National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for halogen bulbs halo

  1. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. Compared to traditional incandescents, energy-efficient lightbulbs such as halogen incandescents, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), and light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the

  2. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  3. L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs This September 23, 2008 webcast provided an overview of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) technology competition. The L Prize calls for super-efficient SSL products to replace two of the most common light bulbs used today: the 60-watt incandescent and the PAR-38 halogen reflector. Kelly Gordon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, kicked off the webcast with an overview of the

  4. SuperBulbs Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SuperBulbs, Inc. Place: Rewood City, California Zip: 94065 Product: California-based LED manufacturer and technology developer. References: SuperBulbs, Inc.1 This article is...

  5. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  6. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

    1988-08-23

    It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

  7. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S. (Windsor, CO)

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  8. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  9. Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last month, the Federal Trade Commission announced that light bulbs will have a brand new style of packaging, starting in 2011.

  10. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  11. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  12. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Products & Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Did you know? CFLs and LEDs last substantially longer than incandescent light bulbs, reducing labor costs of replacing light bulbs. Coal-burning power plants emit mercury into the environment; using ENERGY STAR light bulbs can reduce these emissions. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for light bulbs, a product

  13. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents November 5, 2014 - 11:39pm Addthis By...

  14. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides...

  15. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  16. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for light bulbs, a product category covered by ENERGY STAR. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products or FEMP designated products in all product categories covered by these programs and in any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  17. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save 75 each year. Compared to traditional incandescents, energy-efficient lightbulbs...

  18. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Light Bulb The History of the Light Bulb November 22, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Read more about the History of the Light Bulb. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Like all great inventions, the light bulb can't be credited to one inventor. It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors

  19. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Citation Details In-Document Search...

  20. Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Pays 50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations Westinghouse Pays 50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations December 13, ...

  1. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy EPS Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) High-resolution EPS of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov.' File DoE_Billboard_Which_Bulb.eps More Documents & Publications Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS

  2. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) HIgh-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov.' Image icon DoE_Billboard_Which_Bulb.jpg More Documents & Publications Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG

  3. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  4. Halo model and halo properties in Galileon gravity cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Lombriser, Lucas; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the performance of semi-analytical modelling of large-scale structure in Galileon gravity cosmologies using results from N-body simulations. We focus on the Cubic and Quartic Galileon models that provide a reasonable fit to CMB, SNIa and BAO data. We demonstrate that the Sheth-Tormen mass function and linear halo bias can be calibrated to provide a very good fit to our simulation results. We also find that the halo concentration-mass relation is well fitted by a power law. The nonlinear matter power spectrum computed in the halo model approach is found to be inaccurate in the mildly nonlinear regime, but captures reasonably well the effects of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on small scales. In the Cubic model, the screening mechanism hides essentially all of the effects of the fifth force inside haloes. In the case of the Quartic model, the screening mechanism leaves behind residual modifications to gravity, which make the effective gravitational strength time-varying and smaller than the standard value. Compared to normal gravity, this causes a deficiency of massive haloes and leads to a weaker matter clustering on small scales. For both models, we show that there are realistic halo occupation distributions of Luminous Red Galaxies that can match both the observed large-scale clustering amplitude and the number density of these galaxies.

  5. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin (Stillwater, MN); Janikowski, Stuart Kevin (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  6. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falkenstein, Zoran (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  7. Text-Alternative Version: L Prize™: The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the L Prize™: The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs webcast.

  8. Saturn's moon rhea sports a dusty halo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saturn's moon rhea sports a dusty halo Saturn's moon rhea sports a dusty halo Cassini is carrying among its instruments a pair of ion-mass and ion-beam spectrometers built by Los...

  9. Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-05-01

    In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ?100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

  10. Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monagle, Matthew (Los Alamos, NM); Coogan, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

  11. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  12. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Hann S. (Darien, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  13. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  14. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. PDF icon Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  15. Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps September 11, 2014 - 2:00pm Addthis Shopping for energy-efficient light bulbs just got easier! | Photo courtesy of iStockphotography.com/Thomas_EyeDesign Shopping for energy-efficient light bulbs just got easier! | Photo courtesy of iStockphotography.com/Thomas_EyeDesign Paige Terlip Paige Terlip Former Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How

  16. A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions August 4, 2011 - 3:09pm Addthis This 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on) could save the nation about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity or $3.9 billion in one year and avoid 20 million metric tons of carbon emissions if every 60-watt incandescent bulb in the U.S. was replaced with the L Prize winner. | Photo

  17. Method for halogenating or radiohalogenating a chemical compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabalka, George W.

    2006-05-09

    A method for obtaining a halogenated organic compound, whereby an organotrifluoroborate compound is reacted with a halide ion in the presence of an oxidizing agent to produce the corresponding halogenated organic compound. The method may be used for producing radiohalogenated organic compounds.

  18. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration Authors: Mao,...

  19. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, Walter L.; Catherino, Henry A.; Kotch, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  20. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  1. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Authors: M.Zaug, J ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-25 OSTI Identifier: 1149562 Report Number(s):

  2. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Faraj, Bahjat (Lithonia, GA)

    1999-01-01

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  3. Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs December 7, 2015 - 9:23am Addthis Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs Gabrielle Dreyfus, Ph.D. Gabrielle Dreyfus, Ph.D. Senior Policy Analyst, Office of International Climate and Clean Energy. Chad Gallinat, Ph.D. Chad Gallinat, Ph.D. International Climate Fellow, Office of International Climate and Clean Energy Stand next to a

  4. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  5. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  6. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  7. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov. Image icon DoEBillboardWhichBulbweb.jpg More Documents & ...

  8. DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a part of DOE's continuing enforcement action against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, the company must cease sales of two light bulb models - medium based CFL basic model 15GLOBE/65/2 ...

  9. New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you're like me, it sometimes feels overwhelming standing at the store and staring at a big wall of light bulbs, trying to understand all the lighting choices.

  10. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document, from the Wisconsin Focus on Energy / ENERGY STAR Products Program, is part of the Case Study Series, explaining how "Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women."

  11. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case Study Series-Demonstrating the Value of Program Evaluation 
 ENERGY STAR Products Program Wisconsin Focus on Energy Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation findings prompted a Wisconsin energy efficiency program to modify its program design, resulting in increased sales of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) among women- which evaluation showed were a key target market for growth. The Focus on Energy ENERGY STAR Products Program

  12. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  13. Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop Authors: Fisher, Alan S ;...

  14. Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Summary of the 2014 Beam-Halo Monitoring Workshop You are accessing a...

  15. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  16. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  17. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  18. Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

  19. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E. (Middleton, WI)

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  20. What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eric Barendsen posted about the differences in costs between traditional and energy efficient light bulbs. Several people already chimed in on the original post. (Thanks a bunch for sharing!) But for today's question of the week, we're wondering: What light bulbs do you use in your own home? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis

  1. Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road? January 24, 2012 - 1:31pm Addthis Big Bill and Little Bill are here to talk with you about energy efficiency on behalf of Energy Impact Illinois. Roland Risser Roland Risser Program Director, Building Technologies Office How can I participate? You can view all of Big Bill and Little Bill's videos on the Energy Bill's YouTube channel. Everyone knows that laughter is good for you. Studies suggest it can buffer

  2. Spherical collapse in Galileon gravity: fifth force solutions, halo mass function and halo bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: liqb@mail.ihep.ac.cn E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    We study spherical collapse in the Quartic and Quintic Covariant Galileon gravity models within the framework of the excursion set formalism. We derive the nonlinear spherically symmetric equations in the quasi-static and weak-field limits, focusing on model parameters that fit current CMB, SNIa and BAO data. We demonstrate that the equations of the Quintic model do not admit physical solutions of the fifth force in high density regions, which prevents the study of structure formation in this model. For the Quartic model, we show that the effective gravitational strength deviates from the standard value at late times (z?<1), becoming larger if the density is low, but smaller if the density is high. This shows that the Vainshtein mechanism at high densities is not enough to screen all of the modifications of gravity. This makes halos that collapse at z?<1 feel an overall weaker gravity, which suppresses halo formation. However, the matter density in the Quartic model is higher than in standard ?CDM, which boosts structure formation and dominates over the effect of the weaker gravity. In the Quartic model there is a significant overabundance of high-mass halos relative to ?CDM. Dark matter halos are also less biased than in ?CDM, with the difference increasing appreciably with halo mass. However, our results suggest that the bias may not be small enough to fully reconcile the predicted matter power spectrum with LRG clustering data.

  3. DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS OBSERVATIONS Dark-matter-dominated cluster-scale halos act as an important cosmological probe and provide a key testing ground for structure formation theory. Focusing on their mass profiles, we have carried out (gravity-only) simulations of the concordance {Lambda}CDM cosmology,

  4. PROJECT PROFILE: Halo Industries, Inc. (Incubator 10) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Halo Industries, Inc. (Incubator 10) PROJECT PROFILE: Halo Industries, Inc. (Incubator 10) Project Title: Materials Development and Manufacturing for Low Cost, High Efficiency c-Si Solar Cells Funding Opportunity: SunShot Technology to Market (Incubator 10) SunShot Subprogram: Technology to Market Location: Menlo Park, CA Amount Awarded: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $256,359 Project Investigator: Andrei Iancu The Halo Industries project under the SunShot Technology to Market

  5. Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals 2016 Performance Appraisal Process 2/1 - 2/10: Employee writes self-appraisal. 2/11 - 2/28: Evaluating Supervisor writes appraisals for Direct Reports. 2/28 - 3/11: Evaluating Supervisor meets with Direct Reports; Evaluating Supervisor and Direct Report sign off on the appraisal; Second Level Manager reviews and approves appraisals. Unless your appraisal requires Second Level Manager review and approval, all of the other steps listed in this timeframe

  6. COMPOSITION OF LOW-REDSHIFT HALO GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cen Renyue

    2013-06-20

    Halo gas in low-z (z < 0.5) {>=}0.1 L{sub *} galaxies in high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations is examined with respect to three components: cold, warm, and hot with temperatures of <10{sup 5}, 10{sup 5-6}, and >10{sup 6} K, respectively. Utilizing O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 absorption lines, the warm component is compared to observations, and agreement is found with respect to the galaxy-O VI line correlation, the ratio of the O VI line incidence rate in blue to red galaxies, and the amount of O VI mass in star-forming galaxies. A detailed account of the sources of warm halo gas (stellar feedback heating, gravitational shock heating, and accretion from the intergalactic medium), inflowing and outflowing warm halo gas metallicity disparities, and their dependencies on galaxy types and environment is also presented. With the warm component securely anchored, our simulations make the following additional predictions. First, cold gas is the primary component in inner regions with its mass comprising 50% of all gas within galactocentric radius r = (30, 150) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies. Second, at r > (30, 200) kpc in (red, blue) galaxies the hot component becomes the majority. Third, the warm component is a perpetual minority, with its contribution peaking at {approx}30% at r = 100-300 kpc in blue galaxies and never exceeding 5% in red galaxies. The significant amount of cold gas in low-z early-type galaxies, which was found in simulations and in agreement with recent observations (Thom et al.), is intriguing, as is the dominance of hot gas at large radii in blue galaxies.

  7. Splashback in accreting dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Susmita; Dalal, Neal; Chamberlain, Robert T. E-mail: dalaln@illinois.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recent work has shown that density profiles in the outskirts of dark matter halos can become extremely steep over a narrow range of radius. This behavior is produced by splashback material on its first apocentric passage after accretion. We show that the location of this splashback feature may be understood quite simply, from first principles. We present a simple model, based on spherical collapse, that accurately predicts the location of splashback without any free parameters. The important quantities that determine the splashback radius are accretion rate and redshift.

  8. The prolate dark matter halo of the Andromeda galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashi, Kohei; Chiba, Masashi E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    We present new limits on the global shape of the dark matter halo in the Andromeda galaxy using and generalizing non-spherical mass models developed by Hayashi and Chiba and compare our results with theoretical predictions of cold dark matter (CDM) models. This is motivated by the fact that CDM models predict non-spherical virialized dark halos, which reflect the process of mass assembly in the galactic scale. Applying our models to the latest kinematic data of globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Andromeda halo, we find that the most plausible cases for Andromeda yield a prolate shape for its dark halo, irrespective of assumed density profiles. We also find that this prolate dark halo in Andromeda is consistent with theoretical predictions in which the satellites are distributed anisotropically and preferentially located along major axes of their host halos. It is a reflection of the intimate connection between galactic dark matter halos and the cosmic web. Therefore, our result is profound in understanding internal dynamics of halo tracers in Andromeda, such as orbital evolutions of tidal stellar streams, which play important roles in extracting the abundance of CDM subhalos through their dynamical effects on stream structures.

  9. MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The primary aim of the MACHO Project is to test the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the dark matter in the halo of the Milky Way is made up of objects like brown dwarfs or planets: these objects have come to be known as MACHOs, for MAssive Compact Halo Objects. The signature of these objects is the occasional amplification of the light from extragalactic stars by the gravitational lens effect. The amplification can be large, but events are extremely rare: it is necessary to monitor photometrically several million stars for a period of years in order to obtain a useful detection rate. For this purpose MACHO has a two channel system that employs eight CCDs, mounted on the 50 inch telescope at Mt. Stromlo. The high data rate (several GBytes per night) is accommodated by custom electronics and on-line data reduction. The Project has taken more than 27,000 images with this system since June 1992. Analysis of a subset of these data has yielded databases containing light curves in two colors for 8 million stars in the LMC and 10 million in the bulge of the Milky Way. A search for microlensing has turned up four candidates toward the Large Magellanic Cloud and 45 toward the Galactic Bulge. The web page for data provides links to MACHO Project data portals and various specialized interfaces for viewing or searching the data. (Specialized Interface)

  10. Evidence for universal structure in galactic halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, William H.; Sikivie, Pierre

    2000-04-15

    The late infall of dark matter onto a galaxy produces structure (such as caustics) in the distribution of dark matter in the halo. We argue that such structure is likely to occur generically on length scales proportional to l{approx}t{sub 0}v{sub rot}, where t{sub 0} is the age of the universe and v{sub rot} is the rotation velocity of the galaxy. A set of 32 extended galactic rotation curves is analyzed. For each curve, the radial coordinate is rescaled according to r{yields}r(tilde sign){identical_to}r(v{sub 0}/v{sub rot}), where we choose v{sub 0}=220 km/s. A linear fit to each rescaled rotation curve is subtracted, and the residuals are binned and averaged. The sample shows significant features near r(tilde sign)=40 kpc and r(tilde sign)=20 kpc. This is consistent with the predictions of the self-similar caustic ring model of galactic halos. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. [?/Fe]ABUNDANCES OF FOUR OUTER M31 HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: luis.vargas@yale.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We present alpha element to iron abundance ratios, [?/Fe], for four stars in the outer stellar halo of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The stars were identified as high-likelihood field halo stars by Gilbert et al. and lie at projected distances between 70 and 140 kpc from M31's center. These are the first alpha abundances measured for a halo star in a galaxy beyond the Milky Way. The stars range in metallicity between [Fe/H] = 2.2 and [Fe/H] = 1.4. The sample's average [?/Fe] ratio is +0.20 0.20. The best-fit average value is elevated above solar, which is consistent with rapid chemical enrichment from Type II supernovae. The mean [?/Fe] ratio of our M31 outer halo sample agrees (within the uncertainties) with that of Milky Way inner/outer halo stars that have a comparable range of [Fe/H].

  12. Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Violations | Department of Energy Department of Energy has successfully resolved the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE's federal efficiency requirements and for the sale of at least 29,000 general service fluorescent and medium base compact fluorescent lamps that used more energy than permitted by law. This case reflects DOE's renewed commitment to enforce the federal efficiency requirements systematically

  13. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L.

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  14. Halogen-free benzoxazine based curable compositions for high TG applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan

    2015-03-10

    The present invention provides a halogen-free curable composition including a benzoxazine monomer, at least one epoxy resin, a catalyst, a toughening agent and a solvent. The halogen-free curable composition is especially suited for use in automobile and aerospace applications since the composition, upon curing, produces a composite having a high glass transition temperature.

  15. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple factmore » that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15× noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.« less

  16. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple fact that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15 noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.

  17. The halo model in a massive neutrino cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massara, Elena; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it

    2014-12-01

    We provide a quantitative analysis of the halo model in the context of massive neutrino cosmologies. We discuss all the ingredients necessary to model the non-linear matter and cold dark matter power spectra and compare with the results of N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos. Our neutrino halo model is able to capture the non-linear behavior of matter clustering with a ?20% accuracy up to very non-linear scales of k=10 h/Mpc (which would be affected by baryon physics). The largest discrepancies arise in the range k=0.51 h/Mpc where the 1-halo and 2-halo terms are comparable and are present also in a massless neutrino cosmology. However, at scales k<0.2 h/Mpc our neutrino halo model agrees with the results of N-body simulations at the level of 8% for total neutrino masses of <0.3 eV. We also model the neutrino non-linear density field as a sum of a linear and clustered component and predict the neutrino power spectrum and the cold dark matter-neutrino cross-power spectrum up to k=1 h/Mpc with ?30% accuracy. For masses below 0.15 eV the neutrino halo model captures the neutrino induced suppression, casted in terms of matter power ratios between massive and massless scenarios, with a 2% agreement with the results of N-body/neutrino simulations. Finally, we provide a simple application of the halo model: the computation of the clustering of galaxies, in massless and massive neutrinos cosmologies, using a simple Halo Occupation Distribution scheme and our halo model extension.

  18. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the mχ – σn plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin – g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR),more » the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.« less

  19. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m{sub χ}−σ{sub n} plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the v{sub min}−g-tilde plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from v{sub min} to nuclear recoil momentum (p{sub R}), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call h-til-tilde(p{sub R}). The entire family of conventional halo-independent g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single h-tilde(p{sub R}) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in h-tilde(p{sub R}) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple g-tilde(v{sub min}) plots for different DM masses. We conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  20. Halo-independent direct detection analyses without mass assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Adam J.; Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2015-10-06

    Results from direct detection experiments are typically interpreted by employing an assumption about the dark matter velocity distribution, with results presented in the m? ?n plane. Recently methods which are independent of the DM halo velocity distribution have been developed which present results in the vmin g~ plane, but these in turn require an assumption on the dark matter mass. Here we present an extension of these halo-independent methods for dark matter direct detection which does not require a fiducial choice of the dark matter mass. With a change of variables from vmin to nuclear recoil momentum (pR), the full halo-independent content of an experimental result for any dark matter mass can be condensed into a single plot as a function of a new halo integral variable, which we call tilde h(pR). The entire family of conventional halo-independent tilde g~(vmin) plots for all DM masses are directly found from the single tilde h~(pR) plot through a simple rescaling of axes. By considering results in tildeh~(pR) space, one can determine if two experiments are inconsistent for all masses and all physically possible halos, or for what range of dark matter masses the results are inconsistent for all halos, without the necessity of multiple tilde g~(vmin) plots for different DM masses. As a result, we conduct a sample analysis comparing the CDMS II Si events to the null results from LUX, XENON10, and SuperCDMS using our method and discuss how the results can be strengthened by imposing the physically reasonable requirement of a finite halo escape velocity.

  1. DUAL HALOS AND FORMATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-08-20

    We present a determination of the two-dimensional shape parameters of the blue and red globular cluster systems (GCSs) in a large number of elliptical galaxies and lenticular galaxies (early-type galaxies, called ETGs). We use a homogeneous data set of the globular clusters in 23 ETGs obtained from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. The position angles of both blue and red GCSs show a correlation with those of the stellar light distribution, showing that the major axes of the GCSs are well aligned with those of their host galaxies. However, the shapes of the red GCSs show a tight correlation with the stellar light distribution as well as with the rotation property of their host galaxies, while the shapes of the blue GCSs do much less. These provide clear geometric evidence that the origins of the blue and red globular clusters are distinct and that ETGs may have dual halos: a blue (metal-poor) halo and a red (metal-rich) halo. These two halos show significant differences in metallicity, structure, and kinematics, indicating that they are formed in two distinguishable ways. The red halos might have formed via dissipational processes with rotation, while the blue halos are through accretion.

  2. Halo-independent tests of dark matter annual modulation signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan

    2015-09-02

    New halo-independent lower bounds on the product of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and the local dark matter density that are valid for annual modulations of dark matter direct detection signals are derived. They are obtained by making use of halo-independent bounds based on an expansion of the rate on the Earth’s velocity that were derived in previous works. In combination with astrophysical measurements of the local energy density, an observed annual modulation implies a lower bound on the cross section that is independent of the velocity distribution and that must be fulfilled by any particle physics model. In order to illustrate the power of the bounds we apply them to DAMA/LIBRA data and obtain quite strong results when compared to the standard halo model predictions. We also extend the bounds to the case of multi-target detectors.

