ...

Kelsch, Wolfgang

80

A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nation billions of dollars annually. I'm referring to a revolutionary 10-watt light emitting diode (LED) bulb developed by Philips Lighting North America -- the first winner of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

600 New Lights Bulbs to Improve Energy Efficiency at DOE | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

our Washington, D.C., Forrestal North Building canopy with state of the art Light Emitting Diode (LED) fixtures. Every new bulb now uses just 23 watts instead of 205 watts....

82

Direct Calculation of Thermodynamic Wet Bulb Temperature as a Function of Pressure and Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple analytical method was developed for directly calculating the thermodynamic wet bulb temperature from air temperature and the vapor pressure (or relative humidity) at any desired elevation. This methodology was based on the fact that the ...

Sayed-Hossein Sadeghi; Troy R. Peters; Douglas R. Cobos; Henry W. Loescher; Colin S. Campbell

83

DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another October 18, 2010 - 10:27am Addthis As a part of DOE's continuing enforcement action against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, the company must cease sales of two light bulb models - medium based CFL basic model 15GLOBE/65/2 (Westinghouse product code 3800400) and general service fluorescent lamp model F40T12/CWE (Westinghouse product code 07521000) - because they do not meet DOE's energy efficiency standards. Based on test data provided by Westinghouse for basic model 15GLOBE/65/2, DOE has issued a Notice of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, requiring Westinghouse to halt sales and notify all

84

The Boulder, Colorado, Concentric Halo Display of 21 July 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exceptional concentric halo display was observed in Boulder, Colorado, on 21 July 1986. As many as six halos were observed and photographed simultaneously between 1530 and 1945 UTC. Extensive photographic documentation (>100 photographs) ...

Paul J. Neiman

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Exam Stochastic Processes 2WB08 January 29, 2007 A light bulb burns for an amount of time having distribution F(), with Laplace trans-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exam Stochastic Processes 2WB08 ­ January 29, 2007 Problem 1: A light bulb burns for an amount moment µ2. When the light bulb burns out, it is immediately replaced by another light bulb which has the same life time distribution F(·), etc. Let m(t) be the mean number of replacements of light bulbs upto

Giardinà, Cristian

86

HALO-TO-HALO SIMILARITY AND SCATTER IN THE VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION OF DARK MATTER  

SciTech Connect

We examine the velocity distribution function (VDF) in dark matter halos from Milky Way to cluster mass scales. We identify an empirical model for the VDF with a wider peak and a steeper tail than a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, and discuss physical explanations. We quantify sources of scatter in the VDF of cosmological halos and their implication for direct detection of dark matter. Given modern simulations and observations, we find that the most significant uncertainty in the VDF of the Milky Way arises from the unknown radial position of the solar system relative to the dark matter halo scale radius.

Mao, Yao-Yuan; Strigari, Louis E.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Hahn, Oliver [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USAAND (United States) [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USAAND (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wu, Hao-Yi [Currently at Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. (United States)] [Currently at Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

Lyke, Stephen E. (Middleton, WI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Probing the Structure of Halo Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our understanding of halo nuclei has so far relied on high-energy scattering and reactions, but a number of uncertainties remain. I discuss in general terms the new range of observables which will be measured by experiments around the Coulomb barrier, and how some details of the reaction mechanisms still need to be clarified.

I. J. Thompson

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

GAS CONDENSATION IN THE GALACTIC HALO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of vertically stratified hot halo gas, we examine the conditions under which clouds can form and condense out of the hot halo medium to potentially fuel star formation in the gaseous disk. We find that halo clouds do not develop from linear isobaric perturbations. This is a regime where the cooling time is longer than the Brunt-Vaeisaelae time, confirming previous linear analysis. We extend the analysis into the nonlinear regime by considering mildly or strongly nonlinear perturbations with overdensities up to 100, also varying the initial height, the cloud size, and the metallicity of the gas. Here, the result depends on the ratio of cooling time to the time required to accelerate the cloud to the sound speed (similar to the dynamical time). If the ratio exceeds a critical value near unity, the cloud is accelerated without further cooling and gets disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz and/or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. If it is less than the critical value, the cloud cools and condenses before disruption. Accreting gas with overdensities of 10-20 is expected to be marginally unstable; the cooling fraction will depend on the metallicity, the size of the incoming cloud, and the distance to the galaxy. Locally enhanced overdensities within cold streams have a higher likelihood of cooling out. Our results have implications on the evolution of clouds seeded by cold accretion that are barely resolved in current cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and absorption line systems detected in galaxy halos.

Joung, M. Ryan; Bryan, Greg L.; Putman, Mary E., E-mail: moo@astro.columbia.edu [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ORIGAMI: DELINEATING HALOS USING PHASE-SPACE FOLDS  

SciTech Connect

We present the ORIGAMI method of identifying structures, particularly halos, in cosmological N-body simulations. Structure formation can be thought of as the folding of an initially flat three-dimensional manifold in six-dimensional phase space. ORIGAMI finds the outer folds that delineate these structures. Halo particles are identified as those that have undergone shell-crossing along three orthogonal axes, providing a dynamical definition of halo regions that is independent of density. ORIGAMI also identifies other morphological structures: particles that have undergone shell-crossing along 2, 1, or 0 orthogonal axes correspond to filaments, walls, and voids, respectively. We compare this method to a standard friends-of-friends halo-finding algorithm and find that ORIGAMI halos are somewhat larger, more diffuse, and less spherical, though the global properties of ORIGAMI halos are in good agreement with other modern halo-finding algorithms.

Falck, Bridget L.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

S.P. Gerhardt

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Spatial assessment of net mercury emissions from the use of fluorescent bulbs  

SciTech Connect

While fluorescent lighting is an important technology for reducing electrical energy demand, mercury used in the bulbs is an ongoing concern. Using state and country level data, net emissions of mercury from the marginal use of fluorescent lightbulbs are examined for a base year of 2004 for each of the 50 United States and 130 countries. Combustion of coal for electric power generation is generally the largest source of atmospheric mercury pollution; reduction in electricity demand from the substitution of incandescent bulbs with fluorescents leads to reduced mercury emissions during the use of the bulb. This analysis considers the local mix of power sources, coal quality, thermal conversion efficiencies, distribution losses, and any mercury control technologies that might be in place. Emissions of mercury from production and end-of-life treatment of the bulbs are also considered, providing a life-cycle perspective. Net reductions in mercury over the entire life cycle range from -1.2 to 97 mg per bulb depending on the country. The consequences for atmospheric mercury emissions of several policy scenarios are also discussed. 46 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Matthew J. Eckelman; Paul T. Anastas; Julie B. Zimmerman [Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we review our current knowledge on diffuse gamma-rays from galactic halos. Estimates of the relative contribution of the various emission processes at low and high latitudes are compared to the data over 6 decades in energy. The observed spectral shape differs from what was expected, especially at ver low and very high energies. In the latter case, above 1 GeV, the sky emission related to gas exceeds the expected pi^0 decay spectrum. At energies below 1 MeV the relatively high gamma-ray intensity indicates at high density of nearly relativistic electrons which would have a strong influence on the energy and ionisation balance of the interstellar medium. Given the EGRET results for the Magellanic Clouds the gamma-ray emissivity in the outer halo is probably small, so that a substantial amount of baryonic dark matter may be hidden at 20-50 kpc radius without inducing observable gamma-ray emission.

M. Pohl

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Halogenated high {Tc} superconductors and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for producing a superconductor of the R-Ba-Cu-O system which comprises of selecting an insulating material of the formula RBa{sub x}Cu{sub y}O{sub z} where R is selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu, and where x ranges from about 1.7 to about 2.3, y ranges from about 2.7 to about 3.3 and z ranges from about 5.0 to about 6.99, and halogenating said material with a halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine, iodine, and mixtures thereof, while maintaining said material at a temperature ranging from about 160 to about 440{degrees}C, for a period of time sufficient to cause incorporation of said halogen into said material. Also, disclosed are the materials produced by the method and articles of manufacture incorporating said materials as electronic circuitry components.

Radousky, H.B.; Glass, R.S.; Fluss, M.J.

1990-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Merger Rates of Dark-Matter Haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic merger rates for dark-matter haloes within the framework of the Extended Press-Schechter (EPS) formalism. These rates become self-consistent within EPS once we realize that the typical merger in the limit of a small time-step involves more than two progenitors, contrary to the assumption of binary mergers adopted in earlier studies. We present a general method for computing merger rates that span the range of solutions permitted by the EPS conditional mass function, and focus on a specific solution that attempts to match the merger rates in N-body simulations. The corrected EPS merger rates are more accurate than the earlier estimates of Lacey & Cole, by ~20% for major mergers and by up to a factor of ~3 for minor mergers of mass ratio 1:10^4. Based on the revised merger rates, we provide a new algorithm for constructing Monte-Carlo EPS merger trees, that could be useful in Semi-Analytic Modeling. We provide analytic expressions and plot numerical results for several quantities that are very useful in studies of galaxy formation. This includes (a) the rate of mergers of a given mass ratio per given final halo, (b) the fraction of mass added by mergers to a halo, and (c) the rate of mergers per given main progenitor. The creation and destruction rates of haloes serve for a self-consistency check. Our method for computing merger rates can be applied to conditional mass functions beyond EPS, such as those obtained by the ellipsoidal collapse model or extracted from $N$-body simulations.

Eyal Neistein; Avishai Dekel

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

97

Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? January 24, 2012 - 1:31pm Addthis Big Bill and Little Bill are here to talk with you about energy efficiency on behalf of Energy Impact Illinois. Roland Risser Roland Risser Program Director, Building Technologies Office How can I participate? You can view all of Big Bill and Little Bill's videos on the Energy Bill's YouTube channel. Everyone knows that laughter is good for you. Studies suggest it can buffer stress and increase your resistance to disease. Also, it just feels great to laugh. Advertisers have long used the allure of laughter to sell their products, and many Americans tune in to the Super Bowl just to chuckle at the funny commercials. However, when it comes to selling people on smart

98

Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? January 24, 2012 - 1:31pm Addthis Big Bill and Little Bill are here to talk with you about energy efficiency on behalf of Energy Impact Illinois. Roland Risser Roland Risser Program Director, Building Technologies Office How can I participate? You can view all of Big Bill and Little Bill's videos on the Energy Bill's YouTube channel. Everyone knows that laughter is good for you. Studies suggest it can buffer stress and increase your resistance to disease. Also, it just feels great to laugh. Advertisers have long used the allure of laughter to sell their products, and many Americans tune in to the Super Bowl just to chuckle at the funny commercials. However, when it comes to selling people on smart

99

Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging technology, also called "solid state lighting" as it is light produced by a solid-state (chip) device - General Service Incandescent Lamp: The most common residential light bulb in use, with a medium screw base, and a lumen range of 310 to 2,600 lumens

100

Do halos exist on the dripline of deformed nuclei?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the effect of deformation and pairing on the development of halo nuclei is presented. Exploratory three-body $core+n+n$ calculations show that both the NN interaction and the deformation/excitation of the core hinder the formation of the halo. Preliminary self-consistent mean-field calculations are used to search for regions in the nuclear chart where halos could potentially develop. These are also briefly discussed.

Nunes, F M; Duguet, T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full Spectrum Light Therapy Full spectrum light bulbs are said to not only improve mood, but also spectrum light bulbs produce light that is seen by the human eye in a bluish-white tint. Where is full energy, learning ability, and behavior. Light therapy mimics outdoor light and causes a biochemical

Bates, Rebecca A.

102

Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered a blackbody radiator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1 Chapter 30: Quantum Physics 9. The tungsten filament in a standard light bulb can be considered frequency is that of infrared electromagnetic radiation, the light bulb radiates more energy in the infrared. The light from a flashlight can be considered as the emission of many photons of the same frequency

Kioussis, Nicholas

103

Unveiling the Secrets of Nanoparticle Haloing | Advanced Photon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

halo, it opens a window to the systematic study of the entire nanoparticle-microsphere phase diagram for this type of novel colloidal stabilization mechanism," said Argonne's...

104

An Efficient and Accurate Method for Computing the Wet-Bulb Temperature along Pseudoadiabats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for computing the wet-bulb potential temperature of a parcel and its temperature after pseudoadiabatic ascent or descent to a new pressure level is presented. It is based on inverting Bolton’s most accurate formula for equivalent ...

Robert Davies-Jones

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Large Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Limb Halo Coronal Mass Ejections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar cycle 23 witnessed the observation of hundreds of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs), thanks to the high dynamic range and extended field of view of the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. More than two thirds of halo CMEs originating on the front side of the Sun have been found to be geoeffective (Dst = 45deg) have a 20% shorter delay time on the average. It was suggested that the geomagnetic storms due to limb halos must be due to the sheath portion of the interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) so that the shorter delay time can be accounted for. We confirm this suggestion by examining the sheath and ejecta portions of ICMEs from Wind and ACE data that correspond to the limb halos. Detailed examination showed that three pairs of limb halos were interacting events. Geomagnetic storms following five limb halos were actually produced by other disk halos. The storms followed by four isolated limb halos and the ones associated with interact...

Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko; Makela, Pertti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Cluster models for dripline halo nuclei: Achievements and puzzles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Few-Body methods to investigate Borromean two-neutron halo nuclei discussed together with recent experiments. Progress in 6 He and 11 Li studies is analyzed. Some new problems created by large neutron excess and halo phenomenon are under consideration.

B. V. Danilin; I. J. Thompson; M. V. Zhukov; J. S. Vaagen; RNBT (Russian-Nordic-British Theory) Collaboration

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that, because of their unique properties, halogen bonds have tremendous potential in the development of new pharmaceutical compounds and materials. In this study we investigate the phenomenon of halogen bonding by carrying out ab initio calculations on the halomethane-formaldehyde complexes as well as the fluorine substituted FnH?-nCX---OCH? dimers, where the halogen bonding halogens (X) are chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Coupled cluster (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ) calculations indicate that the binding energies for these type of interactions lie in the range between -1.05 kcal/mol (H?CCl---OCH?) and -3.72 kcal/mol (F?CI---OCH?). One of the most important findings in this study is that, according to symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) analyses, halogen bonds are largely dependent on both electrostatic and dispersion type interactions. As the halogen atom involved in halogen bonding becomes larger the interaction strength for this type of interaction also gets larger and, interestingly, more electrostatic (and less dispersive) in character. Halogen bonding interactions also become stronger and more electrostatic upon substitution of (the very electronegative) fluorines onto the halomethane molecule.

Riley, Kevin E.; Hobza, Pavel

2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Streams in the Aquarius stellar haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the very high resolution, fully cosmological simulations from the Aquarius project, coupled to a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation, to study the phase-space distribution of halo stars in "solar neighbourhood"-like volumes. We find that this distribution is very rich in substructure in the form of stellar streams for all five stellar haloes we have analysed. These streams can be easily identified in velocity space, as well as in spaces of pseudo-conserved quantities such as E vs. Lz. In our best-resolved local volumes, the number of identified streams ranges from ~ 300 to 600, in very good agreement with previous analytical predictions, even in the presence of chaotic mixing. The fraction of particles linked to (massive) stellar streams in these volumes can be as large as 84%. The number of identified streams is found to decrease as a power-law with galactocentric radius. We show that the strongest limitation to the quantification of substructure in our poorest-resolved local volumes is particle...

Gómez, Facundo A; Cooper, Andrew P; Frenk, Carlos S; Navarro, Julio F; White, Simon D M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ENVIRONMENT DEPENDENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS IN SYMMETRON MODIFIED GRAVITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the environment dependence of dark matter halos in the symmetron modified gravity scenario. The symmetron is one of three known mechanisms for screening a fifth force and thereby recovering general relativity in dense environments. The effectiveness of the screening depends on both the mass of the object and the environment it lies in. Using high-resolution N-body simulations we find a significant difference, which depends on the halo's mass and environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos similar to the f(R) modified gravity. The symmetron can however yield stronger signatures due to a freedom in the strength of coupling to matter.

Winther, Hans A.; Mota, David F. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Li Baojiu [ICC, Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

FEDOTOV, A.V.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

An improved RF cavity search for halo axions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle and cold dark matter candidate. In this RF cavity experiment, halo axions entering a resonant cavity immersed in a static magnetic field convert into microwave photons, with ...

Yu, D. B. (Daniel Byungyoon), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Light-cone Simulations: Evolution of dark matter haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new fast method for simulating pencil-beam type light-cones, using the MLAPM-code (Multi Level Adaptive Particle Mesh) with light-cone additions. We show that by a careful choice of the light-cone orientation, it is possible to avoid extra periodicities in the light-cone. As an example, we apply the method to simulate a 6 Gpc deep light-cone, create the dark matter halo catalogue for the light-cone and study the evolution of haloes from $z=6$ up to the present time. We determine the spatial density of the haloes, their large-scale correlation function, and study the evolution of the mass function. We find a surprisingly simple relation for the dependence of halo maximum mass on redshift, and apply it to derive redshift limits for bright quasars.

P. Hein"am"aki; I. Suhhonenko; E. Saar; Maret Einasto; Jaan Einasto; Heidi Virtanen

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS FOR BEAM HALO INVESTIGATION IN SNS LINAC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncontrolled beam loss is a major concern in the operation of a high intensity hadron linac. A low density cloud of particles with large oscillation amplitudes, so called halo, can form around the dense regular beam core. This halo can be a direct or indirect cause of beam loss. There is experimental evidence of halo growing in the SNS linac and limiting the further reduction of beam loss. A set of tools is being developed for detecting of the halo and investigating its origin and dynamics. The set includes high resolution emittance measurements in the injector, laser based emittance measurements at 1 GeV, and high resolution profile measurements along the linac. We will present our experience with useful measurement techniques and data analysis algorithms.

Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Blokland, Willem [ORNL; Liu, Yun [ORNL; Long, Cary D [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Red Galaxies from Hot Halos in Cosmological Hydro Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I highlight three results from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations that yield a realistic red sequence of galaxies: 1) Major galaxy mergers are not responsible for shutting off star-formation and forming the red sequence. Starvation in hot halos is. 2) Massive galaxies grow substantially (about a factor of 2 in mass) after being quenched, primarily via minor (1:5) mergers. 3) Hot halo quenching naturally explains why galaxies are red when they either (a) are massive or (b) live in dense environments.

Gabor, Jared

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Halo of the Milky Way  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the star counts in the spheroid of the Milky Way are not symmetric about the l=0, l=180 deg. plane. The minimum counts are found towards l=155 deg. The Galactic longitude of maximum star counts depends on the magnitude and color selection of the halo stars. We interpret this as evidence that the spheroid population is triaxial with a major axis oriented 65 deg from the line of sight from the Sun to the Galactic center, and approximately perpendicular to the Galactic bar. Large local star concentrations from tidal debris and possible tidal debris are also observed. A full understanding of the Galactic spheroid population awaits position information and three dimensional space velocities for a representative set of stars in every substructure. Tangential velocities for many stars will be provided by current and planned astrometry missions, but no planned mission will measure stars faint enough to unravel the more distant parts of the spheroid, which contain the majority of the spatial substructure. This paper uses data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) public data release DR3.

Heidi Jo Newberg; Brian Yanny

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

HALO VELOCITY GROUPS IN THE PISCES OVERDENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report spectroscopic observations of five faint (V {approx} 20) RR Lyrae stars associated with the Pisces overdensity conducted with the Gemini South Telescope. At a heliocentric and galactocentric distance of {approx}80 kpc, this is the most distant substructure in the Galactic halo known to date. We combined our observations with literature data and confirmed that the substructure is composed of two different kinematic groups. The main group contains eight stars and has (V{sub gsr}) = 50 km s{sup -1}, while the second group contains four stars at a velocity of (V{sub gsr}) = -52 km s{sup -1}, where V{sub gsr} is the radial velocity in the galactocentric standard of rest. The metallicity distribution of RR Lyrae stars in the Pisces overdensity is centered on [Fe/H] = -1.5 dex and has a width of 0.3 dex. The new data allowed us to establish that both groups are spatially extended making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and are more likely to be debris of a tidally disrupted galaxy or galaxies. Due to small sky coverage, it is still unclear whether these groups have the same or different progenitors.

Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Vivas, A. Katherina [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Apartado Postal 264, Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Duffau, Sonia, E-mail: bsesar@u.washington.ed, E-mail: zi@u.washington.ed, E-mail: akvivas@cida.v, E-mail: sonia.duffau@gmail.co [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstrasse 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Summer Polar Chemistry Observations in the Stratosphere Made by HALOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions of low stratospheric ozone that are anticorrelated with HCl, NO, and NO2 levels have been observed in the Arctic and Antarctic summers of 1992 and 1993 by the Halogen Occultation Experiment on the UARS platform. The low ozone areas are ...

Jae H. Park; James M. Russell III

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cross-linking of atrial natriuretic peptide to binding sites in rat olfactory bulb membranes  

SciTech Connect

Binding sites for /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)2 in rat olfactory bulb membranes have been studied using pharmacological and biochemical methods. Various unlabeled ANP-related peptides were tested for the ability to inhibit the binding of the radioligand in membrane binding assays. ANP(92-126) and ANP(99-126) were the most potent inhibitors tested, both exhibiting an IC50 value of 0.40 nM. ANP(103-126) and ANP(103-123) were 3 and 70 times less potent, respectively. ANP(111-126) was unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand at a concentration of 1 microM. Several peptides unrelated to ANP were unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand to rat olfactory bulb membranes. Membranes labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP were incubated with cross-linking agents and subjected to SDS-PAGE followed by autoradiography. A band possessing an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa was identified. The labeling of this band was progressively decreased by increasing concentrations of unlabeled ANP(99-126) (IC50 = 0.6 nM) and by several other ANP-related peptides at nanomolar concentrations. For comparison purposes, ANP binding sites in rat aorta membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP and cross-linked using identical techniques. Three bands possessing molecular masses of 120, 72, and 62 kDa were identified. These results indicate that the ANP binding site in rat olfactory bulb membranes displays pharmacological and biochemical properties similar to peripheral ANP receptors.

Wildey, G.M.; Glembotski, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The orientation of galaxy dark matter haloes around cosmic voids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the Millennium N-body simulation we explore how the shape and angular momentum of galaxy dark matter haloes surrounding the largest cosmological voids are oriented. We find that the major and intermediate axes of the haloes tend to lie parallel to the surface of the voids, whereas the minor axis points preferentially in the radial direction. We have quantified the strength of these alignments at different radial distances from the void centres. The effect of these orientations is still detected at distances as large as 2.2 R_void from the void centre. Taking a subsample of haloes expected to contain disc-dominated galaxies at their centres we detect, at the 99.9% confidence level, a signal that the angular momentum of those haloes tends to lie parallel to the surface of the voids. Contrary to the alignments of the inertia axes, this signal is only detected in shells at the void surface (1haloes and baryonic matter have acquired, conjointly, their angular momentum before the moment of turnaround.

Riccardo Brunino; Ignacio Trujillo; Frazer R. Pearce; Peter A. Thomas

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environment Dependence of Dark Matter Halos in Symmetron Modified Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the environment dependence of dark matter halos in the symmetron modified gravity scenario. The symmetron is one of three known mechanisms for screening a fifth-force and thereby recovering General Relativity in dense environments. The effectiveness of the screening depends on both the mass of the object and the environment it lies in. Using high-resolution N-body simulations we find a significant difference, which depends on the halos mass and environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos similar to the f(R) modified gravity. The symmetron can however yield stronger signatures due to a freedom in the strength of the coupling to matter.

Hans A. Winther; David F. Mota; Baojiu Li

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

A 500 PARSEC HALO SURROUNDING THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR NGC 1851  

SciTech Connect

Using imaging that shows 4 mag of main-sequence stars, we have discovered that the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 is surrounded by a halo that is visible from the tidal radius of 700 arcsec (41 pc) to more than 4500 arcsec (>250 pc). This halo is symmetric and falls in density as a power law of r {sup -1.24}. It contains approximately 0.1% of the dynamical mass of NGC 1851. There is no evidence for tidal tails. Current models of globular cluster evolution do not explain this feature, although simulations of tidal influences on dwarf spheroidal galaxies qualitatively mimic these results. Given the state of published models, it is not possible to decide between creation of this halo from either isolated cluster evaporation or from tidal or disk shocking, or from destruction of a dwarf galaxy in which this object may have once been embedded.

Olszewski, Edward W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Saha, Abhijit; Knezek, Patricia [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ (United States); Subramaniam, Annapurni [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India); De Boer, Thomas [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Seitzer, Patrick [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)], E-mail: eolszewski@as.arizona.edu

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

The density profiles of hot galactic halo gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended gas haloes around galaxies are a ubiquitous prediction of galaxy formation scenarios. However, the density profiles of this hot halo gas is virtually unknown, although various profiles have been suggested on theoretical grounds. In order to quantitatively address the gas profile, we compare galaxies from direct cosmological simulations with analytical solutions of the underlying gas equations. We find remarkable agreement between simulations and theoretical predictions. We present an expression for this gas profile with a non-trivial dependence on the total mass profile. This expression is useful when setting up equilibrium galaxy models for numerical experiments.

Steen H. Hansen; Jesper Sommer-Larsen

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

Suppressed fusion cross section for neutron halo nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion reactions of neutron-halo nuclei are investigated theoretically with a three-body model. The time-dependent wave-packet method is used to solve the three-body Schrodinger equation. The halo neutron behaves as a spectator during the Coulomb dissociation process of the projectile. The fusion cross sections of 11Be-209Bi and 6He-238U are calculated and are compared with measurements. Our calculation indicates that the fusion cross section is slightly hindered by the presence of weakly bound neutrons.

Makoto Ito; Kazuhiro Yabana; Takashi Nakatsukasa; Manabu Ueda

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Abstract: Tracking and Visualizing Evolution of the Universe: In Situ Parallel Dark Matter Halo Merger Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a framework to study the behavior and properties of cosmological structures called dark matter halos. As part of the framework, we build an evolution history, called halo merger trees, which follows the evolution of the halos over time. The ... Keywords: parallel programming, distributed systems, feature tracking, merger tree

Jay Takle, Katrin Heitmann, Tom Peterka, Deborah Silver, George Zagaris, Salman Habib

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Probing the shape and history of the Milky Way halo with orbital spectral analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase space coordinates of individual halo stars obtained by Galactic surveys enable the computation of their full 3-dimensional orbits. Spectral analysis of halo orbits can be used to construct "frequency maps" which provide a compact representation of the 6-dimensional phase space distribution function. Frequency maps identify important major orbit families, and the orbital abundances reflect the shape and orientation of the dark matter halo relative to the disk. We apply spectral analysis to halo orbits in a series of controlled simulations of disk galaxies. Although the shape of the simulated halo varies with radius, frequency maps of local samples of halo orbits confined to the inner halo contain most of the information about the global shape of the halo and its major orbit families. Quiescent or adiabatic disk formation results in significant trapping of halo orbits in resonant orbit families (i.e. orbits with commensurable frequencies). If a good estimate of the Galactic potential in the inner halo (within ~50kpc) is available, the appearance of strong, stable resonances in frequency maps of halo orbits will allow us to determine the degree of resonant trapping induced by the disk potential. The locations and strengths of these resonant families are determined both by the global shape of the halo and its distribution function. Identification of such resonances in the Milky Way's stellar halo would therefore provide evidence of an extended period of adiabatic disk growth. If the Galactic potential is not known exactly, a measure of the diffusion rate of large sample of 10^4 halo orbits can help distinguish between the true potential and an incorrect potential. The orbital spectral analysis methods described in this paper provide a strong complementarity to existing methods for constraining the potential of the Milky Way halo and its stellar distribution function (ABRIDGED).