  3. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  4. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  5. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  6. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  7. HOT GAS HALOS IN EARLY-TYPE FIELD GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulchaey, John S. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: mulchaey@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study the hot gas content in a sample of field early-type galaxies. We find that the L {sub X}-L {sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. The low hot gas content of field galaxies with L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} suggests that internal processes such as supernovae-driven winds or active galactic nucleus feedback expel hot gas from low-mass galaxies. Such mechanisms may be less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium can confine outflowing material. In addition, galaxies in groups and clusters may be able to accrete gas from the ambient medium. While there is a population of L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} galaxies in groups and clusters that retain hot gas halos, some galaxies in these rich environments, including brighter galaxies, are largely devoid of hot gas. In these cases, the hot gas halos have likely been removed via ram pressure stripping. This suggests a very complex interplay between the intragroup/intracluster medium and hot gas halos of galaxies in rich environments, with the ambient medium helping to confine or even enhance the halos in some cases and acting to remove gas in others. In contrast, the hot gas content of more isolated galaxies is largely a function of the mass of the galaxy, with more massive galaxies able to maintain their halos, while in lower mass systems the hot gas escapes in outflowing winds.

  8. Parallel halo finding in N-body cosmology simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfitzner, D.W.; Salmon, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Cosmological N-body simulations on parallel computers produce large datasets - about five hundred Megabytes at a single output time, or tens of Gigabytes over the course of a simulation. These large datasets require further analysis before they can be compared to astronomical observations. We have implemented two methods for performing halo finding, a key part of the knowledge discovery process, on parallel machines. One of these is a parallel implementation of the friends of friends (FOF) algorithm, widely used in the field of N-body cosmology. The new isodensity (ID) method has been developed to overcome some of the shortcomings of FOR Both have been implemented on a variety of computer systems, and successfully used to extract halos from simulations with up to 256{sup 3} (or about 16.8 million) particles, which axe among the largest N-body cosmology simulations in existence.

  9. Systematic uncertainties from halo asphericity in dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, Nicols; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Garani, Raghuveer; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ific.uv.es

    2014-09-01

    Although commonly assumed to be spherical, dark matter halos are predicted to be non-spherical by N-body simulations and their asphericity has a potential impact on the systematic uncertainties in dark matter searches. The evaluation of these uncertainties is the main aim of this work, where we study the impact of aspherical dark matter density distributions in Milky-Way-like halos on direct and indirect searches. Using data from the large N-body cosmological simulation Bolshoi, we perform a statistical analysis and quantify the systematic uncertainties on the determination of local dark matter density and the so-called J factors for dark matter annihilations and decays from the galactic center. We find that, due to our ignorance about the extent of the non-sphericity of the Milky Way dark matter halo, systematic uncertainties can be as large as 35%, within the 95% most probable region, for a spherically averaged value for the local density of 0.3-0.4 GeV/cm {sup 3}. Similarly, systematic uncertainties on the J factors evaluated around the galactic center can be as large as 10% and 15%, within the 95% most probable region, for dark matter annihilations and decays, respectively.

  10. Three-point galaxy-galaxy lensing as a probe of dark matter halo shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Susmita; Chue, Chun Yin Ricky; Dalal, Neal E-mail: chue2@illinois.edu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the ellipticities of dark matter halos using the lens-shear-shear 3-point correlation function. This method is immune to effects of galaxy-halo misalignments that can potentially limit 2-point galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of halo anisotropy. Using a simple model for the projected mass distributions of dark matter halos, we construct an ellipticity estimator that sums over all possible triangular configurations of the 3-point function. By applying our estimator to halos from N-body simulations, we find that systematic errors in the recovered ellipticity will be at the ?<5% fractional level. We estimate that future imaging surveys like LSST will have sufficient statistics to detect halo ellipticities using 3-point lensing.

  11. Halos in a deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Lulu; Meng Jie; Ring, P.; Zhao Enguang; Zhou Shangui

    2012-10-20

    In this contribution we present some recent results about neutron halos in deformed nuclei. A deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory in continuumhas been developed and the halo phenomenon in deformed weakly bound nuclei is investigated. These weakly bound quantum systems present interesting examples for the study of the interdependence between the deformation of the core and the particles in the halo. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and detailed results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nuclei {sup 42}Mg. The core of this nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the existence of halos in deformed nuclei and for the occurrence of this decoupling effect are discussed.

  12. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AS TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Willman, Beth [Haverford College, Department of Astronomy, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Brooks, Alyson M. [California Institute of Technology, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James, E-mail: az481@nyu.ed, E-mail: bwillman@haverford.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L88 4M1 (Canada)

    2010-09-20

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [{alpha}/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local L{sup *} galaxies.

  13. Core excitation effects in the breakup of halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, A. M.; Diego, R. de; Lay, J. A.; Crespo, R.; Johnson, R. C.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2012-10-20

    The role of core excitation in the structure and dynamics of two-body halo nuclei is investigated. We present calculations for the resonant breakup of {sup 11}Be on protons at an incident energy of 63.7 MeV/nucleon, where core excitation effects were shown to be important. To describe the reaction, we use a recently developed extension of the DWBA formalism which incorporates these core excitation effects within the no-recoil approximation. The validity of the no-recoil approximation is also examined by comparing with DWBA calculations which take into account core recoil. In addition, calculations with two different continuum representations are presented and compared.

  14. School Energy Survey Teacher Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Student Guide Page 20 INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Number of bulbs to get 25,000 hours 25 8.3 2.5 1 Cost of bulbs for 25,000...

  15. Dwarf galaxies in the halo of NGC 891

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, Earl

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a survey of the region within 40 arcmin of NGC 891, a nearby nearly perfectly edge-on spiral galaxy. Candidate 'non-stars' with diameters greater than 15 arcsec were selected from the GSC 2.3.2 catalog and cross-comparison of observations in several bands using archived GALEX, DSS2, WISE, and Two Micron All Sky Survey images identified contaminating stars, artifacts, and background galaxies, all of which were excluded. The resulting 71 galaxies, many of which were previously uncataloged, comprise a size-limited survey of the region. A majority of the galaxies are in the background of NGC 891 and are for the most part members of the A347 cluster at a distance of about 75 Mpc. The new finds approximately double the known membership of A347, previously thought to be relatively sparse. We identify a total of seven dwarf galaxies, most of which are new discoveries. The newly discovered dwarf galaxies are dim and gas-poor and may be associated with the previously observed arcs of red giant branch halo stars in the halo and the prominent H I filament and the lopsided features in the disk of NGC 891. Several of the dwarfs show signs of disruption, consistent with being remnants of an ancient collision.

  16. THE SPIN AND ORIENTATION OF DARK MATTER HALOS WITHIN COSMIC FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Youcai; Yang Xiaohu; Lin Weipeng; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Springel, Volker; Wang Huiyuan

    2009-11-20

    Clusters, filaments, sheets, and voids are the building blocks of the cosmic web. Forming dark matter halos respond to these different large-scale environments, and this in turn affects the properties of galaxies hosted by the halos. It is therefore important to understand the systematic correlations of halo properties with the morphology of the cosmic web, as this informs both about galaxy formation physics and possible systematics of weak lensing studies. In this study, we present and compare two distinct algorithms for finding cosmic filaments and sheets, a task which is far less well established than the identification of dark matter halos or voids. One method is based on the smoothed dark matter density field and the other uses the halo distributions directly. We apply both techniques to one high-resolution N-body simulation and reconstruct the filamentary/sheet like network of the dark matter density field. We focus on investigating the properties of the dark matter halos inside these structures, in particular, on the directions of their spins and the orientation of their shapes with respect to the directions of the filaments and sheets. We find that both the spin and the major axes of filament halos with masses approx<10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} are preferentially aligned with the direction of the filaments. The spins and major axes of halos in sheets tend to lie parallel to the sheets. There is an opposite mass dependence of the alignment strength for the spin (negative) and major (positive) axes, i.e. with increasing halo mass the major axis tends to be more strongly aligned with the direction of the filament, whereas the alignment between halo spin and filament becomes weaker with increasing halo mass. The alignment strength as a function of the distance to the most massive node halo indicates that there is a transit large-scale environment impact: from the two-dimensional collapse phase of the filament to the three-dimensional collapse phase of the cluster/node halo at small separation. Overall, the two algorithms for filament/sheet identification investigated here agree well with each other. The method based on halos alone can be easily adapted for use with observational data sets.

  17. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  18. Predicting weak lensing statistics from halo mass reconstructions - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Spencer

    2015-08-20

    As dark matter does not absorb or emit light, its distribution in the universe must be inferred through indirect effects such as the gravitational lensing of distant galaxies. While most sources are only weakly lensed, the systematic alignment of background galaxies around a foreground lens can constrain the mass of the lens which is largely in the form of dark matter. In this paper, I have implemented a framework to reconstruct all of the mass along lines of sight using a best-case dark matter halo model in which the halo mass is known. This framework is then used to make predictions of the weak lensing of 3,240 generated source galaxies through a 324 arcmin field of the Millennium Simulation. The lensed source ellipticities are characterized by the ellipticity-ellipticity and galaxy-mass correlation functions and compared to the same statistic for the intrinsic and ray-traced ellipticities. In the ellipticity-ellipticity correlation function, I and that the framework systematically under predicts the shear power by an average factor of 2.2 and fails to capture correlation from dark matter structure at scales larger than 1 arcminute. The model predicted galaxy-mass correlation function is in agreement with the ray-traced statistic from scales 0.2 to 0.7 arcminutes, but systematically underpredicts shear power at scales larger than 0.7 arcminutes by an average factor of 1.2. Optimization of the framework code has reduced the mean CPU time per lensing prediction by 70% to 24 5 ms. Physical and computational shortcomings of the framework are discussed, as well as potential improvements for upcoming work.

  19. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION FOR LOCAL GROUP GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brook, C. B.; Cintio, A. Di; Knebe, A.; Yepes, G.; Gottlber, S.; Hoffman, Y.; Garrison-Kimmel, S.

    2014-03-20

    We contend that a single power-law halo mass distribution is appropriate for direct matching to the stellar masses of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies, allowing the determination of the slope of the stellar mass-halo mass relation for low-mass galaxies. Errors in halo masses are well defined as the Poisson noise of simulated Local Group realizations, which we determine using local volume simulations. For the stellar mass range 10{sup 7}M {sub ?}halo mass relation follows a power law with slope of 3.1, significantly steeper than most values in the literature. This steep relation between stellar and halo masses would indicate that Local Group dwarf galaxies are hosted by dark matter halos with a small range of mass. Our methodology is robust down to the stellar mass to which the census of observed Local Group galaxies is complete, but the significant uncertainty in the currently measured slope of the stellar-to-halo mass relation will decrease dramatically if the Local Group completeness limit was 10{sup 6.5}M {sub ?} or below, highlighting the importance of pushing such limit to lower masses and larger volumes.

  20. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  1. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  2. The end of the MACHO era, revisited: New limits on MACHO masses from halo wide binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroy-Rodrguez, Miguel A.; Allen, Christine

    2014-08-01

    In order to determine an upper bound for the mass of the massive compact halo objects (MACHOs), we use the halo binaries contained in a recent catalog by Allen and Monroy-Rodrguez. To dynamically model their interactions with massive perturbers, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted, using an impulsive approximation method and assuming a galactic halo constituted by massive particles of a characteristic mass. The results of such simulations are compared with several subsamples of our improved catalog of candidate halo wide binaries. In accordance with Quinn et al., we also find our results to be very sensitive to the widest binaries. However, our larger sample, together with the fact that we can obtain galactic orbits for 150 of our systems, allows a more reliable estimate of the maximum MACHO mass than that obtained previously. If we employ the entire sample of 211 candidate halo stars we, obtain an upper limit of 112 M{sub ?}. However, using the 150 binaries in our catalog with computed galactic orbits, we are able to refine our fitting criteria. Thus, for the 100 most halo-like binaries we obtain a maximum MACHO mass of 21-68 M{sub ?}. Furthermore, we can estimate the dynamical effects of the galactic disk using binary samples that spend progressively shorter times within the disk. By extrapolating the limits obtained for our most reliablealbeit smallestsample, we find that as the time spent within the disk tends to zero, the upper bound of the MACHO mass tends to less than 5 M{sub ?}. The non-uniform density of the halo has also been taken into account, but the limit obtained, less than 5 M{sub ?}, does not differ much from the previous one. Together with microlensing studies that provide lower limits on the MACHO mass, our results essentially exclude the existence of such objects in the galactic halo.

  3. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    linac (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Authors: Jeon, Dong-O Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1091911 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID:

  4. The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars Authors: Deason, Alis J. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC Publication Date: 2016-02-02 OSTI

  5. The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites and the Metallicity Distribution of Accreted Stars × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of

  6. A hybrid fast-multipole technique for space-charge tracking with halos

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A hybrid fast-multipole technique for space-charge tracking with halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A hybrid fast-multipole technique for space-charge tracking with halos The simulation of injection and accumulation of intense proton beams in synchrotrons and accumulator rings requires a flexible and robust treatment of space-charge effects. In particular, the simulation must be able to correctly incorporate the

  7. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    linac (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Authors: Jeon, Dong-O Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1091911 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue:

  8. The MassiveBlack-II simulation: The evolution of haloes and galaxies to z ~ 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khandai, Nishikanta; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen; Feng, Yu; Tucker, Evan; DeGraf, Colin; Liu, Mao -Sheng

    2015-04-24

    We investigate the properties and clustering of halos, galaxies and blackholes to z = 0 in the high resolution hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). MBII evolves a ?CDM cosmology in a cubical comoving volume Vbox = (100Mpc/h). It is the highest resolution simulation of this size which includes a self-consistent model for star formation, black hole accretion and associated feedback. We provide a simulation browser web application which enables interactive search and tagging of the halos, subhalos and their properties and publicly release our galaxy catalogs to the scientific community. Our analysis of the halo mass function in MBII reveals that baryons have strong effects with changes in the halo abundance of 2035% below the knee of the mass function (Mhalo 1013.2 M? h at z = 0) when compared to dark-matter-only simulations. We provide a fitting function for the halo MF out to redshift z = 11 and discuss its limitations.

  9. Shape profiles and orientation bias for weak and strong lensing cluster halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groener, A. M.; Goldberg, D. M.

    2014-11-10

    We study the intrinsic shape and alignment of isodensities of galaxy cluster halos extracted from the MultiDark MDR1 cosmological simulation. We find that the simulated halos are extremely prolate on small scales and increasingly spherical on larger ones. Due to this trend, analytical projection along the line of sight produces an overestimation of the concentration index as a decreasing function of radius, which we quantify by using both the intrinsic distribution of three-dimensional concentrations (c {sub 200}) and isodensity shape on weak and strong lensing scales. We find this difference to be ?18% (?9%) for low- (medium-)mass cluster halos with intrinsically low concentrations (c {sub 200} = 1-3), while we find virtually no difference for halos with intrinsically high concentrations. Isodensities are found to be fairly well aligned throughout the entirety of the radial scale of each halo population. However, major axes of individual halos have been found to deviate by as much as ?30. We also present a value-added catalog of our analysis results, which we have made publicly available to download.

  10. A DISTANT RADIO MINI-HALO IN THE PHOENIX GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weeren, R. J.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Intema, H. T. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Lal, D. V. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411 007 (India); Brggen, M.; De Gasperin, F. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Hoeft, M. [Thringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778, Tautenburg (Germany); Nuza, S. E. [Leibniz-Institut fr Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Rttgering, H. J. A.; Stroe, A., E-mail: rvanweeren@cfa.harvard.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-05-10

    We report the discovery of extended radio emission in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CL J2344-4243, z = 0.596) with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 610MHz. The diffuse emission extends over a region of at least 400-500kpc and surrounds the central radio source of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy, but does not appear to be directly associated with it. We classify the diffuse emission as a radio mini-halo, making it the currently most distant mini-halo known. Radio mini-halos have been explained by synchrotron emitting particles re-accelerated via turbulence, possibly induced by gas sloshing generated from a minor merger event. Chandra observations show a non-concentric X-ray surface brightness distribution, which is consistent with this sloshing interpretation. The mini-halo has a flux density of 17 5mJy, resulting in a 1.4GHz radio power of (10.4 3.5) 10{sup 24}WHz{sup 1}. The combined cluster emission, which includes the central compact radio source, is also detected in a shallow GMRT 156MHz observation and together with the 610MHz data we compute a spectral index of 0.84 0.12 for the overall cluster radio emission. Given that mini-halos typically have steeper radio spectra than cluster radio galaxies, this spectral index should be taken as an upper limit for the mini-halo.

  11. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  12. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  13. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  14. Dark halos and elliptical galaxies as marginally stable dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Zant, A. A.

    2013-12-10

    The origin of equilibrium gravitational configurations is sought in terms of the stability of their trajectories, as described by the curvature of their Lagrangian configuration manifold of particle positionsa context in which subtle spurious effects originating from the singularity in the two-body potential become particularly clear. We focus on the case of spherical systems, which support only regular orbits in the collisionless limit, despite the persistence of local exponential instability of N-body trajectories in the anomalous case of discrete point particle representation even as N ? ?. When the singularity in the potential is removed, this apparent contradiction disappears. In the absence of fluctuations, equilibrium configurations generally correspond to positive scalar curvature and thus support stable trajectories. A null scalar curvature is associated with an effective, averaged equation of state describing dynamically relaxed equilibria with marginally stable trajectories. The associated configurations are quite similar to those of observed elliptical galaxies and simulated cosmological halos and are necessarily different from the systems dominated by isothermal cores, expected from entropy maximization in the context of the standard theory of violent relaxation. It is suggested that this is the case because a system starting far from equilibrium does not reach a 'most probable state' via violent relaxation, but that this process comes to an end as the system finds and (settles in) a configuration where it can most efficiently wash out perturbations. We explicitly test this interpretation by means of direct simulations.

  15. Spectral Energy Distributions for Disk and Halo M Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, S. K.; Allard, F.; Dahn, Conard; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kerr, T. H.; Rayner, J.

    2000-06-01

    We have obtained infrared (1-2.5 {mu}m) spectroscopy for 42 halo and disk dwarfs with spectral types M1-M6.5. These data are compared to synthetic spectra generated by the latest model atmospheres of Allard and Hauschildt. Photospheric parameters metallicity, effective temperature, and radius are determined for the sample.We find good agreement between observation and theory except for known problems due to incomplete molecular data for metal hydrides and H2O. The metal-poor M subdwarfs are well matched by the models, as oxide opacity sources are less important in this case. The derived effective temperatures for the sample range from 3600 to 2600 K; at these temperatures grain formation and extinction are not significant in the photosphere. The derived metallicities range from solar to 1/10 solar. The radii and effective temperatures derived agree well with recent models of low-mass stars. The spectra are available in electronic form upon request. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  16. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass, when cosmological parameters and the power index of the initial density fluctuation spectrum have changed dramatically. Our model predictions also match the PINOCCHIO mass accretion histories very well, which are much independent of our numerical simulations and our definitions of halo merger trees. These models are also simple and easy to implement, making them very useful in modeling the growth and structure of dark matter halos. We provide appendices describing the step-by-step implementation of our models. A calculator which allows one to interactively generate data for any given cosmological model is provided on the Web, together with a user-friendly code to make the relevant calculations and some tables listing the expected concentration as a function of halo mass and redshift in several popular cosmological models. We explain why LAMBDACDM and open CDM halos on nearly all mass scales show two distinct phases in their mass growth histories. We discuss implications of the universal relations we find in connection to the formation of dark matter halos in the cosmic density field.

  17. DOES THE SAGITTARIUS STREAM CONSTRAIN THE MILKY WAY HALO TO BE TRIAXIAL?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibata, R.; Martin, N. F.; Lewis, G. F.; Bellazzini, M.; Correnti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Recent analyses of the stellar stream of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy have suggested that the kinematics and three-dimensional location of the M-giant stars in this structure constrain the dark matter halo of our Galaxy to possess a triaxial shape that is extremely flattened, being essentially an oblate ellipsoid oriented perpendicular to the Galactic disk. Using a new stream-fitting algorithm, based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure, we investigate whether this claim remains valid if we allow the density profile of the Milky Way halo greater freedom. We find stream solutions that fit the leading and trailing arms of this structure even in a spherical halo, although this would need a rising Galactic rotation curve at large Galactocentric radius. However, the required rotation curve is not ruled out by current constraints. It appears therefore that for the Milky Way, halo triaxiality, despite its strong theoretical motivation, is not required to explain the Sagittarius stream. This degeneracy between triaxiality and the halo density profile suggests that, in future endeavors to model this structure, it will be advantageous to relax the strict analytic density profiles that have been used to date.