Monica Valluri; Victor P. Debattista; Thomas R. Quinn; Rok Roskar; James Wadsley

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium light tubes are recycled. They are made from aluminum and metal. Aluminum is a silver-white metal and is very light in weight and strong. Because aluminum is ductile, it can be drawn into wires or pressed

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

132

Field Evaluation of a Novel Sorbent Trap Method for Measuring Metal and Halogen Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of fossil fuel-fired power plants face the challenge of measuring stack emissions of trace metals and acid gases at much lower levels than in the past as a result of increasingly stringent regulations. In the United States, the current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 29 for trace metals and 26 and 26A for halogens. As a possible alternative to the EPA methods, the Energy and Environmental Research ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

133

THE STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY'S HOT GAS HALO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Milky Way's million degree gaseous halo contains a considerable amount of mass that, depending on its structural properties, can be a significant mass component. In order to analyze the structure of the Galactic halo, we use XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer archival data and measure O VII K{alpha} absorption-line strengths toward 26 active galactic nuclei, LMC X-3, and two Galactic sources (4U 1820-30 and X1735-444). We assume a {beta}-model as the underlying gas density profile and find best-fit parameters of n{sub circle} = 0.46{sup +0.74}{sub -0.35} cm{sup -3}, r{sub c} = 0.35{sup +0.29}{sub -0.27} kpc, and {beta} = 0.71{sup +0.13}{sub -0.14}. These parameters result in halo masses ranging between M(18 kpc) = 7.5{sub -4.6}{sup +}2{sup 2.0} x 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} and M (200 kpc) = 3.8{sub -0.5}{sup +6.0} x 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} assuming a gas metallicity of Z = 0.3 Z{sub Sun }, which are consistent with current theoretical and observational work. The maximum baryon fraction from our halo model of f{sub b} = 0.07{sup +0.03}{sub -0.01} is significantly smaller than the universal value of f{sub b} = 0.171, implying the mass contained in the Galactic halo accounts for 10%-50% of the missing baryons in the Milky Way. We also discuss our model in the context of several Milky Way observables, including ram pressure stripping in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, the observed X-ray emission measure in the 0.5-2 keV band, the Milky Way's star formation rate, spatial and thermal properties of cooler gas ({approx}10{sup 5} K), and the observed Fermi bubbles toward the Galactic center. Although the metallicity of the halo gas is a large uncertainty in our analysis, we place a lower limit on the halo gas between the Sun and the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find that Z {approx}> 0.2 Z{sub Sun} based on the pulsar dispersion measure toward the LMC.

Miller, Matthew J.; Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: mjmil@umich.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

What are Machos? Limits on Stellar Objects as the Dark Matter of our Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the Massive Compact Halo objects seen in microlensing experiments and interpreted as dark matter in the Halo of our Galaxy remains a mystery. Arguments are presented that these events are probably not ordinary stellar or substellar objects, i.e., they are probably not faint stars, brown dwarfs, white dwarfs, or neutron stars. On theoretical grounds one is then pushed to either exotic explanations or a "no-Macho" Halo (in which the Machos reside elsewhere than in the Halo). Indeed a nonbaryonic component in the Halo seems to be required.

Katherine Freese; Brian Fields; David Graff

1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

HOT GAS HALOS IN EARLY-TYPE FIELD GALAXIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study the hot gas content in a sample of field early-type galaxies. We find that the L {sub X}-L {sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. The low hot gas content of field galaxies with L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} suggests that internal processes such as supernovae-driven winds or active galactic nucleus feedback expel hot gas from low-mass galaxies. Such mechanisms may be less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium can confine outflowing material. In addition, galaxies in groups and clusters may be able to accrete gas from the ambient medium. While there is a population of L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} galaxies in groups and clusters that retain hot gas halos, some galaxies in these rich environments, including brighter galaxies, are largely devoid of hot gas. In these cases, the hot gas halos have likely been removed via ram pressure stripping. This suggests a very complex interplay between the intragroup/intracluster medium and hot gas halos of galaxies in rich environments, with the ambient medium helping to confine or even enhance the halos in some cases and acting to remove gas in others. In contrast, the hot gas content of more isolated galaxies is largely a function of the mass of the galaxy, with more massive galaxies able to maintain their halos, while in lower mass systems the hot gas escapes in outflowing winds.

Mulchaey, John S. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: mulchaey@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

BULK FLOW OF HALOS IN {Lambda}CDM SIMULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the Pangu N-body simulation validates that the bulk flow of halos follows a Maxwellian distribution with variance that is consistent with the prediction of the linear theory of structure formation. We propose that the consistency between the observed bulk velocity and theories should be examined at the effective scale of the radius of a spherical top-hat window function yielding the same smoothed velocity variance in linear theory as the sample window function does. We compared some recently estimated bulk flows from observational samples with the prediction of the {Lambda}CDM model we used; some results deviate from expectation at a level of {approx}3{sigma}, but the discrepancy is not as severe as previously claimed. We show that bulk flow is only weakly correlated with the dipole of the internal mass distribution, that the alignment angle between the mass dipole and the bulk flow has a broad distribution peaked at {approx}30 Degree-Sign -50 Degree-Sign , and also that the bulk flow shows little dependence on the mass of the halos used in the estimation. In a simulation of box size 1 h {sup -1} Gpc, for a cell of radius 100 h {sup -1} Mpc the maximal bulk velocity is >500 km s{sup -1}; dipoles of the environmental mass outside the cell are not tightly aligned with the bulk flow, but are rather located randomly around it with separation angles {approx}20 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign . In the fastest cell there is a slightly smaller number of low-mass halos; however, halos inside are clustered more strongly at scales {approx}> 20 h {sup -1} Mpc, which might be a significant feature since the correlation between bulk flow and halo clustering actually increases in significance beyond such scales.

Li Ming; Pan Jun; Feng Longlong; Kang Xi [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Gao Liang [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Jing Yipeng; Yang Xiaohu; Lin Weipeng; Zhao Donghai; Zhang Pengjie [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Chi Xuebin; Shan Guihua; Wang Long, E-mail: jpan@bao.ac.cn [Supercomputing Center, Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 4 Zhongguancun Nansijie, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Geomagnetic Storms In Relation With Halo and Partial Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Disturbances in Solar Wind Plasma Parameters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal mass ejections are most energetic solar events that eject huge amount of mass and magnetic fields into the heliosphere and are widely recognized as being responsible to generate measure disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters and geomagnetic storms in the magnetosphere of the earth. We have studied geomagnetic storms Dst solar flares of different categories. We have found that 74.61 % geomagnetic storms are associated with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections. The association rate of geomagnetic storms with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections are found 34.73 % and 65.27% respectively. We have further determined that halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections, which are related to geomagnetic storms, majority of them are associated with M and C, class X-ray solar flares (77%). From the study of geomagnetic storms with disturbances in solar wind plasma parameters, we have determined weak positive correlation between maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma density and magnitude of geomagnetic storms and medium positive correlation between maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma temperature and magnitude of geomagnetic storms and maximum jump amplitude in solar wind plasma velocity and magnitude of geomagnetic storms. Keywords: Geomagnetic storms. Halo coronal mass ejections. Partial halo coronal mass ejections. Disturbances in solar wind plasma temperature, density and velocity. 1.

P. L. Verma; A. K. Tripathi; Sushil Sharma

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Milky Way's stellar halo - lumpy or triaxial?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present minimum chi-squared fits of power law and Hernquist density profiles to F-turnoff stars in eight 2.5 deg wide stripes of SDSS data: five in the North Galactic Cap and three in the South Galactic cap. Portions of the stellar Galactic halo that are known to contain large streams of tidal debris or other lumpy structure, or that may include significant contamination from the thick disk, are avoided. The data strongly favor a model that is not symmetric about the Galaxy's axis of rotation. If included as a free parameter, the best fit to the center of the spheroid is surprisingly approx 3 kpc from the Galactic center in the direction of the Sun's motion. The model fits favor a low value of the density of halo stars at the solar position. The alternative to a non-axisymmetric stellar distribution is that our fits are contaminated by previously unidentified lumpy substructure.

Heidi Jo Newberg; Brian Yanny

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

On the formation of dwarf galaxies and stellar halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using analytic arguments and a suite of very high resolution (10^3 Msun per particle) cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations, we argue that high redshift, z ~ 10, M ~ 10^8 Msun halos, form the smallest `baryonic building block' (BBB) for galaxy formation. These halos are just massive enough to efficiently form stars through atomic line cooling and to hold onto their gas in the presence of supernovae winds and reionisation. These combined effects, in particular that of the supernovae feedback, create a sharp transition: over the mass range 3-10x10^7 Msun, the BBBs drop two orders ofmagnitude in stellar mass. Below ~2x10^7 Msun, galaxies will be dark with almost no stars and no gas. Above this scale is the smallest unit of galaxy formation: the BBB. A small fraction (~100) of these gas rich BBBs fall in to a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. Ten percent of these survive to become the observed LG dwarf galaxies at the present epoch. Those in-falling halos on benign orbits which keep them far away from the Milky Way or Andromeda manage to retain their gas and slowly form stars - these become the smallest dwarf irregular galax ies; those on more severe orbits lose their gas faster than they can form stars and become the dwarf spheroidals. The remaining 90% of the BBBs will be accreted. We show that this gives a metallicity and total stellar mass consistent with the Milky Way old stellar halo (abridged).

J. I. Read; A. P. Pontzen; M. Viel

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

On the formation of dwarf galaxies and stellar halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using analytic arguments and a suite of very high resolution (10^3Msun per particle) cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations, we argue that high redshift, z ~ 10, M ~ 10^8Msun halos, form the smallest `baryonic building block' (BBB) for galaxy formation. These halos are just massive enough to efficiently form stars through atomic line cooling and to hold onto their gas in the presence of supernovae winds and reionisation. These combined effects, in particular that of the supernovae feedback, create a sharp transition: over the mass range 3-10x10^7Msun, the BBBs drop two orders ofmagnitude in stellar mass. Below ~2x10^7Msun, galaxies will be dark with almost no stars and no gas. Above this scale is the smallest unit of galaxy formation: the BBB. A small fraction (~100) of these gas rich BBBs fall in to a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. Ten percent of these survive to become the observed LG dwarf galaxies at the present epoch. Those in-falling halos on benign orbits which keep them far away from the Milky Wa...

Read, J I; Viel, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Weak Lensing Determination of the Mass in Galaxy Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We detect the weak gravitational lensing distortion of 450,000 background galaxies (20projected radius of 200 \\hkpc, the shear profile is consistent with an isothermal profile with circular velocity 164+-20 km/s for an L* galaxy, consistent with typical disk rotation at this luminosity. This halo mass normalization, combined with the halo profile derived by Fischer et al (2000) from lensing analysis SDSS data, places a lower limit of (2.7+-0.6) x 10^{12}h^{-1} solar masses on the mass of an L* galaxy halo, in good agreement with satellite galaxy studies. Given the known luminosity function of LCRS galaxies, and the assumption that $M\\propto L^\\beta$ for galaxies, we determine that the mass within 260\\hkpc of normal galaxies contributes $\\Omega=0.16\\pm0.03$ to the density of the Universe (for $\\beta=1$) or $\\Omega=0.24\\pm0.06$ for $\\beta=0.5$. These lensing data suggest that $0.6agreement with the usual $\\beta\\approx0.5$ Faber-Jackson or Tully-Fisher scaling. This is the most complete direct inventory of the matter content of the Universe to date.

D. R. Smith; G. M. Bernstein; P. Fischer; R. M. Jarvis

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quasars Are Not Light-Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of AGN lifetimes and lightcurves. Given the observed AGN luminosity function, a model for AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity) translates directly to a predicted Eddington ratio distribution. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a 'blowout' decay phase after some peak luminosity (shutting down accretion) make specific predictions for the lifetimes distinct from those expected if AGN are simply gas starved (without feedback) and very different from simple phenomenological 'light bulb' models. Present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning 5 decades in Eddington ratio, 3 in BH mass, and redshifts z=0-1, agree with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out 'light-bulb', pure exponential, and gas starvation models at high significance. We compare the Eddington ratio distributions at fixed BH mass and fixed luminosity (both ...

Hopkins, Philip F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Merger Histories of Galaxy Halos and Implications for Disk Survival  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors study the merger histories of galaxy dark matter halos using a high resolution {Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. The merger trees follow {approx} 17,000 halos with masses M{sub 0} = (10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13})h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} at z = 0 and track accretion events involving objects as small as m {approx_equal} 10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. They find that mass assembly is remarkably self-similar in m/M{sub 0}, and dominated by mergers that are {approx}10% of the final halo mass. While very large mergers, m {approx}> 0.4 M{sub 0}, are quite rare, sizeable accretion events, m {approx} 0.1 M{sub 0}, are common. Over the last {approx} 10 Gyr, an overwhelming majority ({approx} 95%) of Milky Way-sized halos with M{sub 0} = 10{sup 12} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} have accreted at least one object with greater total mass than the Milky Way disk (m > 5 x 10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}), and approximately 70% have accreted an object with more than twice that mass (m > 10{sup 11} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}). The results raise serious concerns about the survival of thin-disk dominated galaxies within the current paradigm for galaxy formation in a {Lambda}CDM universe. in order to achieve a {approx} 70% disk-dominated fraction in Milky Way-sized {Lambda}CDM halos, mergers involving m {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 11} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} objects must not destroy disks. Considering that most thick disks and bulges contain old stellar populations, the situation is even more restrictive: these mergers must not heat disks or drive gas into their centers to create young bulges.

Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Zentner, Andrew R.

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Halos in a deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution we present some recent results about neutron halos in deformed nuclei. A deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuumhas been developed and the halo phenomenon in deformed weakly bound nuclei is investigated. These weakly bound quantum systems present interesting examples for the study of the interdependence between the deformation of the core and the particles in the halo. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and detailed results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nuclei {sup 42}Mg. The core of this nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the existence of halos in deformed nuclei and for the occurrence of this decoupling effect are discussed.

Li Lulu; Meng Jie; Ring, P.; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch (South Africa); Physikdepartment, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany) and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) and Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hierarchical phase space structure of dark matter haloes: Tidal debris, caustics, and dark matter annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the mass content of dark matter haloes is expected to be in the form of tidal debris. The density

Bertschinger, Edmund

146

Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens with catalytic molten salt mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. The subject hydrogen halide is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxygen compound of vanadium and alkali metal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen. The reduced vanadium which remains after this contacting is regenerated to the active higher valence state by contacting the spent molten salt with a stream of oxygen-bearing gas.

Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Galactic Halo's O VI Resonance Line Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used FUSE to observe ultraviolet emission from diffuse O VI in the hot gas in the Galactic halo. By comparing our result with another, nearby observation blocked by an opaque cloud at a distance of 230 pc, we could subtract off the contribution from the Local Bubble, leading to an apparent halo intensity of I_{OVI} = 4680^{+570}_{-660} photons/cm^2/s/sr. A correction for foreground extinction leads to an intrinsic intensity that could be as much as twice this value. Assuming T ~ 3 x 10^5 K, we conclude that the electron density, n_e, is 0.01-0.02 /cm^3, the thermal pressure, p/k, is 7000-10,000 K/cm^3, and that the hot gas is spread over a length of 50-70 pc, implying a small filling factor for O VI-rich gas. ROSAT observations of emission at 1/4 keV in the same direction indicate that the X-rays are weaker by a factor of 1.1 to 4.7, depending on the foreground extinction. Simulated supernova remnants evolving in low density gas have similar O VI to X-ray ratios when the remnant plasma is approaching collisional ioinizational equilibrium and the physical structures are approaching dynamical ``middle age''. Alternatively, the plasma can be described by a temperature power-law. Assuming that the material is approximately isobaric and the length scales according to T^(beta) d(ln T), we find beta = 1.5+/-0.6 and an upper temperature cutoff of 10^{6.6(+0.3,-0.2)} K. The radiative cooling rate for the hot gas, including that which is too hot to hold O VI, is 6 x 10^{38} erg/s/kpc^2. This rate implies that ~70% of the energy produced in the disk and halo by SN and pre-SN winds is radiated by the hot gas in the halo.

Robin L. Shelton; Shauna M. Sallmen; Edward B. Jenkins

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

149

1997 Glossary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

All types of light bulbs are included: incandescent, fluorescent, compact fluorescent, halogen, and high-intensity-discharge (HID). (See Appliances ...

150

Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T5 Incandescent CFL Halogen Other Total Equipment EfficiencyCFL replacement for incandescent bulbs, and high-efficiency

McNeil, Michael A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Age of the Inner Halo Globular Cluster NGC 6652  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HST (V,I) photometry has been obtained for the inner halo globular cluster NGC 6652. The photometry reaches approximately 4 mag below the turn-off and includes a well populated horizontal branch. This cluster is located close to the Galactic center at a galactocentric distance of approximately 2.0 kpc with a reddening of E(V-I) = 0.15 +/- 0.02 and has a metallicity of [Fe/H] approximately -0.85. Based upon Delta(V) between the point on the sub-giant branch which is 0.05 mag redder than the turn-off and the horizontal branch, NGC 6652 is 11.7 +/- 1.6 Gyr old. Using this same Delta(V), precise differential ages for 47 Tuc (a thick disk globular), M107 and NGC 1851 (both halo clusters) were obtained. NGC 6652 appears to be the same age as 47 Tuc and NGC 1851 (within +/- 1.2 Gyr), while there is a slight suggestion that M107 is older than NGC 6652 by 2.3 +/- 1.5 Gyr. As this is a less than 2-sigma result, this issue needs to be investigated further before a definitive statement regarding the relative age of M107 and NGC 6652 may be made.

Brian Chaboyer; Ata Sarajedini; Taft E. Armandroff

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

Dissecting the spin distribution of Dark Matter halos.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We apply a very general statistical theorem introduced by Cramer (1936) to study the origin of the deviations of the halo spin PDF from the reference lognormal shape. We find that these deviations originate from correlations between two quantities entering the definition of spin, namely the ratio $J/M^{5/2}$ (which depends only on mass) and the total gravitational binding energy $E$. To reach this conclusion, we have made usage of the results deduced from two high spatial- and mass resolution simulations. Our simulations cover a relatively small volume and produce a sample of more than 16.000 gravitationally bound halos, each traced by at least 300 particles. We verify that our results are stable to different systematics, by comparing our results with those derived by the GIF2 and by a more recent simulation performed by Maccio' et al. We find that the spin probability distribution function shows systematic deviations from a lognormal, at all redshifts z <= 1. These deviations depend on mass and...

Antonuccio-Delogu, V; Becciani, U; Cielo, S; Giocoli, C; Maccio', A; Romeo, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Information content in the halo-model dark-matter power spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the halo model, we investigate the cosmological Fisher information in the non-linear dark-matter power spectrum about the initial amplitude of linear power. We find that there is little information on `translinear' scales (where the one- and two-halo terms are both significant) beyond what is on linear scales, but that additional information is present on small scales, where the one-halo term dominates. This behavior agrees with the surprising results that Rimes & Hamilton (2005, 2006) found using N-body simulations. We argue that the translinear plateau in cumulative information arises largely from fluctuations in the numbers of large haloes in a finite volume. This implies that more information could be extracted on non-linear scales if the masses of the largest haloes in a survey are known.

Mark C. Neyrinck; István Szapudi; Christopher D. Rimes

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

DETECTING TRIAXIALITY IN THE GALACTIC DARK MATTER HALO THROUGH STELLAR KINEMATICS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assuming the dark matter halo of the Milky Way to be a non-spherical potential (i.e., triaxial, prolate, oblate), we show how the assembling process of the Milky Way halo may have left long-lasting stellar halo kinematic fossils due to the shape of the dark matter halo. In contrast with tidal streams, which are associated with recent satellite accretion events, these stellar kinematic groups will typically show inhomogeneous chemical and stellar population properties. However, they may be dominated by a single accretion event for certain mass assembling histories. If the detection of these peculiar kinematic stellar groups were confirmed, they would be the smoking gun for the predicted triaxiality of dark halos in cosmological galaxy formation scenarios.

Rojas-Nino, Armando; Valenzuela, Octavio; Pichardo, Barbara [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510, Mexico, D.F., Universitaria, D.F. (Mexico); Aguilar, Luis A., E-mail: octavio@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: barbara@astro.unam.mx [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. postal 877, 22800 Ensenada (Mexico)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Etching properties and electrical characterization of surfaces of silicon-on-insulator substrates in presence of halogens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the etching properties of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates in recently developed chromium-free solutions containing halogens. We have shown that the presence of halogen compounds X (I{sup -}, Br{sup -}...) in HF/HNO{sub 3}/CH{sub 3}COOH solutions is required for a selective and preferential etching on SOI. The etching rate of such solutions increases with the dissolved halogen concentrations. The chemical reactivity of Si-X (X = Br{sup -}, I{sup -}..) bonds has been analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Pseudo-MOS (flatband potential) and Kelvin Force Microscopy (KFM) measurements. A negative shift of flatband potential values is explained by an increasing concentration of halogen compounds in the solution and a substitution of Si-H (F) bonds by Si-X bonds during the reaction. Though Si-X bonds, and more particularly Si-I bonds, have been confirmed only at trace levels using XPS, we believe that the formation of Si-X bonds is supported by a mechanism of surface dipoles. Unexpectedly, no significant change in work function could be detected using KFM measurements. Some suggestions, based on KFM technique improvements, are made to explain such results. Finally, though the interaction mechanism between silicon, fluoride, iodide, and nitric acid is not clearly elucidated by our experimental results, the formation of Si-halogen bonds is crucial for etching and defect decoration capability.

Abbadie, A.; Hamaide, G.; Chaupin, M.; Brunier, F. [SOITEC, Parc Technologique des Fontaines, 38920 Crolles cedex (France); Mariolle, D.; Martinez, E. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC, F38054 Grenoble (France); Maehliss, J. [Goethe University, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Quasars Are Not Light-Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of AGN lifetimes and lightcurves. Given the observed AGN luminosity function, a model for AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity) translates directly to a predicted Eddington ratio distribution. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a 'blowout' decay phase after some peak luminosity (shutting down accretion) make specific predictions for the lifetimes distinct from those expected if AGN are simply gas starved (without feedback) and very different from simple phenomenological 'light bulb' models. Present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning 5 decades in Eddington ratio, 3 in BH mass, and redshifts z=0-1, agree with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out 'light-bulb', pure exponential, and gas starvation models at high significance. We compare the Eddington ratio distributions at fixed BH mass and fixed luminosity (both are consistent, but the latter are much less constraining). We present empirical fits to the lifetime distribution and show how the Eddington ratio distributions place tight limits on AGN lifetimes at various luminosities. We use this to constrain the shape of the typical AGN lightcurve, and provide simple analytic fits. Given independent constraints on episodic lifetimes, most local BHs must have gained their mass in no more than a couple of bright episodes, in agreement with merger-driven fueling models.

Philip F. Hopkins; Lars Hernquist

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

A SECOND-ORDER BIAS MODEL FOR THE LOGARITHMIC HALO MASS DENSITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an analytic model for the local bias of dark matter halos in a {Lambda}CDM universe. The model uses the halo mass density instead of the halo number density and is searched for various halo mass cuts, smoothing lengths, and redshift epochs. We find that, when the logarithmic density is used, the second-order polynomial can fit the numerical relation between the halo mass distribution and the underlying matter distribution extremely well. In this model, the logarithm of the dark matter density is expanded in terms of log halo mass density to the second order. The model remains excellent for all halo mass cuts (from M{sub cut} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }), smoothing scales (from R = 5 h{sup -1} Mpc to 50 h{sup -1} Mpc), and redshift ranges (from z = 0 to 1.0) considered in this study. The stochastic term in the relation is found to be not entirely random, but a part of the term can be determined by the magnitude of the shear tensor.

Jee, Inh [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Heogiro 85, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juhan [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Heogiro 85, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun-Young [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungsoo S., E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

On the Density of PBH's in the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculations of the rate of local Primordial Black Hole explosions often assume that the PBH's can be highly concentrated into galaxies, thereby weakening the Page-Hawking limit on the cosmological density of PBH's. But if the PBH's are concentrated by a factor exceeding $c/(H_\\circ R_\\circ) \\approx 4 \\times 10^5$, where $R_\\circ = 8.5$ kpc is the scale of the Milky Way, then the steady emission from the PBH's in the halo will produce an anisotropic high latitude diffuse gamma ray intensity larger than the observed anisotropy. This provides a limit on the rate-density of evaporating PBH's of $\\lesssim 0.4$~pc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$ which is more than 6 orders of magnitude lower than recent experimental limits. However, the weak observed anisotropic high latitude diffuse gamma ray intensity is consistent with the idea that the dark matter that closes the Universe is Planck mass remnants of evaporated black holes.

Edward L. Wright

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

THE AVERAGE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES IN DARK MATTER HALOS FROM z = 0-8  

SciTech Connect

We present a robust method to constrain average galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), star formation histories (SFHs), and the intracluster light (ICL) as a function of halo mass. Our results are consistent with observed galaxy stellar mass functions, specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and cosmic star formation rates (CSFRs) from z = 0 to z = 8. We consider the effects of a wide range of uncertainties on our results, including those affecting stellar masses, SFRs, and the halo mass function at the heart of our analysis. As they are relevant to our method, we also present new calibrations of the dark matter halo mass function, halo mass accretion histories, and halo-subhalo merger rates out to z = 8. We also provide new compilations of CSFRs and SSFRs; more recent measurements are now consistent with the buildup of the cosmic stellar mass density at all redshifts. Implications of our work include: halos near 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are the most efficient at forming stars at all redshifts, the baryon conversion efficiency of massive halos drops markedly after z {approx} 2.5 (consistent with theories of cold-mode accretion), the ICL for massive galaxies is expected to be significant out to at least z {approx} 1-1.5, and dwarf galaxies at low redshifts have higher stellar mass to halo mass ratios than previous expectations and form later than in most theoretical models. Finally, we provide new fitting formulae for SFHs that are more accurate than the standard declining tau model. Our approach places a wide variety of observations relating to the SFH of galaxies into a self-consistent framework based on the modern understanding of structure formation in {Lambda}CDM. Constraints on the stellar mass-halo mass relationship and SFRs are available for download online.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Empirical testing of Tsallis' Thermodynamics as a model for dark matter halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a dark matter halo model from two points of view: the ``stellar polytrope'' (SP) model coming from Tsallis' thermodynamics, and the one coming from the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) paradigm. We make an appropriate comparison between both halo models and analyzing the relations between the global physical parameters of observed galactic disks, coming from a sample of actual galaxies, with the ones of the unobserved dark matter halos, we conclude that the SP model is favored over the NFW model in such a comparison.

Dario Nunez; Roberto A. Sussman; Jesus Zavala; Luis G. Cabral-Rosetti; Tonatiuh Matos

2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

New Spectral Method for Halo Particle Definition in Intense Mis-matched Beams  

SciTech Connect

An advanced spectral analysis of a mis-matched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

Mikhail A. Dorf, Ronald C. Davidson, and Edward A. Startsev

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE  

SciTech Connect

We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Geha, Marla C. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi, E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

Characterization of Solubilized Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptors from Rat Olfactory Bulb and A10 Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from Al 0 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for ‘*% ANP(99-126) was 12.7 PM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 PM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 1251-ANP(99-1 26) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP ( 103-l 26)>>> ANP ( 103-l 23). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP ( 103-l 26) = ANP ( 103-l 23). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose

T. Ft. Gibson; A. D. Zyskind; C. C. Glembotski

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Dependence of the Mass Assembly History of Cold Dark Matter Halos on Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show by means of a high-resolution N-body simulation how the mass assembly histories of galaxy-size cold dark matter (CDM) halos depend on environment. Halos in high density environments form earlier and a higher fraction of their mass is assembled in major mergers, compared to low density environments. The distribution of the present-day specific mass aggregation rate is strongly dependent on environment. While in low density environments only ~20% of the halos are not accreting mass at the present epoch, this fraction rises to ~80% at high densities. At z=1 the median of the specific aggregation rate is ~4 times larger than at z=0 and almost independent on environment. All the dependences on environment found here are critically enhanced by local processes associated to subhalos because the fraction of subhalos increases as the environment gets denser. The distribution of the halo specific mass aggregation rate as well as its dependence on environment resemble the relations for the specific star formation rate distribution of galaxies. An analogue of the morphology-density relation is also present at the level of CDM halos, being driven by the halo major merging history. Nevertheless, baryonic processes are necessary in order to explain further details and the evolution of the star formation rate-, color- and morphology-environment relations.

C. Maulbetsch; V. Avila-Reese; P. Colin; S. Gottloeber; A. Khalatyan; M. Steinmetz

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Linking the Metallicity Distribution of Galactic Halo Stars to the Enrichment History of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the metallicity distribution of Galactic Halo stars with 3D realizations of hierarchical galaxy formation. Outflows from dwarf galaxies enrich the intergalactic medium inhomogeneously, at a rate depending on the local galaxy density. Consequently, the first stars created in small early-forming galaxies are less metal-rich that the first stars formed in more massive galaxies which typically form later. As most halo stars are likely to originate in accreted dwarfs, while disk stars formed out of outflow-enriched gas, this scenario naturally generates a ``metallicity floor'' for old disk stars, which we find to be roughly coincident with the higher end of our predicted metallicity distribution of halo stars, in agreement with observations. The broad and centrally peaked distribution of halo star metallicities is well reproduced in our models, with a natural dispersion depending on the exact accretion history. Our modeling includes the important ``baryonic stripping'' effect of early outflows, which brush away the tenuously held gas in neighboring pre-virialized density perturbations. This stripping process does not significantly modify the predicted shape of the halo star metal distribution but inhibits star-formation and hence the number of accreted stars, helping to reproduce the observed total Galactic halo luminosity and also the lack of low-luminosity local dwarf galaxies relative to N-body predictions.