  18. Taking Halo-Independent Dark Matter Methods Out of the Bin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2014-10-30

    We develop a new halo-independent strategy for analyzing emerging DM hints, utilizing the method of extended maximum likelihood. This approach does not require the binning of events, making it uniquely suited to the analysis of emerging DM direct detection hints. It determines a preferred envelope, at a given confidence level, for the DM velocity integral which best fits the data using all available information and can be used even in the case of a single anomalous scattering event. All of the halo-independent information from a direct detection result may then be presented in a single plot, allowing simple comparisons betweenmore » multiple experiments. This results in the halo-independent analogue of the usual mass and cross-section plots found in typical direct detection analyses, where limit curves may be compared with best-fit regions in halo-space. The method is straightforward to implement, using already-established techniques, and its utility is demonstrated through the first unbinned halo-independent comparison of the three anomalous events observed in the CDMS-Si detector with recent limits from the LUX experiment.« less

  19. Techniques for the measurement of disruption halo currents in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Fredrickson, E.; Guttadora, L.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Takahashi, H.

    2011-10-06

    This paper describes techniques for measuring halo currents, and their associated toroidal peaking, in the National Spherical Torus Experiments. The measurements are based on three techniques: (i) measurement of the toroidal field created by the poloidal halo current, either with segmented Rogowski coils or discrete toroidal field sensors, (ii) the direct measurement of halo currents into specially instrument tiles, and (iii) small Rogowski coils placed on the mechanical supports of in-vessel components. For the segmented Rogowski coils and discrete toroidal field detectors, it is shown that the toroidal peaking factor inferred from the data is significantly less than the peakingmore » factor of the underlying halo current distribution, and a simple model is developed to relate the two. For the array of discrete toroidal field detectors and small Rogowski sensors, the compensation steps that are used to isolate the halo current signal are described. The electrical and mechanical design of compact under-tile resistive shunts and mini-Rogowski coils is described. Example data from the various systems is shown.« less

  20. The MassiveBlack-II simulation: The evolution of haloes and galaxies to z ~ 0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khandai, Nishikanta; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Wilkins, Stephen; Feng, Yu; Tucker, Evan; DeGraf, Colin; Liu, Mao -Sheng

    2015-04-24

    We investigate the properties and clustering of halos, galaxies and blackholes to z = 0 in the high resolution hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). MBII evolves a ΛCDM cosmology in a cubical comoving volume Vbox = (100Mpc/h)³. It is the highest resolution simulation of this size which includes a self-consistent model for star formation, black hole accretion and associated feedback. We provide a simulation browser web application which enables interactive search and tagging of the halos, subhalos and their properties and publicly release our galaxy catalogs to the scientific community. Our analysis of the halo mass function in MBII reveals thatmore » baryons have strong effects with changes in the halo abundance of 20–35% below the knee of the mass function (Mhalo 1013.2 M⊙ h at z = 0) when compared to dark-matter-only simulations. We provide a fitting function for the halo MF out to redshift z = 11 and discuss its limitations.« less

  1. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  2. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T.; Jackson, Kenneth J.; Duba, Alfred G.; Chen, Ching-I

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  3. WEAK GALACTIC HALO-DWARF SPHEROIDAL CONNECTION FROM RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiorentino, Giuliana [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bono, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Martnez-Vsquez, Clara E. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Stetson, Peter B. [National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Tolstoy, Eline [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Postbus 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Salaris, Maurizio [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L35RF (United Kingdom); Bernard, Edouard J., E-mail: giuliana.fiorentino@oabo.inaf.it [SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role that dwarf galaxies may have played in the formation of the Galactic halo (Halo) using RR Lyrae stars (RRL) as tracers of their ancient stellar component. The comparison is performed using two observables (periods, luminosity amplitudes) that are reddening and distance independent. Fundamental mode RRL in 6 dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) and 11 ultra faint dwarf galaxies (?1300) show a Gaussian period distribution well peaked around a mean period of (Pab) =0.6100.001days (? = 0.03). The Halo RRL (?15,000) are characterized by a broader period distribution. The fundamental mode RRL in all the dSphs apart from Sagittarius are completely lacking in High Amplitude Short Period (HASP) variables, defined as those having P ?0.48days and A{sub V} ?0.75mag. Such variables are not uncommon in the Halo and among the globular clusters and massive dwarf irregulars. To further interpret this evidence, we considered 18 globulars covering a broad range in metallicity (2.3?[Fe/H]? 1.1) and hosting more than 35 RRL each. The metallicity turns out to be the main parameter, since only globulars more metal-rich than [Fe/H]? 1.5 host RRL in the HASP region. This finding suggests that dSphs similar to the surviving ones do not appear to be the major building-blocks of the Halo. Leading physical arguments suggest an extreme upper limit of ?50% to their contribution. On the other hand, massive dwarfs hosting an old population with a broad metallicity distribution (Large Magellanic Cloud, Sagittarius) may have played a primary role in the formation of the Halo.

  4. Compact binary mergers as the origin of r-process elements in the Galactic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya; Prantzos, Nikos

    2014-05-02

    Compact binary mergers (of double neutron star and black hole-neutron star systems) are suggested to be the major site of the r-process elements in the Galaxy by recent hydrodynamical and nucleosynthesis studies. It has been pointed out, however, that estimated long lifetimes of compact binaries are in conflict with the presence of r-process-enhanced stars at the metallicity [Fe/H] ? ?3. To resolve this problem, we examine the role of compact binary mergers in the early Galactic chemical evolution on the assumption that our Galactic halo was formed from merging sub-halos. The chemical evolutions are modeled for sub-halos with their total stellar masses between 10{sup 4}M{sub ?} and 2 10{sup 8}M{sub ?}. The lifetimes of compact binaries are assumed to be 100 Myr (95%) and 1 Myr (5%) according to recent binary population synthesis studies. We find that the r-process abundances (relative to iron; [r/Fe]) start increasing at [Fe/H] ? ?3 if the star formation rates are smaller for less massive sub-halos. Our models also suggest that the star-to-star scatter of [r/Fe]'s observed in Galactic halo stars can be interpreted as a consequence of greater gas outflow rates for less massive sub-halos. In addition, the sub-solar [r/Fe]'s (observed as [Ba/Fe] ? ?1.5 for [Fe/H] < ?3) are explained by the contribution from the short-lived (? 1 Myr) binaries. Our result indicates, therefore, that compact binary mergers can be potentially the origin of the r-process elements throughout the Galactic history.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF THE HALO BIAS FROM STACKED SHEAR PROFILES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covone, Giovanni; Sereno, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    We present observational evidence of the two-halo term in the stacked shear profile of a sample of ?1200 optically selected galaxy clusters based on imaging data and the public shear catalog from the CFHTLenS. We find that the halo bias, a measure of the correlated distribution of matter around galaxy clusters, has amplitude and correlation with galaxy cluster mass in very good agreement with the predictions based on the LCDM standard cosmological model. The mass-concentration relation is flat but higher than theoretical predictions. We also confirm the close scaling relation between the optical richness of galaxy clusters and their mass.

  6. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kacprzak, Glenn G. [Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Ly?, Ly?, and O VI ??1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ? log (M {sub h}/M {sub ?}) ? 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ?40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ?15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ?45% for 1 ? D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ?90% for 2 ? D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ?} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ?40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ?85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ?65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ?5%. For 1 ? D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ?55% and ?35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ? D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ?90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  7. Unbound Particles in Dark Matter Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unbound Particles in Dark Matter Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Unbound Particles in Dark Matter Halos Authors: Behroozi, Peter S. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC ; Loeb, Abraham ; /Harvard U. ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC Publication Date: 2013-04-25 OSTI Identifier: 1076824 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15442 arXiv:1208.0334 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  8. Emittance dilution and halo creation during the first milliseconds after injection at the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    During the past year, the Fermilab Booster has been pushed to record intensities in order to satisfy the needs of the Tevatron collider and neutrino programs. This high intensity makes the study of space-charge effects and halo formation highly relevant to optimizing Booster performance. We present measurements of beam width evolution, halo formation, and coherent tune shifts, emphasizing the experimental techniques used and the calibration of the measuring devices. We also use simulations utilizing the 3D space-charge code Synergia to study the physical origins of these effects.

  9. On the shoulders of giants: properties of the stellar halo and the Milky Way mass distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kafle, Prajwal Raj; Sharma, Sanjib; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-10-10

    Halo stars orbit within the potential of the Milky Way, and hence their kinematics can be used to understand the underlying mass distribution. However, the inferred mass distribution depends sensitively on assumptions made on the density and the velocity anisotropy profiles of the tracer population. Also, there is a degeneracy between the parameters of the halo and those of the disk or bulge. Most previous attempts that use halo stars have made arbitrary assumptions about these. In this paper, we decompose the Galaxy into three major componentsa bulge, a Miyamoto-Nagai disk, and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo - and then model the kinematic data of the halo blue horizontal branch and K-giant stars from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. Additionally, we use the gas terminal velocity curve and the Sgr A* proper motion. With the distance of the Sun from the center of the Galaxy R {sub ?} = 8.5 kpc, our kinematic analysis reveals that the density of the stellar halo has a break at 17.2{sub ?1.0}{sup +1.1} kpc and an exponential cutoff in the outer parts starting at 97.7{sub ?15.8}{sup +15.6} kpc. Also, we find that the tracer velocity anisotropy is radially biased with ? {sub s} = 0.4 0.2 in the outer halo. We measure halo virial mass M {sub vir} to be 0.80{sub ?0.16}{sup +0.31}10{sup 12} M{sub ?}, concentration c to be 21.1{sub ?8.3}{sup +14.8}, disk mass to be 0.95{sub ?0.30}{sup +0.24}10{sup 11} M{sub ?}, disk scale length to be 4.9{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.4} kpc, and bulge mass to be 0.91{sub ?0.38}{sup +0.31}10{sup 10} M{sub ?}. The halo mass is found to be small, and this has important consequences. The giant stars reveal that the outermost halo stars have low velocity dispersion, but interestingly this suggests a truncation of the stellar halo density rather than a small overall mass of the Galaxy. Our estimates of local escape velocity v{sub esc}=550.9{sub ?22.1}{sup +32.4} km s{sup ?1} and dark matter density ?{sub ?}{sup DM}=0.0088{sub ?0.0018}{sup +0.0024} M{sub ?} pc{sup ?3} (0.35{sub ?0.07}{sup +0.08} GeV cm{sup 3}) are in good agreement with recent estimates. Some of the above estimates, in particular M {sub vir}, are dependent on the adopted value of R {sub ?} and also on the choice of the outer power-law index of the tracer number density.

  10. Touching the void: A striking drop in stellar halo density beyond 50 kpc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deason, A. J.; Rockosi, C. M.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.

    2014-05-20

    We use A-type stars selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9 photometry to measure the outer slope of the Milky Way stellar halo density profile beyond 50 kpc. A likelihood-based analysis is employed that models the ugr photometry distribution of blue horizontal branch and blue straggler stars. In the magnitude range 18.5 < g < 20.5, these stellar populations span a heliocentric distance range of: 10 ? D {sub BS}/kpc ? 75, 40 ? D {sub BHB}/kpc ? 100. Contributions from contaminants, such as QSOs, and the effect of photometric uncertainties, are also included in our modeling procedure. We find evidence for a very steep outer halo profile, with power-law index ? ? 6 beyond Galactocentric radii r = 50 kpc, and even steeper slopes favored (? ? 6-10) at larger radii. This result holds true when stars belonging to known overdensities, such as the Sagittarius stream, are included or excluded. We show that, by comparison to numerical simulations, stellar halos with shallower slopes at large distances tend to have more recent accretion activity. Thus, it is likely that the Milky Way has undergone a relatively quiet accretion history over the past several gigayears. Our measurement of the outer stellar halo profile may have important implications for dynamical mass models of the Milky Way, where the tracer density profile is strongly degenerate with total mass estimates.

  11. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C. S.; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W.

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 ?m sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Botes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ?}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ? 3-6 h {sup 1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ? 10{sup 12.9} h {sup 1} M {sub ?}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ? 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ? 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ?}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  12. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  13. School Energy Survey Student Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 40 new power plants. INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Brightness 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens Life of Bulb 1,000...

  14. Untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 Bulb Type Incandescent Fluorescent Other Room Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other unknown Total 4,196 431...

  15. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    linac (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Accepted Manuscript Published Article Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Subject: Identifier Numbers: Research Org: Sponsoring Org: Publication Date: to Update Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find DOE PAGES Published Article: Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron Source linac Title:

  16. Shrinking galaxy disks with fountain-driven accretion from the halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Struck, Curtis; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: curt@iastate.edu

    2014-12-01

    Star formation in most galaxies requires cosmic gas accretion because the gas consumption time is short compared to the Hubble time. This accretion presumably comes from a combination of infalling satellite debris, cold flows, and condensation of hot halo gas at the cool disk interface, perhaps aided by a galactic fountain. In general, the accretion will have a different specific angular momentum than the part of the disk that receives it, even if the gas comes from the nearby halo. The gas disk then expands or shrinks over time. Here we show that condensation of halo gas at a rate proportional to the star formation rate in the fountain model will preserve an initial shape, such as an exponential, with a shrinking scale length, leaving behind a stellar disk with a slightly steeper profile of younger stars near the center. This process is slow for most galaxies, producing imperceptible radial speeds, and it may be dominated by other torques, but it could be important for blue compact dwarfs, which tend to have large, irregular gas reservoirs and steep blue profiles in their inner stellar disks.

  17. Milky Way mass and potential recovery using tidal streams in a realistic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaca, Ana; Geha, Marla; Kpper, Andreas H. W.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Diemand, Jrg; Hogg, David W.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method for determining the Galactic gravitational potential based on forward modeling of tidal stellar streams. We use this method to test the performance of smooth and static analytic potentials in representing realistic dark matter halos, which have substructure and are continually evolving by accretion. Our FAST-FORWARD method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to compare, in six-dimensional phase space, an 'observed' stream to models created in trial analytic potentials. We analyze a large sample of streams that evolved in the Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, which represents a realistic Galactic halo potential. The recovered potential parameters are in agreement with the best fit to the global, present-day VL2 potential. However, merely assuming an analytic potential limits the dark matter halo mass measurement to an accuracy of 5%-20%, depending on the choice of analytic parameterization. Collectively, the mass estimates using streams from our sample reach this fundamental limit, but individually they can be highly biased. Individual streams can both under- and overestimate the mass, and the bias is progressively worse for those with smaller perigalacticons, motivating the search for tidal streams at galactocentric distances larger than 70 kpc. We estimate that the assumption of a static and smooth dark matter potential in modeling of the GD-1- and Pal5-like streams introduces an error of up to 50% in the Milky Way mass estimates.

  18. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  19. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US)","USDOE","LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  20. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  1. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  2. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION OF LOCAL GALAXIES SEGREGATES BY COLOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez-Puebla, Aldo; Yang, Xiaohu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Jing, Y. P.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv

    2015-02-01

    By means of a statistical approach that combines different semi-empirical methods of galaxy-halo connection, we derive the stellar-to-halo mass relations (SHMR) of local blue and red central galaxies. We also constrain the fraction of halos hosting blue/red central galaxies and the occupation statistics of blue and red satellites as a function of halo mass, M {sub h}. For the observational input we use the blue and red central/satellite galaxy stellar mass functions and two-point correlation functions in the stellar mass range of 9 < log(M {sub *}/M {sub ?})<12. We find that: (1)the SHMR of central galaxies is segregated by color, with blue centrals having a SHMR above that of red centrals; at log(M {sub h}/M {sub ?}) ?12, the M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratio of the blue centrals is ?0.05, which is ?1.7times larger than the value of red centrals. (2) The constrained scatters around the SHMRs of red and blue centrals are ?0.14 and ?0.11dex, respectively. The scatter of the average SHMR of all central galaxies changes from ?0.20dex to ?0.14dex in the 11.3 < log(M {sub h}/M {sub ?})<15 range. (3) The fraction of halos hosting blue centrals at M{sub h}=10{sup 11} M {sub ?} is 87%, but at 2 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} decays to ?20%, approaching a few percent at higher masses. The characteristic mass at which this fraction is the same for blue and red galaxies is M{sub h}?710{sup 11} M {sub ?}. Our results suggest that the SHMR of central galaxies at large masses is shaped by mass quenching. At low masses processes that delay star formation without invoking too strong supernova-driven outflows could explain the high M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratios of blue centrals as compared to those of the scarce red centrals.

  3. Predicting Galaxy Star Formation Rates via the Co-evolution of Galaxies and Halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Hearin, Andrew P.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Becker, Matthew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Skibba, Ramin A.; Reyes, Reinabelle; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2014-03-06

    In this paper, we test the age matching hypothesis that the star formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy is determined by its dark matter halo formation history, and as such, that more quiescent galaxies reside in older halos. This simple model has been remarkably successful at predicting color-based galaxy statistics at low redshift as measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To further test this method with observations, we present new SDSS measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and galaxy-galaxy lensing as a function of stellar mass and SFR, separated into quenched and star forming galaxy samples. We find that our age matching model is in excellent agreement with these new measurements. We also employ a galaxy group finder and show that our model is able to predict: (1) the relative SFRs of central and satellite galaxies, (2) the SFR-dependence of the radial distribution of satellite galaxy populations within galaxy groups, rich groups, and clusters and their surrounding larger scale environments, and (3) the interesting feature that the satellite quenched fraction as a function of projected radial distance from the central galaxy exhibits an approx r-.15 slope, independent of environment. The accurate prediction for the spatial distribution of satellites is intriguing given the fact that we do not explicitly model satellite-specific processes after infall, and that in our model the virial radius does not mark a special transition region in the evolution of a satellite, contrary to most galaxy evolution models. The success of the model suggests that present-day galaxy SFR is strongly correlated with halo mass assembly history.

  4. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: RATIONALE, DESIGN, AND A CENSUS OF CIRCUMGALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Sembach, Kenneth R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Meiring, Joseph D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Dav, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, South African Astronomical Observatories, and African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cape Town (South Africa); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ford, Amanda Brady [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); O'Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT (United States); Peeples, Molly S. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We present the design and methods of the COS-Halos survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos of 44 z = 0.15-0.35 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. This survey has yielded 39 spectra of z{sub em} ? 0.5 QSOs with S/N ?10-15 per resolution element. The QSO sightlines pass within 150 physical kpc of the galaxies, which span early and late types over stellar mass log M{sub *}/M{sub ?} = 9.5-11.5. We find that the circumgalactic medium exhibits strong H I, averaging ? 1 in Ly? equivalent width out to 150 kpc, with 100% covering fraction for star-forming galaxies and 75% covering for passive galaxies. We find good agreement in column densities between this survey and previous studies over similar range of impact parameter. There is weak evidence for a difference between early- and late-type galaxies in the strength and distribution of H I. Kinematics indicate that the detected material is bound to the host galaxy, such that ?> 90% of the detected column density is confined within 200 km s{sup 1} of the galaxies. This material generally exists well below the halo virial temperatures at T ?< 10{sup 5} K. We evaluate a number of possible origin scenarios for the detected material, and in the end favor a simple model in which the bulk of the detected H I arises in a bound, cool, low-density photoionized diffuse medium that is generic to all L* galaxies and may harbor a total gaseous mass comparable to galactic stellar masses.

  5. A MEGACAM SURVEY OF OUTER HALO SATELLITES. II. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN THE LOWEST STELLAR DENSITY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana, Felipe A.; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Geha, Marla; Cote, Patrick; Stetson, Peter; Simon, Joshua D.; Djorgovski, S. G. E-mail: rmunoz@das.uchile.cl

    2013-09-10

    We present a homogeneous study of blue straggler stars across 10 outer halo globular clusters, 3 classical dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and 9 ultra-faint galaxies based on deep and wide-field photometric data taken with MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We find blue straggler stars to be ubiquitous among these Milky Way satellites. Based on these data, we can test the importance of primordial binaries or multiple systems on blue straggler star formation in low-density environments. For the outer halo globular clusters, we find an anti-correlation between the specific frequency of blue stragglers and absolute magnitude, similar to that previously observed for inner halo clusters. When plotted against density and encounter rate, the frequency of blue stragglers is well fit by a single trend with a smooth transition between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters; this result points to a common origin for these satellites' blue stragglers. The fraction of blue stragglers stays constant and high in the low encounter rate regime spanned by our dwarf galaxies, and decreases with density and encounter rate in the range spanned by our globular clusters. We find that young stars can mimic blue stragglers in dwarf galaxies only if their ages are 2.5 {+-} 0.5 Gyr and they represent {approx}1%-7% of the total number of stars, which we deem highly unlikely. These results point to mass-transfer or mergers of primordial binaries or multiple systems as the dominant blue straggler formation mechanism in low-density systems.

  6. The Dark Matter Halos of Massive, Relaxed Galaxy Clusters Observed With Chandra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Robert W.; /Heidelberg, Astron. Rechen Inst.; Allen, S.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-11

    We use the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the dark matter halos of 34 massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters, spanning the redshift range 0.06 < z < 0.7. The observed dark matter and total mass (dark-plus-luminous matter) profiles can be approximated by the Navarro Frenk & White (hereafter NFW) model for cold dark matter (CDM) halos; for {approx} 80 percent of the clusters, the NFW model provides a statistically acceptable fit. In contrast, the singular isothermal sphere model can, in almost every case, be completely ruled out. We observe a well-defined mass-concentration relation for the clusters with a normalization and intrinsic scatter in good agreement with the predictions from simulations. The slope of the mass-concentration relation, c {infinity} M{sub vir}{sup a}/(1 + z){sup b} with a = -0.41 {+-} 0.11 at 95 percent confidence, is steeper than the value a {approx} -0.1 predicted by CDM simulations for lower mass halos. With the slope a included as a free fit parameter, the redshift evolution of the concentration parameter, b = 0.54 {+-} 0.47 at 95 percent confidence, is also slower than, but marginally consistent with, the same simulations (b {approx} 1). Fixing a {approx} -0.1 leads to an apparent evolution that is significantly slower, b = 0.20 {+-} 0.45, although the goodness of fit in this case is significantly worse. Using a generalized NFW model, we find the inner dark matter density slope, a, to be consistent with unity at 95 percent confidence for the majority of clusters. Combining the results for all clusters for which the generalized NFW model provides a good description of the data, we measure ? = 0.88 {+-} 0.29 at 95 percent confidence, in agreement with CDM model predictions.

  7. Galaxy Mergers and Dark Matter Halo Mergers in LCDM: Mass, Redshift, and Mass-Ratio Dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    We employ a high-resolution LCDM N-body simulation to present merger rate predictions for dark matter halos and investigate how common merger-related observables for galaxies - such as close pair counts, starburst counts, and the morphologically disturbed fraction - likely scale with luminosity, stellar mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift from z = 0 to z = 4. We provide a simple 'universal' fitting formula that describes our derived merger rates for dark matter halos a function of dark halo mass, merger mass ratio, and redshift, and go on to predict galaxy merger rates using number density-matching to associate halos with galaxies. For example, we find that the instantaneous merger rate of m/M > 0.3 mass ratio events into typical L {approx}> fL{sub *} galaxies follows the simple relation dN/dt {approx_equal} 0.03(1+f)Gyr{sup -1} (1+z){sup 2.1}. Despite the rapid increase in merger rate with redshift, only a small fraction of > 0.4L{sub *} high-redshift galaxies ({approx} 3% at z = 2) should have experienced a major merger (m/M > 0.3) in the very recent past (t < 100 Myr). This suggests that short-lived, merger-induced bursts of star formation should not contribute significantly to the global star formation rate at early times, in agreement with observational indications. In contrast, a fairly high fraction ({approx} 20%) of those z = 2 galaxies should have experienced a morphologically transformative merger within a virial dynamical time. We compare our results to observational merger rate estimates from both morphological indicators and pair-fraction based determinations between z = 0-2 and show that they are consistent with our predictions. However, we emphasize that great care must be made in these comparisons because the predicted observables depend very sensitively on galaxy luminosity, redshift, overall mass ratio, and uncertain relaxation timescales for merger remnants. We show that the majority of bright galaxies at z = 3 should have undergone a major merger (> 0.3) in the last 700 Myr and conclude that mergers almost certainly play an important role in delivering baryons and influencing the kinematic properties of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs).

  8. WEAK GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS A PROBE OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUBSTRUCTURES IN DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirasaki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a novel method to select satellite galaxies in outer regions of galaxy groups or clusters using weak gravitational lensing. The method is based on the theoretical expectation that the tangential shear pattern around satellite galaxies would appear with negative values at an offset distance from the center of the main halo. We can thus locate the satellite galaxies statistically with an offset distance of several lensing smoothing scales by using the standard reconstruction of surface mass density maps from weak lensing observation. We test the idea using high-resolution cosmological simulations. We show that subhalos separated from the center of the host halo are successfully located even without assuming the position of the center. For a number of such subhalos, the characteristic mass and offset length can be also estimated on a statistical basis. We perform a Fisher analysis to show how well upcoming weak lensing surveys can constrain the mass density profile of satellite galaxies. In the case of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope with a sky coverage of 20,000deg{sup 2}, the mass of the member galaxies in the outer region of galaxy clusters can be constrained with an accuracy of ?0.1 dex for galaxy clusters with mass 10{sup 14} h {sup 1} M {sub ?} at z = 0.15. Finally we explore the detectability of tidal stripping features for subhalos having a wide range of masses of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} h {sup 1} M {sub ?}.

  9. Quantifying (dis)agreement between direct detection experiments in a halo-independent way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldstein, Brian; Kahlhoefer, Felix, E-mail: brian.feldstein@physics.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: felix.kahlhoefer@physics.ox.ac.uk [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    We propose an improved method to study recent and near-future dark matter direct detection experiments with small numbers of observed events. Our method determines in a quantitative and halo-independent way whether the experiments point towards a consistent dark matter signal and identifies the best-fit dark matter parameters. To achieve true halo independence, we apply a recently developed method based on finding the velocity distribution that best describes a given set of data. For a quantitative global analysis we construct a likelihood function suitable for small numbers of events, which allows us to determine the best-fit particle physics properties of dark matter considering all experiments simultaneously. Based on this likelihood function we propose a new test statistic that quantifies how well the proposed model fits the data and how large the tension between different direct detection experiments is. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in order to determine the probability distribution function of this test statistic and to calculate the p-value for both the dark matter hypothesis and the background-only hypothesis.

  10. The derivation of constraints on the msugra parameter space from the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Nellen, L.; Nunez, D.; Sussmann, R.; Zavala, J.

    2009-04-20

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a present dark matter halo described by a Navarro-Frenk-White modified model with a central core. We obtain an expression for the relic abundance of neutralinos by comparing this entropy of the halo with the value it had during the freeze-out era. Using WMAP observations, we constrain the parameter space for mSUGRA models. Combining our results with the usual abundance criteria, we are able to discriminate clearly among different validity regions for tan {beta} values. For this, we require both criteria to be consistent within a 2{sigma} bound of the WMAP observations for the relic density: 0.112<{omega}h{sup 2}<0.122. We find that for sgn {mu} = +1, small values of tan {beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta}{approx}50 are both criteria significantly consistent. Both criteria allow us to put a lower bound on the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  11. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  12. Interpreting short gamma-ray burst progenitor kicks and time delays using the host galaxy-dark matter halo connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Fryer, Christopher L.

    2014-09-10

    Nearly 20% of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) have no observed host galaxies. Combining this finding with constraints on galaxies' dark matter halo potential wells gives strong limits on the natal kick velocity distribution for sGRB progenitors. For the best-fitting velocity distribution, one in five sGRB progenitors receives a natal kick above 150 km s{sup 1}, consistent with merging neutron star models but not with merging white dwarf binary models. This progenitor model constraint is robust to a wide variety of systematic uncertainties, including the sGRB progenitor time-delay model, the Swift redshift sensitivity, and the shape of the natal kick velocity distribution. We also use constraints on the galaxy-halo connection to determine the host halo and host galaxy demographics for sGRBs, which match extremely well with available data. Most sGRBs are expected to occur in halos near 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} and in galaxies near 5 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} (L {sub *}); unobserved faint and high-redshift host galaxies contribute a small minority of the observed hostless sGRB fraction. We find that sGRB redshift distributions and host galaxy stellar masses weakly constrain the progenitor time-delay model; the active versus passive fraction of sGRB host galaxies may offer a stronger constraint. Finally, we discuss how searches for gravitational wave optical counterparts in the local universe can reduce follow-up times using these findings.

  13. The COS-Halos survey: physical conditions and baryonic mass in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Tumlinson, Jason; Peeples, Molly S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Thom, Christopher; Bordoloi, Rongmon [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Lehner, Nicolas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States); O'Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT (United States); Ford, Amanda Brady [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Dav, Romeel [University of the Western Cape, Bellville, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Weinberg, David H., E-mail: jwerk@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T ?10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of L ? L* galaxies at z ? 0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n {sub H} {sub II}/n {sub H} ? 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background. Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R {sub vir}, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n {sub H} = (10{sup 4.20.25})(R/R {sub vir}){sup 0.80.3}. Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the H I column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M{sub CGM}{sup cool}>6.510{sup 10} M {sub ?} for the volume within R < R {sub vir}. Allowing for an additional warm-hot, O VI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} scale.

  14. Light bending in the galactic halo by Rindler-Ishak method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Nandi, Kamal K.; Isaev, Ruslan; Scalia, Massimo; Cattani, Carlo E-mail: subfear@gmail.com E-mail: ccattani@unisa.it

    2010-09-01

    After the work of Rindler and Ishak, it is now well established that the bending of light is influenced by the cosmological constant ? appearing in the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. We show that their method, when applied to the exact Mannheim-Kazanas-de Sitter solution of the Weyl conformal gravity, nicely yields the expected answer together with several other physically interesting new terms. Apart from ?, the solution is parametrized by a conformal parameter ?, which is known to play a dominant role in the galactic halo gravity. The application of the method yields exactly the same ?? correction to Schwarzschild bending as obtained by standard methods. Different cases are analyzed, which include some corrections to the special cases considered in the original paper by Rindler and Ishak.

  15. DETECTION OF A DISTINCT METAL-POOR STELLAR HALO IN THE EARLY-TYPE GALAXY NGC3115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Strader, Jay; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.

    2015-02-10

    We present the resolved stellar populations in the inner and outer halo of the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC3115. Using deep Hubble Space Telescope observations, we analyze stars 2 mag fainter than the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We study three fields along the minor axis of this galaxy, 19, 37, and 54kpc from its centercorresponding to 7, 14, and 21 effective radii (r{sub e} ). Even at these large galactocentric distances, all of the fields are dominated by a relatively enriched population, with the main peak in the metallicity distribution decreasing with radius from [Z/H] ? 0.5 to 0.65. The fraction of metal-poor stars ([Z/H] < 0.95) increases from 17% at 16-37 kpc to 28% at ?54kpc. We observe a distinct low-metallicity population (peaked at [Z/H] ? 1.3 and with total mass 2 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} ? 14% of the galaxy's stellar mass) and argue that this represents the detection of an underlying low-metallicity stellar halo. Such halos are generally predicted by galaxy formation theories and have been observed in several late-type galaxies, including the Milky Way and M31. The metallicity and spatial distribution of the stellar halo of NGC3115 are consistent with the galaxy's globular cluster system, which has a similar low-metallicity population that becomes dominant at these large radii. This finding supports the use of globular clusters as bright chemodynamical tracers of galaxy halos. These data also allow us to make a precise measurement of the magnitude of the TRGB, from which we derive a distance modulus of NGC3115 of 30.05 0.05 0.10{sub sys} (10.2 0.2 0.5{sub sys}Mpc)

  16. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  17. A population of relic intermediate-mass black holes in the halo of the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashkov, Valery; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-10

    If 'seed' central black holes were common in the subgalactic building blocks that merged to form present-day massive galaxies, then relic intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) should be present in the Galactic bulge and halo. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate the N-body Via Lactea II high-resolution simulation with black holes, and assess the size, properties, and detectability of the leftover population. The method assigns a black hole to the most tightly bound central particle of each subhalo at infall according to an extrapolation of the M {sub BH}-?{sub *} relation, and self-consistently follows the accretion and disruption of Milky Way progenitor dwarfs and their holes in a cosmological 'live' host from high redshift to today. We show that, depending on the minimum stellar velocity dispersion, ? {sub m}, below which central black holes are assumed to be increasingly rare, as many as ?2000 (? {sub m} = 3 km s{sup 1}) or as few as ?70 (? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup 1}) IMBHs may be left wandering in the halo of the Milky Way today. The fraction of IMBHs forced from their hosts by gravitational recoil is ? 20%. We identify two main Galactic subpopulations, 'naked' IMBHs, whose host subhalos were totally destroyed after infall, and 'clothed' IMBHs residing in dark matter satellites that survived tidal stripping. Naked IMBHs typically constitute 40%-50% of the total and are more centrally concentrated. We show that, in the ? {sub m} = 12 km s{sup 1} scenario, the clusters of tightly bound stars that should accompany naked IMBHs would be fainter than m{sub V} = 16 mag, spatially resolvable, and have proper motions of 0.1-10 mas yr{sup 1}. Their detection may provide an observational tool to constrain the formation history of massive black holes in the early universe.

  18. TURBULENCE AND RADIO MINI-HALOS IN THE SLOSHING CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.

    2013-01-10

    A number of relaxed, cool-core galaxy clusters exhibit diffuse, steep-spectrum radio sources in their central regions, known as radio mini-halos. It has been proposed that the relativistic electrons responsible for the emission have been reaccelerated by turbulence generated by the sloshing of the cool core gas. We present a high-resolution MHD simulation of gas sloshing in a galaxy cluster coupled with subgrid simulations of relativistic electron acceleration to test this hypothesis. Our simulation shows that the sloshing motions generate turbulence on the order of {delta}v {approx} 50-200 km s{sup -1} on spatial scales of {approx}50-100 kpc and below in the cool core region within the envelope of the sloshing cold fronts, whereas outside the cold fronts, there is negligible turbulence. This turbulence is potentially strong enough to reaccelerate relativistic electron seeds (with initial {gamma} {approx} 100-500) to {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 4} via damping of magnetosonic waves and non-resonant compression. The seed electrons could remain in the cluster from, e.g., past active galactic nucleus activity. In combination with the magnetic field amplification in the core, these electrons then produce diffuse radio synchrotron emission that is coincident with the region bounded by the sloshing cold fronts, as indeed observed in X-rays and the radio. The result holds for different initial spatial distributions of pre-existing relativistic electrons. The power and the steep spectral index ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To 1-2) of the resulting radio emission are consistent with observations of mini-halos, though the theoretical uncertainties of the acceleration mechanisms are high. We also produce simulated maps of inverse-Compton hard X-ray emission from the same population of relativistic electrons.

  19. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: KECK LRIS AND MAGELLAN MagE OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Thom, Christopher; Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Meiring, Joseph D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); O'Meara, John M., E-mail: jwerk@ucolick.org [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present high signal-to-noise optical spectra for 67 low-redshift (0.1 < z < 0.4) galaxies that lie within close projected distances (5 kpc < {rho} < 150 kpc) of 38 background UV-bright QSOs. The Keck LRIS and Magellan MagE data presented here are part of a survey that aims to construct a statistically sampled map of the physical state and metallicity of gaseous galaxy halos using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. We provide a detailed description of the optical data reduction and subsequent spectral analysis that allow us to derive the physical properties of this uniquely data-rich sample of galaxies. The galaxy sample is divided into 38 pre-selected L {approx} L*, z {approx} 0.2 'target' galaxies and 29 'bonus' galaxies that lie in close proximity to the QSO sightlines. We report galaxy spectroscopic redshifts accurate to {+-}30 km s{sup -1}, impact parameters, rest-frame colors, stellar masses, total star formation rates (SFRs), and gas-phase interstellar medium oxygen abundances. When we compare the distribution of these galaxy characteristics to those of the general low-redshift population, we find good agreement. The L {approx} L* galaxies in this sample span a diverse range of color (1.0 < u - r < 3.0), stellar mass (10{sup 9.5} < M/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 11.5}), and SFRs (0.01-20 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). These optical data, along with the COS UV spectroscopy, comprise the backbone of our efforts to understand how halo gas properties may correlate with their host galaxy properties, and ultimately to uncover the processes that drive gas outflow and/or are influenced by gas inflow.

  20. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the experiments actually reflect two chemically meaningful contributions, namely, a stabilizing interaction arising from the anisotropy of the charge distribution around the Cl atom in CCl{sub 4} and a stereospecific electron transfer that occurs at the intermolecular distances mainly probed by the experiments. Our model calculations suggest that the largest effect is for the vertex geometry of CCl{sub 4} while other geometries appear to play a minor to negligible role.

  1. Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S. ); Amidan, Brett G. ); Cada, G F.

    2003-07-31

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface pressure for a 48-hour post exposure observation period. No fall chinook salmon died during or after exposure to the horizontal bulb turbine passage pressures, and no injuries were observed during the 48-hour post exposure observation period. As with the previous test series, it cannot be determined whether fall chinook salmon acclimated to the greater water pressure during the pretest holding period. For bluegill sunfish exposed to the horizontal bulb turbine turbine-passage pressures, only one fish died and injuries were less severe and less common than for bluegills subjected to either the"worst case" pressure or modified Kaplan turbine pressure conditions in previous tests. Injury rates for bluegills were higher at 0.7 atm nadir than for the 0.95 atm nadir. However, injuries were limited to minor internal hemorrhaging. Bluegills did not suffer swim bladder rupture in any tested scenarios. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  2. Dark matter and halo bispectrum in redshift space: theory and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gil-Marn, Hctor; Percival, Will [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Wagner, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Norea, Jorge [Department of Theoretical Physics and Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP), 24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Verde, Licia, E-mail: hector.gil@port.ac.uk, E-mail: cwagner@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: jorge.norena@unige.ch, E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: will.percival@port.ac.uk [ICREA Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats, Passeig Llus Companys 23, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    We present a phenomenological modification of the standard perturbation theory prediction for the bispectrum in redshift space that allows us to extend the model to mildly non-linear scales over a wide range of redshifts, z?1.5. Our model require 18 free parameters that are fitted to N-body simulations using the shapes k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1,1.5,2.0,2.5. We find that we can describe the bispectrum of dark matter particles with ?5% accuracy for k{sub i}?<0.10h/Mpc at z=0, for k{sub i}?<0.15h/Mpc at z=0.5, for k{sub i}?<0.17h/Mpc at z=1.0 and for k{sub i}?<0.20h/Mpc at z=1.5. For very squeezed triangles with k{sub 1}=k{sub 2}?>0.1hMpc{sup -1} and k{sub 3}?0.02hMpc{sup -1}, however, neither SPT nor the proposed fitting formula are able to describe the measured dark matter bispectrum with this accuracy. We show that the fitting formula is sufficiently general that can be applied to other intermediate shapes such as k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1.25,1.75,and2.25. We also test that the fitting formula is able to describe with similar accuracy the bispectrum of cosmologies with different ?{sub m}, in the range 0.2?haloes. We find that the combination of these three statistics can break the degeneracy between b{sub 1}, f and ?{sub 8}. For dark matter particles the new model can be used to recover f and ?{sub 8} with ?1% accuracy. For dark matter haloes we find that f and ?{sub 8} present larger systematic shifts, ?10%. The systematic offsets arise because of limitations in the modelling of the interplay between bias and redshift space distortions, and represent a limitation as the statistical errors of forthcoming surveys reach this level. Conveniently, we find that these residual systematics are mitigated for combinations of parameters. In particular, the quantity f?{sub 8} is still recovered with ?1% accuracy for the particular halo population and cosmology studied. The improvement on the modelling of the bispectrum presented in this paper will be useful for extracting information from current and future galaxy surveys.

  3. Collisions induced by halo and weakly bound nuclei around the Coulomb barrier: Results at INFN-LNS Catania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figuera, Pierpaolo

    2012-10-20

    The study of collisions around the Coulomb barrier induced by halo and/or weakly bound nuclei has been the object of many publications in the last years, since the peculiar structure of such nuclei can strongly affect the reaction dynamics. In this paper we will summarize some results on the above topic obtained by our group at INFN-LNS Catania. Results concerning the study of elastic scattering and different reaction mechanisms in collisions induced by the halo nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 6}He and by the weakly bound stable nuclei {sup 6,7}Li on a {sup 64}Zn target, at energies around the Coulomb barrier, will be presented. The conclusions of our studies will be compared with the ones of other authors, in order to show if clear systematic conclusions can be drawn from the different papers published in the literature so far.

  4. TWO DISTANT HALO VELOCITY GROUPS DISCOVERED BY THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Levitan, David; Kirby, Evan N.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A.; Juric, Mario; Ofek, Eran O.