Evan Scannapieco; Tom Broadhurst

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

EVIDENCE FOR A TRIAXIAL MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM THE SAGITTARIUS STELLAR TIDAL STREAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the lengthy tidal streams produced by the destruction of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr dSph) are capable of providing strong constraints on the shape of the Galactic gravitational potential. However, previous work, based on modeling different stream properties in axisymmetric Galactic models, has yielded conflicting results: while the angular precession of the Sgr leading arm is most consistent with a spherical or slightly oblate halo, the radial velocities of stars in this arm are reproduced only by prolate halo models. We demonstrate that this apparent paradox can be resolved by instead adopting a triaxial potential. Our new Galactic halo model, which simultaneously fits all well-established phase space constraints from the Sgr stream, provides the first conclusive evidence for, and tentative measurement of, triaxiality in an individual dark matter halo. The Milky Way halo within {approx}60 kpc is best characterized by a minor/major axis ratio of the isovelocity contours c/a {approx} 0.67, intermediate/major axis ratio b/a {approx} 0.83, and triaxiality parameter T {approx} 0.56. In this model, the minor axis of the dark halo is coincident with the Galactic X-axis connecting the Sun and the Galactic center to within {approx}15 deg., while the major axis also lies in the Galactic plane, approximately along the Galactic Y-axis.

Law, David R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-0818 (United States); Johnston, Kathryn V., E-mail: drlaw@astro.ucla.ed, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.ed, E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.ed [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Characterization of solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptors from rat olfactory bulb and A10 cultured smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from A10 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for 125I-ANP(99-126) was 12.7 pM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 pM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 125I-ANP(99-126) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) much greater than ANP(103-123). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP(103-126) = ANP(103-123). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose column, a portion of the olfactory ANP receptor was retained on the column and could be eluted with 5 mM GTP, while the VSMC ANP receptor did not adsorb to the column. Since the olfactory bulb ANP receptor has been shown to contain a binding component of 116 kDa, while the VSMC ANP receptor binding component is 66 kDa, these receptors appear to be similar to the 2 receptor classes described recently in which the 120 kDa receptor that binds GTP is postulated to be coupled to guanylate cyclase, while the 60 kDa receptor does not bind GTP, is not coupled to guanylate cyclase, and may possess a hormone clearance function. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclic GMP appears to be a second messenger for ANP in the brain.

Gibson, T.R.; Zyskind, A.D.; Glembotski, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dark matter haloes determine the masses of supermassive black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy and momentum deposited by the radiation from accretion onto the supermassive black holes (BHs) that reside at the centres of virtually all galaxies can halt or even reverse gas inflow, providing a natural mechanism for supermassive BHs to regulate their growth and to couple their properties to those of their host galaxies. However, it remains unclear whether this self-regulation occurs on the scale at which the BH is gravitationally dominant, on that of the stellar bulge, the galaxy, or that of the entire dark matter halo. To answer this question, we use self-consistent simulations of the co-evolution of the BH and galaxy populations that reproduce the observed correlations between the masses of the BHs and the properties of their host galaxies. We first confirm unambiguously that the BHs regulate their growth: the amount of energy that the BHs inject into their surroundings remains unchanged when the fraction of the accreted rest mass energy that is injected, is varied by four orders of magnitude....

Booth, C M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Halo streams in the 7th SDSS data release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have detected stellar halo streams in the solar neighborhood using data from the 7th public data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which includes the directed stellar program SEGUE: Sloan Extension For Galactic Understanding and Exploration. In order to derive distances to each star, we used the metallicity-dependent photometric parallax relation from Ivezic et al. (2008) for which we examine and quantify the accuracy. Our final sample consists of 22,321 nearby (d < 2 kpc), metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -0.5) main-sequence stars with 6D estimates of position and space velocity. We characterize the orbits of these stars through suitable kinematic proxies for their "effective" integrals of motion, angular momentum, eccentricity, and orbital polar angle and compare the observed distribution to expectations from a smooth distribution in four [Fe/H] bins. On this basis we identify at least five significant "phase-space overdensities" of stars on very similar orbits in the solar neighborhood to which ...

Klement, R; Flynn, C; Fuchs, B; Beers, T C; Prieto, C Allende; Bizyaev, D; Brewington, H; Lee, Y S; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Fiorentin, P Re; Simmons, A; Snedden, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Levy-Student distributions for halos in accelerator beams  

SciTech Connect

We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of stochastic mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Schroedinger-like (SL) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in recent papers by coupling this S-L equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space-charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self-consistent solutions are related to the (external and space-charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (constant focusing), and when we a priori prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few other ideas by introducing generalized Student distributions, namely, non-Gaussian, Levy infinitely divisible (but not stable) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non-Gaussian) Levy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the Levy-Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

Cufaro Petroni, Nicola; De Martino, Salvatore; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica dell'Universita di Bari and INFN Sezione di Bari, via E. Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Salerno, INFM Unita di Salerno, and INFN Sezione di Napoli Gruppo collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

The halo mass function from the dark ages through the present day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use an array of high-resolution N-body simulations to determine the mass function of dark matter haloes at redshifts 10-30. We develop a new method for compensating for the effects of finite simulation volume that allows us to find an approximation to the true ``global'' mass function. By simulating a wide range of volumes at different mass resolution, we calculate the abundance of haloes of mass 10^{5-12} Msun/h. This enables us to predict accurately the abundance of the haloes that host the sources that reionize the universe. In particular, we focus on the small mass haloes (>~10^{5.5-6} Msun/h) likely to harbour population III stars where gas cools by molecular hydrogen emission, early galaxies in which baryons cool by atomic hydrogen emission at a virial temperature of ~10^4K (10^{7.5-8} Msun/h), and massive galaxies that may be observable at redshift ~10. When we combine our data with simulations that include high mass halos at low redshift, we find that the best fit to the halo mass function depends not only on linear overdensity, as is commonly assumed in analytic models, but also upon the slope of the linear power spectrum at the scale of the halo mass. The Press-Schechter model gives a poor fit to the halo mass function in the simulations at all epochs; the Sheth-Tormen model gives a better match, but still overpredicts the abundance of rare objects at all times by up to 50%. Finally, we consider the consequences of the recently released WMAP 3-year cosmological parameters. These lead to much less structure at high redshift, reducing the number of z=10 ``mini-haloes'' by more than a factor of two and the number of z=30 galaxy hosts by more than four orders of magnitude. Code to generate our best-fit halo mass function may be downloaded from http://icc.dur.ac.uk/Research/PublicDownloads/genmf_readme.html

Darren Reed; Richard Bower; Carlos Frenk; Adrian Jenkins; Tom Theuns

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Mechanism of the Initial Oxidation of Hydrogen andHalogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces in Air  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial stage of the oxidation of Ge(111) surfaces etched by HF, HCl and HBr solutions is systematically studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). We perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different oxidation factors. SR-PES results show that both moisture and oxygen contribute to the oxidation of the surfaces; however, they play different roles in the oxidation process. Moisture effectively replaces the hydrogen and halogen termination layers with hydroxyl (OH), but hardly oxidizes the surfaces further. On the other hand, dry oxygen does not replace the termination layers, but breaks the Ge-Ge back bonds and oxidizes the substrates with the aid of moisture. In addition, room light enhances the oxidation rate significantly.

Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

2006-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

THE CORRELATED FORMATION HISTORIES OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AND THEIR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect

Using observations in the COSMOS field, we report an intriguing correlation between the star formation activity of massive ({approx}10{sup 11.4} M{sub Sun }) central galaxies, their stellar masses, and the large-scale ({approx}10 Mpc) environments of their group-mass ({approx}10{sup 13.6} M{sub Sun }) dark matter halos. Probing the redshift range z = [0.2, 1.0], our measurements come from two independent sources: an X-ray-detected group catalog and constraints on the stellar-to-halo mass relation derived from a combination of clustering and weak lensing statistics. At z = 1, we find that the stellar mass in star-forming (SF) centrals is a factor of two less than in passive centrals at the same halo mass. This implies that the presence or lack of star formation in group-scale centrals cannot be a stochastic process. By z = 0, the offset reverses, probably as a result of the different growth rates of these objects. A similar but weaker trend is observed when dividing the sample by morphology rather than star formation. Remarkably, we find that SF centrals at z {approx} 1 live in groups that are significantly more clustered on 10 Mpc scales than similar mass groups hosting passive centrals. We discuss this signal in the context of halo assembly and recent simulations, suggesting that SF centrals prefer halos with higher angular momentum and/or formation histories with more recent growth; such halos are known to evolve in denser large-scale environments. If confirmed, this would be evidence of an early established link between the assembly history of halos on large scales and the future properties of the galaxies that form inside them.

Tinker, Jeremy L. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); George, Matthew R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garchingbei Muenchen (Germany); Massey, Richard [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Rhodes, Jason [California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H., E-mail: jeremy.tinker@nyu.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Levy-Student Distributions for Halos in Accelerator Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the transverse beam distribution in particle accelerators within the controlled, stochastic dynamical scheme of the Stochastic Mechanics (SM) which produces time reversal invariant diffusion processes. This leads to a linearized theory summarized in a Shchr\\"odinger--like (\\Sl) equation. The space charge effects have been introduced in a recent paper~\\cite{prstab} by coupling this \\Sl equation with the Maxwell equations. We analyze the space charge effects to understand how the dynamics produces the actual beam distributions, and in particular we show how the stationary, self--consistent solutions are related to the (external, and space--charge) potentials both when we suppose that the external field is harmonic (\\emph{constant focusing}), and when we \\emph{a priori} prescribe the shape of the stationary solution. We then proceed to discuss a few new ideas~\\cite{epac04} by introducing the generalized Student distributions, namely non--Gaussian, L\\'evy \\emph{infinitely divisible} (but not \\emph{stable}) distributions. We will discuss this idea from two different standpoints: (a) first by supposing that the stationary distribution of our (Wiener powered) SM model is a Student distribution; (b) by supposing that our model is based on a (non--Gaussian) L\\'evy process whose increments are Student distributed. We show that in the case (a) the longer tails of the power decay of the Student laws, and in the case (b) the discontinuities of the L\\'evy--Student process can well account for the rare escape of particles from the beam core, and hence for the formation of a halo in intense beams.

N. Cufaro Petroni; S. De Martino; S. De Siena; F. Illuminati

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

On the usage of Flaring Gas Layers to determine the Shape of Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a new method of deriving the shape of the dark matter (DM) halos of spiral galaxies. The method relies on the comparison of model predictions with high spectral and spatial resolution HI observations of the gas layer. The potential arising from the {\\em total} mass distribution of the galaxy is used in the calculation of the vertical distribution of the gas. I developed a new algorithm to calculate the force field of an arbitrary, azimuthally symmetric, density distribution. This algorithm is used to calculate the forces due to the radially truncated stellar disk as well as of the flaring gas layer. I use a simple two-parameter family of disk-halo models which have essentially the same observed equatorial rotation curve but different vertical forces. This mass model is composed of a stellar disk with constant M/L, and a DM-halo with a given axial ratio. I approximate the radial force due to the gaseous disk, and iteratively determine the vertical force due to the global distribution of the gas. The thickness of the gaseous disk is sensitive to both the flattening of the DM-halo and the self-gravity of the gas, but not to the particular choice of disk-halo decomposition. I show that the determination of the thickness of the gas layer is not restricted to edge-on galaxies, but can be measured for moderately inclined systems as well.

Rob P. Olling

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

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181

CONTINUUM HALOS IN NEARBY GALAXIES: AN EVLA SURVEY (CHANG-ES). I. INTRODUCTION TO THE SURVEY  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a new survey to map the radio continuum halos of a sample of 35 edge-on spiral galaxies at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz in all polarization products. The survey is exploiting the new wide bandwidth capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array) in a variety of array configurations (B, C, and D) in order to compile the most comprehensive data set yet obtained for the study of radio halo properties. This is the first survey of radio halos to include all polarization products. In this first paper, we outline the scientific motivation of the survey, the specific science goals, and the expected improvements in noise levels and spatial coverage from the survey. Our goals include investigating the physical conditions and origin of halos, characterizing cosmic-ray transport and wind speed, measuring Faraday rotation and mapping the magnetic field, probing the in-disk and extraplanar far-infrared-radio continuum relation, and reconciling non-thermal radio emission with high-energy gamma-ray models. The sample size allows us to search for correlations between radio halos and other properties, including environment, star formation rate, and the presence of active galactic nuclei. In a companion paper (Paper II) we outline the data reduction steps and present the first results of the survey for the galaxy, NGC 4631.

Irwin, Judith; Henriksen, Richard N. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Beck, Rainer; Krause, Marita; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Schmidt, Philip [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Benjamin, R. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater, 800 West Main Street, Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States); Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Miskolczi, Arpad [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); English, Jayanne [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Heald, George; Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnson, Megan [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Greenbank, WV 24944 (United States); Li, Jiang-Tao [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Porter, Troy A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rand, Richard J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, 800 Yale Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Saikia, D. J. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411 007 (India); Strong, A. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Walterbos, Rene, E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: henriksn@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: twiegert@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: cmora@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

WHAT DO DARK MATTER HALO PROPERTIES TELL US ABOUT THEIR MASS ASSEMBLY HISTORIES?  

SciTech Connect

Individual dark matter halos in cosmological simulations vary widely in their detailed structural properties, properties such as concentration, shape, spin, and degree of internal relaxation. Recent non-parametric (principal component) analyses suggest that a few principal components explain a large fraction of the scatter in these structural properties. The main principal component is closely aligned with concentration, which in turn is known to be related to the mass accretion history (MAH) of the halo, as described by its merger tree. Here, we examine more generally the connection between the MAH and structural parameters. The space of mass accretion histories has principal components of its own. The strongest, accounting for almost 60% of the scatter between individual histories, can be interpreted as the age of the system. We give an analytic fit for this first component, which provides a rigorous way of defining the dynamical age of a halo. The second strongest component, representing acceleration or deceleration of growth at late times, accounts for 25% of the scatter. Relating structural parameters to formation history, we find that concentration correlates strongly with the early history of the halo, while shape and degree of relaxation or dynamical equilibrium correlate with the later history. We examine the inferences about formation history that can be drawn by splitting halos into sub-samples based on observable properties such as concentration and shape. Applications include the definition young and old samples of galaxy clusters in a quantitative way, or empirical tests of environmental processing rates in clusters.

Wong, Anson W. C.; Taylor, James E., E-mail: a57wong@uwaterloo.ca, E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Imaging extrasolar planets by stellar halo suppression in separately-corrected color bands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extra-solar planets have not been imaged directly with existing ground or space telescopes because they are too faint to be seen against the halo of the nearby bright star. Most techniques being explored to suppress the halo are achromatic, with separate correction of diffraction and wavefront errors. Residual speckle structure may be subtracted by differencing images taken through narrowband filters, but photon noise remains and ultimately limits sensitivity. Here we describe two ways to take advantage of narrow bands to reduce speckle photon flux and to obtain better control of systematic errors. Multiple images are formed in separate color bands of 5-10% bandwidth, and recorded by coronagraphic interferometers equipped with active control of wavefront phase and/or amplitude. In one method, a single deformable pupil mirror is used to actively correct both diffraction and wavefront components of the halo. This yields good diffraction suppression for complex pupil obscuration, with high throughput over half the focal plane. In a second method, the coronagraphic interferometer is used as a second stage after conventional apodization. The halo from uncontrollable residual errors in the pupil mask or wavefront is removed by destructive interference made directly at the detector focal plane with an "anti-halo", synthesized by spatial light modulators in the reference arm of the interferometer. In this way very deep suppression may be achieved by control elements with greatly relaxed, and thus achievable, tolerances. In both examples, systematic errors are minimized because the planet imaging cameras themselves also provide the error sensing data.

Johanan L. Codona; Roger Angel

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

CONSTRAINTS ON THE SHAPE OF THE MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM THE SAGITTARIUS STREAM  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new model for the dark matter halo of the Milky Way that fits the properties of the stellar stream associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. Our dark halo is oblate with q{sub z} = 0.9 for r {approx}< 10 kpc, and can be made to follow the Law and Majewski model at larger radii. However, we find that the dynamical perturbations induced by the Large Magellanic Cloud on the orbit of Sgr cannot be neglected when modeling its streams. When taken into account, this leads us to constrain the Galaxy's outer halo shape to have minor-to-major axis ratio >(c/a){sub {Phi}} = 0.8 and intermediate-to-major axis ratio (b/a){sub {Phi}} = 0.9, in good agreement with cosmological expectations.

Vera-Ciro, Carlos [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53076 (United States); Helmi, Amina, E-mail: ciro@astro.wisc.edu [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

185

Absorption and emission line studies of gas in the Milky Way halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a systematic study of physical properties and distribution of neutral and ionised gas in the halo of the Milky Way (MW). Beside the large neutral intermediate- and high-velocity cloud (IVC, HVC) complexes there exists a population of partly ionised gaseous structures with low-column densities that have a substantial area filling factor. The origin and nature of these structures are still under debate. We analyse the physical parameters of the MW halo gas and the relation to quasar (QSO) metal-absorption line systems at low and high redshifts. For this purpose we combine new HI 21-cm data from the EBHIS and GASS surveys with optical quasar absorption line data to study the filling factor and distribution of these gaseous clouds in the halo at HI densities below 10^19 1/cm^2. This study is important to understand the evolution of the MW in particular and the gas accretion mechanisms of galaxies in general.

Bekhti, N Ben; Winkel, B; Kerp, J; Kalberla, P; Klein, U; Murphy, M T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, oscillatory features in the inflationary perturbation spectrum, do not induce a substantial difference in the number density of halos at their best fit values, when compared with, say, a nearly scale invariant spectrum as is generated by the standard quadratic potential. However, we find that the number density and the formation rates of halos change by about 13-22% for halo masses ranging over 10^4-10^14 solar mass, for potential parameters that lie within 2-sigma around the best fit values arrived at from the aforesaid joint constraints. We briefly discuss the implications of our results.

Dhiraj Kumar Hazra

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Information content in the halo-model dark-matter power spectrum II: Multiple cosmological parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological Fisher information in the non-linear dark-matter power spectrum in the context of the halo model. We find that there is a plateau in information content on translinear scales which is generic to all cosmological parameters we tried. There is a rise in information on smaller scales, but we find that it is quite degenerate among different cosmological parameters (except, perhaps, the tilt). This suggests that it could be difficult to constrain cosmological parameters using the non-linear regime of the dark-matter power spectrum. We suggest ways to get around this problem, such as removing the largest haloes from consideration in survey analysis.

Mark C. Neyrinck; István Szapudi

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

EXPERIENCE WITH THE LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR (LEDA) HALO EXPERIMENT BEAM INSTRUMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 52 quadrupole-magnet FODO lattice has been assembled and operated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of this lattice is to provide a platform to measure the resulting beam halo as the first few magnets of the lattice produce various mismatch conditions. These data are then compared with particle simulation so that halo formation mechanisms may be better understood. The lattice is appended to the LEDA 6.7-MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and is followed by a short high-energy beam transport (HEBT) that safely dumps the beam into a 670-kW beam stop.

Gilpatrick, J. D. (John Douglas); Barr, D. S. (Dean S.); Colestock, P. L. (Patrick L.),; Day, L. A. (Lisa A.); Sellyey, W. C. (William C.); Shurter, R. B. (Robert B.); Stettler, M. W. (Matthew W.); Valdiviez, R. (Robert); Gruchalla, M. (Michael); O'Hara, J. F. (James F.); Schulze, M. E. (Martin E.); Barr, D. S. (Dean S.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hydrogen--halogen energy storage system. Annual report, January--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory on the electrochemically regenerative hydrogen--chlorine energy storage system has included electrochemical investigations, materials studies, and technoeconomic assessment. Electrochemical studies have confirmed the reversibility of the cell reactions and the possibility of using the same cell in the electrolysis and fuel cell mode. The hydrogen--chlorine cell differs from most batteries in that the open circuit potential varies appreciably with temperature and depth of discharge. The temperature variation of the open circuit potential reflects the large negative entropy of formation of HCl. A detailed heat and mass balance analysis has been carried out for the H/sub 2//Cl/sub 2/ system for one method of reactant storage and two schemes of heat exchange between the hydrochloric acid storage subsystem and the reactant storage subsystems. Characterization of Nafion membranes in H/sub 2//Cl/sub 2/ cells is reported. From a cost comparison on a 20 MW/200 MWh electrochemically regenerative hydrogen--halogen system it was concluded that the use of either clorine or bromine or alternative methods of chlorine storage had an insignificant effect on the overall cost of the system. The most cost effective method of hydrogen storage is very dependent on the cost of activated metal hydrides.

McBreen, J.; Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.; Beaufrere, A.H.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

February 16, 2010 The dark matter halo shape of edge-on disk galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the velocity dispersion of the HI gas (preferably as a function of height from the central plane of the disk, gas and halo potentials, tot = h + s + g. Assuming that the gas velocity dispersion Fig. 5. Rotation of the gas velocity dispersion and the vertical FWHM thickness of the gas, both functions of radius which we

Kruit, Piet van der

191

Remix and play: lessons from rule variants in texas hold'em and halo 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Players can change the rules of a multi-person game to experience a different gameplay mechanic, add thematic color, or fine-tune its balance. To better understand game variants, we use a grounded approach to analyze 62 variants for Texas Hold'em, a ... Keywords: customization, game design, halo, honor rules, poker, variants

Gifford Cheung; Jeff Huang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Direct Gravitational Imaging of Intermediate Mass Black Holes in Extragalactic Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A galaxy halo may contain a large number of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses in the range of 10^{2-6} solar mass. We propose to directly detect these IMBHs by observing multiply imaged QSO-galaxy or galaxy-galaxy strong lens systems in the submillimeter bands with high angular resolution. The silhouette of an IMBH in the lensing galaxy halo would appear as either a monopole-like or a dipole-like variation at the scale of the Einstein radius against the Einstein ring of the dust-emitting region surrounding the QSO. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo with black holes, and show that the surface mass density and number density of IMBHs have power-law dependences on the distance from the center of the host halo if smoothed on a scale of ~ 1 kpc. Most of the black holes orbiting close to the center are freely roaming as they have lost their dark matter hosts during infall due to tidal stripping. Next generation submillimeter telescopes with high angular resolution (solar mass in a lensing galaxy that harbours a O(10^9) solar mass supermassive black hole in its nucleus.

Kaiki Taro Inoue; Valery Rashkov; Joseph Silk; Piero Madau

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Two measures of the shape of the Milky Way’s dark halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to test the reliability of determinations of the shapes of galaxies ’ dark matter halos, we have made such measurements for the Milky Way by two independent methods. First, we have combined the measurements of the over-all mass distribution of the Milky Way derived from its rotation curve and the measurements of the amount of dark matter in the solar neighborhood obtained from stellar kinematics to determine the flattening of the dark halo. Second, we have used the established technique based on the variation in thickness of the Milky Way’s Hi layer with radius: by assuming that the Hi gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium in the gravitational potential of a galaxy, one can use the observe flaring of the gas layer to determine the shape of the dark halo. These techniques are found to produce a consistent estimate for the flattening of the dark matter halo, with a shortest-to-longest axis ratio of q ? 0.8, but only if one adopts somewhat non-standard values for the distance to the Galactic centre, R0, and the local Galactic rotation speed, ?0. For consistency, one requires values

Rob P. Olling; Michael R. Merrifield

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The collisions of high-velocity clouds with the galactic halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spiral galaxies are surrounded by a widely distributed hot coronal gas and seem to be fed by infalling clouds of neutral hydrogen gas with low metallicity and high velocities. We numerically study plasma waves produced by the collisions of these high-velocity clouds (HVCs) with the hot halo gas and with the gaseous disk. In particular, we tackle two problems numerically: 1) collisions of HVCs with the galactic halo gas and 2) the dispersion relations to obtain the phase and group velocities of plasma waves from the equations of plasma motion as well as further important physical characteristics such as magnetic tension force, gas pressure, etc. The obtained results allow us to understand the nature of MHD waves produced during the collisions in galactic media and lead to the suggestion that these waves can heat the ambient halo gas. These calculations are aiming at leading to a better understanding of dynamics and interaction of HVCs with the galactic halo and of the importance of MHD waves as a heating proce...

Jelinek, Petr; 10.1016/j.cpc.2011.01.023

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Accepted to ApJL Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj v. 6/22/04 INTERNAL ALIGNMENT OF THE HALOS OF DISK GALAXIES IN COSMOLOGICAL HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of disk galaxy formation are analyzed to determine the alignment of the disk within the dark matter halo and the internal structure of the halo. We find that the orientation of the outer halo, beyond ? 0.1 rvir, is unaffected by the presence of the disk. In contrast, the inner halo is aligned such that the halo minor axis aligns with the disk axis. The relative orientation of these two regions of the halo are uncorrelated. The alignment of the disk and inner halo appears to take place simultaneously through their joint evolution. The disconnect between these two regions of the halo should be taken into account when modelling tidal streams in the halos of disk galaxies and when calculating intrinsic alignments of disk galaxies based on the properties of dark matter halos.

Jeremy Bailin; Daisuke Kawata; Brad K. Gibson; Matthias Steinmetz; Julio F. Navarro; Chris B; Stuart P. D. Gill; Rodrigo A. Ibata; Er Knebe; Geraint F. Lewis; Takashi Okamoto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

197

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

In Situ Observation of Cirrus Scattering Phase Functions with 22° and 46° Halos: Cloud Field Study on 19 February 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of halos and related phenomena due to ice crystals are commonly reported from ground observations and presented in the literature. Nevertheless, ice crystal characteristics have only been poorly documented from in situ measurements ...

Frederique Auriol; Jean-François Gayet; Guy Febvre; Olivier Jourdan; Laurent Labonnote; Gerard Brogniez

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Central and Satellite Colors in Galaxy Groups: A Comparison of the Halo Model and SDSS Group Catalogs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current analytic and semi-analytic dark matter halo models distinguish between the central galaxy in a halo and the satellite galaxies in halo substructures. It is expected that galaxy properties are correlated with host halo mass, and that central galaxies tend to be the most luminous, massive, and reddest galaxies in halos while the satellites around them are fainter and bluer. Using a recent halo-model description of the color dependence of galaxy clustering (Skibba & Sheth 2008), we investigate the colors of central and satellite galaxies predicted by the model and compare them to those of two galaxy group catalogs constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Yang et al. 2007, Berlind et al. 2006a). In the model, the environmental dependence of galaxy color is determined by that of halo mass, and the predicted color mark correlations were shown to be consistent with SDSS measurements. The model assumes that satellites tend to follow a color-magnitude sequence that approaches the red sequence at bright luminosities; the model’s success suggests that bright satellites tend to be ‘red and dead ’ while the star formation in fainter ones is in the process of being quenched. In both the model and the SDSS group catalogs, we find that at fixed luminosity or stellar mass, central galaxies tend to be bluer than satellites. In contrast, at fixed group richness or halo mass, central galaxies tend to be redder than satellites, and galaxy colors become redder with increasing mass. We also compare the central and satellite galaxy color distributions, as a function of luminosity and as a function of richness, in the model and in the two group catalogs. Except for faint galaxies and small groups, the model and both group catalogs are in very good agreement.

Ramin A. Skibba

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Carbon-19 in Halo EFT: Effective-range parameters from Coulomb-dissociation experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Coulomb dissociation of the 19C nucleus in an effective field theory that uses the 18C core and the neutron as effective degrees of freedom and exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We extract the effective-range parameters and the separation energy of the halo neutron from the experimental data taken at RIKEN by Nakamura et al. We obtain a value of (575 +/- 55(stat.) +/- 20(EFT)) keV for the one-neutron separation energy of 19C, and (7.75 +/- 0.35(stat.) +/- 0.3(EFT)) fm for the 18C-neutron scattering length. The width of the longitudinal momentum distribution predicted by EFT using this separation energy agrees well with the experimental data taken at NSCL by Bazin et al., reaffirming the dominance of the s-wave configuration of the valence neutron.

B. Acharya; Daniel R. Phillips

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Accurate calculations of the WIMP halo around the Sun and prospects for gamma ray detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) can be captured by heavenly objects, like the Sun. Under the process of being captured by the Sun, they will build up a population of WIMPs around it, that will eventually sink to the core of the Sun. It has been argued with simpler estimates before that this halo of WIMPs around the Sun could be a strong enough gamma ray source to be a detectable signature for WIMP dark matter. We here revisit the problem using detailed Monte Carlo simulations and detailed composition and structure information about the Sun to estimate the size of the gamma ray flux. Compared to earlier estimates, we find that the gamma ray flux from WIMP annihilations in the Sun halo would be negligible and no current or planned detectors would even be able to detect this flux.