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of two new halo velocity groups (Cancer groups A and B) traced by eight distant RR Lyrae stars and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory survey at R.A. {approx} 129 Degree-Sign , decl. {approx} 20 Degree-Sign (l {approx} 205 Degree-Sign , b {approx} 32 Degree-Sign ). Located at 92 kpc from the Galactic center (86 kpc from the Sun), these are some of the most distant substructures in the Galactic halo known to date. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Palomar Observatory 5.1 m Hale telescope and W. M. Keck Observatory 10 m Keck I telescope indicate that the two groups are moving away from the Galaxy at v-bar{sub gsr}{sup A} = 78.0{+-}5.6 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group A) and v-bar{sub gsr}{sup B} = 16.3{+-}7.1 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group B). The groups have velocity dispersions of {sigma}{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup A}}}} = 12.4{+-}5.0 km s{sup -1} and {sigma}B{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup B}}}} =14.9{+-}6.2 km s{sup -1} and are spatially extended (about several kpc), making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and more likely to be debris of tidally disrupted dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. Both groups are metal-poor (median metallicities of [Fe/H]{sup A} = -1.6 dex and [Fe/H]{sup B} = -2.1 dex) and have a somewhat uncertain (due to small sample size) metallicity dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, suggesting dwarf galaxies as progenitors. Two additional RR Lyrae stars with velocities consistent with those of the Cancer groups have been observed {approx}25 Degree-Sign east, suggesting possible extension of the groups in that direction.

  5. Mapping compound cosmic telescopes containing multiple projected cluster-scale halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammons, S. Mark; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: kwong@as.arizona.edu E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-01-20

    Lines of sight with multiple projected cluster-scale gravitational lenses have high total masses and complex lens plane interactions that can boost the area of magnification, or tendue, making detection of faint background sources more likely than elsewhere. To identify these new 'compound' cosmic telescopes, we have found directions in the sky with the highest integrated mass densities, as traced by the projected concentrations of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). We use new galaxy spectroscopy to derive preliminary magnification maps for two such lines of sight with total mass exceeding ?3 10{sup 15} M {sub ?}. From 1151 MMT Hectospec spectra of galaxies down to i {sub AB} = 21.2, we identify two to three group- and cluster-scale halos in each beam. These are well traced by LRGs. The majority of the mass in beam J085007.6+360428 (0850) is contributed by Zwicky 1953, a massive cluster at z = 0.3774, whereas beam J130657.5+463219 (1306) is composed of three halos with virial masses of 6 10{sup 14}-2 10{sup 15} M {sub ?}, one of which is A1682. The magnification maps derived from our mass models based on spectroscopy and Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry alone display substantial tendue: the 68% confidence bands on the lens plane area with magnification exceeding 10 for a source plane of z{sub s} = 10 are [1.2, 3.8] arcmin{sup 2} for 0850 and [2.3, 6.7] arcmin{sup 2} for 1306. In deep Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging of beam 0850, we serendipitously discover a candidate multiply imaged V-dropout source at z {sub phot} = 5.03. The location of the candidate multiply imaged arcs is consistent with the critical curves for a source plane of z = 5.03 predicted by our mass model. Incorporating the position of the candidate multiply imaged galaxy as a constraint on the critical curve location in 0850 narrows the 68% confidence band on the lens plane area with ? > 10 and z{sub s} = 10 to [1.8, 4.2] arcmin{sup 2}, an tendue range comparable to that of MACS 0717+3745 and El Gordo, two of the most powerful single cluster lenses known. The significant lensing power of our beams makes them powerful probes of reionization and galaxy formation in the early universe.

  6. The PAndAS field of streams: Stellar structures in the milky way halo toward Andromeda and Triangulum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Rich, R. Michael; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Fardal, Mark A.; Irwin, Michael J.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Conn, Anthony R.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Babul, Arif; Navarro, Julio F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Crnojevi?, Denija; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Pearrubia, Jorge; Mackey, A. Dougal; Tanvir, Nial T.; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2014-05-20

    We reveal the highly structured nature of the Milky Way (MW) stellar halo within the footprint of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS) photometric survey from blue main sequence (MS) and MS turn-off stars. We map no fewer than five stellar structures within a heliocentric range of ?5-30 kpc. Some of these are known (the Monoceros Ring, the Pisces/Triangulum globular cluster stream), but we also uncover three well-defined stellar structures that could be, at least partly, responsible for the so-called Triangulum/Andromeda and Triangulum/Andromeda 2 features. In particular, we trace a new faint stellar stream located at a heliocentric distance of ?17 kpc. With a surface brightness of ? {sub V} ? 32-32.5 mag arcsec{sup 2}, it follows an orbit that is almost parallel to the Galactic plane north of M31 and has so far eluded surveys of the MW halo as these tend to steer away from regions dominated by the Galactic disk. Investigating our follow-up spectroscopic observations of PAndAS, we serendipitously uncover a radial velocity signature from stars that have colors and magnitudes compatible with the stream. From the velocity of eight likely member stars, we show that this stellar structure is dynamically cold, with an unresolved velocity dispersion that is lower than 7.1 km s{sup 1} at the 90% confidence level. Along with the width of the stream (300-650 pc), its dynamics point to a dwarf-galaxy-accretion origin. The numerous stellar structures we can map in the MW stellar halo between 5 and 30 kpc and their varying morphology is a testament to the complex nature of the stellar halo at these intermediate distances.

  7. A novel approach to derive halo-independent limits on dark matter properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, Francesc; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian

    2015-09-21

    We propose a method that allows to place an upper limit on the dark matter elastic scattering cross section with nucleons which is independent of the velocity distribution. Our approach combines null results from direct detection experiments with indirect searches at neutrino telescopes, and goes beyond previous attempts to remove astrophysical uncertainties in that it directly constrains the particle physics properties of the dark matter. The resulting halo-independent upper limits on the scattering cross section of dark matter are remarkably strong and reach σ{sub SI}{sup p}≲10{sup −43} (10{sup −42}) cm{sup 2} and σ{sub SD}{sup p}≲10{sup −37} (3×10{sup −37}) cm{sup 2}, for dark matter particles of m{sub DM}∼1 TeV annihilating into W{sup +}W{sup −} (bb-bar), assuming ρ{sub loc}=0.3 GeV/cm{sup 3}.

  8. Extended maximum likelihood halo-independent analysis of dark matter direct detection data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2015-11-24

    We extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct dark matter detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as independent variable we use the minimum speed a dark matter particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.7, the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed by CDMS-II-Si is compatible with the constraints imposed by all other experiments with null results. We also find a similar compatibility for exothermic inelastic spin-independent interactions with f{sub n}/f{sub p}=−0.8.

  9. Channeling and Volume Reflection Based Crystal Collimation of Tevatron Circulating Beam Halo (T-980)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Annala, G.; Drozhdin, A.; Johnson, T.; Legan, A.; Mokhov, N.; Reilly, R.; Still, D.; Tesarek, R.; Zagel, J.; Peggs, S.; /Brookhaven /CERN /Serpukhov, IHEP /INFN, Ferrara /PNPI, CSTD

    2010-05-01

    The T980 crystal collimation experiment is underway at the Tevatron to determine if this technique could increase 980 GeV beam-halo collimation efficiency at high-energy hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the LHC. T980 also studies various crystal types and parameters. The setup has been substantially enhanced during the Summer 2009 shutdown by installing a new O-shaped crystal in the horizontal goniometer, as well as adding a vertical goniometer with two alternating crystals (O-shaped and multi-strip) and additional beam diagnostics. First measurements with the new system are quite encouraging, with channeled and volume-reflected beams observed on the secondary collimators as predicted. Investigation of crystal collimation efficiencies with crystals in volume reflection and channeling modes are described in comparison with an amorphous primary collimator. Results on the system performance are presented for the end-of-store studies and for entire collider stores. The first investigation of colliding beam collimation simultaneously using crystals in both the vertical and horizontal plane has been made in the regime with horizontally channeled and vertically volume-reflected beams. Planning is underway for significant hardware improvements during the FY10 summer shutdown and for dedicated studies during the final year of Tevatron operation and also for a 'post-collider beam physics running' period.

  10. Constraining the mSUGRA (minimal supergravity) parameter space using the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunez, Dario; Zavala, Jesus; Nellen, Lukas; Sussman, Roberto A; Cabral-Rosetti, Luis G; Mondragon, Myriam E-mail: jzavala@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lukas@nucleares.unam.mx E-mail: lgcabral@ciidet.edu.mx; Collaboration: For the Instituto Avanzado de Cosmologia, IAC

    2008-05-15

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a dark matter halo described using a Navarro-Frenk-White model with a core. The comparison of this entropy with that of dark matter in the freeze-out era allows us to constrain the parameter space in mSUGRA models. Moreover, combining these constraints with the ones obtained from the usual abundance criterion and demanding that these criteria be consistent with the 2{sigma} bounds for the abundance of dark matter: 0.112{<=}{Omega}{sub DM}h{sup 2}{<=}0.122, we are able to clearly identify validity regions among the values of tan{beta}, which is one of the parameters of the mSUGRA model. We found that for the regions of the parameter space explored, small values of tan{beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta} Asymptotically-Equal-To 50 are the two criteria significantly consistent. In the region where the two criteria are consistent we also found a lower bound for the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  11. THE BIZARRE CHEMICAL INVENTORY OF NGC 2419, AN EXTREME OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Kirby, Evan N. E-mail: enk@astro.caltech.edu

    2012-11-20

    We present new Keck/HIRES observations of six red giants in the globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. Although the cluster is among the most distant and most luminous in the Milky Way, it was considered chemically ordinary until very recently. Our previous work showed that the near-infrared Ca II triplet line strength varied more than expected for a chemically homogeneous cluster, and that at least one star had unusual abundances of Mg and K. Here, we confirm that NGC 2419 harbors a population of stars, comprising about one-third of its mass, that is depleted in Mg by a factor of eight and enhanced in K by a factor of six with respect to the Mg-normal population. Although the majority, Mg-normal population appears to have a chemical abundance pattern indistinguishable from ordinary, inner-halo GCs, the Mg-poor population exhibits dispersions of several elements. The abundances of K and Sc are strongly anti-correlated with Mg, and some other elements (Si and Ca among others) are weakly anti-correlated with Mg. These abundance patterns suggest that the different populations of NGC 2419 sample the ejecta of diverse supernovae in addition to asymptotic giant branch ejecta. However, the abundances of Fe-peak elements except Sc show no star-to-star variation. We find no nucleosynthetic source that satisfactorily explains all of the abundance variations in this cluster. Because NGC 2419 appears like no other GC, we reiterate our previous suggestion that it is not a GC at all, but rather the core of an accreted dwarf galaxy.

  12. A budget and accounting of metals at z ? 0: Results from the COS-Halos survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeples, Molly S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Oppenheimer, Benjamin D. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Katz, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Weinberg, David H., E-mail: molly@stsci.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present a budget and accounting of metals in and around star-forming galaxies at z ? 0. We combine empirically derived star formation histories with updated supernova and asymptotic giant branch yields and rates to estimate the total mass of metals produced by galaxies with present-day stellar mass of 10{sup 9.3}-10{sup 11.6} M{sub ?}. On the accounting side of the ledger, we show that a surprisingly constant 20%-25% mass fraction of produced metals remain in galaxies' stars, interstellar gas and interstellar dust, with little dependence of this fraction on the galaxy stellar mass (omitting those metals immediately locked up in remnants). Thus, the bulk of metals are outside of galaxies, produced in the progenitors of today's L* galaxies. The COS-Halos survey is uniquely able to measure the mass of metals in the circumgalactic medium (CGM, to impact parameters of <150 kpc) of low-redshift ?L* galaxies. Using these data, we map the distribution of CGM metals as traced by both the highly ionized O VI ion and a suite of low-ionization species; combined with constraints on circumgalactic dust and hotter X-ray emitting gas out to similar impact parameters, we show that ?40% of metals produced by M {sub *} ? 10{sup 10} M{sub ?} galaxies can be easily accounted for out to 150 kpc. With the current data, we cannot rule out a constant mass of metals within this fixed physical radius. This census provides a crucial boundary condition for the eventual fate of metals in galaxy evolution models.

  13. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  14. A hadronic-leptonic model for the Fermi bubbles: Cosmic-rays in the galactic halo and radio emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-07-01

    We investigate non-thermal emission from the Fermi bubbles in a hadronic model. Cosmic-ray (CR) protons are accelerated at the forward shock of the bubbles. They interact with the background gas in the Galactic halo and create ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays and secondary electrons through proton-proton interaction. We follow the evolution of the CR protons and electrons by calculating their distribution functions. We find that the spectrum and the intensity profiles of ?{sup 0}-decay gamma-rays are consistent with observations. We predict that the shock front is located far ahead of the gamma-ray boundary of the Fermi bubbles. This naturally explains the fact that a clear temperature jump of thermal gas was not discovered at the gamma-ray boundary in recent Suzaku observations. We also consider re-acceleration of the background CRs in the Galactic halo at the shock front. We find that it can significantly affect the gamma-rays from the Fermi bubbles, unless the density of the background CRs is ? 10% of that in the Galactic disk. We indicate that secondary electrons alone cannot produce the observed radio emission from the Fermi bubbles. However, the radio emission from the outermost region of the bubbles can be explained if electrons are directly accelerated at the shock front with an efficiency of ?0.1% of that of protons.

  15. Accurate calculations of the WIMP halo around the Sun and prospects for its gamma-ray detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivertsson, Sofia; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2010-03-15

    Galactic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) may scatter off solar nuclei to orbits gravitationally bound to the Sun. Once bound, the WIMPs continue to lose energy by repeated scatters in the Sun, eventually leading to complete entrapment in the solar interior. While the density of the bound population is highest at the center of the Sun, the only observable signature of WIMP annihilations inside the Sun is neutrinos. It has been previously suggested that although the density of WIMPs just outside the Sun is lower than deep inside, gamma rays from WIMP annihilation just outside the surface of the Sun, in the so-called WIMP halo around the Sun, may be more easily detected. We here revisit this problem using detailed Monte Carlo simulations and detailed composition and structure information about the Sun to estimate the size of the gamma-ray flux. Compared to earlier simpler estimates, we find that the gamma-ray flux from WIMP annihilations in the solar WIMP halo would be negligible; no current or planned detectors would be able to detect this flux.

  16. Evolution in the HALO Masses of Isolated Galaxies between Z~;1 andZ~;0: From Deep2 to SDSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conroy, Charlie; Prada, Francisco; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Croton,Darren; Coil, Alison L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Faber, S.M.; Gerke, Brian F.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Klypin,Anatoly; Koo, David C.; Yan, Renbin

    2006-09-13

    We measure the evolution in the virial mass-to-light ratio(M_200/L_B) and virial-to-stellar mass ratio (M_200/M*) for isolated ~;L*galaxies between z~;1 and z~;0 by combining data from the DEEP2 GalaxyRedshift Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Utilizing the motionsof satellite galaxies around isolated galaxies, we measure line-of-sightvelocity dispersions and derive dark matter halo virial masses for thesehost galaxies. At both epochs the velocity dispersionof satellitescorrelates with host galaxy stellar mass, with sigma prop M*(0.4+-0.1),while the relation between satellite velocity dispersion and host galaxyB-band luminosity may grow somewhat shallower, from sigma propL_B(0.6+-0.1) at z~;1 to sigma proportional to L_B(0.4+-0.1) at z~;0. Theevolution in M_200/M* from z~;1 to z~;0 displays a bimodality, insofar ashost galaxies with stellar mass below M*~;1011 h-11M_Sub maintain aconstant ratio (the intrinsic increase is constrained to a factor of1.1+-0.5) while host galaxies above this mass experience a factor of3.3+-2.2 increase in their virial-to-stellar mass ratio. This result canbe easily understood if galaxies below this stellar mass scale continueto form stars while star formation in galaxies above this scale isquenched and the dark matter halos of galaxies both above and below thisscale grow in accordance with LCDM cosmological simulations. Hostgalaxies that are red in U - B color have larger satellite dispersionsand hence reside on average in more massive halos than blue galaxies atboth z~;1 and z~;0. The satellite population of host galaxies varieslittle between these epochs; the only significant difference is thatsatellites at z~;1 tend to be comparatively fainter (by ~;0.15 magnitudesin the mean) relative to their host luminosity than satellites at z ~; 0.The redshift and host galaxy stellar mass dependence of M_200/M* agreesqualitatively with the Millennium Run semi-analytic model of galaxyformation.

  17. Study of plasma meniscus formation and beam halo in negative ion source using the 3D3VPIC model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Fukano, A.

    2015-04-08

    In this paper, the effect of the electron confinement time on the plasma meniscus and the fraction of the beam halo is investigated by 3D3V-PIC (three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space) (Particle in Cell) simulation in the extraction region of negative ion source. The electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of diffusion across the magnetic field. Our 3D3V-PIC results support the previous result by 2D3V-PIC results i.e., it is confirmed that the penetration of the plasma meniscus becomes deep into the source plasma region when the effective confinement time is short.

  18. Proposed electron halo detector system as one of the beam overlap diagnostic tools for the new RHIC electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieberger, P.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Chasman, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Lambiase, R.; Montag, C.; Luo, Y.; Minty, M.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Tan, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    An electron lens for head-on beam-beam compensation planned for RHIC requires precise overlap of the electron and proton beams which both can have down to 0.3 mm rms transverse radial widths along the 2m long interaction region. Here we describe a new diagnostic tool that is being considered to aid in the tuning and verification of this overlap. Some of ultra relativistic protons (100 or 250 GeV) colliding with low energy electrons (2 to 10 keV) will transfer sufficient transverse momentum to cause the electrons to spiral around the magnetic guiding field in a way that will make them detectable outside of the main solenoid. Time-of-flight of the halo electron signals will provide position-sensitive information along the overlap region. Scattering cross sections are calculated and counting rate estimates are presented as function of electron energy and detector position.

  19. MEASURING THE ULTIMATE HALO MASS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS: REDSHIFTS AND MASS PROFILES FROM THE HECTOSPEC CLUSTER SURVEY (HeCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rines, Kenneth; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it

    2013-04-10

    The infall regions of galaxy clusters represent the largest gravitationally bound structures in a {Lambda}CDM universe. Measuring cluster mass profiles into the infall regions provides an estimate of the ultimate mass of these halos. We use the caustic technique to measure cluster mass profiles from galaxy redshifts obtained with the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS), an extensive spectroscopic survey of galaxy clusters with MMT/Hectospec. We survey 58 clusters selected by X-ray flux at 0.1 < z < 0.3. The survey includes 22,680 unique MMT/Hectospec redshifts for individual galaxies; 10,145 of these galaxies are cluster members. For each cluster, we acquired high signal-to-noise spectra for {approx}200 cluster members and a comparable number of foreground/background galaxies. The cluster members trace out infall patterns around the clusters. The members define a very narrow red sequence. We demonstrate that the determination of velocity dispersion is insensitive to the inclusion of bluer members (a small fraction of the cluster population). We apply the caustic technique to define membership and estimate the mass profiles to large radii. The ultimate halo mass of clusters (the mass that remains bound in the far future of a {Lambda}CDM universe) is on average (1.99 {+-} 0.11)M{sub 200}, a new observational cosmological test in essential agreement with simulations. Summed profiles binned in M{sub 200} and in L{sub X} demonstrate that the predicted Navarro-Frenk-White form of the density profile is a remarkably good representation of the data in agreement with weak lensing results extending to large radius. The concentration of these summed profiles is also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  20. A WIDE-FIELD PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY FOR EXTRATIDAL TAILS AROUND FIVE METAL-POOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Young-Wook; Sohn, Young-Jong; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sohn, Sangmo T.; Park, Jang-Hyun; Han, Wonyong; Kim, Ho-Il; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Sang-Gak

    2010-02-15

    Wide-field deep g'r'i' images obtained with the Megacam of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the spatial configuration of stars around five metal-poor globular clusters M15, M30, M53, NGC 5053, and NGC 5466, in a field-of-view {approx}3 deg. Applying a mask filtering algorithm to the color-magnitude diagrams of the observed stars, we sorted cluster's member star candidates that are used to examine the characteristics of the spatial stellar distribution surrounding the target clusters. The smoothed surface density maps and the overlaid isodensity contours indicate that all of the five metal-poor globular clusters exhibit strong evidence of extratidal overdensity features over their tidal radii, in the form of extended tidal tails around the clusters. The orientations of the observed extratidal features show signatures of tidal tails tracing the clusters' orbits, inferred from their proper motions, and effects of dynamical interactions with the Galaxy. Our findings include detections of a tidal bridge-like feature and an envelope structure around the pair of globular clusters M53 and NGC 5053. The observed radial surface density profiles of target clusters have a deviation from theoretical King models, for which the profiles show a break at 0.5-0.7r{sub t} , extending the overdensity features out to 1.5-2r{sub t} . Both radial surface density profiles for different angular sections and azimuthal number density profiles confirm the overdensity features of tidal tails around the five metal-poor globular clusters. Our results add further observational evidence that the observed metal-poor halo globular clusters originate from an accreted satellite system, indicative of the merging scenario of the formation of the Galactic halo.

  1. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: AN EMPIRICAL DESCRIPTION OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION IN THE LOW-REDSHIFT CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Thom, Christopher; Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tripp, Todd M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); O'Meara, John M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, VT (United States); Peeples, Molly S., E-mail: jwerk@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angles, CA (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present the equivalent width and column density measurements for low and intermediate ionization states of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding 44 low-z, L Almost-Equal-To L* galaxies drawn from the COS-Halos survey. These measurements are derived from far-UV transitions observed in HST/COS and Keck/HIRES spectra of background quasars within an impact parameter R < 160 kpc to the targeted galaxies. The data show significant metal-line absorption for 33 of the 44 galaxies, including quiescent systems, revealing the common occurrence of a cool (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K), metal-enriched CGM. The detection rates and column densities derived for these metal lines decrease with increasing impact parameter, a trend we interpret as a declining metal surface density profile for the CGM. A comparison of the relative column densities of adjacent ionization states indicates that the gas is predominantly ionized. The large surface density in metals demands a large reservoir of metals and gas in the cool CGM (very conservatively, M {sup cool} {sub CGM} > 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun }), which likely traces a distinct density and/or temperature regime from the highly ionized CGM traced by O{sup +5} absorption. The large dispersion in absorption strengths (including non-detections) suggests that the cool CGM traces a wide range of densities or a mix of local ionizing conditions. Lastly, the kinematics inferred from the metal-line profiles are consistent with the cool CGM being bound to the dark matter halos hosting the galaxies; this gas may serve as fuel for future star formation. Future work will leverage this data set to provide estimates on the mass, metallicity, dynamics, and origin of the cool CGM in low-z, L* galaxies.

  2. The angular clustering of WISE-selected active galactic nuclei: Different halos for obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donoso, E.; Yan, Lin; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of ?170,000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 ?m flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGNs and to have a mean redshift of (z) = 1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE AGNs is roughly similar to that of optical AGNs. We cross-match these objects with the photometric Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog and distinguish obscured sources with r W2 > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGNs. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGNs are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find that obscured sources at (z) ? 0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log (M/M {sub ?} h {sup 1}) ? 13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGNs at (z) ? 1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 0.6 and inhabit halos of log (M/M {sub ?} h {sup 1}) ? 12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGNs inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGNs, and they are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  3. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jason R Hollomon Brad Dillon Heather E Snowden Swan Lesley J LED light emitting diode CFL incandescent halogen lamp bulb TCLP STLC TTLC WET hazardous waste electronic waste e...

  4. THE STRIKINGLY SIMILAR RELATION BETWEEN SATELLITE AND CENTRAL GALAXIES AND THEIR DARK MATTER HALOS SINCE z = 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2013-08-01

    Satellite galaxies in rich clusters are subject to numerous physical processes that can significantly influence their evolution. However, the typical L* satellite galaxy resides in much lower mass galaxy groups, where the processes capable of altering their evolution are generally weaker and have had less time to operate. To investigate the extent to which satellite and central galaxy evolution differs, we separately model the stellar mass-halo mass (M{sub *}-M{sub h} ) relation for these two populations over the redshift interval 0 < z < 1. This relation for central galaxies is constrained by the galaxy stellar mass function while the relation for satellite galaxies is constrained against recent measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function (2PCF). Our approach does not rely on the abundance matching technique but instead adopts a flexible functional form for the relation between satellite galaxy stellar mass and subhalo mass, where subhalo mass is considered as the maximum mass that a subhalo has ever reached in its merger history, M{sub peak}. At z {approx} 0 the satellites, on average, have {approx}10% larger stellar masses at fixed M{sub peak} compared to central galaxies of the same halo mass (although the two relations are consistent at 2{sigma}-3{sigma} for M{sub peak} {approx}> 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun }). This is required in order to reproduce the observed stellar mass-dependent 2PCF and satellite fractions. At low masses our model slightly under-predicts the correlation function at {approx}1 Mpc scales. At z {approx} 1 the satellite and central galaxy M{sub *}-M{sub h} relations are consistent within the errors, and the model provides an excellent fit to the clustering data. At present, the errors on the clustering data at z {approx} 2 are too large to constrain the satellite model. A simple model in which satellite and central galaxies share the same M{sub *}-M{sub h} relation is able to reproduce the extant z {approx} 2 clustering data. We speculate that the striking similarity between the satellite and central galaxy M{sub *}-M{sub h} relations since z {approx} 2 arises because the central galaxy relation evolves very weakly with time and because the stellar mass of the typical satellite galaxy has not changed significantly since it was accreted. The reason for this last point is not yet entirely clear, but it is likely related to the fact that the typical {approx}L* satellite galaxy resides in a poor group where transformation processes are weak and lifetimes are short.

  5. Evaluation of vost and semivost methods for halogenated compounds in the Clean Air Act amendments title III. Validation study at fossil fuel plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.D.; Knoll, J.E.; Midgett, M.R.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), Title III, present a need for stationary source sampling and analytical methods for the list of 189 toxic air pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has used VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods for a wide variety of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the past, but these methodologies have been completely validated for only a few of the organic compounds. The applicability of VOST and SemiVOST techniques to the halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has been evaluated under laboratory conditions for chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric response, sorbent recovery and analytical method detection limit. Dynamic spiking techniques for the sampling trains (both gaseous and liquid dynamic spiking) were also evaluated in the laboratory. In the study, the VOST and SemiVOST methods were evaluated in the field at a fossil fuel power plant. The source was selected to provide actual stationary source emissions with the compounds of interest present in trace amounts or not present. The paper presents the results of the field validation of the VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods.

  6. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei; Sun, Fengqiang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  7. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Letant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; Levie, H. W.; Kuhl, A. L.; Murphy, G. A.; Alves, S. W.; Vandersall, K. S.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-12-17

    We found that energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemicalcode. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly themore » full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. These results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide andaluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. Our results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  8. Constraining dark matter halo profiles and galaxy formation models using spiral arm morphology. II. Dark and stellar mass concentrations for 13 nearby face-on galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seigar, Marc S. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota Duluth, 1023 University Drive, MWAH 371, Duluth, MN 55812-3009 (United States); Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel; Kennefick, Daniel [Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, 202 Field House, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the use of spiral arm pitch angles as a probe of disk galaxy mass profiles. We confirm our previous result that spiral arm pitch angles (P) are well correlated with the rate of shear (S) in disk galaxy rotation curves. We use this correlation to argue that imaging data alone can provide a powerful probe of galactic mass distributions out to large look-back times. We then use a sample of 13 galaxies, with Spitzer 3.6 ?m imaging data and observed H? rotation curves, to demonstrate how an inferred shear rate coupled with a bulge-disk decomposition model and a Tully-Fisher-derived velocity normalization can be used to place constraints on a galaxy's baryon fraction and dark matter halo profile. Finally, we show that there appears to be a trend (albeit a weak correlation) between spiral arm pitch angle and halo concentration. We discuss implications for the suggested link between supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass and dark halo concentration, using pitch angle as a proxy for SMBH mass.

  9. A halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-05-21

    We show that a positive signal in a dark matter (DM) direct detection experiment can be used to place a lower bound on the DM capture rate in the Sun, independent of the DM halo. For a given particle physics model and DM mass we obtain a lower bound on the capture rate independent of the local DM density, velocity distribution, galactic escape velocity, as well as the scattering cross section. We illustrate this lower bound on the capture rate by assuming that upcoming direct detection experiments will soon obtain a significant signal. When comparing the lower bound on the capture rate with limits on the high-energy neutrino flux from the Sun from neutrino telescopes, we can place upper limits on the branching fraction of DM annihilation channels leading to neutrinos. With current data from IceCube and Super-Kamiokande non-trivial limits can be obtained for spin-dependent interactions and direct annihilations into neutrinos. In some cases also annihilations into ττ or bb start getting constrained. For spin-independent interactions current constraints are weak, but they may become interesting for data from future neutrino telescopes.

  10. AN OVER-AND-OUT HALO CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN BY THE FULL ERUPTION OF A KINKED FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Jiayan; Jiang Yunchun; Bi Yi; Li Haidong; Hong Junchao; Yang Dan; Zheng Ruisheng; Yang Bo

    2012-04-10

    Over-and-out coronal mass ejections (CMEs) represent a broad class of CMEs that come from flare-producing magnetic explosions of various sizes but are laterally far offset from the flare, and their productions can be depicted by the magnetic-arch-blowout scenario. In this paper, we present observations of an over-and-out halo CME from the full eruption of a small kinking filament in an emerging active region (AR). In combination with the results of a derived coronal magnetic configuration, our observations showed that the CME was associated with a coronal helmet streamer, and the filament was located in the northern outskirts of the streamer base. Formed along a neutral line where flux cancellation was forced by the emerging AR with the surrounding opposite-polarity magnetic field, the filament underwent a full, non-radial eruption along the northern leg of the streamer arcade, accompanied by a clockwise deflection of the eruption direction. As a characteristic property of kink instability, the eruption displayed a clear inverse {gamma} shape, indicative of a writhing motion of the filament apex. Coronal dimmings, including a remote one, formed in opposite-polarity footprint regions of the streamer arcade during the eruption, and the consequent CME was laterally offset from the AR. These observations suggest that the kink instability is likely to be the driver in the eruption. The event can be well explained by putting this driver into the magnetic-arch-blowout model, in which the eruption-direction deflection and the full-eruption nature of the kinking filament are caused by the guiding action of the streamer arcade and the external reconnection between them.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF DARK MATTER HALOS ON DYNAMICAL ESTIMATES OF BLACK HOLE MASS: 10 NEW MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-{sigma} EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusli, S. P.; Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Fabricius, M.; Erwin, P.; Bender, R.; Nowak, N.; Lee, C. H.; Riffeser, A.; Sharp, R.

    2013-09-15

    Adaptive optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of 10 early-type galaxies are presented. Based primarily on the SINFONI kinematics, 10 black hole (BH) masses occupying the high-mass regime of the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation are derived using three-integral Schwarzschild models. The effect of dark matter (DM) inclusion on the BH mass is explored. The omission of a DM halo in the model results in a higher stellar mass-to-light ratio, especially when extensive kinematic data are used in the model. However, when the diameter of the sphere of influence-computed using the BH mass derived without a dark halo-is at least 10 times the point-spread function FWHM during the observations, it is safe to exclude a DM component in the dynamical modeling, i.e., the change in BH mass is negligible. When the spatial resolution is marginal, restricting the mass-to-light ratio to the right value returns the correct M{sub BH} although a dark halo is not present in the model. Compared to the M{sub BH}-{sigma} and M{sub BH}-L relations of McConnell et al., the 10 BHs are all more massive than expected from the luminosities and 7 BH masses are higher than expected from the stellar velocity dispersions of the host bulges. Using new fitted relations, which include the 10 galaxies, we find that the space density of the most massive BHs (M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) estimated from the M{sub BH}-L relation is higher than the estimate based on the M{sub BH}-{sigma} relation and the latter is higher than model predictions based on quasar counts, each by about an order of magnitude.

  12. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Light Bulbs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  13. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer

    2009-08-15

    We predict the acceleration of the Local Group generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey within the framework of {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies. We show that as the galaxy fluctuations derived from the halo model have more power on small scales compared with the mass fluctuations, the misalignment angle between the CMB velocity vector and the 2MASS Redshift Survey dipole is in reasonable agreement with the observed 21 deg. This statistical analysis suggests that it is not necessary to invoke a hypothetical nearby galaxy or a distant cluster to explain this misalignment.

  14. RELICS OF GALAXY MERGING: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS FOR A WANDERING MASSIVE BLACK HOLE AND ACCOMPANYING STAR CLUSTER IN THE HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Galaxies and massive black holes (BHs) presumably grow via galactic merging events and subsequent BH coalescence. As a case study, we investigate the merging event between the Andromeda galaxy (M31) and a satellite galaxy. We compute the expected observational appearance of the massive BH that was at the center of the satellite galaxy prior to the merger and is currently wandering in the M31 halo. We demonstrate that a radiatively inefficient accretion flow with a bolometric luminosity of a few tens of solar luminosities develops when Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto the BH is assumed. We compute the associated broadband spectrum and show that the radio band (observable with EVLA, ALMA, and the Square Kilometre Array) is the best frequency range in which to detect the emission. We also evaluate the mass and the luminosity of the stars bound by the wandering BH and find that such a star cluster is sufficiently luminous that it could correspond to one of the star clusters found by the PAndAS survey. The discovery of a relic massive BH wandering in a galactic halo will provide a direct means of investigating in detail the coevolution of galaxies and BHs. It also means a new population of BHs (off-center massive BHs) and offers targets for clean BH imaging that avoid strong interstellar scattering in the centers of galaxies.

  15. THE HALO MASSES AND GALAXY ENVIRONMENTS OF HYPERLUMINOUS QSOs AT z {approx_equal} 2.7 IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor, Ryan F.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2012-06-10

    We present an analysis of the galaxy distribution surrounding 15 of the most luminous ({approx}> 10{sup 14} L{sub Sun }; M{sub 1450} {approx_equal} -30) QSOs in the sky with z {approx_equal} 2.7. Our data are drawn from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey, which has been optimized to examine the small-scale interplay between galaxies and the intergalactic medium during the peak of the galaxy formation era at z {approx} 2-3. In this work, we use the positions and spectroscopic redshifts of 1558 galaxies that lie within {approx}3' (4.2 h{sup -1} comoving Mpc; cMpc) of the hyperluminous QSO (HLQSO) sight line in 1 of 15 independent survey fields, together with new measurements of the HLQSO systemic redshifts. By combining the spatial and redshift distributions, we measure the galaxy-HLQSO cross-correlation function, the galaxy-galaxy autocorrelation function, and the characteristic scale of galaxy overdensities surrounding the sites of exceedingly rare, extremely rapid, black hole accretion. On average, the HLQSOs lie within significant galaxy overdensities, characterized by a velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub v} {approx_equal} 200 km s{sup -1} and a transverse angular scale of {approx}25'' ({approx}200 physical kpc). We argue that such scales are expected for small groups with log (M{sub h}/M{sub Sun }) {approx_equal} 13. The galaxy-HLQSO cross-correlation function has a best-fit correlation length r{sup GQ}{sub 0} = (7.3 {+-} 1.3) h{sup -1} cMpc, while the galaxy autocorrelation measured from the spectroscopic galaxy sample in the same fields has r{sup GG}{sub 0} = (6.0 {+-} 0.5) h{sup -1} cMpc. Based on a comparison with simulations evaluated at z {approx} 2.6, these values imply that a typical galaxy lives in a host halo with log (M{sub h}/M{sub Sun }) = 11.9 {+-} 0.1, while HLQSOs inhabit host halos of log (M{sub h}/M{sub Sun }) = 12.3 {+-} 0.5. In spite of the extremely large black hole masses implied by their observed luminosities [log (M{sub BH}/M{sub Sun }) {approx}> 9.7], it appears that HLQSOs do not require environments very different from their much less luminous QSO counterparts. Evidently, the exceedingly low space density of HLQSOs ({approx}< 10{sup -9} cMpc{sup -3}) results from a one-in-a-million event on scales <<1 Mpc, and not from being hosted by rare dark matter halos.

  16. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 Common lightbulbs now sold in the United States typically use about 25%-80% less energy than traditional incandescents. Many bulbs meet these new standards, including halogen incandescents, CFLs, and LEDs. The new bulbs provide a wide range of choices in color and brightness, and many of them last much longer than traditional lightbulbs. The

  17. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E. [UCO/Lick Observatories (United States)

    2010-06-08

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

  18. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  19. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL...

  20. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pioneer Charles Proteus Steinmetz (center in light-colored suit) poses with Albert Einstein (immediate left) and other inventors at the RCA Brunswick, New Jersey,...

  1. Investigating the Effects of Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating the Effects of Temperature on Power Output Objective: Students will use concepts learned in class to explore the many variables that effect the efficiency of solar panels in regards to power output. Materials: * PV Array or Solar Panel * 2 Multimeter * Frozen Ice Packs * Low Power DC Bulb * Halogen Lamp (500 Watts) * 4 or 5 Alligator clip wires * Timer Investigative Question: How does the power output change as the temperature of the PV system changes. Procedure: 1) Attach the

  2. The first mixed-halide zirconium cluster compounds: Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.6}I{sub 10.4}Be, Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.3}I{sub 10.7}B, and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Matrix effects and halogen substitution in compact network structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeckerling, M.; Qi, R.Y.; Corbett, J.D.

    1996-03-13

    Investigations of the effect of halogen size on structure stability have been conducted in well-reduced and heavily interbridged zirconium chloride-iodide cluster systems. The title compounds are obtained in good yields from reactions of Zr, ZrCl{sub 4}, ZrI{sub 4}, and B or Be in sealed Ta tubes for {approximately} 4 weeks at 850 {degrees}C. Single-crystal diffraction at room temperature established these as Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.65(4)}I{sub 10.35(4)}Be and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.27/(3)}. These are derivatives of the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C and orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13}B structures, respectively, the latter containing unusual linear chains of clusters interbridged by Cl{sup i-i} that are in turn interconnected by three-bonded Cl{sup a-a-a} atoms. The random substitution of fractional Cl at specific I sites in the first two, and I for certain Cl in the third, was positionally resolved in all cases. The replacement always occurs at two-bonded X{sup i}, so that single types of halogen are left in sites that interconnected clusters and generate the three-dimensional array. Structural changes seen in both structures are specifically related to relief of X{hor_ellipsis}X crowding in the parent structure (matrix effects). Substitution of Cl for I{sup i} in the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C type greatly reduces intercluster I{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions and allows, among other things, a 0.20 {Angstrom} (5.8*5) reduction in Zr-I{sup 1-i} intercluster bond lengths. Increased Cl{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions caused by I substitution in orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Phase widths found are 0{le} x {le} 1.4 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub x}I{sub 12-x}Z (Z=B, Be) and 0 {le} x {le} 1.5 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13-x}I{sub x}B. The limit for iodine substitution in the chlorine-rich rhombohedral Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 12-x}I{sub x}Be is about x=2.5.

  3. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  4. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department has issued Notices of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company determining, based on corrected test data provided by...

  11. DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    product code 0521000), which is manufactured by Fuzhou and sold under the Westinghouse brand. The companies previously submitted data to DOE showing that 12 Westinghouse-brand...

  12. Studying some mechanical properties of MgO with used neon bulb glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issa, Tarik Talib; Khaleel, Saba Mahdi; Abdul Kareem, Noura Ammar

    2013-12-16

    Ceramic compact of MgO +WT% of UNBG were sintered at different sintering temperature (700, 900, 1100, 1300)c, under static air for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction and some mechanical properties were conducted. The maximum sintered density, compression; fracture strength and hardness were indicated for the compilation of MgO ?20 WT % UNBG, sintered at 1300 c.

  13. DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - On January 25th, the General Counsel notified 25 manufacturers that the Department of Energy has withdrawn their right to use the Energy Star label on 34 different models of...

  14. MODERATE C IV ABSORBER SYSTEMS REQUIRE 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} DARK MATTER HALOS AT z {approx} 2.3: A CROSS-CORRELATION STUDY OF C IV ABSORBER SYSTEMS AND QUASARS IN SDSS-III BOSS DR9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikas, Shailendra; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Lundgren, Britt; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; AlSayyad, Yusra; York, Donald G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brinkmann, J.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Snedden, Stephanie; Ge, Jian; Muna, Demitri; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; and others

    2013-05-01

    We measure the two-point cross-correlation function of C IV absorber systems and quasars, using spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS; Data Release 9). The 19,701 quasars and 6149 C IV ''moderate'' absorbers, 0.28 A < rest-frame equivalent width (EW) < 5 A, in our study cover a redshift range of 2.1 < z < 2.5 over 3300 deg{sup 2} and represent a factor of two increase in sample size over previous investigations. We find a correlation scale length and slope of the redshift-space cross-correlation function of s{sub 0} = 8.46 {+-} 1.24 Mpc, {gamma} = 1.68 {+-} 0.19, in the redshift-space range 10 < s < 100 Mpc. We find a projected cross-correlation function of C IV absorption systems and quasars of r{sub 0} = 7.76 {+-} 2.80 Mpc, {gamma} = 1.74 {+-} 0.21. We measure the combined quasar and C IV bias to be b{sub QSO} b{sub C{sub IV}} = 8.81 {+-} 2.28. Using an estimate of b{sub QSO} from the quasar auto-correlation function we find b{sub CIV} = 2.38 {+-} 0.62. This b{sub CIV} implies that EW > 0.28 A C IV absorbers at z {approx} 2.3 are typically found in dark matter halos that have masses {>=}10{sup 11.3}-10{sup 13.4} M{sub Sun} at that redshift. The complete BOSS sample will triple the number of both quasars and absorption systems and increase the power of this cross-correlation measurement by a factor of two.