Sivertsson, Sofia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Accurate calculations of the WIMP halo around the Sun and prospects for its gamma ray detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) can be captured by heavenly objects, like the Sun. Under the process of being captured by the Sun, they will build up a population of WIMPs around it, which will eventually sink to the core. It has been suggested that this halo of WIMPs around the Sun could be a gamma ray source, possibly distinct enough to have nice detectable signature for WIMP dark matter. We here revisit this problem using detailed Monte Carlo simulations and detailed composition and structure information about the Sun to estimate the size of the gamma ray flux. Compared to earlier simpler estimates, we find that the gamma ray flux from WIMP annihilations in the Sun halo would be negligible; no current or planned detectors would be able to detect this flux.

Sivertsson, Sofia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions  

SciTech Connect

In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V., E-mail: saran@pnpi.spb.ru [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute NRC KI (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

RR Lyrae Stars in the Andromeda Halo from Deep Imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a complete census of RR Lyrae stars in a halo field of the Andromeda galaxy. These deep observations, taken as part of a program to measure the star formation history in the halo, spanned a period of 41 days with sampling on a variety of time scales, enabling the identification of short and long period variables. Although the long period variables cannot be fully characterized within the time span of this program, the enormous advance in sensitivity provided by the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope allows accurate characterization of the RR Lyrae population in this field. We find 29 RRab stars with a mean period of 0.594 days, 25 RRc stars with a mean period of 0.316 days, and 1 RRd star with a fundamental period of 0.473 days and a first overtone period of 0.353 days. These 55 RR Lyrae stars imply a specific frequency S_RR=5.6, which is large given the high mean metallicity of the halo, but not surprising given that these stars arise from the old, metal-poor tail of the distribution. This old population in the Andromeda halo cannot be clearly placed into one of the Oosterhoff types: the ratio of RRc/RRabc stars is within the range seen in Oosterhoff II globular clusters, the mean RRab period is in the gap between Oosterhoff types, and the mean RRc period is in the range seen in Oosterhoff I globular clusters. The periods of these RR Lyraes suggest a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.6, while their brightness implies a distance modulus to Andromeda of 24.5+/-0.1, in good agreement with the Cepheid distance.

Thomas M. Brown; Henry C. Ferguson; Ed Smith; Randy A. Kimble; Allen V. Sweigart; Alvio Renzini; R. Michael Rich

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Galaxy Bulge Formation: Interplay with Dark Matter Halo and Central Supermassive Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple scenario where the formation of galactic bulges was regulated by the dark halo gravity and regulated the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Assuming the angular momentum is low, we suggest that bulges form in a runaway collapse due to the "gravothermal" instability once the central gas density or pressure exceeds certain threshold (Xu & Zhao 2007). We emphasize that the threshold is nearly universal, set by the background NFW dark matter gravity $g_{DM} \\sim 1.2 \\times 10^{-8}{\\rm cm} {\\rm sec}^{-2}$ in the central cusps of halos. Unlike known thresholds for gradual formation of galaxy disks, we show that the universal "halo-regulated" star formation threshold for spheroids matches the very high star formation rate and star formation efficiency shown in high-redshift observations of central starburst regions. The starburst feedback also builds up a pressure shortly after the collapse. This large pressure could both act outward to halt further infall of gas from larger scale, and act inward to counter the Compton-thick wind launched from the central black hole in an Eddington accretion. Assuming the feedback balancing inward and outward forces, our scenario naturally gives rise to the black hole-bulge relationships observed in the local universe.

Bing-Xiao Xu; Xue-Bing Wu; HongSheng Zhao

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

CHARACTERIZING THE FORMATION HISTORY OF MILKY WAY LIKE STELLAR HALOS WITH MODEL EMULATORS  

SciTech Connect

We use the semi-analytic model ChemTreeN, coupled to cosmological N-body simulations, to explore how different galaxy formation histories can affect observational properties of Milky Way like galaxies' stellar halos and their satellite populations. Gaussian processes are used to generate model emulators that allow one to statistically estimate a desired set of model outputs at any location of a p-dimensional input parameter space. This enables one to explore the full input parameter space orders of magnitude faster than could be done otherwise. Using mock observational data sets generated by ChemTreeN itself, we show that it is possible to successfully recover the input parameter vectors used to generate the mock observables if the merger history of the host halo is known. However, our results indicate that for a given observational data set, the determination of 'best-fit' parameters is highly susceptible to the particular merger history of the host. Very different halo merger histories can reproduce the same observational data set, if the 'best-fit' parameters are allowed to vary from history to history. Thus, attempts to characterize the formation history of the Milky Way using these kind of techniques must be performed statistically, analyzing large samples of high-resolution N-body simulations.

Gomez, Facundo A.; O'Shea, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Coleman-Smith, Christopher E. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wolpert, Robert L. [Department of Statistical Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0251 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

RR Lyrae Stars in the Andromeda Halo from Deep Imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a complete census of RR Lyrae stars in a halo field of the Andromeda galaxy. These deep observations, taken as part of a program to measure the star formation history in the halo, spanned a period of 41 days with sampling on a variety of time scales, enabling the identification of short and long period variables. Although the long period variables cannot be fully characterized within the time span of this program, the enormous advance in sensitivity provided by the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope allows accurate characterization of the RR Lyrae population in this field. We find 29 RRab stars with a mean period of 0.594 days, 25 RRc stars with a mean period of 0.316 days, and 1 RRd star with a fundamental period of 0.473 days and a first overtone period of 0.353 days. These 55 RR Lyrae stars imply a specific frequency S_RR=5.6, which is large given the high mean metallicity of the halo, but not surprising given that these stars arise from the old, metal-poor tail of the dis...

Brown, T M; Smith, E; Kimble, R A; Sweigart, A V; Renzini, A; Rich, R M; Brown, Thomas M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Smith, Ed; Kimble, Randy A.; Sweigart, Allen V.; Renzini, Alvio

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

IDENTIFYING CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STELLAR HALO FROM ACCRETED, KICKED-OUT, AND IN SITU POPULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a medium-resolution spectroscopic survey of late-type giant stars at mid-Galactic latitudes of (30 Degree-Sign fall on the locus defined by the majority of stars in the halo. The chemical abundance trends of the RV outliers suggest that this sample consists predominantly of stars accreted from infalling dwarf galaxies. A smaller fraction of stars in the RV outlier sample may have been formed in the inner Galaxy and subsequently kicked to higher eccentricity orbits, but the sample is not large enough to distinguish conclusively between this interpretation and the alternative that these stars represent the tail of the velocity distribution of the thick disk. Our data do not rule out the possibility that a minority of the sample could have formed from gas in situ on their current orbits. These results are consistent with scenarios where the stellar halo, at least as probed by M giants, arises from multiple formation mechanisms; however, when taken at face value, our results for metal-rich halo giants suggest a much higher proportion to be accreted than found by Carollo et al. and more like the fraction suggested in the analysis by Nissen and Schuster and Schuster et al. We conclude that M giants with large RVs can provide particularly fruitful samples to mine for accreted structures and that some of the velocity sequences may indeed correspond to real physical associations resulting from recent accretion events.

Sheffield, Allyson A.; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Mail Code 5246, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R., E-mail: asheffield@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

The age of the Milky Way halo stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determined the age of the stellar content of the Galactic halo by considering main-sequence turn-off stars. From the large number of halo stars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we could accurately detect the turn-off as a function of metallicity, which was done by looking at the hottest (bluest) stars of a population. Using isochrones with turn-off temperatures and metallicites of the stars we found that our stellar sample consisted of one dominating stellar population, with no age gradient as a function of metallicity. This would mean that the dominating population of the Galactic halo formed rapidly, probably during the collapse of the proto-Galactic gas. Moreover, we could find a significant number of stars with hotter temperatures than the turn-off, which might be explained as young stars formed in external galaxies and accreted later on to our Milky Way. Motivated by the current debate about the efficiency of gravitational settling (atomic diffusion) in the interior of old solar-type stars, we us...

Jofre, Paula

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fusion and Direct Reactions of Halo Nuclei at Energies around the Coulomb Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present understanding of reaction processes involving light unstable nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier is reviewed. The effect of coupling to direct reaction channels on elastic scattering and fusion is investigated, with the focus on halo nuclei. A list of definitions of processes is given, followed by a review of the experimental and theoretical tools and information presently available. The effect of couplings on elastic scattering and fusion is studied with a series of model calculations within the coupled-channels framework. The experimental data on fusion are compared to "bare" no-coupling one-dimensional barrier penetration model calculations. On the basis of these calculations and comparisons with experimental data, conclusions are drawn from the observation of recurring features. The total fusion cross sections for halo nuclei show a suppression with respect to the "bare" calculations at energies just above the barrier that is probably due to single neutron transfer reactions. The data for total fusion are also consistent with a possible sub-barrier enhancement; however, this observation is not conclusive and other couplings besides the single-neutron channels would be needed in order to explain any actual enhancement. We find that a characteristic feature of halo nuclei is the dominance of direct reactions over fusion at near and sub-barrier energies; the main part of the cross section is related to neutron transfers, while calculations indicate only a modest contribution from the breakup process.

N. Keeley; R. Raabe; N. Alamanos; J. L. Sida

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ultra-Fast Quantum Efficiency Solar Cell Test - Energy ...  

Using light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ... The technology is based on a full-spectrum array of LEDs instead of traditional halogen bulbs and ...

212

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Included in this category are the familiar screw-in light bulbs, as well as somewhat more efficient lamps, such as tungsten halogen lamps, reflector ...

213

EXPLORING HALO SUBSTRUCTURE WITH GIANT STARS: SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE LOCAL HALO AS SEEN IN THE GRID GIANT STAR SURVEY INCLUDING EXTENDED TIDAL DEBRIS FROM {omega}CENTAURI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the latitude-normalized radial velocity (v{sub b} ) distribution of 3318 subsolar metallicity, V {approx}< 13.5 stars from the Grid Giant Star Survey (GGSS) in southern hemisphere fields. The sample includes giants mostly within {approx}5 kpc from the Galactic disks and halo. The nearby halo is found to (1) exhibit significant kinematical substructure, and (2) be prominently represented by several velocity coherent structures, including a very retrograde 'cloud' of stars at l {approx} 285 Degree-Sign and extended, retrograde 'streams' visible as relatively tight l-v{sub b} sequences. One sequence in the fourth Galactic quadrant lies within the l-v{sub b} space expected to contain tidal debris from the 'star cluster' {omega}Centauri. Not only does {omega}Cen lie precisely in this l-v{sub b} sequence, but the positions and v{sub b} of member stars match those of N-body simulations of tidally disrupting dwarf galaxies on orbits ending with {omega}Cen's current position and space motion. But the ultimate proof that we have very likely found extended parts of the {omega}Cen tidal stream comes from echelle spectroscopy of a subsample of the stars that reveals a very particular chemical abundance signature known to occur only in {omega}Cen. The newly discovered {omega}Cen debris accounts for almost all fourth Galactic quadrant retrograde stars in the southern GGSS, which suggests {omega}Cen is a dominant contributor of retrograde giant stars in the inner Galaxy.

Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Damke, Guillermo J.; Patterson, Richard J.; Garcia Perez, Ana E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Smith, Verne V. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Kunkel, William E. [Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Bizyaev, Dmitry, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu, E-mail: dln5q@virginia.edu, E-mail: gjd3r@virginia.edu, E-mail: ricky@virginia.edu, E-mail: aeg4x@virginia.edu, E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu, E-mail: kunkel@jeito.lco.cl, E-mail: dmbiz@apo.nmsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University/Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot NM 88349 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Measuring the Dark Matter Halo Mass of X-ray AGN at z~1 using photometric redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from the AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS surveys are combined to infer the bias and dark matter halo mass of moderate luminosity [LX(2-10 keV) = 42.9 erg s-1] X-ray AGN at z~1 via their cross-correlation function with galaxies. In contrast to standard cross-correlation function estimators, we present a method that requires spectroscopy only for the AGN and uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions for galaxies to determine the projected real-space AGN/galaxy cross-correlation function. The estimated dark matter halo mass of X-ray AGN in the combined AEGIS, COSMOS and ECDFS fields is ~13h-1M_solar, in agreement with previous studies at similar redshift and luminosity ranges. Removing from the sample the 5 per cent of the AGN associated with X-ray selected groups results in a reduction by about 0.5 dex in the inferred AGN dark matter halo mass. The distribution of AGN in dark matter halo mass is therefore skewed and the bulk of the population lives in moderate mass haloes. This result favour col...

Mountrichas, G; Finoguenov, A; Erfanianfar, G; Cooper, M C; Coil, A L; Laird, E S; Nandra, K; Newman, J A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hierarchical Phase Space Structure of Dark Matter Haloes: Tidal debris, Caustics, and Dark Matter annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the mass content of dark matter haloes is expected to be in the form of tidal debris. The density of debris is not constant, but rather can grow due to formation of caustics at the apocenters and pericenters of the orbit, or decay as a result of phase mixing. In the phase space, the debris assemble in a hierarchy which is truncated by the primordial temperature of dark matter. Understanding this phase structure can be of significant importance for the interpretation of many astrophysical observations and in particular dark matter detection experiments. With this purpose in mind, we develop a general theoretical framework to describe the hierarchical structure of the phase space of cold dark matter haloes. We do not make any assumption of spherical symmetry and/or smooth and continuous accretion. Instead, working with correlation functions in the action-angle space, we can fully account for the hierarchical structure (predicting a two-point correlation function ~ (\\Delta J)^{-1.6} in the action space), as well as the primordial discreteness of the phase space. As an application, we estimate the boost to the dark matter annihilation signal due to the structure of the phase space within virial radius: the boost due to the hierarchical tidal debris is of order unity, whereas the primordial discreteness of the phase structure can boost the total annihilation signal by up to an order of magnitude. The latter is dominated by the regions beyond 20% of the virial radius, and is largest for the recently formed haloes with the least degree of phase mixing.

Niayesh Afshordi; Roya Mohayaee; Edmund Bertschinger

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

The study of Borromean halo nuclei by the neutron wall with simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The model of three-body Borromean halo nuclei breakup was described by using standard phase space distributions and the Monte Carlo simulation method was established to resolve the detection problem of two neutrons produced from breakup reaction on the neutron wall detector. For $^{6}$He case, overall resolution $\\sigma_{E_{k}}$ for the Gaussian part of the detector response and the detection efficiency including solid angle acceptance with regard to the excitation energy $E_{k}$ are obtained by the simulation of two neutrons from $^{6}$He breakup into the neutron wall. The effects of the algorithm on the angular and energy correlations of the fragments are briefly discussed.

Liu Longxiang; Sun Zhiyu; Yue Ke; Xiao Guoqing; Chen Ximeng; Yu Yuhong; Zhang Xuehong; Wang Shitao; Tang Shuwen; Zhou Yong; Yan Duo; Fang Fang

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

217

Empirical models for Dark Matter Halos. I. Nonparametric Construction of Density Profiles and Comparison with Parametric Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use techniques from nonparametric function estimation theory to extract the density profiles, and their derivatives, from a set of N-body dark matter halos. We consider halos generated from LCDM simulations of gravitational clustering, as well as isolated, spherical collapses. The logarithmic density slopes gamma = d(log rho)/d(log r) of the LCDM halos are found to vary as power-laws in radius, reaching values of gamma ~ -1 at the innermost resolved radii (~0.01 r_virial). This behavior is significantly different from that of broken power-law models like the NFW profile, but similar to that of models like de Vaucouleurs'. Accordingly, we compare the N-body density profiles with various parametric models to find which provide the best fit. We consider an NFW-like model with arbitrary inner slope; Dehnen & McLaughlin's anisotropic model; Einasto's model (identical in functional form to Sersic's model but fit to the space density); and the density model of Prugniel & Simien that was designed to match the deprojected form of Sersic's R^{1/n} law. Overall, the best-fitting model to the LCDM halos is Einasto's, although the Prugniel-Simien and Dehnen-McLaughlin models also perform well. With regard to the spherical collapse halos, both the Prugniel-Simien and Einasto models describe the density profiles well, with an rms scatter some four times smaller than that obtained with either the NFW-like model or the 3-parameter Dehnen-McLaughlin model. Finally, we confirm recent claims of a systematic variation in profile shape with halo mass.

David Merritt; Alister W. Graham; Ben Moore; Juerg Diemand; Balsa Terzic

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Are Gamma Ray Bursts due to Rotation Powered High Velocity Pulsars in the Halo ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The BATSE experiment has now observed more than 1100 gamma-ray bursts. The observed angular distribution is isotropic, while the brightness distribution of bursts shows a reduced number of faint events. These observations favor a cosmological burst origin. Alternatively, very extended Galactic Halo (EGH) models have been considered. In the latter scenario, the currently favored source of gamma-ray bursts involves high velocity pulsars ejected from the Galactic disk. To be compatible with the observed isotropy, most models invoke a sampling distance of 300 kpc, a turn-on delay of 30 Myrs, and a source life time of about 1 Gyr. We consider the global energy requirements of such models and show that the largest known resource. rotational kinetic energy, is insufficient by orders of magnitude to provide the observed burst rate. More exotic energy sources or differently tuned pulsar models may be able to get around the global energy constraint but at the cost of becoming contrived. Thus, while extended halo models are not ruled out, our arguments place a severe obstacle for such models and we encourage proponents of EGH models to clearly address the issue of global energetics.

Dieter Hartmann; Ramesh Narayan

1995-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

New UltraCool and Halo White Dwarf Candidates in SDSS Stripe 82  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 2.5 x 100 degree region along the celestial equator (Stripe 82) has been imaged repeatedly from 1998 to 2005 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A new catalogue of ~4 million light-motion curves, together with over 200 derived statistical quantities, for objects in Stripe 82 brighter than r~21.5 has been constructed by combining these data by Bramich et al. (2007). This catalogue is at present the deepest catalogue of its kind. Extracting the ~130000 objects with highest signal-to-noise ratio proper motions, we build a reduced proper motion diagram to illustrate the scientific promise of the catalogue. In this diagram disk and halo subdwarfs are well-separated from the cool white dwarf sequence. Our sample of 1049 cool white dwarf candidates includes at least 8 and possibly 21 new ultracool H-rich white dwarfs (T_eff < 4000K) and one new ultracool He-rich white dwarf candidate identified from their SDSS optical and UKIDSS infrared photometry. At least 10 new halo white dwarfs are also identified from their kinematics.

S. Vidrih; D. M. Bramich; P. C. Hewett; N. W. Evans; G. Gilmore; S. Hodgkin; M. Smith; L. Wyrzykowski; V. Belokurov; M. Fellhauer; M. J. Irwin; R. G. McMahon; D. Zucker; J. A. Munn; H. Lin; G. Miknaitis; H. C. Harris; R. H. Lupton; D. P. Schneider

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Orientations of LASCO Halo CMEs and Their Connection to the Flux Rope Structure of Interplanetary CMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed near the Sun via LASCO coronographic imaging are the most important solar drivers of geomagnetic storms. ICMEs, their interplanetary, near-Earth counterparts, can be detected in-situ, for example, by the Wind and ACE spacecraft. An ICME usually exhibits a complex structure that very often includes a magnetic cloud (MC). They can be commonly modelled as magnetic flux ropes and there is observational evidence to expect that the orientation of a halo CME elongation corresponds to the orientation of the flux rope. In this study, we compare orientations of elongated CME halos and the corresponding MCs, measured by Wind and ACE spacecraft. We characterize the MC structures by using the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique and three MC fitting methods to obtain their axis directions. The CME tilt angles and MC fitted axis angles were compared without taking into account handedness of the underlying flux rope field and the polarity of its axial field. We report that for about 64% of CME-MC events, we found a good correspondence between the orientation angles implying that for the majority of interplanetary ejecta their orientations do not change significantly (less than 45 deg rotation) while travelling from the Sun to the near Earth environment.

V. Yurchyshyn; Q. Hu; R. P. Lepping; B. J. Lynch; J. Krall

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

V474 Car: A RARE HALO RS CVn BINARY IN RETROGRADE GALACTIC ORBIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery that the star V474 Car is an extremely active, high velocity halo RS CVn system. The star was originally identified as a possible pre-main-sequence star in Carina, given its enhanced stellar activity, rapid rotation (10.3 days), enhanced Li, and absolute magnitude which places it above the main sequence (MS). However, its extreme radial velocity (264 km s{sup -1}) suggested that this system was unlike any previously known pre-MS system. Our detailed spectroscopic analysis of echelle spectra taken with the CTIO 4 m finds that V474 Car is both a spectroscopic binary with an orbital period similar to the photometric rotation period and metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx_equal}-0.99). The star's Galactic orbit is extremely eccentric (e {approx_equal} 0.93) with a perigalacticon of only {approx}0.3 kpc of the Galactic center-and the eccentricity and smallness of its perigalacticon are surpassed by only {approx}0.05% of local F/G-type field stars. The observed characteristics are consistent with V474 Car being a high-velocity, metal-poor, tidally locked, chromospherically active binary, i.e., a halo RS CVn binary, and one of only a few such specimens known.

Bubar, Eric J.; Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Jensen, Eric L. N. [Swarthmore College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Walter, Frederick M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

K. Toyota et al.: Photochemistry of VOCs and halogens in the MBL (Supplement) 1 A supplement to "A box model study on photochemical interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Toyota et al.: Photochemistry of VOCs and halogens in the MBL (Supplement) 1 A supplement to "A boundary layer" by K. Toyota et al. K. Toyota1,* , Y. Kanaya1 , M. Takahashi1,2 , and H. Akimoto1 1) Correspondence to: K. Toyota (ktoyota@yorku.ca) ClCH2CH2OO + CH3OO 0.44 Ã? (ClCH2CH2O + CH3O + O2) + 0.28 Ã? (Cl

Meskhidze, Nicholas

223

A Cosmological Kinetic Theory for the Evolution of Cold Dark Matter Halos with Substructure: Quasi-Linear Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a kinetic theory for the evolution of the phase-space distribution of dark matter particles in galaxy halos in the presence of a cosmological spectrum of fluctuations. This theory introduces a new way to model the formation and evolution of halos, which traditionally have been investigated by analytic gravitational infall models or numerical N-body methods. Unlike the collisionless Boltzmann equation, our kinetic equation contains nonzero terms on the right-hand side arising from stochastic fluctuations in the gravitational potential due to substructures in the dark matter mass distribution. Using statistics for constrained Gaussian random fields in standard cosmological models, we show that our kinetic equation to second-order in perturbation theory is of the Fokker-Planck form, with one scattering term representing drift and the other representing diffusion in velocity-space. The drift is radial, and the drift and diffusion coefficients depend only on positions and not velocities; our relaxation process in the quasilinear regime is therefore different from the standard two-body relaxation. We provide explicit expressions relating these coefficients to the linear power spectrum of mass fluctuation and present results for the currently favored cold dark matter model with a nonzero cosmological constant. Solutions to this kinetic equation will provide a complete description of the cold dark matter spatial and velocity distributions for the average halo during the early phases of galaxy halo formation.

Chung-Pei Ma; Edmund Bertschinger

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

Insight Into the Formation of the Milky Way Through Cold Halo Substructure. I. The ECHOS of Milky Way Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identify ten -- seven for the first time -- elements of cold halo substructure (ECHOS) in the volume within 17.5 kpc of the Sun in the inner halo of the Milky Way. Our result is based on the observed spatial and radial velocity distribution of metal-poor main sequence turnoff (MPMSTO) stars in 137 Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) lines of sight. We point out that the observed radial velocity distribution is consistent with a smooth stellar component of the Milky Way's inner halo overall, but disagrees significantly at the radial velocities that correspond to our detections. We show that all of our detections are statistically significant and that we expect no false positives. We also use our detections and completeness estimates to infer a formal upper limit of 0.34 +/- 0.02 on the fraction of the MPMSTO population in the inner halo that belong to ECHOS. Our detections and completeness calculations suggest that there is a significant population of low fractional overdensit...

Schlaufman, Kevin C; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Lee, Young Sun; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Yanny, Brian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

THE ORIGIN AND DISTRIBUTION OF COLD GAS IN THE HALO OF A MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze an adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a Milky-Way-sized galaxy to study the cold gas in the halo. H I observations of the Milky Way and other nearby spirals have revealed the presence of such gas in the form of clouds and other extended structures, which indicates ongoing accretion. We use a high-resolution simulation (136-272 pc throughout) to study the distribution of cold gas in the halo, compare it with observations, and examine its origin. The amount ({approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} in H I), covering fraction, and spatial distribution of the cold halo gas around the simulated galaxy at z = 0 are consistent with existing observations. At z = 0, the H I mass accretion rate onto the disk is 0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We track the histories of the 20 satellites that are detected in H I in the redshift interval 0.5 > z > 0 and find that most of them are losing gas, with a median mass-loss rate per satellite of 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This stripped gas is a significant component of the H I gas seen in the simulation. In addition, we see filamentary material coming into the halo from the intergalactic medium at all redshifts. Most of this gas does not make it directly to the disk, but part of the gas in these structures is able to cool and form clouds. The metallicity of the gas allows us to distinguish between filamentary flows and satellite gas. We find that the former accounts for at least 25%-75% of the cold gas in the halo seen at any redshift analyzed here. Placing constraints on cloud formation mechanisms allows us to better understand how galaxies accrete gas and fuel star formation at z = 0.

Fernandez, Ximena; Joung, M. Ryan; Putman, Mary E. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

Richardson, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hickox, Ryan, E-mail: jonathan.richardson@uchicago.edu, E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cool carbon stars in the halo II. A study of 25 new objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results from an ongoing survey of carbon-rich asymptotic giant (AGB) stars in the halo of our Galaxy. After selecting candidates primarily through their 2MASS colours, slit spectroscopy was achieved at the ESO NTT telescope. Twenty-one new AGB carbon stars were discovered, increasing the total of presently known similar AGB C stars to about 120. A further four were observed again in order to confirm their carbon-rich nature and measure radial velocities. Two main findings emerge from this work. First, we found a C star located at about 130 kpc from the Sun and at b = -62 degrees. This distant star is remarkably close (5 kpc) to the principal plane of the Stream of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, and is likely to be a tracer of a distant poorly populated southern warp of the Stream. etc etc

N. Mauron; T. R. Kendall; K. Gigoyan

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Prediction Space Weather Using an Asymmetric Cone Model for Halo CMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are responsible of the most severe geomagnetic storms. A prediction of their geoeffectiveness and travel time to Earth's vicinity is crucial to forecast space weather. Unfortunately coronagraphic observations are subjected to projection effects and do not provide true characteristics of CMEs. Recently, Michalek (2006, {\\it Solar Phys.}, {\\bf237}, 101) developed an asymmetric cone model to obtain the space speed, width and source location of HCMEs. We applied this technique to obtain the parameters of all front-sided HCMEs observed by the SOHO/LASCO experiment during a period from the beginning of 2001 until the end of 2002 (solar cycle 23). These parameters were applied for the space weather forecast. Our study determined that the space speeds are strongly correlated with the travel times of HCMEs within Earth's vicinity and with the magnitudes related to geomagnetic disturbances.

G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; S. Yashiro

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

Prediction Space Weather Using an Asymmetric Cone Model for Halo CMEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are responsible of the most severe geomagnetic storms. A prediction of their geoeffectiveness and travel time to Earth's vicinity is crucial to forecast space weather. Unfortunately coronagraphic observations are subjected to projection effects and do not provide true characteristics of CMEs. Recently, Michalek (2006, {\\it Solar Phys.}, {\\bf237}, 101) developed an asymmetric cone model to obtain the space speed, width and source location of HCMEs. We applied this technique to obtain the parameters of all front-sided HCMEs observed by the SOHO/LASCO experiment during a period from the beginning of 2001 until the end of 2002 (solar cycle 23). These parameters were applied for the space weather forecast. Our study determined that the space speeds are strongly correlated with the travel times of HCMEs within Earth's vicinity and with the magnitudes related to geomagnetic disturbances.

Michalek, G; Yashiro, S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Study on the One-Proton Halo Structure in $^{23}$Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Glauber theory has been used to investigate the reaction cross section of proton-rich nucleus $^{23}$Al. A core plus a proton structure is assumed for $^{23}$Al. HO-type density distribution is used for the core while the density distribution for the valence proton is calculated by solving the eigenvalue problem of Woods-Saxon potential. The transparency function in an analytical expression is obtained adopting multi-Gaussian expansion for the density distribution. Coulomb correction and finite-range interaction are introduced. This modified Glauber model is apt for halo nuclei. A dominate s-wave is suggested for the last proton in $^{23}$Al from our analysis which is possible in the RMF calculation.

D. Q. Fang; C. W. Ma; Y. G. Ma; X. Z. Cai; J. G. Chen; J. H. Chen; W. Guo; W. D. Tian; K. Wang; Y. B. Wei; T. Z. Yan; C. Zhong; J. X. Zuo; W. Q. Shen

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fusion reactions with the one-neutron halo nucleus 15C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of 15C, with an s1/2 neutron weakly bound to a closed-neutron shell nucleus 14C, makes it a prime candidate for a one-neutron halo nucleus. We have for the first time studied the cross section for the fusion-fission reaction 15C + 232Th at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier and compared it to the yield of the neighboring 14C + 232Th system measured in the same experiment. At sub-barrier energies, an enhancement of the fusion yield by factors of 2-5 was observed for 15C, while the cross sections for 14C match the trends measured for 12,13C.

M. Alcorta; K. E. Rehm; B. B. Back; S. Bedoor; P. F. Bertone; C. M. Deibel; B. DiGiovine; H. Esbensen; J. P. Greene; C. R. Hoffmann; C. L. Jiang; J. C. Lighthall; S. T. Marley; R. C. Pardo; M. Paul; A. M. Rogers; C. Ugalde; A. H. Wuosmaa

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Bar-Halo Interaction - II. Secular evolution and the religion of N-body simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores resonance-driven secular evolution between a bar and dark-matter halo using N-body simulations. We make direct comparisons to our analytic theory (Weinberg & Katz 2005) to demonstrate the great difficulty that an N-body simulation has representing these dynamics for realistic astronomical interactions. In a dark-matter halo, the bar's angular momentum is coupled to the central density cusp (if present) by the Inner Lindblad Resonance. Owing to this angular momentum transfer and self-consistent re-equilibration, strong realistic bars WILL modify the cusp profile, lowering the central densities within about 30% of the bar radius in a few bar orbits. Past results to the contrary (Sellwood 2006, McMillan & Dehnen 2005) may be the result of weak bars or numerical artifacts. The magnitude depends on many factors and we illustrate the sensitivity of the response to the dark-matter profile, the bar shape and mass, and the galaxy's evolutionary history. For example, if the bar length is comparable to the size of a central dark-matter core, the bar may exchange angular momentum without changing its pattern speed significantly. We emphasise that this apparently simple example of secular evolution is remarkably subtle in detail and conclude that an N-body exploration of any astronomical scenario requires a deep investigation into the underlying dynamical mechanisms for that particular problem to set the necessary requirements for the simulation parameters and method (e.g. particle number and Poisson solver). Simply put, N-body simulations do not divinely reveal truth and hence their results are not infallible. They are unlikely to provide useful insight on their own, particularly for the study of even more complex secular processes such as the production of pseudo-bulges and disk heating.

Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

233

EFFECT OF DUST ON Ly{alpha} PHOTON TRANSFER IN AN OPTICALLY THICK HALO  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effects of dust on Ly{alpha} photons emergent from an optically thick medium by solving the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer of resonant photons. To solve the differential equations numerically, we use the weighted essentially non-oscillatory method. Although the effects of dust on radiative transfer are well known, the resonant scattering of Ly{alpha} photons makes the problem non-trivial. For instance, if the medium has an optical depth of dust absorption and scattering of {tau}{sub a} >> 1, {tau} >> 1, and {tau} >> {tau}{sub a}, the effective absorption optical depth in a random walk scenario would be equal to {radical}({tau}{sub a}({tau}{sub a}+{tau})). We show, however, that for a resonant scattering at frequency {nu}{sub 0}, the effective absorption optical depth would be even larger than {tau}({nu}{sub 0}). If the cross section of dust scattering and absorption is frequency-independent, the double-peaked structure of the frequency profile given by the resonant scattering is basically dust-independent. That is, dust causes neither narrowing nor widening of the width of the double-peaked profile. One more result is that the timescales of the Ly{alpha} photon transfer in an optically thick halo are also basically independent of the dust scattering, even when the scattering is anisotropic. This is because those timescales are mainly determined by the transfer in the frequency space, while dust scattering, either isotropic or anisotropic, does not affect the behavior of the transfer in the frequency space when the cross section of scattering is wavelength-independent. This result does not support the speculation that dust will lead to the smoothing of the brightness distribution of a Ly{alpha} photon source with an optically thick halo.

Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Roy, Ishani [Computing Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3QD (United Kingdom); Fang Lizhi [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)  

SciTech Connect

Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

Chad Smutzer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface pressure for a 48-hour post exposure observation period. No fall chinook salmon died during or after exposure to the horizontal bulb turbine passage pressures, and no injuries were observed during the 48-hour post exposure observation period. As with the previous test series, it cannot be determined whether fall chinook salmon acclimated to the greater water pressure during the pretest holding period. For bluegill sunfish exposed to the horizontal bulb turbine turbine-passage pressures, only one fish died and injuries were less severe and less common than for bluegills subjected to either the"worst case" pressure or modified Kaplan turbine pressure conditions in previous tests. Injury rates for bluegills were higher at 0.7 atm nadir than for the 0.95 atm nadir. However, injuries were limited to minor internal hemorrhaging. Bluegills did not suffer swim bladder rupture in any tested scenarios. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

Abernethy, Cary S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Amidan, Brett G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cada, G F. (ORNL)

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

University of California Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The incandescent bulbs used about 150 W to illuminate a display case. The LED lighting uses about 30 W per case all their 35-W halogen bulbs in the hallways with 5-W LEDs. There are 750 of these and they are turnedDonald's restaurant in Sønderborg, Denmark that replaced 133 halogen bulbs with LEDs reduces CO2 emissions by 12 tons

Carter, Troy

237

Limits on Stellar Objects as the Dark Matter of Our Halo: Nonbaryonic Dark Matter Seems to be Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the dark matter in the Halo of our Galaxy remains a mystery. Arguments are presented that the dark matter does not consist of ordinary stellar or substellar objects, i.e., the dark matter is not made of faint stars, brown dwarfs, white dwarfs, or neutron stars. In fact, faint stars and brown dwarfs constitute no more than a few percent of the mass of our Galaxy, and stellar remnants must satisfy $\\Omega_{WD} \\leq 3 \\times 10^{-3} h^{-1}$, where $h$ is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km/s Mpc^{-1}. On theoretical grounds one is then pushed to more exotic explanations. Indeed a nonbaryonic component in the Halo seems to be required.

Katherine Freese; Brian Fields; David Graff

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chandra Observations of MRK 273: Unveiling the Central AGN and the Extended Hot Gas Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report X-ray observations of the field containing the ultraluminous IRAS galaxy Mrk~273 Using the ACIS-S3 instrument on board Chandra. The high resolution X-ray image, for the first time, reveals a compact hard X-ray nucleus in Mrk~273. Its X-ray energy distribution is well described by a heavily obscured power-law spectrum plus a narrow $\\Feka$ emission line at 6.4 keV. The neutral hydrogen column density is about $4\\times10^{23}\\cm^{-2}$, implying an absorption -corrected X-ray luminosity (0.1--10 keV) for the nucleus of $\\Lx\\approx 6.5\\times 10^{43} \\ergs$. There are also bright soft X-ray clumps and diffuse soft X-ray emissions surrounding the central hard X-ray nucleus within the $10\\arcsec$ of the nuclear region. Its spectrum can be fitted by a MEKAL thermal model with temperature of about 0.8 keV and high metallicity ($Z\\sim 1.5Z_\\odot$) plus emission lines from $\\alpha$ elements and ions. Further outside the central region, the Chandra observations reveal a very extended hot gas halo with a projected diameter of about $108 \\kpc\\times 68 \\kpc$ and soft X-ray luminosity of $\\Lx\\approx 1.9\\times 10^{41} \\ergs$. The temperature of the hot gas is about 0.62 keV with a low metallicity ($Z \\sim 0.1 Z_\\odot$). We discuss the nature of the AGN in Mrk~273 and the implications of our results on the origin of X-ray halos in elliptical galaxies. We also discuss the properties of Mrk~273x, a background AGN in the Mrk~273 field. The AGN has an X-ray luminosity of $\\Lx \\approx 2.43\\times 10^{44}\\ergs$ in the 0.5-10 keV band. Its X-ray properties resemble those of Seyfert 1 galaxies while its optical properties are similar to Seyfert 2 galaxies. Such mixed classifications may be a challenge for the unification scheme of AGNs.

X. Y. Xia; S. J. Xue; S. Mao; Th. Boller; Z. G. Deng; H. Wu

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Autocorrelation function of the soft X-ray background produced by warm-hot gas in dark halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the angular two-point autocorrelation function (ACF) of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) produced by the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) associated with dark halos, motivated primarily by searching for missing baryons and distinguishing different physical processes of the WHIM in dark halos. We employ a purely analytic model for the halo population which is completely determined by the universal density profile and the Press-Schechter mass function. We then adopt a phenomenological approach to nongravitational processes of the WHIM such as preheating and radiative cooling. It shows that the power spectra of the SXRB predicted by three WHIM models, namely, the self-similar model, preheating model and cooling model demonstrate remarkably different signatures in both amplitude and shape, with the peak locations moving from 4X10^4 for the self-similar model to a smaller value of (3-5)X10^3 when nongravitational processes are taken into account. The corresponding ACFs for preheating and cooling models become shallower too as compared with the prediction of the self-similar model. This may permit an effective probe of the physical processes of the WHIM in massive halos in conjunction with the observationally determined power spectrum or ACF of the SXRB from diffuse WHIM. However, a direct comparison of our theoretical predictions with existing data (e.g. the ACF determined from ROSAT observations) is still difficult because of the dominant contribution of AGNs in the soft X-ray sky. We discuss briefly the implication of our results for resolving the missing baryon problem in the local universe.

Xiang-Ping Wu; Yan-Jie Xue

2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nuclear Charge Radii of 7;9;10 Be and the One-Neutron Halo Nucleus 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Charge Radii of 7;9;10 Be and the One-Neutron Halo Nucleus 11 Be W. No¨rtersha¨user,1,2 D, Canada E3B 5A3 (Received 6 September 2008; published 13 February 2009) Nuclear charge radii of 7 calculations of the mass-dependent isotope shifts yields nuclear charge radii. The charge radius decreases from

Pfeifer, Holger

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241

Wednesday, January 30, 2013, 1:15 pm EDT (1 hour talk followed by 30 minute of networking refreshments will be served)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and projected bulb efficacies of existing white light sources with white LEDs . LEDs have the potential distinct markets for the LEDs: the low efficacy market, characterized by the incandescent and halogen bulbs.157 0.186 LED 2020 (high invest) Any 160 13 100,000 0.013 0.044 0.057 Fluorescent bulbs are currently

Salama, Khaled

242

Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies  

SciTech Connect

We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt [Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Quantifying the heart of darkness with GHALO - a multi-billion particle simulation of our galactic halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a series of simulations of a Galactic mass dark matter halo at different resolutions, our largest uses over three billion particles and has a mass resolution of 1000 M_sun. We quantify the structural properties of the inner dark matter distribution and study how they depend on numerical resolution. We can measure the density profile to a distance of 120 pc (0.05% of R_vir) where the logarithmic slope is -0.8 and -1.4 at (0.5% of R_vir). We propose a new two parameter fitting function that has a linearly varying logarithmic density gradient which fits the GHALO and VL2 density profiles extremely well. Convergence in the density profile and the halo shape scales as N^(-1/3), but the shape converges at a radius three times larger at which point the halo becomes more spherical due to numerical resolution. The six dimensional phase-space profile is dominated by the presence of the substructures and does not follow a power law, except in the smooth under-resolved inner few kpc.

Joachim Stadel; Doug Potter; Ben Moore; Jürg Diemand; Piero Madau; Marcel Zemp; Michael Kuhlen; Vicent Quilis

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Halo expansion in cosmological hydro simulations: towards a baryonic solution of the cusp/core problem in massive spirals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A clear prediction of the Cold Dark Matter model is the existence of cuspy dark matter halo density profiles on all mass scales. This is not in agreement with the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies, challenging on small scales the otherwise successful CDM paradigm. In this work we employ high resolution cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations to study the effects of dissipative processes on the inner distribution of dark matter in Milky-Way like objects (M~1e12 Msun). Our simulations include supernova feedback, and the effects of the radiation pressure of massive stars before they explode as supernovae. The increased stellar feedback results in the expansion of the dark matter halo instead of contraction with respect to N-body simulations. Baryons are able to erase the dark matter cuspy distribution creating a flat, cored, dark matter density profile in the central several kpc of a massive Milky-Way like halo. The profile is well fit by a Burkert profile, with fitting parameters consistent with the ...

Maccio', Andrea V; Brook, Chris B; Wadsley, James; Couchman, H M P; Shen, Sijing; Gibson, Brad K; Quinn, Tom

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

HALO EXPANSION IN COSMOLOGICAL HYDRO SIMULATIONS: TOWARD A BARYONIC SOLUTION OF THE CUSP/CORE PROBLEM IN MASSIVE SPIRALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear prediction of the cold dark matter (CDM) model is the existence of cuspy dark matter halo density profiles on all mass scales. This is not in agreement with the observed rotation curves of spiral galaxies, challenging on small scales the otherwise successful CDM paradigm. In this work we employ high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the effects of dissipative processes on the inner distribution of dark matter in Milky Way like objects (M Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }). Our simulations include supernova feedback, and the effects of the radiation pressure of massive stars before they explode as supernovae. The increased stellar feedback results in the expansion of the dark matter halo instead of contraction with respect to N-body simulations. Baryons are able to erase the dark matter cuspy distribution, creating a flat, cored, dark matter density profile in the central several kiloparsecs of a massive Milky-Way-like halo. The profile is well fit by a Burkert profile, with fitting parameters consistent with the observations. In addition, we obtain flat rotation curves as well as extended, exponential stellar disk profiles. While the stellar disk we obtain is still partially too thick to resemble the Milky Way thin disk, this pilot study shows that there is enough energy available in the baryonic component to alter the dark matter distribution even in massive disk galaxies, providing a possible solution to the long-standing problem of cusps versus cores.

Maccio, A. V.; Stinson, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brook, C. B.; Gibson, B. K. [University of Central Lancashire, Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shen, S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Quinn, T., E-mail: maccio@mpia.de, E-mail: stinson@mpia.de [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

$^7$Li Abundances in Halo Stars: Testing Stellar Evolution Models and the Primordial $^7$Li Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of stellar evolution models with [Fe/H] = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial $^7$Li abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of Li abundances in extremely metal poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models do a good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than 5600 K. They predict a primordial $^7$Li abundance of Log N(Li) = 2.24\\pm 0.03$. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the $^7$Li destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of $^7$Li from the surface of the star. The [Fe/H] = -2.3 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable $^7$Li depletion in these models and the primordial $^7$Li abundance inferred from these models is Log N(Li) = $3.08\\pm 0.1$.

Brian Chaboyer; P. Demarque

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chandra Observations of MRK 273 Unveiling the Central AGN and the Extended Hot Gas Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report X-ray observations of the field containing the ultraluminous IRAS galaxy Mrk~273 Using the ACIS-S3 instrument on board Chandra. The high resolution X-ray image, for the first time, reveals a compact hard X-ray nucleus in Mrk~273. Its X-ray energy distribution is well described by a heavily obscured power-law spectrum plus a narrow $\\Feka$ emission line at 6.4 keV. The neutral hydrogen column density is about $4\\times10^{23}\\cm^{-2}$, implying an absorption -corrected X-ray luminosity (0.1--10 keV) for the nucleus of $\\Lx\\approx 6.5\\times 10^{43} \\ergs$. There are also bright soft X-ray clumps and diffuse soft X-ray emissions surrounding the central hard X-ray nucleus within the $10\\arcsec$ of the nuclear region. Its spectrum can be fitted by a MEKAL thermal model with temperature of about 0.8 keV and high metallicity ($Z\\sim 1.5Z_\\odot$) plus emission lines from $\\alpha$ elements and ions. Further outside the central region, the Chandra observations reveal a very extended hot gas halo with a project...

Xia, X Y; Mao, S; Boller, T; Deng, Z G; Wu, H; Boller, Th.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A new Milky Way halo star cluster in the Southern Galactic Sky  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the discovery of a new Milky Way companion stellar system located at (RA, Dec) = (22h10m43s, +14:56:30). The discovery was made using the eighth data release of SDSS after applying an automated method to search for overdensities in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey footprint. Follow-up observations were performed using CFHT-MegaCam, which reveal that this system is comprised of an old stellar population, located at a distance of 31.9+1.0-1.6 kpc, with a half-light radius of r_h = 9.27 +/- 0.88 pc and a concentration parameter of c = 0.82. A systematic isochrone fit to its color-magnitude diagram resulted in log(age) = 10.07+0.05-0.03 and [Fe/H] = -1.58+0.08-0.13 . These quantities are typical of globular clusters in the MW halo. The newly found object is of low stellar mass, whose observed excess relative to the background is caused by 96 +/- 3 stars. The direct integration of its background decontaminated luminosity function leads to an absolute magnitude of MV = -1.21 +/- 0.66. The re...

Balbinot, Eduardo; da Costa, L; Maia, M A G; Majewski, S R; Nidever, D; Rocha-Pinto, H J; Thomas, D; Wechsler, R H; Yanny, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Kinematics of the stellar halo and the mass distribution of the Milky Way using BHB stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we present a kinematic study of the Galactic halo out to a radius of $\\sim$ 60 kpc, using 4664 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars selected from the SDSS/SEGUE survey, to determine key dynamical properties. Using a maximum likelihood analysis, we determine the velocity dispersion profiles in spherical coordinates ($\\sigma_{r}$, $\\sigma_{\\theta}$, $\\sigma_{\\phi}$) and the anisotropy profile ($\\beta$). The radial velocity dispersion profile ($\\sigma_{r}$) is measured out to a galactocentric radius of $r \\sim 60$ kpc, but due to the lack of proper-motion information, $\\sigma_{\\theta}$, $\\sigma_{\\phi}$ and $\\beta$ could only be derived directly out to $r \\sim25$ kpc. From a starting value of $\\beta\\approx 0.5$ in the inner parts ($9

Kafle, Prajwal R; Lewis, Geraint F; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A New Giant Stellar Structure Near the Outer Halo of M31: Satellite or Stream?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of stars ~3 degrees to the north-east of the Andromeda galaxy through a number excess of luminous red giant stars, which we have called Andromeda NE. With the data at hand, the distance to Andromeda NE is well enough determined to ascertain that these stars are bound within M31's dark matter halo, rather than a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~29 mag/arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. Depending on its exact distance, Andromeda NE may be undergoing tidal disruption, if indeed we have imaged the main body of the stellar feature.

Zucker, D B; Bell, E F; Martínez-Delgado, D; Grebel, E K; Rix, H W; Rockosi, C M; Holtzman, J A; Walterbos, R A M; Ivezic, Z; Brinkmann, J; Brewington, H; Harvanek, M J; Kleinman, S J; Krzesínski, J; Long, D; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; Zucker, Daniel B.; Kniazev, Alexei Y.; Bell, Eric F.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Grebel, Eva K.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brewington, Howard; Harvanek, Michael; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Newman, Peter R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Snedden, Stephanie A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Chandra Observation of the Edge-on Spiral NGC 5775: Probing the Hot Galactic Disk/Halo Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the edge-on galaxy NGC 5775, utilizing a 58.2 ks {\\sl Chandra} ACIS-S observation together with complementary {\\sl HST} ACS, {\\sl Spitzer} IRAC and other multi-wavelength data sets. This edge-on galaxy, with its disk-wide active star formation, is particularly well-suited for studying the disk/halo interaction on sub-galactic scales. We detect 27 discrete X-ray sources within the $D_{25}$ region of the galaxy, including an ultra-luminous source with a 0.3-7 keV luminosity of $\\sim7\\times10^{40}\\rm ergs s^{-1}$. The source-removed diffuse X-ray emission shows several prominent extraplanar features, including a $\\sim10\\rm kpc$ diameter ``shell-like'' feature and a ``blob'' reaching a projected distance of $\\sim25\\rm kpc$ from the galactic disk. The bulk of the X-ray emission in the halo has a scale height of $\\sim$1.5 kpc and can be characterized by a two-temperature optically thin thermal plasma with temperatures of $\\sim$ 0.2 and 0.6 keV and a total 0.3-2 keV luminosity of $\\sim3.5\\times10^{39}\\rm ergs s^{-1}$. The high-resolution, multi-wavelength data reveal the presence of several extraplanar features around the disk, which appear to be associated with the in-disk star formation. We suggest that hot gas produced with different levels of mass loading can have different temperatures, which may explain the characteristic temperatures of hot gas in the halo. We have obtained a sub-galactic scale X-ray-intensity-star formation relation, which is consistent with the integrated version in other star forming galaxies.

J. T. Li; Z. Y. Li; Q. D. Wang; J. A. Irwin; J. Rossa

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

PROBING THE STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TRANSITION LAYER BETWEEN THE MAGELLANIC STREAM AND THE HALO IN H I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a nearby laboratory for studying the fate of cool gas streams injected into a gaseous galactic halo. We investigate properties of the boundary layer between the cool MS gas and the hot Milky Way halo with 21 cm H I observations of a relatively isolated cloud having circular projection in the northern MS. Through averaging and modeling techniques, our observations, obtained with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, reach unprecedented 3{sigma} sensitivity of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, while retaining the telescope's 9.'1 resolution in the essential radial dimension. We find an envelope of diffuse neutral gas with FWHM of 60 km s{sup -1}, associated in velocity with the cloud core having FWHM of 20 km s{sup -1}, extending to 3.5 times the core radius with a neutral mass seven times that of the core. We show that the envelope is too extended to represent a conduction-dominated layer between the core and the halo. Its observed properties are better explained by a turbulent mixing layer driven by hydrodynamic instabilities. The fortuitous alignment of the NGC 7469 background source near the cloud center allows us to combine UV absorption and H I emission data to determine a core temperature of 8350 {+-} 350 K. We show that the H I column density and size of the core can be reproduced when a slightly larger cloud is exposed to Galactic and extragalactic background ionizing radiation. Cooling in the large diffuse turbulent mixing layer envelope extends the cloud lifetime by at least a factor of two relative to a simple hydrodynamic ablation case, suggesting that the cloud is likely to reach the Milky Way disk.

Nigra, Lou; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Gallagher, John S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wood, Kenneth [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Nidever, David; Majewski, Steven, E-mail: lou@zooniverse.org, E-mail: sstanimi@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: jsg@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: kw25@st-andrews.ac.uk, E-mail: dnidever@virginia.edu, E-mail: srm4n@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reaction mechanisms for weakly-bound, stable nuclei and unstable, halo nuclei on medium-mass targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental overview of reactions induced by the stable, but weakly-bound nuclei 6Li, 7Li and 9Be, and by the exotic, halo nuclei 6He, 8B, 11Be and 17F on medium-mass targets, such as 58Ni, 59Co or 64Zn, is presented. Existing data on elastic scattering, total reaction cross sections, fusion processes, breakup and transfer channels are discussed in the framework of a CDCC approach taking into account the breakup degree of freedom.

Beck, C; Papka, P; Courtin, S; Souza, F A; Carlin, N; Neto, R Liguori; De Moura, M M; del Santo, M G; Suaide, A A I; Munhoz, M G; Szanto, E M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Keeley, N; Díaz-Torres, A; Hagino, K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The High Energy Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of the Dark Matter in the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present constraints on the density of halo dark matter candidates within the solar circle based on the anisotropy in the high energy gamma-ray background. The known galactic components of the gamma-ray background, in particular the inverse Compton component, have been estimated more accurately. We find the spectrum of the residual emission, after subtracting the galactic component is inconsistent with emission from some of the proposed dark matter candidates. We derive upper limits of 10^8 M_sun for the mass of diffuse gas and 3*10^9 pc^(-3) for the number density of primordial black holes contributing to the gamma-ray background.

R. Chary; E. L. Wright

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN LOW- AND HIGH-{alpha} FIELD HALO STARS AND THE DISCOVERY OF TWO FIELD STARS BORN IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen abundances of 67 dwarf stars in the metallicity range -1.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4 are derived from a non-LTE analysis of the 777 nm O I triplet lines. These stars have precise atmospheric parameters measured by Nissen and Schuster, who find that they separate into three groups based on their kinematics and {alpha}-element (Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) abundances: thick disk, high-{alpha} halo, and low-{alpha} halo. We find the oxygen abundance trends of thick-disk and high-{alpha} halo stars very similar. The low-{alpha} stars show a larger star-to-star scatter in [O/Fe] at a given [Fe/H] and have systematically lower oxygen abundances compared to the other two groups. Thus, we find the behavior of oxygen abundances in these groups of stars similar to that of the {alpha} elements. We use previously published oxygen abundance data of disk and very metal-poor halo stars to present an overall view (-2.3 < [Fe/H] < +0.3) of oxygen abundance trends of stars in the solar neighborhood. Two field halo dwarf stars stand out in their O and Na abundances. Both G53-41 and G150-40 have very low oxygen and very high sodium abundances, which are key signatures of the abundance anomalies observed in globular cluster (GC) stars. Therefore, they are likely field halo stars born in GCs. If true, we estimate that at least 3% {+-} 2% of the local field metal-poor star population was born in GCs.

Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Melendez, J. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo 05508-900, SP (Brazil); Chaname, J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5859,2946,5154,738,245,600 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7464,4047,6722,1108,663,991 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,10393,6055,9815,1759,1701,1996 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,9053,5004,8344,2296,2224,1611

257

Dark Matter Halos and Evolution of Bars in Disk Galaxies: Varying Gas Fraction and Gas Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments by evolving gaseous/stellar disks embedded in live dark matter halos aiming at quantifying the effect of gas spatial resolution and gas content on the bar evolution. Model sequences have been constructed using different resolution, and gas fraction has been varied along each sequence within fgas=0%-50%, keeping the disk and halo properties unchanged. We find that the spatial resolution becomes important with an increase in `fgas'. For the higher resolution model sequences, we observe a bimodal behavior in the bar evolution with respect to the gas fraction, especially during the secular phase of this evolution. The switch from the gas-poor to gas-rich behavior is abrupt and depends on the resolution used. The diverging evolution has been observed in nearly all basic parameters characterizing bars, such as the bar strength, central mass concentration, vertical buckling amplitude, size, etc. We find that the presence of the gas component severely limits the bar growth and affects...

Villa-Vargas, Jorge; Heller, Clayton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Chandra Observation of the Edge-on Spiral NGC 5775: Probing the Hot Galactic Disk/Halo Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the edge-on galaxy NGC 5775, utilizing a 58.2 ks {\\sl Chandra} ACIS-S observation together with complementary {\\sl HST} ACS, {\\sl Spitzer} IRAC and other multi-wavelength data sets. This edge-on galaxy, with its disk-wide active star formation, is particularly well-suited for studying the disk/halo interaction on sub-galactic scales. We detect 27 discrete X-ray sources within the $D_{25}$ region of the galaxy, including an ultra-luminous source with a 0.3-7 keV luminosity of $\\sim7\\times10^{40}\\rm ergs s^{-1}$. The source-removed diffuse X-ray emission shows several prominent extraplanar features, including a $\\sim10\\rm kpc$ diameter ``shell-like'' feature and a ``blob'' reaching a projected distance of $\\sim25\\rm kpc$ from the galactic disk. The bulk of the X-ray emission in the halo has a scale height of $\\sim$1.5 kpc and can be characterized by a two-temperature optically thin thermal plasma with temperatures of $\\sim$ 0.2 and 0.6 keV and a total 0.3-2 keV luminosity of $\\sim3.5\\times10^{39}\\rm er...

Li, J T; Wang, Q D; Irwin, J A; Rossa, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CONTINUUM HALOS IN NEARBY GALAXIES: AN EVLA SURVEY (CHANG-ES). II. FIRST RESULTS ON NGC 4631  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first results from the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies-an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES), a new survey of 35 edge-on galaxies to search for both in-disk and extraplanar radio continuum emission. CHANG-ES is exploiting the new wide-band, multi-channel capabilities of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (i.e., the Expanded Very Large Array or EVLA) with observations in two bands centered at 1.5 and 6 GHz in a variety of array configurations with full polarization. The motivation and science case for the survey are presented in a companion paper (Paper I). These first results are based on C-array test observations in both observing bands of the well-known radio halo galaxy, NGC 4631. In this paper, we outline the observations and the data reduction steps that are required for wide-band calibration and mapping of EVLA data, including polarization. With modest on-source observing times (30 minutes at 1.5 GHz and 75 minutes at 6 GHz for the test data), we have achieved best rms noise levels of 22 and 3.5 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} at 1.5 GHz and 6 GHz, respectively. New disk-halo features have been detected, among them two at 1.5 GHz that appear as loops in projection. We present the first 1.5 GHz spectral index map of NGC 4631 to be formed from a single wide-band observation in a single array configuration. This map represents tangent slopes to the intensities within the band centered at 1.5 GHz, rather than fits across widely separated frequencies as has been done in the past and is also the highest spatial resolution spectral index map yet presented for this galaxy. The average spectral index in the disk is {alpha}-bar{sub 1.5GHz} = -0.84 {+-} 0.05 indicating that the emission is largely non-thermal, but a small global thermal contribution is sufficient to explain a positive curvature term in the spectral index over the band. Two specific star-forming regions have spectral indices that are consistent with thermal emission. Polarization results (uncorrected for internal Faraday rotation) are consistent with previous observations and also reveal some new features. On broad scales, we find strong support for the notion that magnetic fields constrain the X-ray-emitting hot gas.