  15. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver » Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED

  16. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2015-08-06 OSTI Identifier: 1212293 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16355 Journal ID: ISSN 1538--4357; arXiv:1503.02637 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource...

  17. DARK MATTER HALO PROFILES OF MASSIVE CLUSTERS: THEORY VERSUS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Argonne, IL 60439 (United States) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, ...

  18. Mergers and Mass Accretion for Infalling Halos Both End Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park U. Zurich ; Klypin, Anatoly ; New Mexico State U. ; Primack, Joel R. ; UC, Santa Cruz ; , Publication Date: 2014-05-06 OSTI...

  19. Evidence of a halo formation mechanism in the Spallation Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Send to ...

  20. Mergers and Mass Accretion for Infalling Halos Both End Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Hahn, Oliver ; ETH, Zurich ; Busha, Michael T. ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park U. Zurich ; Klypin,...

  1. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical illuminance measurements taken on the walls, indicating better lateral dispersion of the light. The undercabinet fixture’s light output was midway between the low and high power halogen undercabinet fixture light outputs (35.8 foot candle versus 13.4 fc and 53.4 fc) but it produced a more uniform light (max/min ratio of 7.0 versus 10.8). The color correlated temperature (CCT, the blue or yellowness) of the LED light correlated well with the halogen and incandescent lights (2675 K vs 2700 K). The color rendering of the LED downlight also correlated well at 92 CRI compared to 100 CRI for the halogen and incandescent lamps. The LED undercabinet fixture had measures of 2880 K CCT and 71 CRI compared to the 2700 K and 100 CRI scores for the halogen undercabinet fixture. Builders who toured the homes were surveyed; they gave the LED downlight high marks for brightness, said the undercabinet improved shadows and glare and said both products improved overall visibility, home appearance, and home value. Paybacks on the LED downlight ranged from 7.6 years (assuming electricity cost of 11 c/kWh) to 13.5 years (at 5C/kWh). Paybacks on the LED undercabinet fixture in a new home ranged from 4.4 years (11c/kWh electricity) to 7.6 years (5c/kWh) based on product costs of $95 per LED downlight and $140 per LED undercabinet fixture at 3 hrs per day of usage for the downlight and 2 hrs per day for the undercabinet lighting.

  2. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  3. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  4. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  5. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Roslyn Harbor, NY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Lafayette, LA); Ladner, Edward P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Anderson, Richard R. (Brownsville, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  6. Energy efficient synthesis of boranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, David L; Tumas, William; Schwarz, Daniel E; Burrell, Anthony K

    2012-01-24

    The reaction of halo-boron compounds (B--X compounds, compounds having one or more boron-halogen bonds) with silanes provides boranes (B--H compounds, compounds having one or more B--H bonds) and halosilanes. Inorganic hydrides, such as surface-bound silane hydrides (Si--H) react with B--X compounds to form B--H compounds and surface-bound halosilanes. The surface bound halosilanes are converted back to surface-bound silanes electrochemically. Halo-boron compounds react with stannanes (tin compounds having a Sn--H bond) to form boranes and halostannanes (tin compounds having a Sn--X bond). The halostannanes are converted back to stannanes electrochemically or by the thermolysis of Sn-formate compounds. When the halo-boron compound is BCl.sub.3, the B--H compound is B.sub.2H.sub.6, and where the reducing potential is provided electrochemically or by the thermolysis of formate.

  7. Energy efficient synthesis of boranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2010-11-23

    The reaction of halo-boron compounds (B--X compounds, compounds having one or more boron-halogen bonds) with silanes provides boranes (B--H compounds, compounds having one or more B--H bonds) and halosilanes. Inorganic hydrides, such as surface-bound silane hydrides (Si--H) react with B--X compounds to form B--H compounds and surface-bound halosilanes. The surface bound halosilanes are converted back to surface-bound silanes electrochemically. Halo-boron compounds react with stannanes (tin compounds having a Sn--H bond) to form boranes and halostannanes (tin compounds having a Sn--X bond). The halostannanes are converted back to stannanes electrochemically or by the thermolysis of Sn-formate compounds. When the halo-boron compound is BCl.sub.3, the B--H compound is B.sub.2H.sub.6, and where the reducing potential is provided electrochemically or by the thermolysis of formate.

  8. Departments of Energy and Defense Launch ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out- the Military Challenge Campaign to Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on Earth Day launched a joint Department of Energy (DOE) and Defense campaign to challenge military bases nationwide to change their...

  9. Normal and outlying populations of the Milky Way stellar halo at [Fe/H] <2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; Thompson, Ian; McWilliam, Andrew; Shectman, Stephen; Reimers, Dieter; Wisotzki, Lutz; Kirby, Evan E-mail: N.Christlieb@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: shec@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: dreimers@hs.uni-hamburg.de E-mail: ekirby@uci.edu

    2013-11-20

    From detailed abundance analysis of >100 Hamburg/ESO candidate extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars we find 45 with [Fe/H] < 3.0 dex. We identify a heretofore unidentified group: Ca-deficient stars with sub-solar [Ca/Fe] ratios and the lowest neutron-capture abundances; the Ca-deficient group comprises ?10% of the sample, excluding Carbon stars. Our radial velocity distribution shows that the carbon-enhanced stars with no s-process enhancements, CEMP-no, and which do not show C{sub 2} bands are not preferentially binary systems. Ignoring Carbon stars, approximately 15% of our sample are strong (?5?) outliers in one or more elements between Mg and Ni; this rises to ?19% if very strong (?10?) outliers for Sr and Ba are included. Examples include: HE03050554 with the lowest [Ba/H] known; HE10121540 and HE23230256, two (non-velocity variable) C-rich stars with very strong [Mg,Al/Fe] enhancements; and HE12261149, an extremely r-process rich star.

  10. IONIZATION SOURCE OF A MINOR-AXIS CLOUD IN THE OUTER HALO OF M82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Hattori, T.; Ozaki, S.; Yoshikawa, T.; Nagao, T.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2012-12-10

    The M82 ''cap'' is a gas cloud at a projected radius of 11.6 kpc along the minor axis of this well-known superwind source. The cap has been detected in optical line emission and X-ray emission and therefore provides an important probe of the wind energetics. In order to investigate the ionization source of the cap, we observed it with the Kyoto3DII Fabry-Perot instrument mounted on the Subaru Telescope. Deep continuum, H{alpha}, [N II]{lambda}6583/H{alpha}, and [S II]{lambda}{lambda}6716,6731/H{alpha} maps were obtained with subarcsecond resolution. The superior spatial resolution compared to earlier studies reveals a number of bright H{alpha} emitting clouds within the cap. The emission line widths ({approx}< 100 km s{sup -1} FWHM) and line ratios in the newly identified knots are most reasonably explained by slow to moderate shocks velocities (v{sub shock} 40-80 km s{sup -1}) driven by a fast wind into dense clouds. The momentum input from the M82 nuclear starburst region is enough to produce the observed shock. Consequently, earlier claims of photoionization by the central starburst are ruled out because they cannot explain the observed fluxes of the densest knots unless the UV escape fraction is very high (f{sub esc} > 60%), i.e., an order of magnitude higher than observed in dwarf galaxies to date. Using these results, we discuss the evolutionary history of the M82 superwind. Future UV/X-ray surveys are expected to confirm that the temperature of the gas is consistent with our moderate shock model.

  11. Primordial non-Gaussianity in the Bispectrum of the Halo Density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U. ; Seljak, Uros ; Zurich U. UC, Berkeley LBL, Berkeley IEU, Seoul ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Stanford U., ITP KIPAC, Menlo Park Publication Date: 2013-06-13 OSTI Identifier:...

  12. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Gunn, James E.; Raskutti, Sudhir; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-10-20

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions ?{sub *} ?> 150 km s{sup 1}. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2R{sub e} is old (?10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ? 0.5), and ?-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ? 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ? 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ? 1.5-2)

  13. Unbound Particles in Dark Matter Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Peter S. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC ; Loeb, Abraham ; Harvard U. ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; KIPAC, Menlo Park Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC...

  14. Primordial non-Gaussianity in the Bispectrum of the Halo Density...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  15. The Eating Habits of Milky Way Mass Halos: Destroyed Dwarf Satellites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  16. Resonance Raman and far-infrared studies of isotopically disordered and mixed-halide halogen-bridged platinum chain solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, S.P.; Worl, L.A.; Donohoe, R.J.; Huckett, S.C.; Saxena, A.; Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1992-12-31

    The MX chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](CIO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2} and X=Cl, Br), referred to as ``PtX,`` are used to explore some of the surprising spectral consequences of disorder in 1-D systems, first for pure PtCl, where the disorder arises from randomly distributed Cl isotopes, then for the more drastic case of the mixed-halide materials PtCl{sub 1minusx}Br{sub x}. Lattice dynamics and Peierls-Hubbard modelling are used to analyze the observed spectral behavior. In both cases, the complex structure seen in the Raman and IR spectra is found to arise from strongly localized vibrational modes residing on chain segments, defined by sequences of Cl isotopes for PtCl, and by sequences of Cl and Br for PtCl{sub 1minusx}Br{sub x}. 4 figs, 8 refs.

  17. Gas Phase Reactions between Fuel Molecules and Halogens: A Review of the Reaction between Atomic Chlorine and Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven Ewa Xuefei Tao Jingjing Alecu Mielke Papajak Xu Yu Zheng Annual Report Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Princeton, NJ Sept. 23, 2010 Truhlar group University of Minnesota Practical methods for including torsional anharmonicity in thermochemical calculations on complex molecules * We proposed a new approximation called the multi-structural method with torsional anharmonicity (MS-T) to calculate conformational-vibrational-rotational partition functions. * It is applicable for

  18. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Heat Pumps: 1,600 - 3,200 Lighting Fixtures: varies, up to 100fixture Light bulbs and lighting: varies, up to 15bulb LED Fixtures: 30 LED Bulbs: 10 FanMotor...

  19. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs,...

  20. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old incandescent bulbs ...

  1. Share the Love (and Energy Savings) This Mother's Day | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10-20 times longer than traditional incandescent light bulbs. Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. ...

  2. Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by 25% to 50%. Replacing 15 incandescent light bulbs with energy efficient bulbs can save approximately 50 per year. When shopping for appliances, look for the Energy Star...

  3. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women This document, from the Wisconsin...

  4. Entergy Arkansas- Agricultural Energy Solutions Program Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Presecriptive Option offers predetermined incentives on a wide variety of energy efficiency measures including Compact Flourescent Light Bulbs and high performance flourescent bulb replacemen...

  5. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manufacturer of energy-saving Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs, solar-powered lights, LED bulbs, auto lamps and other speciality lamps. Coordinates: 23.049681, 113.173737...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Xcel service territory. Rebates are available for evaporative cooling systems, LED light bulbs, and CFL light bulbs. All equipment must meet program requirements....

  7. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for households to see a simple payback from compact fluorescent bulbs depends on the price of electricity. Assuming a 26-watt compact fluorescent bulb that costs 22 dollars,...

  8. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women This document,...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    install energy efficiency measures in Xcel service territory. Rebates are available for evaporative cooling systems, LED light bulbs, and CFL light bulbs. All equipment must meet...

  10. CFL Lightbulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All of these lightbulbs meet the new energy standards that take effect from 20122014.These CFL bulbs use about 75% less energy than traditional bulbs.

  11. History of the Lightbulb | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightbulb History of the Lightbulb Read more about the History of the Light Bulb.

  12. Halo-independent tests of dark matter direct detection signals: local DM density, LHC, and thermal freeze-out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas; Vogl, Stefan

    2015-08-19

    From an assumed signal in a Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiment a lower bound on the product of the DM-nucleon scattering cross section and the local DM density is derived, which is independent of the local DM velocity distribution. This can be combined with astrophysical determinations of the local DM density. Within a given particle physics model the bound also allows a robust comparison of a direct detection signal with limits from the LHC. Furthermore, the bound can be used to formulate a condition which has to be fulfilled if the particle responsible for the direct detection signal is a thermal relic, regardless of whether it constitutes all DM or only part of it. We illustrate the arguments by adopting a simplified DM model with a Z{sup ′} mediator and assuming a signal in a future xenon direct detection experiment.

  13. CALiPER Report 20.2: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-03-31

    This report focuses on the flicker and power quality performance of the Series 20 lamps at full output and various dimmed levels. All of the Series 20 PAR38 lamps that manufacturers claimed to be dimmable (including all halogen lamps) were evaluated individually (one lamp at a time) both on a switch and under the control of a phase-cut dimmer designed for use with "all classes of bulbs." Measurements of luminous flux, flicker, and power quality were taken at 10 target dimmed settings and compared with operation on a switch. Because only a single unit of each product was evaluated on a single dimmer that may or may not have been recommended by its manufacturer, this report focuses on the performance of the products relative to each other, rather than the best-case performance of each lamp or variation in performance delivered from each lamp. Despite these limitations, the results suggest that LED performance is improving, and performance trends are beginning to emerge, perhaps due in part to the identification of preferred LED driver strategies for lamp products.

  14. The translucency of dental composites investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitrescu, L. Silaghi; Pastrav, O.; Prejmerean, C.; Prodan, D.; Boboia, S.; Codruta, S.; Moldovan, M.

    2013-11-13

    Translucency is the property of a material to partially transmit and diffuse incident light, and can be described as a partial opacity or a state between complete opacity and complete transparency. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the translucency index of resin composites according to their chemical structure and to the light source used for curing. Our study was achieved on four commercial composite samples (30 mm 2 mm) cured with two different lamps (Optilux - halogen bulb and Ultralight - LED). Measurements were made with a UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the reflection spectrum was recorded in the 380-770 nm region on white and black, compared with a SPECTRALON standard white. For all materials cured with the LED lamp on the glossy sides, the best results were given by Tetric Evo Ceram followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril{sup RO} and Premise. The measurements made on samples cured with an Optilux lamp, to the smooth and rough sides of the samples, revealed that the highest index of translucency is provided by Tetric Evo Ceram on the smooth side, followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril{sup RO} and Premises. We can say that the translucency of the composites is mostly determined by the chemical composition of the material, which is observed from transmittance values recorded for each sample, and by the source of radiation applied on the sample.

  15. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: Semivost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final project report, August 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    The candidate methods for semivolatile organic compounds are SW-846 Sampling Method 0010 and Analytical Method 8270, which are applicable to stationary sources. Two field tests were conducted using quadruple sampling trains with dynamic spiking were performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. The first field test was performed at a site with low levels of moisture. The second test reported here was conducted at a chemical manufacturing facility where chemical wastes were burned in a coal-fired boiler. Poor recoveries obtained for the spiked analytes at the second test were attributed to wet sorbent from the sampling train, use of methanol to effect complete transfer of wet sorbent from the sampling module, and use of extraction techniques which did not effect a complete separation of methylene chloride from methanol. A procedure to address problems with preparation of samples from Method 0010 is included in the report.

  16. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  17. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

    1999-02-02

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

  18. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, Michael G.; Turner, Brian; Wooten, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

  19. TipCard_Front_back_final_rev2.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    helps you understand your purchase. The label has the lumens - or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warm/yellow, to white, to cool/blue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range of colors. energysavers.gov/lumens Lumens tell you how bright a bulb is. More lumens mean brighter light. When replacing a 60-watt traditional incandescent bulb, look for a new bulb that gives you about 800 lumens. Choose your next light bulb for

  20. 6

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    helps you understand your purchase. The label has the lumens - or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warm/yellow, to white, to cool/blue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range of colors. energysavers.gov/lumens Lumens tell you how bright a bulb is. More lumens mean brighter light. When replacing a 60-watt traditional incandescent bulb, look for a new bulb that gives you about 800 lumens. Choose your next light bulb for

  1. Saving Energy and Saving Money in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Oliver, LeAnn; Gajewski, Katherine; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain

    2011-01-01

    Philadelphia is using a portion of its EECBG grant, to change out over 50,000 traffic bulbs with energy-efficient LED bulbs and save $1 million per year in energy savings.

  2. Saving Energy and Saving Money in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Oliver, LeAnn; Gajewski, Katherine; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain

    2013-05-29

    Philadelphia is using a portion of its EECBG grant, to change out over 50,000 traffic bulbs with energy-efficient LED bulbs and save $1 million per year in energy savings.

  3. New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25, 2012 - ...

  4. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on lighting costs. Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old...

  5. Getting CFLs Home in Longview, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Inefficient light bulbs can drive up electricity bills and drain homeowners' wallets. With that in mind, government officials in the east Texas city of Longview established a light bulb swap program that is projected to save participating households $242.

  6. LED Lightbulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All of these lightbulbs meet the new energy standards that take effect from 20122014. These LED bulbs use about 75%80% less energy than traditional bulbs.

  7. Department of Energy Announces Philips Lighting North America as Winner of L Prize Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philips Product Delivers on Department's Challenge to Replace Common Light Bulb with Energy-Saving Lighting Alternative

  8. Another Side of Light - D

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. Three quantum phenomena In fluorescence, matter absorbs light waves of a high frequency and then emits light of the same or lower frequency. This process was studied and named by George Gabriel Stokes in the mid-19th century. Today, fluorescence is familiar to us from fluorescent light bulbs. A fluorescent bulb's filament produces ultraviolet light, which is absorbed by the bulb's inner coating, which then emits lower-frequency visible light-more visible light than an incandescent bulb

  9. Solid bromine complexers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ)

    1987-01-20

    The cell of the invention comprises a housing, a zinc or cadmium anode, a chemically non-reactive counterelectrode and cathodic halogen. The cathodic halogen is selected from chlorine and bromine, and preferably is bromine. The cell also is provided with an aqueous metal halide containing electrolyte in which the metal ions are of the same metal as the metal of the anode and halide anions are of the same halogen as the cathodic halogen material. Importantly, in the present invention, anion exchange resins provide a convenient means for storing the halogen generated during charging of the cell and providing a source of halogen to be used in the discharge of the cell.

  10. COSMIC EMULATION: THE CONCENTRATION-MASS RELATION FOR wCDM UNIVERSES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cosmological parameters studied, the mean halo concentration varies from c approx 2 to ... the c-M relation, finding that they underestimate the halo concentration at high masses. ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric ... matter power spectra and compare (i) the halo model using a mass function evaluated from ...

  12. SPORTAL3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to sportal3?' located at the end of this document. 2 Link to the Halogen site with Internet Explorer: o https:halogen2.ameslab.govHalogenwelcome.jsp o For additional...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/18-VT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Rebuttable presumption for used oil. Used oil containing more than 1000 ppm total halogens is presumed to be a hazardous waste because it has been mixed with halogenated...

  14. Georgia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or halogen: 6.50 LED lamp replacing incandescent or halogen: 9 Lighting Occupancy Sensor: 7 Lighting Daylight Sensor: 25 SplitPackaged Air Conditioners: 20-30ton Split...

  15. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Matching replacement lightbulbs to existing fixtures and ballasts can be tricky, especially with older fixtures. Using new fixtures made for new lightbulbs gives you the greatest energy savings, reliability, and longevity compared with simply replacing bulbs. Before replacing a lightbulb and/or ballast in a light

  16. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  17. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH)

    2012-02-14

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  18. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH); Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH)

    2011-02-22

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to commercial customers for a variety of appliances, ETS heating systems, general lighting upgrades, CFL bulbs, and exit sign retrofit kits. A......

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebates to residences for heat pump water heaters, central air conditioning systems, washers, refrigerators, ceiling fans, CFL light bulbs and equipment maintenance. These...

  1. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recycle LANL innovates recycling paths for various materials. Aerosol cans Asphalt Batteries Cardboard Concrete Light bulbs Metal Pallets Paper Tires Toner cartridges Vegetation...

  2. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for incandescent bulbs such as table lamps, ceiling fixtures, and wall sconces. Globe lamps are similar to spiral lamps, but feature a globe or other decorative shape...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy provides rebates to residences for heat pump water heaters, central air conditioning systems, washers, refrigerators, ceiling fans, CFL light bulbs and equipment...