Irwin, Judith; Henriksen, Richard N. [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Beck, Rainer; Krause, Marita; Mora, Silvia Carolina; Schmidt, Philip [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121, Bonn (Germany); Benjamin, R. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater, 800 West Main St., Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States); Dettmar, Ralf-Juergen; Miskolczi, Arpad [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); English, Jayanne [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Heald, George; Oosterloo, Tom [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnson, Megan [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Greenbank, WV 24944 (United States); Li, Jiang-Tao [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Porter, Troy A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rand, Richard J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, 800 Yale Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Saikia, D. J. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411 007 (India); Strong, A. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Walterbos, Rene, E-mail: irwin@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: henriksn@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: twiegert@astro.queensu.ca, E-mail: rbeck@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: cmora@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effect of continuum couplings in fusion of halo $^{11}$Be on $^{208}$Pb around the Coulomb barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of continuum couplings in the fusion of the halo nucleus $^{11}$Be on $^{208}$Pb around the Coulomb barrier is studied using a three-body model within a coupled discretised continuum channels (CDCC) formalism. We investigate in particular the role of continuum-continuum couplings. These are found to hinder total, complete and incomplete fusion processes. Couplings to the projectile $1p_{1/2}$ bound excited state redistribute the complete and incomplete fusion cross sections, but the total fusion cross section remains nearly constant. Results show that continuum-continuum couplings enhance the irreversibility of breakup and reduce the flux that penetrates the Coulomb barrier. Converged total fusion cross sections agree with the experimental ones for energies around the Coulomb barrier, but underestimate those for energies well above the Coulomb barrier.

A. Diaz-Torres; I. J. Thompson

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

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261

THE CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF STARS IN THE HALO (CASH) PROJECT. II. A SAMPLE OF 14 EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STARS ,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive abundance analysis of 20 elements for 16 new low-metallicity stars from the Chemical Abundances of Stars in the Halo (CASH) project. The abundances have been derived from both Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph snapshot spectra (R {approx}15, 000) and corresponding high-resolution (R {approx}35, 000) Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectra. The stars span a metallicity range from [Fe/H] from -2.9 to -3.9, including four new stars with [Fe/H] pipeline. This code will be used for the entire {approx}500 star CASH snapshot sample. We find that the pipeline results are statistically identical for snapshot spectra when compared to a traditional, manual analysis from a high-resolution spectrum.

Hollek, Julie K.; Sneden, Christopher; Shetrone, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Frebel, Anna [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roederer, Ian U. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and JINA: Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Kang, Sung-ju [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Thom, Christopher, E-mail: julie@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: shetrone@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: afrebel@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: iur@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: sjkang@iastate.edu, E-mail: cthom@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Canaries in a Coal Mine Using Globular Clusters to Place Limits on Massive Black Holes in the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility that massive black holes comprise a significant fraction of the dark matter of our galaxy by studying the dissolution of galactic globular clusters bombarded by them. In our simulations, we evolve the clusters along a sequence of King models determined by changes of state resulting from collisions with the black holes. The results divide naturally into regimes of `small' and `large' black hole mass. `Small' black holes do not destroy clusters in single collisions; their effect is primarily cumulative, leading to a relation between $\\mbh$ and $\\fhalo$, the fraction of the halo in black holes of mass $\\mbh$, which is $\\fhalo\\mbh < $ constant (up to logarithmic corrections). For $\\fhalo=1$, we find $\\mbh \\simless 10^{3} \\msun$ by requiring survival of the same clusters studied by Moore (1993), who neglected cluster evolution, mass loss, and stochasticity of energy inputs in his estimates, but reached a similar conclusion. `Large' black holes may not penetrate a cluster without disru...

Arras, P; Arras, Phil; Wasserman, Ira

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A PETAL OF THE SUNFLOWER: PHOTOMETRY OF THE STELLAR TIDAL STREAM IN THE HALO OF MESSIER 63 (NGC 5055)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present deep surface photometry of a very faint, giant arc-loop feature in the halo of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5055 (M63) that is consistent with being a part of a stellar stream resulting from the disruption of a dwarf satellite galaxy. This faint feature was first detected in early photographic studies by van der Kruit; more recently, in the study of Martinez-Delgado and as presented in this work, from the loop has been realized to be the result of a recent minor merger through evidence obtained by wide-field, deep images taken with a telescope of only 0.16 m aperture. The stellar stream is clearly confirmed in additional deep images taken with the 0.5 m telescope of the BlackBird Remote Observatory and the 0.8 m telescope of the McDonald Observatory. This low surface brightness ({mu}{sub R} Almost-Equal-To 26 mag arcsec{sup -2}) arc-like structure around the disk of the galaxy extends 14.'0 ({approx}29 kpc projected) from its center, with a projected width of 1.'6 ({approx}3.3 kpc). The stream's morphology is consistent with that of the visible part of a giant, 'great-circle' type stellar stream originating from the recent accretion of a {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} dwarf satellite in the last few Gyr. The progenitor satellite's current position and final fate are not conclusive from our data. The color of the stream's stars is consistent with dwarfs in the Local Group and is similar to the outer faint regions of M63's disk and stellar halo. From our photometric study, we detect other low surface brightness 'plumes'; some of these may be extended spiral features related to the galaxy's complex spiral structure, and others may be tidal debris associated with the disruption of the galaxy's outer stellar disk as a result of the accretion event. We are able to differentiate between features related to the tidal stream and faint, blue extended features in the outskirts of the galaxy's disk previously detected by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite. With its highly warped H I gaseous disk ({approx}20 Degree-Sign ), M63 represents one of the several examples of an isolated spiral galaxy with a warped disk showing recently discovered strong evidence of an ongoing minor merger.

Chonis, Taylor S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Martinez-Delgado, David [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabany, R. Jay [BlackBird Observatory, Mayhill, NM (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Hill, Gary J. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gralak, Ray [Sirius Imaging Observatory, Mayhill, NM (United States); Trujillo, Ignacio, E-mail: tschonis@astro.as.utexas.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea, s/n, E38205 - La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

ISOTHERMAL DISTRIBUTIONS IN MONDian GRAVITY AS A SIMPLE UNIFYING EXPLANATION FOR THE UBIQUITOUS{rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -3} DENSITY PROFILES IN TENUOUS STELLAR HALOS  

SciTech Connect

That the stellar halo of the Milky Way has a density profile which, to first approximation, satisfies{rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -3} and has been known for a long time. More recently, it has become clear that M31 also has such an extended stellar halo, which approximately follows the same radial scaling. Studies of distant galaxies have revealed the same phenomenology. Also, we now know that the density profiles of the globular cluster systems of our Galaxy and Andromeda to first approximation follow{rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -3},{Sigma}{proportional_to}R {sup -2} in projection. Recently, diffuse populations of stars have been detected spherically surrounding a number of Galactic globular clusters, extending much beyond the Newtonian tidal radii, often without showing any evidence of tidal features. Within the standard Newtonian and general relativity scenario, numerous and diverse particular explanations have been suggested, individually tailored to each of the different classes of systems described above. Here we show that in a MONDian gravity scenario any isothermal tenuous halo of tracer particles forming a small perturbation surrounding a spherically symmetric mass distribution will have an equilibrium configuration which to first approximation satisfies a{rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -3} scaling.

Hernandez, X.; Jimenez, M. A.; Allen, C., E-mail: xavier@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-264, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

265

PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

Lewis, Geraint F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Braun, Robert [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McConnachie, Alan W. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)] [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F. [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire de Strasbourg, 11, rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Fardal, Mark [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Dubinski, John [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, University of Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Widrow, Larry [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Mackey, A. Dougal [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)] [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Tanvir, Nial R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, Michael, E-mail: geraint.lewis@sydney.edu.au [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)] [Division of Astronomy, University of California, 8979 Math Sciences, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Canaries in a Coal Mine: Using Globular Clusters to Place Limits on Massive Black Holes in the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the possibility that massive black holes comprise a significant fraction of the dark matter of our galaxy by studying the dissolution of galactic globular clusters bombarded by them. In our simulations, we evolve the clusters along a sequence of King models determined by changes of state resulting from collisions with the black holes. The results divide naturally into regimes of `small' and `large' black hole mass. `Small' black holes do not destroy clusters in single collisions; their effect is primarily cumulative, leading to a relation between $\\mbh$ and $\\fhalo$, the fraction of the halo in black holes of mass $\\mbh$, which is $\\fhalo\\mbh < $ constant (up to logarithmic corrections). For $\\fhalo=1$, we find $\\mbh \\simless 10^{3} \\msun$ by requiring survival of the same clusters studied by Moore (1993), who neglected cluster evolution, mass loss, and stochasticity of energy inputs in his estimates, but reached a similar conclusion. `Large' black holes may not penetrate a cluster without disrupting it; their effect is mainly catastrophic (close collisions), but also partly cumulative (distant collisions). In the large $\\mbh$ limit, $\\fhalo$ (but not $\\mbh$) can be constrained by computing the probability that a cluster survives a combination of close, destructive encounters and distant, nondestructive encounters. We find that it is unlikely that $\\fhalo \\simgreat 0.3$ by requiring 50 per cent survival probability for Moore's clusters over $10^{10}$ years.

Phil Arras; Ira Wasserman

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear Charge Radii of Be-7,9,10 and the one-neutron halo nucleus Be-11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear charge radii of $^{7,9,10,11}$Be have been determined by high-precision laser spectroscopy. On-line measurements were performed with collinear laser spectroscopy in the $2s_{1/2} \\to 2p_{1/2}$ transition on a beam of Be$^{+}$ ions. Collinear and anticollinear laser beams were used simultaneously and the absolute frequency determination using a frequency comb yielded an accuracy in the isotope-shift measurements of about 1 MHz. Combination with accurate calculations of the mass-dependent isotope shifts yield nuclear charge radii. The charge radius decreases from $^7$Be to $^{10}$Be and then increases for the halo nucleus $^{11}$Be. When comparing our results with predictions of {\\it ab initio} nuclear structure calculations we find good agreement. Additionally, the nuclear magnetic moment of $^7$Be was determined to be $-1.3995(5)\\mu_{\\rm N}$ and that of $^{11}$Be from a previous $\\beta$-NMR measurement was confirmed.

W. Nörtershäuser; D. Tiedemann; M. Žáková; Z. Andjelkovic; K. Blaum; M. L. Bissell; R. Cazan; G. W. F. Drake; Ch. Geppert; M. Kowalska; J. Krämer; A. Krieger; R. Neugart; R. Sánchez; F. Schmidt-Kaler; Z. -C. Yan; D. T. Yordanov; C. Zimmermann

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Experiments on 2D Vortex Patterns in a Malmberg-Penning Trap with a Photocathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the solenoidal ¯eld. The vertical section attached to the end and led down to a large ion pump, which constraints: ² The light is provided by a halogen slide projector lamp, type EXW. The diameter of this bulb quality. An aperture with a diameter of 1 inch is also used to reduce aberration. Because the light bulb

California at Berkeley, University of

269

An extremely wide and very low-mass pair with common proper motion. Is it representative of a nearby halo stream?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We describe the discovery of an extremely wide pair of low-mass stars with a common large proper motion and discuss their possible membership in a Galactic halo stream crossing the Solar neighbourhood. (...) The late-type (M7) dwarf SSSPM J2003$-$4433 and the ultracool subdwarf SSSPM J1930$-$4311 (sdM7) sharing the same very large proper motion of about 860 mas/yr were found in the same sky region with an angular separation of about 6\\degr. From the comparison with other high proper motion catalogues we have estimated the probability of a chance alignment of the two new large proper motions to be less than 0.3%. From the individually estimated spectroscopic distances of about $38^{+10}_{-7}$ pc and $72^{+21}_{-16}$ pc, respectively for the M7 dwarf and the sdM7 subdwarf, and in view of the accurate agreement in their large proper motions we assume a common distance of about 50 pc and a projected physical separation of about 5 pc. The mean heliocentric space velocity of the pair $(U,V,W)=(-232, -170, +74)$ km/s, based on the correctness of the preliminary radial velocity measurement for only one of the components and on the assumption of a common distance and velocity vector, is typical of the Galactic halo population. The large separation and the different metallicities of dwarfs and subdwarfs make a common formation scenario as a wide binary (later disrupted) improbable, although there remains some uncertainty in the spectroscopic classification scheme of ultracool dwarfs/subdwarfs so that a dissolved binary origin cannot be fully ruled out yet. It seems more likely that this wide pair is part of an old halo stream. (...)

R. -D. Scholz; N. V. Kharchenko; N. Lodieu; M. J. McCaughrean

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chandra Observations and Monte Carlo Simulations of the Grain-Scattered Halo of the Binary X-Ray Pulsar 4U 1538-52  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of the X-ray halo of the eclipsing X-ray pulsar 4U 1538-52 are derived from a 25 ksec observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Profiles of the halo, compiled in two energy ranges, 2 to 4 keV and 4 to 6 keV, and three time intervals before and after an eclipse immersion, exhibit a three-peak shape. The observed profiles are fitted by the profiles of a simulated halo generated by a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code operating on a model of three discrete clouds and a spectrum of the photons emitted by the source over a period of time extending from 270 ksec before the observation began till it ended. The distances of the two nearer dust clouds are fixed at the distances of the peaks of atomic hydrogen derived from the 21-cm spectrum in the direction of the X-ray source, namely at 1.30 and 2.56 kpc. A good fit is achieved with the source at a distance 4.5 kpc, the distance of the third cloud at 4.05 kpc, the total scattering optical depth of the three clouds equal to 0.159 at 3 keV, and the column density of hydrogen set to 4.6x10^22 cm^-2. With Av=6.5 mag for the binary companion star, QV Nor, the ratio of the scattering optical depth at 3 keV to the visual extinction is 0.0234 mag^-1.

George W. Clark

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

THE INFLUENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS ON DYNAMICAL ESTIMATES OF BLACK HOLE MASS: 10 NEW MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-{sigma} EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Adaptive optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of 10 early-type galaxies are presented. Based primarily on the SINFONI kinematics, 10 black hole (BH) masses occupying the high-mass regime of the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation are derived using three-integral Schwarzschild models. The effect of dark matter (DM) inclusion on the BH mass is explored. The omission of a DM halo in the model results in a higher stellar mass-to-light ratio, especially when extensive kinematic data are used in the model. However, when the diameter of the sphere of influence-computed using the BH mass derived without a dark halo-is at least 10 times the point-spread function FWHM during the observations, it is safe to exclude a DM component in the dynamical modeling, i.e., the change in BH mass is negligible. When the spatial resolution is marginal, restricting the mass-to-light ratio to the right value returns the correct M{sub BH} although a dark halo is not present in the model. Compared to the M{sub BH}-{sigma} and M{sub BH}-L relations of McConnell et al., the 10 BHs are all more massive than expected from the luminosities and 7 BH masses are higher than expected from the stellar velocity dispersions of the host bulges. Using new fitted relations, which include the 10 galaxies, we find that the space density of the most massive BHs (M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) estimated from the M{sub BH}-L relation is higher than the estimate based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation and the latter is higher than model predictions based on quasar counts, each by about an order of magnitude.

Rusli, S. P.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Fabricius, M.; Erwin, P.; Bender, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nowak, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany); Lee, C. H.; Riffeser, A. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Sharp, R. [Anglo-Australian Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

CONSTRAINTS ON THE SHAPE OF THE MILKY WAY DARK MATTER HALO FROM JEANS EQUATIONS APPLIED TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We search for evidence of dark matter in the Milky Way by utilizing the stellar number density distribution and kinematics measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to heliocentric distances exceeding {approx}10 kpc. We employ the cylindrically symmetric form of Jeans equations and focus on the morphology of the resulting acceleration maps, rather than the normalization of the total mass as done in previous, mostly local, studies. Jeans equations are first applied to a mock catalog based on a cosmologically derived N-body+SPH simulation, and the known acceleration (gradient of gravitational potential) is successfully recovered. The same simulation is also used to quantify the impact of dark matter on the total acceleration. We use Galfast, a code designed to quantitatively reproduce SDSS measurements and selection effects, to generate a synthetic stellar catalog. We apply Jeans equations to this catalog and produce two-dimensional maps of stellar acceleration. These maps reveal that in a Newtonian framework, the implied gravitational potential cannot be explained by visible matter alone. The acceleration experienced by stars at galactocentric distances of {approx}20 kpc is three times larger than what can be explained by purely visible matter. The application of an analytic method for estimating the dark matter halo axis ratio to SDSS data implies an oblate halo with q{sub DM} = 0.47 {+-} 0.14 within the same distance range. These techniques can be used to map the dark matter halo to much larger distances from the Galactic center using upcoming deep optical surveys, such as LSST.

Loebman, Sarah R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Quinn, Thomas R.; Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Christensen, Charlotte R. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Juric, Mario, E-mail: sloebman@astro.washington.edu [LSST Corporation, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics Interpretation of the Tadpole VV29 Merging Galaxy System: Dark-Matter-Halo-Planet Star-Cluster Wakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hubble Space telescope (HST) images of merging galaxy system VV29 reveal the 0.3 Mpc baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) halo composed of primordial protoglobularstarcluster (PGC) clumps of planets. Star-cluster-wakes trace the merger by formation of stars from the planets. Aligned young globular star clusters (YGCs), star-wakes and dust-trails show the frictional, spiral passage of galaxy fragments VV29cdef in a long tail-like galaxy (VV29b) as the fragments merge on the accretion disk plane of the central spiral galaxy VV29a. The observations confirm the hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) prediction of Gibson 1996 and quasar microlensing inference of Schild 1996 that the dark matter of galaxies is dominated by planets (PFPs) in million-solar-mass clumps. Globular star clusters (YGCs, OGCs, PGCs) preserve the density of the plasma epoch 30,000 years after the big bang when viscous supercluster-fragmentation began. Tadpole images show linear galaxy clusters reflecting turbulent vortex lines of protogalaxy fragmentation at the 0.003 Mpc Kolmogorov-Nomura scale of the plasma before transition to gas. The halo size indicates strong diffusion of PGC primordial-planet-clumps from a cooling protogalaxy as its planets freeze.

Carl H. Gibson

2008-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

Gas-regulation of galaxies: the evolution of the cosmic sSFR, the metallicity-mass-SFR relation and the stellar content of haloes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very simple physical model of galaxies, in which the formation of stars is instantaneously regulated by the mass of gas in a reservoir, links together three different aspects of the evolving galaxy population:(a) the cosmic time evolution of the specific star-formation rate sSFR relative to the growth of haloes, (b) the gas-phase metallicities across the galaxy population and over cosmic time, and (c) the ratio of the stellar to dark matter mass of haloes. If the SFR efficiency and wind mass loading are constant, the sSFR is set to the specific accretion rate of the galaxy: more realistic situations lead to an sSFR which is perturbed from this identity. The metallicity is set by the instantaneous operation of the regulator system rather than by the past history of the system. The regulator system naturally produces a Z(mstar, SFR) relation, with SFR as a second parameter in the mass-metallicity relation. This will be the same at all epochs unless the efficiency and mass-loading change with time, naturally p...

Lilly, Simon J; Pipino, Antonio; Renzini, Alvio; Peng, Yingjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sales of specialty incandescent bulbs decline despite ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... This effect points to broader lighting market transformation beyond the target of the original legislation, ...

276

GROUP FINDING IN THE STELLAR HALO USING M-GIANTS IN THE TWO MICRON ALL SKY SURVEY: AN EXTENDED VIEW OF THE PISCES OVERDENSITY?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A density-based hierarchical group-finding algorithm is used to identify stellar halo structures in a catalog of M-giants from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The intrinsic brightness of M-giant stars means that this catalog probes deep into the halo where substructures are expected to be abundant and easy to detect. Our analysis reveals 16 structures at high Galactic latitude (greater than 15{sup 0}), of which 10 have been previously identified. Among the six new structures, two could plausibly be due to masks applied to the data, one is associated with a strong extinction region, and one is probably a part of the Monoceros Ring. Another one originates at low latitudes, suggesting some contamination from disk stars, but also shows protrusions extending to high latitudes, implying that it could be a real feature in the stellar halo. The last remaining structure is free from the defects discussed above and hence is very likely a satellite remnant. Although the extinction in the direction of the structure is very low, the structure does match a low-temperature feature in the dust maps. While this casts some doubt on its origin, the low-temperature feature could plausibly be due to real dust in the structure itself. The angular position and distance of this structure encompass the Pisces overdensity traced by RR Lyraes in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). However, the 2MASS M-giants indicate that the structure is much more extended than what is visible with the SDSS, with the point of peak density lying just outside Stripe 82. The morphology of the structure is more like a cloud than a stream and reminiscent of that seen in simulations of satellites disrupting along highly eccentric orbits. This finding is consistent with expectations of structure formation within the currently favored cosmological model: assuming the cosmologically predicted satellite orbit distributions are correct, prior work indicates that such clouds should be the dominant debris structures at large Galactocentric radii ({approx}100 kpc and beyond).

Sharma, Sanjib; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Carlberg, Joleen K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Munoz, Ricardo R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Bullock, James [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Cosmology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

277

Statistical Physics of Dark and Normal Matter Distribution in Galaxy Formation : Dark Matter Lumps and Black Holes in Core and Halo of Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In unified field theory the cosmological model of the universe has supersymmetric fields. Supersymmetric particles as dark and normal matter in galaxy clusters have a phase separation. Dark matter in halos have a statistical physics equation of state. Neutralino particle gas with gravitation can have a collapse of dark matter lumps. A condensate phase due to boson creation by annhillation and exchange can occur at high densities. The collapse of the boson condensate, including neutralinos, into the Schwarzschild radius creates dark matter black holes. Microscopic dark matter black holes can evaporate with Hawking effect giving gamma ray bursts and create a spectrum of normal particles. The phase separation of normal and dark matter in galaxy clusters and inside galaxies is given by statistical physics.

Ajay Patwardhan

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

THE MASSIVE-BLACK-HOLE-VELOCITY-DISPERSION RELATION AND THE HALO BARYON FRACTION: A CASE FOR POSITIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Force balance considerations put a limit on the rate of active galactic nucleus radiation momentum output, L/c, capable of driving galactic superwinds and reproducing the observed M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion. We show that black holes cannot supply enough momentum in radiation to drive the gas out by pressure alone. Energy-driven winds give a M{sub BH}-{sigma} scaling favored by a recent analysis but also fall short energetically once cooling is incorporated. We propose that outflow triggering of star formation by enhancing the intercloud medium turbulent pressure and squeezing clouds can supply the necessary boost and suggest possible tests of this hypothesis. Our hypothesis simultaneously can account for the observed halo baryon fraction.

Silk, Joseph [Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Nusser, Adi, E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.u, E-mail: adi@physics.technion.ac.i [Physics Department and the Asher Space Science Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Field test of a generic method for the sampling and analysis of halogenated hydrocarbons listed in title III of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990. Report for January 1992-December 1993  

SciTech Connect

To validate a new source test method for EPA use, the performance of the sampling and analytical methodology for the chemicals of interest must be established and demonstrated through field tests at sources similar to those of interest. Validation studies for measuring volatile and semi-volatile halogenated organics were undertaken in two different studies. Repeated sampling runs of the Volatile Organic Sample Train (VOST; SW-846 Sampling Method 0030 with Analytical Method 5041) and Semi-Volatile Organic Sample Train (Semi-VOST; SW-846 Method 0010 with Analytical Method 8270) were collected at two source locations. Quadruple sampling trains were used in each run, with two of the trains being spiked with standards. For the VOST method, the results of the two field studies were consistent with laboratory tests. For the Semi-VOST method, consistent results were obtained in the laboratory study and one of the field tests. At the second field site, the Semi-VOST data were inadequate because of problems encountered in preparation of the samples for analysis.

McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Rice, J.; Merrill, R.G.; Jackson, M.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An extremely wide and very low-mass pair with common proper motion. Is it representative of a nearby halo stream?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We describe the discovery of an extremely wide pair of low-mass stars with a common large proper motion and discuss their possible membership in a Galactic halo stream crossing the Solar neighbourhood. (...) The late-type (M7) dwarf SSSPM J2003$-$4433 and the ultracool subdwarf SSSPM J1930$-$4311 (sdM7) sharing the same very large proper motion of about 860 mas/yr were found in the same sky region with an angular separation of about 6\\degr. From the comparison with other high proper motion catalogues we have estimated the probability of a chance alignment of the two new large proper motions to be less than 0.3%. From the individually estimated spectroscopic distances of about $38^{+10}_{-7}$ pc and $72^{+21}_{-16}$ pc, respectively for the M7 dwarf and the sdM7 subdwarf, and in view of the accurate agreement in their large proper motions we assume a common distance of about 50 pc and a projected physical separation of about 5 pc. The mean heliocentric space velocity of the pair $(U,V,W)=(-232, -170...

Scholz, R -D; Lodieu, N; McCaughrean, M J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PROBING THE HALO FROM THE SOLAR VICINITY TO THE OUTER GALAXY: CONNECTING STARS IN LOCAL VELOCITY STRUCTURES TO LARGE-SCALE CLOUDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the first potential connections made between two local features in velocity space found in a survey of M giant stars and stellar spatial inhomogeneities on global scales. Comparison to cosmological, chemodynamical stellar halo models confirms that the M giant population is particularly sensitive to rare, recent and massive accretion events. These events can give rise to locally observed velocity sequences-each made from a small fraction of debris from a massive progenitor, passing at high velocity through the survey volume, near the pericenter of the eccentric orbit of the system. The majority of the debris is found in much larger structures, whose morphologies are more cloud-like than stream-like and which lie at the orbital apocenters. Adopting this interpretation, the full-space motions represented by the observed M giant velocity features are derived under the assumption that the members within each sequence share a common space velocity. Orbit integrations are then used to trace the past and future trajectories of these stars across the sky revealing plausible associations with large, previously discovered, cloud-like structures. The connections made between nearby velocity structures and these distant clouds represent preliminary steps toward developing coherent maps of such giant debris systems. These maps promise to provide new insights into the origin of debris clouds, new probes of Galactic history and structure, and new constraints on the high-velocity tails of the local dark matter distribution that are essential for interpreting direct dark matter particle detection experiments.

Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sheffield, Allyson A. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-0818 (United States); Sharma, Sanjib [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rocha-Pinto, Helio J., E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics Interpretation of the Tadpole VV29 Merging Galaxy System: Dark-Matter-Halo-Planet Star-Cluster Wakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hubble Space telescope (HST) images of merging galaxy system VV29 reveal the 0.3 Mpc baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) halo composed of primordial protoglobularstarcluster (PGC) clumps of planets. Star-cluster-wakes trace the merger by formation of stars from the planets. Aligned young globular star clusters (YGCs), star-wakes and dust-trails show the frictional, spiral passage of galaxy fragments VV29cdef in a long tail-like galaxy (VV29b) as the fragments merge on the accretion disk plane of the central spiral galaxy VV29a. The observations confirm the hydro-gravitational-dynamics (HGD) prediction of Gibson 1996 and quasar microlensing inference of Schild 1996 that the dark matter of galaxies is dominated by planets (PFPs) in million-solar-mass clumps. Globular star clusters (YGCs, OGCs, PGCs) preserve the density of the plasma epoch 30,000 years after the big bang when viscous supercluster-fragmentation began. Tadpole images show linear galaxy clusters reflecting turbulent vortex lines of protogalaxy fragmentatio...

Gibson, Carl H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E. [UCO/Lick Observatories (United States)

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hydrogen/halogen energy storage system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen/chlorine energy storage system has been considered at BNL for large scale energy storage. In FY1978 work included an assessment of system safety and cost, investigations of cell performance under conditions elevated pressure and temperature, determination of the transport properties of Nafion membranes and electrochemical engineering studies. Results are summarized.

Spaziante, P M; Sioli, G C; Trotta, R; Perego, A; McBreen, J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modern Records of Radiatively Important Halogenated Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at CDIAC sites: Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including three Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in...

286

Purified Halogen Gas Production - Available Technologies ...  

Computers & Electronics; Enabled by the Office of Science. Security & Privacy | Contact PNNL. Last Update: February 2012 | Pacific Northwest ...

287

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition 2) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering

Heidrich, Wolfgang

288

THE AFFECTS OF ORGANIC AND INORGANIC NITROGEN LOADING ON MICROPLANKTON TROPHIC STRUCTURE: A MICROCOSM EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was provided by both halogen and fluorescent bulbs and levels were 2000±25 µE/cm2 during #12;the light phase in Conviron© PGR-15 growth chambers at 20°C under a cycle of 12 hours light and 12 hours darkness. Light

Vallino, Joseph J.

289

To appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition and Rendering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness in halogen light bulbs can have a significant impact on the illumination patterns generatedTo appear in the ACM SIGGRAPH conference proceedings Accurate Light Source Acquisition) The University of British Columbia Figure 1: Stages of light source measurement and rendering (from left to right

Recanati, Catherine

290

* Corresponding author. Tel.:##44-117-928-4418; fax:##44-117-E-mail address: K.Jandt@bris.ac.uk (K.D. Jandt).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for curing light-activated dental materials [6]. Rather than a hot "lament as used in halogen bulbs, LEDs use.Jandt@bris.ac.uk (K.D. Jandt). Biomaterials 21 (2000) 1379}1385 Light-emitting diode (LED) polymerisation of dental performance of light polymerised dental composites is greatly in#uenced by the quality of the light

Ashworth, Stephen H.

291

A retractable electron emitter for the creation of unperturbed pure electron plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1063/1.2431090 I. INTRODUCTION In recent years the desire for increased confinement time in stellarators has led time of the emitter. The emitter itself is a tungsten coil from a halogen light bulb. It is mounted and moves through a photomicrosensor. The photomicrosensor is a device with a small light-emitting diode LED

292

A Second UV "Light Bulb" behind the SN 1006 Remnant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A point X-ray source located 9 arcmin northeast of the center of SN~1006 has been spectroscopically identified as a background QSO, with a redshift of 0.335. The object is moderately bright, with magnitude V=18.3. If its ultraviolet spectrum is typical of low-z quasars, this object will be a second (after the Schweizer-Middleditch star) source to use for absorption spectroscopy of material within SN 1006. Absorption spectra provide a unique probe for unshocked ejecta within this supernova remnant, and can possibly solve the long-standing problem of "missing" iron in the remnants of Type Ia supernovae.

Winkler, P F; Long, Knox S.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Second UV "Light Bulb" behind the SN 1006 Remnant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A point X-ray source located 9 arcmin northeast of the center of SN~1006 has been spectroscopically identified as a background QSO, with a redshift of 0.335. The object is moderately bright, with magnitude V=18.3. If its ultraviolet spectrum is typical of low-z quasars, this object will be a second (after the Schweizer-Middleditch star) source to use for absorption spectroscopy of material within SN 1006. Absorption spectra provide a unique probe for unshocked ejecta within this supernova remnant, and can possibly solve the long-standing problem of "missing" iron in the remnants of Type Ia supernovae.

P. Frank Winkler; Knox S. Long

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

294

The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future is Here One of the fastest developing lighting technologies today is the light-emitting diode (or LED). A type of solid-state lighting, LEDs use a semiconductor to convert...

295

The Effect of and Correction for Different Wet-Bulb and Dry-Bulb Response in Thermocouple Psychrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast-responding thermocouple psychrometers are often used in atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence measurements for the computation of heat and moisture fluxes. Small size, low cost, ease of interchange-ability and the use of the familiar ...

W. J. Shaw; J. E. Tillman

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and calcium, beinglimestone(CaCO3), lime(CaO),hydratedlime(Ca(OH)2), nahcolite(NaHCO3), soda (Na2CO3) or trona with soda/trona for IGCC gasifier product gas at 400-500EC (picture from Kiel, 1997) Based on thermodynamic, shown in Figure 7.12, is based on a soda/trona sorbent for use at 400-500EC. Based on laboratory tests

Laughlin, Robert B.

297

Nuclear clusters with Halo Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief discussion of effective field theory applied to nuclear clusters, I present the aspect of Coulomb interactions, with applications to low-energy alpha-alpha and nucleon-alpha scattering.

Higa, Renato

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear clusters with Halo Effective Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief discussion of effective field theory applied to nuclear clusters, I present the aspect of Coulomb interactions, with applications to low-energy alpha-alpha and nucleon-alpha scattering.

Renato Higa

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Understanding dark matter halos with tidal caustics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The products of interactions between galaxies with a high mass ratio and low orbital angular momentum are studied. The interactions scatter the material from the smaller galaxy into structures with distinctive dynamics and ...

Sanderson, Robyn Ellyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Merging Galaxies and Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

galaxy velocity dispersion, gas distribution and itsdispersion- dominated elliptical. The intense starbursts triggered during gas-

Wetzel, Andrew Rodger

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

HALO: haskell to logic through denotational semantics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even well-typed programs can go wrong in modern functional languages, by encountering a pattern-match failure, or simply returning the wrong answer. An increasingly-popular response is to allow programmers to write contracts that express semantic properties, ... Keywords: first-order logic, static contract checking

Dimitrios Vytiniotis; Simon Peyton Jones; Koen Claessen; Dan Rosén

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Saturn's moon rhea sports a dusty halo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a pair of ion-mass and ion-beam spectrometers built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. March 6, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in...

303

A Fast Response Continuous Analyzer for Halogenated Atmospheric Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast response version of the continuous SF6 analyzer originally introduced in 1976 has been developed. The new continuous analyzer has a response time constant of 0.36 s, which is 4–30 times faster than previous analyzers. The very fast ...

Richard L. Benner; Brian Lamb

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Accumulation and Metabolism of Halogenated Compounds in Sea Turtles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with between 1 and 10 chlorine atoms substituted on theon the right. The number of chlorine atoms is represented bysubstitute GSH for a chlorine atom on PCB, as has been

Richardson, Kristine Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Origin of Halogens and Nitrogen in Enstatite Chondrites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.Y. Je rome, Abundances of chlorine, bromine and iodine inof boron, lithium and chlorine in meteorites, in MeteoriteW. Scherle, Determination of chlorine in stony meteorites by

Rubin, Alan E.; Choi, Byeon-Gak

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Insensitive explosive composition of halogenated copolymer and triaminotrinitrobenzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly insensitive and heat resistant plastic-bonded explosive containing 90 wt % triaminotrinitrobenzene and 10 wt % of a fully saturated copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride is readily manufactured by the slurry process.

Benziger, Theodore M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

BSA 02-15: Use of Halogenated Carboranyl Porphyrins for ...  

Radiation sensitizing agents targeting ... Tests in animals hae shown that the carboranylporphyrins of the present invention ... Report a Problem ...

308

Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

Hammond, Michael J. (Sterling Heights, MI); Arendell, Mark W. (Warren, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Characterisation and Removal of Halogens in the EAF Dust and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... For most thermal processes for zinc recovery, such as the plasma processes with a zinc condenser, the halides in the gas stream will form a ...

310

Accumulation and Metabolism of Halogenated Compounds in Sea Turtles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lexington: The University of Kentucky Press, 35-46. JewellLexington, KY: The University of Kentucky Press, xi- xxx.Lexington: The University of Kentucky Press, 35-46. Jaspers

Richardson, Kristine Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

On the Use of Wet Bulb Temperature as an Environmental Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cooling capacity of an atmospheric environment is examined with respect to a wet object of a given surface temperature. The maximum cooling capacity (MCC) is defined as the sum of the sensible and latent heat fluxes out of a unit area of the ...

Abraham Zangvil

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................................5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................35 Problem # 4: Resistors and Light Bulbs

Minnesota, University of

313

Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in  the  kitchen  with  LED  bulbs   Replaced  most  of  long  time  to  find  an  LED  bulb  that  was  reasonably  light  bulb  with  a  LED  light  bulb   Replaced  light  

Ingle, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Halo Star Abundances and r-Process Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent observational studies of heavy element abundances in low metallicity stars and explore some implications of these results for nucleosynthesis and early Galactic chemical evolution.

J. W. Truran; J. J. Cowan; B. D. Fields

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Globular Cluster Ages and the Formation of the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Main sequence turnoff magnitudes from the recent set of Yale isochrones (Chaboyer \\ea 1995) have been combined with a variety of relations for the absolute magnitude of RR Lyr stars (\\mvrr) to calibrate age as a function of the difference in magnitude between the main sequence turn-off and the horizontal branch (\\dv). A best estimate for the calibration of \\mvrr is derived from a survey of the current literature: $\\mvrr = 0.20 \\feh + 0.98$. This estimate, together with other calibrations (with slopes ranging from 0.15 to 0.30) has been used to derive \\dv ages for 43 Galactic globular clusters. Independent of the choice of \\mvrr, there is no strong evidence for an age-Galacto\\-centric distance relationship among the 43 globular clusters. However, an age-metallicity relation exists, with the metal-poor clusters being the oldest. A study of the age distribution reveals that an age range of 5 Gyr exists among the bulk of the globular clusters. In addition, about 10\\% of the sample are substantially younger, and including them in the analysis increases the age range to 9 Gyr. Once again, these statements are independent of the \\mvrr ~relation. Evidence for age being the second parameter governing horizontal branch morphology is found by comparing the average \\dv ~age of the second parameter clusters to the normal clusters. The second parameter clusters are found to be on average 2 - 3 Gyr younger than the other clusters, which is consistent with age being the second parameter. These results suggest that globular clusters were formed over an extended period of time, with progressively more metal-rich globular clusters ($\\feh \\ga -1.7$) being formed at later times.

Brian Chaboyer; P. Demarque; Ata Sarajedini

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Through the analytic halo: Fission via irregular singularities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article is concerned with moduli spaces of connections on bundles on Riemann surfaces, where the structure group of the bundle may vary in different regions of the surface. Here we will describe such moduli spaces as complex symplectic manifolds, generalising the complex character varieties of Riemann surfaces.

Philip Boalch

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Declarative Modeling and Bayesian Inference of Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic programming allows specification of probabilistic models in a declarative manner. Recently, several new software systems and languages for probabilistic programming have been developed on the basis of newly developed and improved methods for approximate inference in probabilistic models. In this contribution a probabilistic model for an idealized dark matter localization problem is described. We first derive the probabilistic model for the inference of dark matter locations and masses, and then show how this model can be implemented using BUGS and Infer.NET, two software systems for probabilistic programming. Finally, the different capabilities of both systems are discussed. The presented dark matter model includes mainly non-conjugate factors, thus, it is difficult to implement this model with Infer.NET.

Kronberger, Gabriel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

High Resolution Numerical Studies of the Milky Way Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T. C. , Barentine, J. C. , Brewington, H. , Brinkmann, J. ,T. C. , Barentine, J. C. , Brewington, H. , Harvanek, M. ,P. , Barentine, J. C. , Brewington, H. J. , Brinkmann, J. ,

Rashkov, Valery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Aisle Marking Requirements permanent workplace aisles should have appropriate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including cables · light bulbs: REQUIRED to recycle fluorescent, compact fluorescent, and ultraviolet bulbs

Cohen, Robert E.

320

Untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 Bulb Type Incandescent Fluorescent Other Room Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other/ unknown Total 4,196 431 2,811 409 14 159 173 34 24 141 Bathroom 621 44 417 81 4 35 14 2 1 23 Bedroom 1,121 119 868 66 6 8 5 9 8 32 Dining Room 218 28 119 51 2 0 1 1 2 14 Den/Family/ Rec Room 279 28 171 42 1 7 12 2 3 13 Hallway/Stairs 193 42 136 6 0 1 3 0 0 5 Kitchen 820 80 440 70 1 85 104 12 1 27 Living Room 711 65 511 80 0 11 8 8 8 20 Laundry Room/Other 233 25 149 13 0 12 26 0 1 7 Note: These data are from the 474 households included in the Lighting Supplement. The supplement was not designed to weight the data to the population level. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-457A-C, E, and H of the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Go to Table 4.21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives for evaluating local cerebral blood flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of chemical synthesis of radiohalogenated thienylethylamine derivatives useful in brain imaging is described. These 5-halo-thiophene-2-isopropyl amines readily cross the blood- brain barrier and are retained in the brain for a sufficient length of time to allow evaluation of regional blood flow in the cerebrum. The advantages of the invention include a simpler synthesis route and a final compound which is less diluted with nonradioactive halogen. Use of this invention will allow clearer radioimaging or lower radiation doses to the patient, depending on the objective. 2 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1988-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

PQ Hotline Call of the Month - September 2005: Life-Extension and Energy-Saving Devices for Incandescent Light Bulbs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Power Quality Hotline is provided as a service to all Power Quality Knowledge funders. EPRI's Power Quality Knowledge program provides best-in-class information and resource tools needed to manage power quality in a competitive environment, and to understand and solve vexing power quality problems. The program offers a comprehensive collection of unbiased and actionable technical and informational publications and products, educational forums, technical support, and Web-based services to enable ...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Math 115 Final Exam Fall 2006 1. Consider the surface z = f(x, y) = 2x2 + y2. Find the tangent plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/3 F. 7/11 G. 83/120 H. 7/13 8. 6% of Type A light bulbs are defective, 4% of Type B light bulbs are defective, and 2% of Type C light bulbs are defective. A light bulb is selected at random from a batch of light bulbs containing 50 Type A bulbs, 30 Type B bulbs, and 20 Type C bulbs. The selected bulb is found

325

Climatic effects due to halogenated compounds in the earth's atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by approx.0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong ..nu../sub 3/ band at 7.8 ..mu..m, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K (ppbv)/sup -1/ with and without taking into account overlap with CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/O bands. At concentration higher than 1 ppbv, absorption by the ..nu../sub 3/ band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

Wang, W.; Pinto, J.P.; Yung, Y.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and W. Gerhardt, Zur Chemie Der Platinmetalle - Ruo2Anorganische Und Allgemeine Chemie, 1963. 319(5-6): p. 327-A. Tebben, and W. Gerhardt, Zur Chemie Der Platinmetalle .5.

Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Halogen-elimination photochemistry and oxygen-activation chemistry of late transition-metal complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-electron reaction chemistry, from both ground- and excited-state species, is at the heart of many topics in renewable energy and catalysis. In this thesis, two classes of reactions central to the themes of energy ...

Teets, Thomas S. (Thomas Sebastian)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Continuous Fast-Response Dual-Tracer Analyzer for Halogenated Atmospheric Tracer Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single ...

James P. Rydock; Brian K. Lamb

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Climatic Effects Due to Halogenated Compounds in the Earth’s Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by 0.2 K due to ...

Wei-Chyung Wang; Joseph P. Pinto; Yuk Ling Yung

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Program on Technology Innovation: Coastal Halogen Atmospheric Research on Mercury Deposition (CHARMeD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining mercury’s atmospheric transformation reactions is essential for atmospheric deposition models that are used for regulatory purposes. It is the oxidation of inorganic elemental Hg (Hg0) to its water-soluble ionic form (Hg2+) that determines the rate of Hg deposited in waterways. Substantial research has been done in the past on atmospheric Hg transformation reactions with ozone (O3) and the hydroxyl radical (OH), but O3 and OH may not be capable of fully causing mercury’s observed oxidation an...

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Quality and Performance of LED Flashlights in Kenya: Common End User Preferences and Complaints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with torches? Failure of: ? LEDs/Bulb [1] ? Battery [2] ?to incandescent bulbs, and low cost LEDs have achieved pricepowered LED flashlights. Incandescent bulb flashlights are

Tracy, Jenny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although bulbs, primarily in LED and CFL efficaciescompact fluorescent bulbs, with LEDs being a likely futurelights. LED street lights offer increased bulb lifetime (and

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Demand for Environmentally-Friendly Durables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dataset of weekly light bulb sales covering 210 stores in 13sales of incandescent light bulbs: sales of 100-watt bulbs5% of total light bulb sales; by 2006 CFL market share was

Martin, Leslie Aimee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

GREEN PURCHASING GUIDE THE FOLLOWING PRODUCTS CAN BE FOUND ON W.B. MASON'S GREEN PRODUCTS PAGE AND HAVE BEEN SELECTED BY THE CAMPUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPOSTABLE COMPOSTABLE COMPOSTABLE HYPERLINK LIGHT BULBS **ALL COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) AND LED LIGHT BULBS OF BULBS PROPERLY. THE LED BULBS FROM WB MASON ARE SIGNIFICANTLY (5-6X) MORE EXPENSIVE THAN THOSE FOUND

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

336

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................INTRO -1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..............................................................................................II - 9 Problem # 4: Resistors and Light Bulbs

Minnesota, University of

337

Funding Sustainable Initiatives: Should Williams Implement a Revolving Loan Fund?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to replace its incandescent light bulbs with more efficient compact fluorescent (CFL) light bulbs. These light bulbs use 2/3 less energy than #12;Terra 4 standard incandescent bulbs, but they are more

Aalberts, Daniel P.

338

Facilities Team Safety Meeting Minutes Thursday July 21, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bulbs and large lamps, light bulbs and battery recycle containers all need to have the date. The bulbs need to be stored in a closed container. Each time a container is opened to place bulbs inside

339

Achieving Extreme Efficiency: How to get the job done when energy is extremely expensive and scarce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs, organic LED (OLED)60W incandescent bulb, is a LED bulb that is now GeneralBy comparison, basic LED bulbs generally have efficiencies

Brown, Rich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING ANNIVERSARY GALA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by atom. Pacemakers are installed almost as frequently as light bulbs are changed. And even light bulbs

Thompson, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Torchieres Torchieres Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of torchieres since 2005. A torchiere, or torch lamp, is a lamp fixture with a tall (such as 5 foot) stand of wood or metal. Torchiere lamps use fluorescent or halogen incandescent light bulbs. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates There are no recent updates for this product. Standards for Torchieres The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards of DOE's regulations. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

342

This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 March 1, 2011 - 8:54am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL It's still a bit early for spring, but we at Energy Savers have major spring fever. We're pretty sure the rest of the country does, too, after a winter where all 50 states had at least some snow on the ground (and some of you had-or still have-much, much more than others!). So we're thinking spring and bidding a fond farewell (good riddance?) to February and a hearty hello to March. Here's a look back at what happened this month: New or Noteworthy on Energy Savers Did you know that upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home could save you about $50 per year. New lighting standards take effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen

343

MATH 56A SPRING 2008 STOCHASTIC PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that it starts at the end of the previous process). I used the example of a light bulb. You put a light bulb considered three kinds of light bulbs: (1) The guaranteed light bulb which will last exactly 1000 hours. (2) The Poisson light bulb. This light bulb is as good as new as long as it is working. Assume it has an expected

Igusa, Kiyoshi

344

MATH 56A SPRING 2008 STOCHASTIC PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the end of the previous process). I used the example of a light bulb. You put a light bulb into a socket kinds of light bulbs: (1) The guaranteed light bulb which will last exactly 1000 hours. (2) The Poisson light bulb. This light bulb is as good as new as long as it is working. Assume it has an expected life

Igusa, Kiyoshi

345

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, a comprehensive framework for predicting etching behavior is developed using the test case of hafnium lanthanate (HfxLayOz) in Cl2/BCl3 chemistry, starting from… (more)

Marchack, Nathan

0294-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amounts of kinetic data (such as chemical reaction sets)kinetic parameters related to specific chemical reactionsChemical Engineering by Nathan Philip Marchack ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Kinetic

Marchack, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the “I E ” button (should light up green) and use the leftresult in the button being illuminated by a green light). Atin the button beginning to blink with a green light) and

Marchack, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effective work function (EWF) of the metal gate/stackand effectively reducing the EWF of the gate electrode. Apinning, thus allowing full EWF control without the need for

Marchack, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Two versatile cofactors, flavin adenine dinucleotide and non-heme iron, involved in DNA repair and natural product halogenation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cofactors assist enzymes with a variety of complex chemistries. Two versatile cofactors, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and non-heme iron, together with molecular oxygen as an oxidizing agent, perform a wide array of ...

Wong, Cintyu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Extracting electric dipole breakup cross section of one-neutron halo nuclei from breakup observables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to extract an electric dipole (E1) breakup cross section \\sigma(E1) from one- neutron removal cross sections measured by using 12C and 208Pb targets, \\sigma_(-1n)^C and \\sigma_(-1n)^Pb, respectively, is discussed. It is shown that within about 5% error, \\sigma(E1) can be obtained by subtracting \\Gamma \\sigma_(-1n)^C from \\sigma_(- 1n)^Pb, as assumed in preceding studies. However, for the reaction of weakly-bound projectiles, the scaling factor \\Gamma is found to be two times as large as that usually adopted. As a result, we obtain 13-20% smaller \\sigma(E1) of 31Ne at 250 MeV/nucleon than extracted in a previous analysis of experimental data. By compiling the values of \\Gamma obtained for several projectiles, \\Gamma=(2.30 +/- 0.41)\\exp(- S_n)+(2.43 +/- 0.21) is obtained, where S_n is the neutron separation energy. The target mass number dependence of the nuclear parts of the one-neutron removal cross section and the elastic breakup cross section is also investigated.

Kazuki Yoshida; Tokuro Fukui; Kosho Minomo; Kazuyuki Ogata

2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

352

Disruption, Halo Current and Rapid Shutdown Database Activities for ITER (A26885)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings Of 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 11-16, 2010, Daejeon, Republic Of Korea, Http://www-pub.iaea.org/mtcd/meetings/cn180_papers.asp, Paper ITR/P1-2623rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference Daejeon, KP, 2010999618055

Wesley, J.C.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

353

Constraining Dark Matter Halo Profiles and Galaxy Formation Models Using Spiral Arm Morpholohy. I. Method Outline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Propulsion Labora- tory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space

Seigar, Marc S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

IONIZED GAS IN THE FIRST 10 kpc OF THE INTERSTELLAR GALACTIC HALO: METAL ION FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present direct measures of the ionization fractions of several sulfur ions in the Galactic warm ionized medium (WIM). We obtained high-resolution ultraviolet absorption-line spectroscopy of post-asymptotic giant branch stars in the globular clusters Messier 3 [(l, b) = (42.{sup 0}2, +78.{sup 0}7), d = 10.2 kpc, and z = 10.0 kpc] and Messier 5 [(l, b) = (3.{sup 0}9, +46.{sup 0}8), d = 7.5 kpc, and z = +5.3 kpc] with the Hubble Space Telescope and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer to measure, or place limits on, the column densities of S I, S II, S III, S IV, S VI, and H I. These clusters also house millisecond pulsars, whose dispersion measures give an electron column density from which we infer the H II column in these directions. We find fractions of S{sup +2} in the WIM for the M 3 and M 5 sight lines x(S{sup +2}) {identical_to} N(S{sup +2})/N(S) = 0.33 {+-} 0.07 and 0.47 {+-} 0.09, respectively, with variations perhaps related to location. With negligible quantities of the higher ionization states, we conclude that S{sup +} and S{sup +2} account for all of the S in the WIM. We extend the methodology to study the ion fractions in the warm and hot ionized gas of the Milky Way, including the high ions Si{sup +3}, C{sup +3}, N{sup +4}, and O{sup +5}. The vast majority of the Galactic ionized gas is warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) and photoionized (the WIM) or very hot (T > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K) and collisionally ionized. The common tracer of ionized gas beyond the Milky Way, O{sup +5}, traces <1% of the total ionized gas mass of the Milky Way.

Howk, J. Christopher [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Consiglio, S. Michelle, E-mail: jhowk@nd.edu, E-mail: smconsiglio@ucla.edu [Current address: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Instrumentation2: Other instruments, ghost/satellite bunch monitoring, halo, emittance, new developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to estimate in absolute terms the luminosity of LHC certain beam parameters have to be measured very accurately. In particular the total beam current and the relative distribution of the charges around the ring, the transverse size of the beams at the interaction points and the relative position of the beams at the interaction point. The experiments can themselves measure several of these parameters very accurately thanks to the versatility of their detectors, other parameters need however to be measured using the monitors installed on the machine. The beam instrumentation is usually built for the purpose of aiding the operation team in setting up and optimizing the beams, often this only requires precise relative measurements and therefore the absolute scale is usually not very precisely calibrated. The luminosity calibration requires several machine-side instruments to be pushed beyond their initial scope.

Enrico Bravin; for the CERN BE/BI Collaboration

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

A window to the Galactic X-ray halo: The ISM towards the Lockman hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a combined X-ray/HI-analysis of the ISM towards the Lockman hole. This sky region is considered as the "window to the distant universe" because of its absolute lowest HI column density on the whole sky. The Lockman hole appears to be not as transparent as the HI data suggest. We propose that about half of the ISM towards the Lockman hole is in form of ionized hydrogen rather than HI.

M. Kappes; J. Kerp

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

357

A New Giant Stellar Structure in the Outer Halo of M31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of luminous red giant stars ~ 3 degrees (40 projected kpc) to the northeast of M31, which we have called Andromeda NE. The line-of-sight distance to Andromeda NE is within approximately 50 kpc of M31; Andromeda NE is not a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~ 29 mag/sq.arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Based on its distance and morphology, Andromeda NE is likely undergoing tidal disruption. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's present-day outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. However, Andromeda NE has a red giant branch color similar to that of the G1 clump; it is possible that these structures are both material torn off of M31's disk in the distant past, or that these are both part of one ancient stellar stream.

Daniel B. Zucker; Alexei Y. Kniazev; Eric F. Bell; David Martinez-Delgado; Eva K. Grebel; Hans-Walter Rix; Constance M. Rockosi; Jon A. Holtzman; Rene A. M. Walterbos; Zeljko Ivezic; J. Brinkmann; Howard Brewington; Michael Harvanek; S. J. Kleinman; Jurek Krzesinski; Don Q. Lamb; Dan Long; Peter R. Newman; Atsuko Nitta; Stephanie A. Snedden

2004-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

Problem 7-3: The air enters with a dry-bulb temperature of 50 o F and, at 50% relative humidity, with a wet-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with our Total Dry Scrubbing Systems. MWC or RDF facilities using conventional spray dryer/fabric filter slurry in the spray dryer without the likelihood of wall build up or moisture carry over. Since carbon are injected into the flue gas. The reactor tower is basically a vertical double annulus, which

359

Multiple choice set 2 This set of questions covers material from Section 3. Multiple choice is the same format as for the midterm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.8891. Q2. A container of 100 light bulbs contains five bad bulbs. We draw 10 bulbs without replacement. Find probability of drawing at least one defective bulb. (a) 0.416 (b) 0.584 (c) 0.1 (d) none of the preceding Solution to Q2: Note: this is not a binomial experiment!!! Let X - number of defective bulbs

Kulik, Rafal

360

2009 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 2901-9004 Virginia Cooperative Extension programs and employment are open to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

return on your investment when you replace your most frequently used incandescent light bulbs with CFLS and living rooms and kitchen. It is estimated that if every household in the U.S. changed just one light bulb" Light Bulbs Work? Incandescent bulbs or "regular" bulbs consist of finely coiled wire filaments

Liskiewicz, Maciej

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

March 10, 2011 Let There Be More Efficient Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards for light bulbs, which include a phasing out of incandescent bulbs in favor of more energy-efficient bulbs. The "government has no business telling an individual what kind of light bulb to buy," she during the 20th century. Today we can go to our hardware store and choose from hundreds of light bulbs

Colorado at Boulder, University of

362

MATH 371 Exam 3 November 22, 2010 Name: ____________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of light bulbs are independent exponential random variables with a mean of 3 hours. (a) (4 points) Find the EXACT probability that a light bulb has a lifetime greater than 2 hours. (b) (4 points) Suppose that you have 100 light bulbs. If the bulbs are used one at a time, with a failed bulb being replaced

Koban, Lori

363

MATH 371 Exam 3 November 22, 2010 Name: ____________________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Evaluate P(X light bulbs that a light bulb has a lifetime greater than 2 hours. (b) (4 points) Suppose that you have 100 light bulbs) Now suppose that you only have 2 light bulbs, which are used one at a time, with a failed bulb being

Koban, Lori

364

EERE Roofus' Solar and Efficient Home: Lights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by buying energy-saving light bulbs. I use these light bulbs to save energy in my solar house Most people have incandescent (IN-CAN-DE-SENT) light bulbs in their house. If...

365

CoServ Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Up to 50 worth LED Bulbs: 1.75bulb HVAC Tune-Up: 150 Energy Star Home: 550 Heat Pumps: 150 - 300 Water Heater...

366

A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

out" of less-efficient bulbs will begin with 100 watt bulbs in 2012; lesser wattage light bulbs will then be gradually removed from distribution, ending with noncompliant 40...

367

STAT 341 Problem set 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;7. A set of cheap light bulbs have a lifetime (in hours) which is exponentially distributed with the unknown mean . Choosing a random sample of the light bulbs light bulbs were still working. How would you define the likelihood function

Guttorp, Peter

368

For more information, contact Mary Helen Meza at (mmeza@uh.edu) or Rebecca Szwarc at (rszwarc@central.uh.edu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Lamps (lights come on by touch only) Light Bulbs (60 watts), bulbs for outside (yellow bulbs) Linens NEW ITEMS NEEDED All Purpose Wipes Bathing Towels Batteries & Flash lights Books in large print Chucks

Azevedo, Ricardo

369

Ch 18. Electric Current Liu UCD Phy1B 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identical normal light bulbs inside a closed roomThree identical normal light bulbs inside a closed room switch controls which bulb Rule: flip the switches outside the room, determine the correspondence inside

Yoo, S. J. Ben

370

The effects of cytoskeletal disruption and mechanical load on cardiac conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were tested: a 40-LED array bulb (LEDtronics) and a highwavelength, 3.6W 40-LED cluster bulbs (Ledtronics, Inc. ).wavelength, 3.6W 40-LED cluster bulbs (Ledtronics, Inc. ).

Wright, Adam Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Essays on Environmental and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Light Bulb Choice, ILB (left) or LED (right) in thefor the Light Bulb Choice, ILB (left) or LED (right) in theWith Other Light Bulbs LEDs are the most efficient light

Toledo, Chantal Nathalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Supporting Scientific Reasoning and Conceptual Understanding Through the use of Inscriptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the circuit configurations that led to a lit bulb andthose that led to an unlit bulb. Then, Mayumi pushed thethe bulb does not light. Reina’s presentation led to two key

Wong, Nicole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimate of Technical Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in practice current LED bulbs are generally no better thanof 100- lm/W LED general-purpose light bulbs is achievable,incandescent light bulbs. Although white LEDs can achieve

Letschert, Virginie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Demand for Environmentally-Friendly Durables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These bulbs are even more4 W LED for 15 W CFL replacing a 60 watt incandescent bulb),Diodes (LEDs). Characteristics of three generations of bulb

Martin, Leslie Aimee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with torches? Failure of: ? LEDs/Bulb [1] ? Battery [2] ?http://light.lbl.gov Component Bulb Type LED Incandescentto incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price

Tracy, Jennifer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to change at least one light at home to an ENERGY STAR(r) Compact Fluorescent Light bulb (CFL). These bulbs are estimated to use 75 percent less energy than standard bulbs...

377

Microsoft Word - INL_EXT-13-30178 Air-Cooled Condenser for Next...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of water. In this method of heat rejection, the heat sink temperature is the wet-bulb temperature instead of the higher ambient (dry-bulb) temperature. Because the wet bulb...

378

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of energy-saving Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs + , solar-powered lights + , LED bulbs + , auto lamps and other speciality lamps. + , Nanhai + , Guangdong Province + ,...

379

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on retail sales of energy-saving light bulbs. A total of 210sales ban from November 2009. From this date 2009, all light bulbs

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Technology Installation Review - Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Conditions, Chapter 27.7 - Climatic Design Information, 2001 ASHRAE Handbook Fundamentals. Figure 14. Wet-bulb efficiency rating versus wet-bulb temperature...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Assistance for energy-efficient light bulbs HELPCFLY Year of assistance for energy-efficient light bulbs HELPCW HELPCWY Year of assistance for the ...

382

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light bulb standards begin taking effect in 2012. November 28, 2011 ... Incandescent bulbs still play a role in the future of lighting. February 10, ...

383

The Better Buildings Neighborhood View - December 10, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traditional incandescent bulbs? Consider installing energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) in your basement lighting fixtures. Light Neighborhood View to Become...

384

Surge Withstand Capability of Various Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heard, the bulb will fail with a flash and a click ... protect the bulbs. ... When used with captive light sources, the power photocell can provide appreciable ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Taking America's Measure--Fun Activities for Kids!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... light bulbs that help you read the label were measured using standards that rely on a NIST master light standard. The electricity for the light bulb is ...

386

Chapter 2. Background: An Overview of Relevant Education Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Prentice Hall 1997.) 1. A series circuit consists of three identical light bulbs connected to a battery) The intensities of bulbs A and B (b) The inte

Maryland at College Park, University of

387

NREL: Technology Transfer - Brilliant White Light with Amber ...  

LED bulbs are the future of lighting for industry, business, and consumers. ... the LED bulbs can make brighter white light with better color more ...

388

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in house lighting, where, when mixed with argon, the incandescent light emits a more blue light (typically incandescent bulbs have a yellowish tint). These bulbs are more...

389

It's Elemental - The Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

melting point of all metallic elements and is used to make filaments for incandescent light bulbs, fluorescent light bulbs and television tubes. Tungsten expands at nearly the...

390

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

incentive program for citizens to exchange incandescent bulbs for compact fluorescent or light-emitting diode bulbs. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, A9,...

391

CX-009174: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

incentive program for citizens to exchange incandescent bulbs for compact fluorescent or light-emitting diode bulbs. CX-009174.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008898:...

392

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light bulb standards begin taking effect in 2012. November 28, 2011 ... Incandescent bulbs still play a role in the future of lighting. March 15, 2011

393

Wednesday, April 03, 2002 (3).m  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... switching surges as well as lightning surges include IEC ... to the failure levels of light bulbs exposed to ... about the mechanism of bulb failure triggered ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Light bulb standards begin taking effect in 2012. March 23, 2011 Incandescent bulbs still play a role in the future of lighting.

395

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Compact fluorescent bulbs: ... Many screw into a standard light socket, and most produce a similar color of light as a standard incandescent bulb.

396

EPA_T1542_SECTOR_HigherEdA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bulb swap in the residence halls and replaced 400 incandescents with compact fluorescent light bulbs. When talking to colleges and universities about energy efficiency, it is...

397

A Well Collimated Quasi-Continuous Atom Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... color (usually red), but the lamp emits white ... in strict cadence, while the light bulb emits waves ... ordinary atomic beams as lasers are from light bulbs. ...

398

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 13- to 15-watts bulbs and LED data for products from 6bulbs have a one-year lifetime, CFLs five years, and LEDs 10

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Odor representations in olfactory cortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure of the olfactory bulb has led to the hypothesissurface of the bulb. A fiber-coupled LED was positioned LED (

Poo, Cindy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solid-State Lighting on a Shoestring Budget: The Economics of Off-Grid Lighting for Small Businesses in Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lantern) Electric (LED Array) Electric (CFL Bulb) Maai MahiuLED Array) Maai Mahiu Maai Mahiu & Karagita Combined Electric (CFL Bulb)

Radecsky, Kristen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AC LEDs, particularly for lower luminosity bulbs. Efficacy (bulb or tube, a compact fluorescent lamp typically includes an integral ballast, as do HID lamps, and an LED

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lighting retrofits at community facilities. Retrofits would consist of changing out fixtures to accommodate compact fluorescent bulbs instead of relying on incandescent bulbs....

403

Restaurants | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

system Light your exit signs with incandescent bulbs Replace the bulbs with light emitting diode (LED) exit sign retrofit kits Light your parking area with incandescent or...

404

CX-007832: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. Upgrade incandescent bulbs to light-emitting diode bulbs at City Hall and Community Center. U.S. Department of Energy NEPA...

405

Northern Municipal Power Agency - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amount Home Energy Assessment: discounted price Compact Fluorescent Lights: 2light bulb LED Screw-In: 7bulb LED Recessed Downlights: 15 - 25install Clothes Washers:...

406

Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products August 6, 2010 -...

407

NETL: News Release - Alaska Well Targets Gas Hydrate, Produces...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bulb, Thomas Edison claimed to have first discovered "a thousand ways not to make a light bulb," with each effort yielding valuable information that contributed to his eventual...

408

Essays on Environmental and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the actual market price of the light bulbs. This informationknow the actual market price of the light bulbs if asked. 35

Toledo, Chantal Nathalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light bulbs having designated usage level in the average house. (3) Refrigerator marketlight bulbs having designated usage level in the average house. (3) Refrigerator market

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

12:15-1:1512:15-1:15 p.m.p.m. on Wednesdays in Aprilon Wednesdays in April Apr. 2Apr. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.positive impact. · Conserve! · Recycle! · Change a light bulb! · Walk or bike. · Carpool or public transportation or Comments? CFL Bulbs--Good or Bad? ·· CFL bulbs use 1/4th the electricityCFL bulbs use 1/4th the electricity

411

Univerza v Ljubljani Fakulteta za matematiko in fiziko  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geometrical optics of a light bulb Avtor: Blaz Zabret Mentor: Prof. dr. Gorazd Planinsic Ljubljana, 25.10.2012 Abstract: If we submerge a light bulb in the water, an interesting phenomenon can be observed. The outside the light bulb is examined and also the reason why some apparently coted light bulbs do not show

Â?umer, Slobodan

412

Look inside for tips on how to:Save money on utility bills by reducing your  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incandescent or fluorescent light bulbs. While we're on the subject, replace any light bulbs you can with CFLs can hold 4 bulbs, consider whether you can light the room effectively with fewer bulbs. Many, and the Not-So-Obvious Turn off the lights when you leave the room, unless you will be back in less than two

Pritchard, Jonathan

413

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

familiar electric curren ts are inside materials such as wires or light bulbs. Even though the interactions your track lighting uses. You decide to build models of circuits with two bulbs connected across, bulbs, and batteries. Use the accompanying legend to build the circuits. Legend: light bulb ba

Minnesota, University of

414

MAS275 Probability Modelling 2 Renewal Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we assume that the light bulb in a room is inspected at regular intervals, and if the bulb is found to have failed it is replaced with a new one; the replacement of the light bulb here is a renewal. It is reasonable to model the lengths of time between renewals (e.g. the life- lengths of light bulbs) as random

Jordan, Jonathan

415

University of Wisconsin-Madison Computer Sciences Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Imagine an environment containing two light bulbs, where each light bulb has a switch that toggles between being on or off; initially both light bulbs are off. The actor in this environment is able to see both light bulbs and at each step has to flip the switch of one of them. Assume the actor always receives

Liblit, Ben

416

By Stanley Micklavzina, Asher Tubman, and Frank Vignola for the Meyer Fund for Sustainable Development and the University of Oregon Department of Physics and the Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of light on the PV cell output current. To answer the question of why fluorescent bulbs are more voltmeter 2 Lamps Light Filters 60W Incandescent Bulb Compact Fluorescent Bulb (13W Comparable light of wavelength (color) of light on the output of a solar cell. Using an incandescent light bulb, the current

Oregon, University of

417

Comparing ASP and CP on Four Grid Puzzles Mehmet Celik, Halit Erdogan, Firat Tahaoglu, Tansel Uras, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are called "hints". Gray cells are the light bulbs. In the literature, there are several attempts to solve light bulbs in the white boxes according to following rules: A1 Light bulbs are permitted to be placed at any white square. A hint (numbered black square) indicates how many light bulbs are nex

Erdem, Esra

418

Experiment 10: Practical Electricity Many metal surfaces have a very thin layer of rust that can throw off resistance readings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

across the light bulb, and the current through the light bulb. Note units. Voltage: _________ Current"), and explain why. 5. A household "nightlight" bulb is designed to emit about the same amount of light: _____________ c. Test your predictions, and explain. 8. Light bulbs are good for getting a feel for voltage

Peterson, Blake R.

419

The Power to Change: Sustainable Electricity Usage in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Light Bulb Exchange program: replaces inefficient incandescent bulbs with integrated compact fluorescent Lighting Project - The UHC (University Housing Council) and the CCSC (Columbia College Student Council bulbs Watt and Woodbridge residence halls Bulbs - 15X longer, save $38,000 in energy cost and 446

Colorado at Boulder, University of

420

TIPs Meeting Minutes Bradley Conference Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light bulbs to replace the incandescent bulbs currently in the dwellings. This Proposal was found invalid due to the false assumption made that FGH gives students free replacement bulbs. FGH only replaces the bulbs after the dwelling has been vacated. However it will be suggested that FGH us energy saving

Dyer, Bill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy-Efficient Lighting The typical American family spends more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) saves you money in the long run with lower energy bills. CFLs are significant Typical incandescent 75-watt light bulb Compact Fluorescent 18-watt light bulb Purchase cost $0.60 $ 5 that incandescent bulbs use becomes heat while only 10 percent becomes light. CFLs create less heat because more

422

Annotating Components to Support Component-Based Static Analyses of Software Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electrical systems, and plumbing systems. Consider the purchase of a simple light bulb. The interface of most light bulbs is identical; however the choice of which to purchase involves tradeo#11;s related to the voltage, wattage, and price of the light bulb. All of these things are listed on the light bulb

Wolf, Alexander L.

423

Cal Poly Department of Mathematics Puzzle of the Week  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cal Poly Department of Mathematics Puzzle of the Week April 2-8, 2010 1000 light bulbs flips the switch on every 3rd light, and so on. After person 1000 finishes how many bulbs are switched a submission. Solution: There are 31 light bulbs left on. Note that light bulb N will have its switch flipped

Sze, Lawrence

424

Smart Spaces Industry/Academia Day | 02.08.2011 | Page 1 Dr. M.A.Stough | Research Solid-State Lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

60 watt bulb with an equivalent lumens LED white light bulb for usage of 50,000 hours leads delay). As is increased, less power goes to incandescent bulb and brightness is reduced. Most LED lamps dimmers. Often on the LED bulb application notes or on the lamp's manufacturer web sites

Lü, James Jian-Qiang

425

BRILLIANT Researchers from the University of Illinois, Northwestern University, the Institute of High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that applied Pico-Jobs for developing new applications of LED light bulbs together with OSRAM were conducted-Jobs for developing new applications for Light Emitting Diode (LED) based light bulbs at OSRAM, a leading manufacturer of light system solutions. In contrast to traditional incandescent light bulbs, LED bulbs do not create

Rogers, John A.

426

Cell, Vol. 96, 807818, March 19, 1999, Copyright 1999 by Cell Press Vertebrate Slit, a Secreted Ligand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of manufacturing processes that could be UV cured are using UV curing today #12;Replace Hg Bulbs with UV LEDs Green (Dual Use) · Industrial Applications (High Power UV) · Summary #12;Bulbs transition to..... Bulbs a bulb/socket model ­ NOT SMART LIGHT First Wave Philips L-Prize Submission #12;Square Source in a Round

Wu, Jane Y.

427

David Cosenza Seth Danielson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenge and costly to produce commercial single-LED bulbs to meet residential illumination requirements) A single-LED bulb: a single line current source in vacuum. (b) A double-LED bulb: two line current sources in vacuum. (c) An improved double- LED bulb: two line current sources in the `anti-mirror' system

Liebling, Michael

428

FUNDAMENTALS OF UNDERVOLTAGE BREAKDOWN THROUGH THE TOWNSEND MECHANISM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

white Incandescent bulb Cool White Fluorescent tube Natural White Daylight LED bulb 16 #12;Warm white kilolumen in 2015 LED Bulb US $100 per kilolumen in 2010 46 #12;Reducing Cost per Lumen Lower ­ shock resistant · Compact (Light bulb ~ 1,000 hrs) Additional LED Properties ULTIMO SCIENCE FESTIVAL

Choueiri, Edgar

429

An approach for evaluating the market effects of energy efficiency programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market effects interim report, significantly more households in the compar- ison states purchased light bulbs

Vine, Edward; Prahl, Ralph; Meyers, Steve; Turiel, Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Color transformations and bolometric corrections for Galactic halo stars: alpha-enhanced vs scaled-solar results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed the first extensive analysis of the impact of an [alpha/Fe]>0 metal distribution on broadband colors in the parameter space (surface gravity, effective temperature, metal content) covered by Galactic globular cluster stars.A comparison of updated and homogeneous ATLAS9 UBVRIJHKL synthetic photometry, for both alpha-enhanced and scaled-solar metal distributions, has shown that it is impossible to reproduce alpha-enhanced (B-V) and (U-B) color transformations with simple rescalings of the scaled-solar ones. At [Fe/H]$\\sim -$2.0 alpha-enhanced transformations are well reproduced by scaled-solar ones with the same [Fe/H], but this good agreement breaks down at [Fe/H] larger than about -1.6.As a general rule, (B-V) and (U-B) alpha-enhanced colors are bluer than scaled-solar ones at either the same [Fe/H] or [M/H], and the differences increase with increasing metallicity and decreasing T_eff. A preliminary analysis of the contribution of the various alpha elements to the stellar colors shows that the magnesium abundance (and to lesser extent oxygen and silicon) is the main responsible for these differences. On the contrary, the bolometric correction to the V band and more infrared colors predicted by alpha-enhanced transformations are well reproduced by scaled-solar results, due to their weak dependence on the metal content.Key parameters like the Turn Off and Zero Age Horizontal Branch V magnitudes, as well as the red Giant Branch tip I magnitude obtained from theoretical isochrones are in general unaffected when using the appropriate alpha-enhanced transformations in place of scaled-solar ones. We have also studied the effect of boundary conditions obtained from appropriate alpha-enhanced model atmospheres on the evolutionary tracks in the HR diagram.

Santi Cassisi; Maurizio Salaris; Fiorella Castelli; Adriano Pietrinferni

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Constraints on the correlation between QSO luminosity and host halo mass from high-redshift quasar clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent measurements of high-redshift QSO clustering from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey indicate that QSOs at z~4 have a bias b~14. We find that this extremely high clustering amplitude, combined with the corresponding space density, constrains the dispersion in the L-Mhalo relation to be less than 50% at 99% confidence for the most conservative case of a 100% duty cycle. This upper limit to the intrinsic dispersion provides as strong a constraint as current upper limits to the intrinsic dispersion in the local M_BH-sigma relation and the ratio of bolometric to Eddington luminosity of luminous QSOs.

Martin White; Paul Martini; J. D. Cohn

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. , 1990. Uranium and (super 10) Be enrichments by fluidsabove 300 °C. (Fig. Enrichments of uranium 238 U over 230 Th

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Donval, J. P. , 2005. Chlorine isotopic compositions ofand Davis, S. , 1984. Natural chlorine isotope variations.precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios.

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean Drillingfluid flow in the western Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oceans. Chemical Geology: Isotope Geoscience section 80(Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, for her Li isotopeisotopes and origin of high-Cl magmas of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Geology

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 March 1, 2011 - 8:54am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL It's still a bit early for spring, but we at Energy Savers have major spring fever. We're pretty sure the rest of the country does, too, after a winter where all 50 states had at least some snow on the ground (and some of you had-or still have-much, much more than others!). So we're thinking spring and bidding a fond farewell (good riddance?) to February and a hearty hello to March. Here's a look back at what happened this month: New or Noteworthy on Energy Savers Did you know that upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home could save you about $50 per year. New lighting standards take effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen

438

New Lighting Fixtures: Combining Creativity and Style with Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This article for a building trade magazine describes a national design competition for energy efficient lighting sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the American Lighting Association, and the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, with winners announced at ALA's Annual Conference May 14, 2004, in Tucson. The Lighting for Tomorrow competition was the first national lighting fixture design competition focusing on energy-efficient residential lighting. The competition invited fixture manufacturers and designers to come up with beautiful, functional lighting fixtures that also happen to be energy efficient. Fixtures were required to use a ''dedicated'' energy-efficient light source, such as a pin-based fluorescent lamp that cannot be replaced with a screw-in incandescent bulb. Fixtures also had to meet a minimum energy efficiency level that eliminated use of incandescent and halogen lamps, leaving the door open only to fluorescent sources and LEDs. More than 150 paper designs were submitted in the first phase of the competition, in 2003. Of those, 24 finalists were invited to submit working prototypes in 2004, and the winners were announced in May. The Grand Prize of $10,000 went to American Fluorescent of Waukegan, Illinois, for its ''Salem'' chandelier. Some winning fixtures are already available through Lowe's Home Improvement Centers.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Foster, Rebecca; McGowan, Terry

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

MATH 56A: STOCHASTIC PROCESSES Mathematically, renewal refers to a continuous time stochastic pro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the lifetime of the nth process: T1 + · · · + Tn = inf{t | Nt = n} I gave a light bulb as an example. There are three kinds of light bulbs: (1) The guaranteed light bulb which will last exactly 1000 hours. (2) The Poisson light bulb. This light bulb is as good as new as long as it is working. Assume it has an expected

Igusa, Kiyoshi

440

Mitigating Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Voluntary Reporting  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration ..... 199 62 Halogenated Substances ..... 22 18 Other Emissions Reductions ..... 59 45 Total ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DETECTION OF KNOWN AND UNKNOWN NATURALLY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... contaminants. The predominant sources of halogenated secondary metabolites are sponges, algae and cyanobacteria. ...

442

Americas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E-3 Product name of Norit Americas ’ halogenated powdered activated carbon FF Fabric Filter (baghouse) FGD

Ravi Strivastava; Technologies Corp; Cold-side Electrostatic Precipitator; Electrostatic Precipitator; Hot-side Electrostatic Precipitator

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency of fans for fuel-fired furnaces, and replacing halogen torchieres with more efficient CFL

Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Lighting a building with a single bulb : toward a system for illumination in the 21st c.; or, A centralized illumination system for the efficient decoupling and recovery of lighting related heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piping light represents the first tenable method for recovery and reutilization of lighting related heat. It can do this by preserving the energy generated at the lamp as radiative, departing from precedent and avoiding ...

Levens, Kurt Antony, 1961-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

Ury, Michael G. (Bethesda, MD); Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Wooten, Robert D. (Rockville, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! May 17, 2012 - 2:21pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For years, I bought light bulbs based on watts, or energy use. Like many light bulb consumers, I looked for a traditional 40, 60, 75, or 100 watt incandescent bulb. Now that stores today carry more and more energy efficient lighting choices, I wanted to replace my old incandescents with new bulbs to save energy and money on my electricity bill. But in shopping for the right bulb, I came across a challenge in looking for bulbs based on watts. Since these newer bulbs use less energy, I found bulbs that use 8, 15, or 26 watts. The wattages are pretty close to each other, but the

448

Modelica-based Modeling and Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

humidity, dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, species concentration, such as water vapor, and trace substances, such as car- bon dioxide. 3.3.7 Package Fluid.Sources...

449

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Choices Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lighting Choices video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lighting Choices." This is followed by shots of a variety of lamps being turned on. We're all used to lighting up dark spaces with the flip of a switch. In fact, people have been doing so since Thomas Edison invented the incandescent light bulb about 130 years ago...and we've used that same old bulb ever since. The video shows a store aisle with a diverse light bulb selection, then moves to close-ups of the packaging labels on various bulbs. Today you'll see more light bulb options in stores. These bulbs will give you the light you want while saving you energy...and money. A hand screws in a light bulb and flips the switch. The bulb is shown in

450

Three Essays on Strategic Considerations for Product Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light bulbs could easily be manufactured to last longer, but are not in order to increase replacement sales.light bulbs could easily be manufactured to last longer, but are not in order to increase replacement sales.

Sawhill, James Winslow

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Andrew Weisberg DOE-Annual-030520-1 Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Improvement [Projected in FY01] Thermoplastic Matrices Blow- Molded Liners e.g. light bulbs, resistors, truck.e. semiconductors, tires, light bulbs, biotech...] · Method relies on samples from batch built under identical

452

Lumens: The new way to shop for light  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR LIGHT Choose Your Next Light Bulb for the Brightness You Want. 450 800 1100 1600 9 years 40 60 75 100 For the greatest savings, choose ENERGY STAR light bulbs. 1205201...

453

New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25, 2012 - 5:52am...

454

Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ten times longer than a comparable incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. CFL bulbs are available in a range of light colors, including warm (white to...

455

Lecture 3 week 2/3 2012: Solar radiation, the greenhouse, global heat engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... that would be like 13.68 one- hundred watt light bulbs illuminating a one-meter square surface, except that light bulbs put about 80% of their 100 watts of power into heat/infrared radiation. Given the distance

456

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solar panels. 17. Key Words Solar Energy, Light Emitting Diodes (LED), Intersections, Incandescent Bulbs to power our traffic signals as well as switching the traditional incandescent bulbs to LED. Since the city

457

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-epa-notice-availability-final-environmental-impact-statement Article The History of the Light Bulb From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, we're exploring the long...

458

Fermilab Today - Safety Tip of the Week Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

yourself money at the same time. And it takes little effort, just use compact fluorescent light bulbs, or CFLs. The bulbs use as little as one-fourth the electricity, and last up...

459

Photometric Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... other hand, is originally an academic society in the field of lighting science and ... Stray light ... have T-20 bulbs, and the 1000 W lamps have T-24 bulbs. ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

TipCard_Front_back_final_rev2.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warmyellow, to white, to coolblue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bulb "My wife and I are having a friendly dispute over the cost of operating electric light bulbs. Some folks insist that there is no friction involved in electricity. Wouldn't...

462

6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warmyellow, to white, to coolblue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range...

464

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION .......................3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that is on the floor. #12;11 LIGHT BULBS AND FUSES Tenants are responsible for providing their own light bulbs (except your smoke detector, you must press the test/silence button on the unit. NOTE: The red LED

Saskatchewan, University of

465

Zinc Oxide and Nitride Nanowire Based Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lumens/W, the LED beats the incandescent bulb and is on thefor an LED as opposed to an incandescent light bulb as shownbulb, fluorescent lamp, and blue light emitting diode. (24) (25) 2.2 LED

Lai, Elaine Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Consumer Electronics Show 2013 Highlights Sustainable Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Eco-Design and Sustainable Technologies category for products that included an inkjet printer and a 57-watt equivalent LED bulb. The bulb, like many other LEDs (including the...

467

FDD Applied to a Residential Split System Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Real-time sampling of feature values requires a steady-state detector : outdoor or condenser air dry-bulb temperature : indoor or evaporator air dry-bulb temperature : indoor or...

468

Essays on Environmental and Resource Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulb Choice, ILB (left) or LED (right) in the UC BerkeleySites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Share of LED Take Up byBulb Choice, ILB (left) or LED (right) in the Brazil- ian

Toledo, Chantal Nathalie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ffing-analysis-instructions-blank-sheet-and-example-sheet Article The History of the Light Bulb From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of...

470

DOE-Idaho Operations Summary For October 18 to November 7, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G received a mile shock when he reached into a desk lamp housing to tighten the light bulb, unaware that the light bulb was broken and the elements exposed. He was examined at...

471

NETL: Educational Initiatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with double-ended alligator clips 1 - 6 volt lantern battery 1 - 6 volt incandescent light bulb and bulb holder 1 - strip of cardboard 2 - electric conducting tin strips 1 -...

472

MATH PROBLEMS - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prisoner's Light Bulb There are 100 prisoners in 100 different cells. There is another room with a light bulb initially off. The warden tells the prisoners they can get ...

473

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-rebuilding-green-homes-after-disaster-revised-fact-sheet Article The History of the Light Bulb From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of...

474

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 4650 of 15,695 results. Article A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions Thomas Edison would be amazed. The conventional light bulb is getting some...

475

THE CHEMISTRY OF 1,4-DEHYDROBENZENES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isolated by bulb to bulb distillation at torr Pr rat of 1,4-dried over Mgso 4 ; distillation through a Ta wire column atcru er as eluent (7:3 distillation ( 03 torr) ev e alcohol

Lockhart, Thomas P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solid bromine complexers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The cell of the invention comprises a housing, a zinc or cadmium anode, a chemically non-reactive counterelectrode and cathodic halogen. The cathodic halogen is selected from chlorine and bromine, and preferably is bromine. The cell also is provided with an aqueous metal halide containing electrolyte in which the metal ions are of the same metal as the metal of the anode and halide anions are of the same halogen as the cathodic halogen material. Importantly, in the present invention, anion exchange resins provide a convenient means for storing the halogen generated during charging of the cell and providing a source of halogen to be used in the discharge of the cell.

Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ)

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

WHEN DISORDER IS THE ORDER: CUBA DURING THE SPECIAL PERIOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

light bulbs from store shelves to the black market, where they can collect all the money from their sale,

Wilson, Suzanne Leigh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

MATH 56A SPRING 2008 STOCHASTIC PROCESSES 135 6.2. distribution of At, Bt, Ct. On the second day I proved a bunch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the same. Ct is different. I used the example of the Poisson light bulb to illustrate the dif- ference = 2000 hrs Although each light bulb has an expected life of 1000 hours, the light bulbs currently. The Poisson bulb is as good as new as long as it is working. So, E(Bt) = E(T) = 1 = µ = 1000 hrs E(At) = 1

Igusa, Kiyoshi

479

Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic ...  

Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for increasing the efficiency of conventional incandescent light bulbs.

480

Practice test for exam ff1 in MA135 In addition to problems on this sheet, students should study webwork problems, assigned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,t ' a- " -3L #12;2 9. A manufacturer of light bulbs estimates that the fraction F(t) of b as many bulbs are burning after 5 weeks as after 9 weeks. a. Find k and determine the fraction of bulbs still burning after 7 weeks. L= \\lnZ ,b. What fraction of the bulbs burn out before 10 weeks? t - * $i

Ferry, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "halogen bulbs halo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Next Generation Light Source  

•Next Generation Light Source – Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination •High Entry Barrier – 71 ...

482

SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011 HIGH TECH SHOW & TELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behind fiber optics, energy efficient light bulbs, e-readers, and much, much more! STARTUP SHOWCASE Meet

483

NIST Light Source Illuminates Fusion Power Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Their measurement tool also is used in incandescent light