  4. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    save you about 50 per year when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Measuring Light in Lumens The new efficiency standards require lightbulbs to consume...

  5. Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and prioritize your larger needs. November 26, 2014 We're thankful for energy-efficient light bulbs, home energy audits, ENERGY STAR appliances, and using public transportation....

  6. Concord Municipal Light Plant- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers residential customers rebates on home weatherization, air conditioning system upgrades, and the purchase of LED bulbs.

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (1) bulb (1) cfl (1) climates (1) clothes washers (1) demand side management (1) e-waste (1) electronic waste (1) energy efficiency standards (1) energy efficient appliances ...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC units, room air conditioners, compact fluorescent light bulbs, refrigerators, clothes washers, dehumidifiers, and dishwashers. Some restrictions apply to this program. All...

  9. Optical Switch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    found in a fluorescent light bulb, is electrically conductive yet transparent to the NIF laser beam. This configuration allows for uniform switching across a large beam with a...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    air conditioning system upgrades, and the purchase of LED bulbs. Eligibility: Construction, Residential Savings Category: Air conditioners, CaulkingWeather-stripping,...

  11. Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Heater: 450 Refrigerator: 30unit Freezer: 30unit Dishwasher: 30unit Television: 25unit CFLLED Bulbs: In-store rebates Summary Black Hills Energy (BHE) offers...

  12. DOE Announces Winners of Lighting for Tomorrow 2010 Competition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004. This year, the SSL competition was expanded beyond fixtures to include light-emitting diode (LED) replacement bulbs as well as lighting control devices that are compatible...

  13. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

  14. Puget Sound Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System: 250 Clothes Washers: 50 Refrigerator: 50 Freezers: 25 Refrigerator Recycling: 25 CFLs: Up to 4 LED Bulbs: 8 LED Fixtures: 15 FloorAtticWall Insulation: 50%...

  15. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    position of the fixture affect the actual output of compact fluorescent bulbs, and the quality of the light may differ between compact fluorescents and incandescents....

  16. Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the production of clean energy technologies like electric vehicles, LED bulbs and solar panels. The Department is also working with manufacturers to increase their energy...

  17. Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bulbs and equipment maintenance. These rebates are available to residential electric utility ratepayers on Hawaii Island, Lanai, Maui, Molokai and Oahu only. In order to be...

  19. Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy Website http:www.hawaiienergy.comrebates State Hawaii Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Instant in-store rebates Heat Pump Water...

  20. Civilight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Civilight Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518108 Product: LED light bulb and streetlight maker. References: Civilight1 This article is a stub. You...

  1. Save Energy With A Picnic! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for...

  2. Videocon Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in consumer electronics and home appliances; foraying into CFL bulb and solar inverters. Coordinates: 24.60642, 88.06496 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  3. Lighting and Daylighting Products and Services | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of ENERGY STAR qualified light bulbs. Fixtures Guide ENERGY STAR Examples and pictures of ENERGY STAR qualified light fixtures. How to Select Residential LED Under-cabinet...

  4. LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    So, what do the little indicator light on your cell phone, a street light, an exit sign, and the common household light bulb have in common?

  5. TOMORROW: Department of Energy to Announce Philips Lighting North...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's L Prize challenged the lighting industry to strive to develop high performance, energy-saving replacements for conventional light bulbs that will save ...

  6. EA-2017: Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine...

  7. DOE-Idaho Operations Summary For Feburary 26, 2013 to March 18...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth elements are deeply embedded in everything from fluorescent light bulbs to smartphones - and they're critical for electric vehicles, wind turbines and solar panels....

  8. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Lighting...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow, or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  9. DOE/EIA-E-0109 Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  10. Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! May 17, 2012 - 2:21pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For years, I bought light bulbs based on watts, or energy use. Like many light bulb consumers, I looked for a traditional 40, 60, 75, or 100 watt incandescent bulb. Now that stores today carry more and more energy efficient lighting choices, I wanted to replace my old incandescents with new bulbs to save

  11. Owatonna Public Utilities - Residential Conserve and Save Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    unit Dishwashers: 25 RefrigeratorsFreezers: 25 RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 15 Room Air Conditioners: 25 Room AC Recycling: 15 CFL Bulbs: 50% of cost CFL Light...

  12. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, <a href="/node/772396">learn more</a> about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and

  13. Distinguished Lecture Series - Balancing the Energy & Climate Budget

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    The average American uses 11400 Watts of power continuously. This is the equivalent of burning 114 x100 Watt light bulbs, all the time. The average person globally uses 2255 Watts of power, or a little less than 23 x100 Watt light bulbs.

  14. Energy Efficiency Wins Top Prize at EPA App Contest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The winner of best overall app at the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Apps for the Environment is called Light Bulb Finder, a free iOS and Android application that helps a user choose the energy efficient bulbs that best match their home’s current lighting conditions.

  15. General Service LED Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Service LED Lamps General Service LED Lamps A U.S. DOE SSL technology fact sheet that compares general service LED light bulbs with incandescent and CFL bulbs. PDF icon led_general-service-lamps.pdf More Documents & Publications LED Directional Lamps Emerging Lighting Technology LED T8 Replacement Lamps

  16. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the

  17. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2MASS Redshift Survey typical in lambda cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? ... 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in lambda cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? ...

  18. Observation of parametric X-rays produced by 400 GeV/c protons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The intensity of PXR emitted from halo protons in a bent crystal used as a primary ... to control crystal collimator alignment by analyzing PXR spectra produced by halo protons. ...

  19. A hybrid fast-multipole technique for space-charge tracking with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the large-amplitude beam halo which is known to arise from a variety of mechanisms. ... in a simulated beam that may include halo particles at arbitrarily large amplitudes. ...

  20. Observation of Parametric X-Rays Produced by 400-GeV/C Protons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The intensity of PXR emitted from halo protons in a bent crystal used as a primary ... to control crystal collimator alignment by analyzing PXR spectra produced by halo protons. ...

  1. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CORONA The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron ... We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic ...

  2. Investigating Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the size of this defect, which appears as a dark line surrounded by a transparent halo. Actinic inspection with the AIT shows that the halo is completely opaque to EUV. This...

  3. SSRL HEADLINES March 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Devices Science Highlight - The Structure of a Reaction Intermediate in Enzymatic Halogenation Budget Impact on SSRL User Operations Very Small Spot Size Achieved at the New...

  4. A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structural similarities between SalL and flurorinase could lead to new halogenation pathways and more effective drug treatment strategies. Closeup view of SalL's...

  5. Spectroscopic Evidence for a High-Spin Br-Fe(IV)-Oxo Intermediate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fungicides and antibiotics. Four classes of enzymes are now known to catalyze halogenation reactions: 1) vanadium haloperoxidases, 2) heme haloperoxidases, 3)...

  6. Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ( adequacy (W processing H corrosion res stainless ste Testing activ contacted wi halogens), s Testing the p blending liqu requirements established. maturity of certain key...

  7. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the filament hot with less electricity. They also provide excellent color rendition. Halogens are a little more expensive than standard incandescent lamps, but are less expensive...

  8. 99second_quarter.pgm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were examined. The range of speciation spanned weak oxo ligands such as nitrate to halogens such as chloride. The XANES spectra varied considerably in the intensity of the...

  9. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Guidelines...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emitting Diodes, most commonly referred to as CFLs and LEDs, respectively. Although Halogens are more efficient than incandescents, we ultimately want to turn customers towards...

  10. Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave...

  11. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) established these efficiency standards. The new energy-saving lightbulbs -- halogen incandescents, CFLs, and LEDs -- could save you about 50 per...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and very low ozone concentrations in the tropical warm pool region permit short-lived halogenated compounds to be transported from the surface to the tropical tropopause layer,...

  13. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  14. A-1 APPENDIX A DEFINITION OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS Acronyms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of radioactive materials; each radionuclide has a characteristic constant half-life. Halogenated Hydrocarbons: Organic compounds containing atoms such as chlorine, fluorine,...

  15. Savannah River Site - A/M Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  16. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Ponds Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No Isotopes Present? Yes...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (1) deposition (1) elements (1) encapsulation (1) fabrication (1) films (1) gold (1) gold chlorides (1) gold compounds (1) halides (1) halogen compounds (1) iron alloys (1) ...

  18. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All...

  19. Incan-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Lit by Each Type of Light Floorspace (million square feet) Incan- descent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  20. Incan-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Floorspace (million square feet) Incan- descent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  1. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All...

  2. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  3. Researchers model birth of universe in one of largest cosmological

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations ever run | Argonne National Laboratory Galaxies have halos surrounding them, which may be composed of both dark and regular matter. This image shows a substructure within a halo in the Q Continuum simulation, with "subhalos" marked in different colors. Image by Heitmann et al. (Click to view larger.) Galaxies have halos surrounding them, which may be composed of both dark and regular matter. This image shows a substructure within a halo in the Q Continuum simulation,

  4. Feeling the Heat... From My TV Set | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Feeling the Heat... From My TV Set Feeling the Heat... From My TV Set August 8, 2011 - 2:32pm Addthis Andrea Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory How many light bulbs does it take to equal the power output of a TV set? Or is it the other way around? The answer: It depends on the bulb and the TV. There are a few factors that determine the answer such as the wattage of the standard light bulb and the wattage of the TV. I was curious about the energy usage of my

  5. Energy Department Offers $10 Million for Energy-Saving Lighting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technologies | Department of Energy Offers $10 Million for Energy-Saving Lighting Technologies Energy Department Offers $10 Million for Energy-Saving Lighting Technologies December 11, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Light bulbs like solid-state light-emitting diodes (LED) are more efficient and can reduce energy costs. LED bulbs use about 75%-80% less energy than traditional bulbs.Credit: Dennis Schroeder / NREL The Energy Department on December 6 announced nearly $10 million to support U.S.

  6. Particle generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  7. Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    used is given off as heat. By replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs with energy-saving lights, you can save about 50 per year -- all while repelling vampires. Learn more...

  8. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Efficacy refers to the overall energy efficiency of light and is measured in lumens (measure of light output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb...

  9. Nicor Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nicor Gas services 129,000 customers and is the largest natural gas distributor in northern Illinois. Certain energy efficient products are eligible for Nicor Gas rebates such as light bulbs,...

  10. Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In addition to using 70% less energy than traditional bulbs, they're brighter, eco-friendly, and are safer, as they are much cooler than incandescent lights. In addition, they...

  11. Debt extension on small project yields real savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 MW Idaho Falls Bulb Turbine Project, nameplate capacity 27 MW DworshakClearwater Small Hydro Power, nameplate capacity 5.4 MW Rocky Brook of Mason PUD No. 1, nameplate...

  12. North Shore Gas- Single Family Direct Install

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, Compact Fluorescent Bulbs (CFLs...

  13. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    billion high-efficiency, high-quality and affordable lighting fixtures and bulbs (like LEDs) around the world. December 5, 2015 How We Solve Climate Change At COP21 in Paris and...

  14. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficientCFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  15. Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    have to be difficult. With these five easy steps, you can find the best energy-efficient light bulb for your home September 9, 2014 Living the college lifestyle doesn't mean you...

  16. Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia allows a four-day sales tax* exemption for dishwashers, clothes washers, air conditioners, ceiling fans, light bulb, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostat and refrigerators that meet fe...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the classroom and, ultimately, our energy needs as a nation. Students will use a photovoltaic (PV) cell to measure the energy from the sun. Using a light bulb with a known...

  18. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for CFL and LED light bulbs,...

  19. Randolph EMC- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet Randolph EMC's standards are eligible for a prescriptive incentive payment. The cooperative will provide a...

  20. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money....

  1. Aero-Tech: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co. failed to certify a variety of incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Aero-Tech: Order (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and closed this case against Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co., without civil penalty, after DOE found that Aero-Tech manufactured and/or privately labeled incandescent reflector lamps, but did not violate DOE regulations.

  3. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs. They laid the groundwork for decades of clean electricity and put the U.S. at...

  4. Vu1 Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Efficiency Product: Aims to develop an efficient light bulb without containing mercury Website: www.vu1.com Coordinates: 47.6254325, -122.3460778 Show Map Loading...

  5. Energy 101: Lumens

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Description: In this edition of Energy 101, we talk about Lumens. When you're shopping for light bulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want.

  6. Components of the NSTX-U | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Components of the NSTX-U Current in center stack: 2 million amps, enough to light 2 million 100 watt light bulbs. Publication File: PDF icon NSTX-U_presskit_print_Components

  7. Final_Testimony(20).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of four Americans say they have replaced inefficient bulbs with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over the last few years, and 84 percent of...

  8. Have You Ever Gotten an Energy Assessment for Your Home? | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Your Home Cool This Summer? Have You Taken Advantage of These Incentives Yet? What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? Connect With Us Facebook iconconnecttwitter.png Twitter...

  9. JULY 2015 POSTINGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 30, 2015: Save the Dates for Two November Workshops PDF icon July 23, 2015: Far Beyond the Bulb-New Frontiers of SSL Energy Savings PDF icon July 15, 2015: SSL in...

  10. LED Lighting on the National Mall | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Using energy-efficient LED light bulbs is an important way Americans can save money by saving energy," said Secretary Chu. "Investing in an American economy that is built to ...

  11. Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Newer lighting choices are available to save you money. Q: When will the new bulbs be phased in? A: Newer energy-saving lightbulb choices that save about 25% to 75% in energy costs ...

  12. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a similar shape to traditional incandescent bulbs. CFLs contain a very small amount of mercury and require special handling if they are broken. CFLs should be recycled at the end...

  13. Salazar, Chu Flip Switch on 65% Energy Savings | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Using energy-efficient LED light bulbs is an important way Americans can save money by saving energy," said Secretary Chu. "Investing in an American economy that is built to last ...

  14. Pumpkin Patterns

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and lasts 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. Biomass is material made from plants and animals, and contains stored energy from the...

  15. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2013-05-29

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  16. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and...

  17. This Month on Energy Savers: August 2011 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Learn about today's energy efficient light bulbs and how they can save you money at home. On the Blog, In Case You Missed It...This Month "Saving Money by Saving Energy" Goes ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be available to save you money. Q: When will the new bulbs be phased in? A: Newer energy-saving lightbulb choices that save about 25% to 75% in energy costs are on the market...

  19. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save 75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options...

  20. EECBG Success Story: South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EECBG Success Story: South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient ... EECBG Success Story: Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season A LED light bulb ...

  1. Pumpkin-Patterns-2015-final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar energy can be found everywhere the sun shines, and solar energy systems like these solar panels have a minimal impact on the environment. Light emitting diode (LED) bulbs ...

  2. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    % rh ( time ) Atmospheric temperature Dry Bulb Temperature C tdry ( time ) Time offset from midnight seconds since 2003-07-07 00:00:00 0:00 time ( time ) Time offset from...

  3. Exhibit F-3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 General Instructions for Counting Lights Count any and all lights in home A light is defined as every light bulb turned on by a single light switch. A fixture or lamp with two...

  4. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Image icon Energy-saving incandescent lighbulbs - high-resolution JPG More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard)

  5. Lighting Choices - White Background | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    All of these lightbulbs-CFLs, LEDs, and energy-saving incandescents-meet the new energy standards that take effect from 2012-2014. File all_bulbs_hires_web.eps

  6. Energy-Efficient College Life | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Let There Be Light Be sure to replace that incandescent bulb in your flexible desk lamp for a brand new LED this semester. Why, you ask? Well, 10% of energy costs in a home can be ...

  7. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two

  8. Solid-State Lighting-L Prize Competition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L Prize Competition Solid-State Lighting-L Prize Competition Presenter: Marc Ledbetter, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The L Prize competition spurs the development of new, ultra-efficient lighting products to replace common light sources, including the 60-watt (W) incandescent bulb and the PAR38 reflector bulb. The goal is to realize significant lighting energy savings through widespread product adoption. Winning manufacturers receive significant recognition, and retailers, energy

  9. News | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs? MIT News highlighted work in the S3TEC center led by Marin Soljacic which improves the efficiency of incandescent light bulbs to the level of some CFLs and LEDs. Read full news Observation of Weyl points highlighted by APS and physicsworld.com Direct observations of Weyl points were named one of the top 10 breakthroughs of 2015 by physicsworld.com Read full news 'Molecular Accordion' Drives Thermoelectric Behavior in Promising Material

  10. EECBG Success Story: Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona EECBG Success Story: Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona July 20, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Arizona's traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Arizona's traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale Glendale, Arizona installed energy-efficient LED lights in 190 signalized street intersections using part

  11. Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency December 18, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for these energy-saving gifts while doing your holiday shopping this year. As the days get colder and

  12. Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer June 21, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day

  13. METALLICITY AND KINEMATIC DISTRIBUTIONS OF RED HORIZONTAL-BRANCH STARS FROM THE SDSS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. K.; Xue, X. X.; Schuster, W. J. E-mail: schuster@astrosen.unam.m

    2010-08-15

    On the basis of a recently derived color-metallicity relation and stellar parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic survey, a large sample of red horizontal-branch (RHB) candidates have been selected to serve as standard candles. The metallicity and kinematic distributions of these stars indicate that they mainly originate from the thick-disk and the halo populations. The typical thick disk is characterized by the first group peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6, V{sub rot} {approx} 170 km s{sup -1} with a vertical scale height around |Z| {approx} 1.2 kpc, while stars with [Fe/H] < -0.9 are dominated by the halo population. Two sub-populations of the halo are suggested by the RHB stars peaking at [Fe/H] {approx} -1.3: one component with V{sub rot} > 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo I) shows a sign of metallicity gradient in the [Fe/H] versus |Z| diagram, while the other with V{sub rot} < 0 km s{sup -1} (Halo II) does not. The Halo I mainly clumps at the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the Halo II comes both from the inner halo with R < 10 kpc and the outer halo with R > 10 kpc based on the star distribution in the R versus |Z| diagram.

  14. Pyrrolo isoquinolines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Z.

    2000-01-01

    Compounds of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X, Y, and R, independently of one another, is each a H; halogen, wherein said halogen is selected from the group consisting of .sup.123 I, .sup.124 I, .sup.125 I, .sup.131 I, .sup.75 Br, .sup.76 Br, .sup.77 Br, .sup.82 Br, .sup.18 F, or .sup.210 At; small alkyl, small alkenyl, or small alkynyl, any of which contains from one to about six carbon atoms and optionally having a carbon atom replaced by an O or S; or halogen substituted-small alkyl, halogen substituted-small alkenyl, or halogen substituted-small alkynyl wherein said compound contains at least one radioacitve halogen. The compounds bind to the serotonin transporter. Depending upon the choice of halogen substituent, the compounds are useful for PET or SPECT imaging, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other conditions associated with defects of serotonin transporter function.

  15. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shulte, J.W.; Suttle, J.F.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to a method and device for determining quantities of gamma radiation and x radiation by exposing to such radiation a mature of a purified halogenated hydrocarbon chosen from the class consisting of chloroform, bromoform, tetrachloroethane and 1,1,2trichloroethane, and a minor quantity of a sensitizer chosen from the class consisting of oxygen, benzoyl peroxide, sodium peroxide, and nitrobenzene, the proportion of the sensitizer being at least about 10/sup -5/ moles per cubic centimeter of halogenated hydrocarbon, the total amount of sensitizer depending upon the range of radiation to be measured, and chemically measuring the amount of decomposition generated by the irradiation of the sensitized halogenated hydrocarbon.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderlaan, Martin (Danville, CA); Watkins, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.; Stanker, L.H.

    1991-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described. 14 figures.

  18. GLAST And Dark Matter Substructure in the Milky Way (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    halo. We have used 'Via Lactea', currently the highest resolution simulation of cold dark matter substructure, to quantify the contribution of subhalos to the annihilation...

  19. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Evaluate a light weight barrier film material as a replacement for standard halo-butyl inner liner. * Milestones - Status Conduct 2 nd tire program to further ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... However, in many models, a substantial fraction of the dark matter halo lies outside the diffusion zone. Positrons produced there can thenmore enter the diffusion zone and get ...

  1. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for different orientations of a crystal collimator. This dependence may be used to control crystal collimator alignment by analyzing PXR spectra produced by halo protons....

  3. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory (HALO) aircraft developed and operated by L3-Aeromet. Personnel from Johns Hopkins University and L3- Aeromet simultaneously operated ground-based instruments from...

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thickness of optically thick clouds is retrieved. In this paper we describe the THOR system, demonstrate that the halo signal is stronger for thicker clouds, and validate...

  5. 6He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1993BO24: 6He(-); measured -delayed deuteron spectrum; deduced branching...

  6. 11Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1992LI24: 11Li(-); measured NMR asymmetry; deduced quadrupole moment ratio....

  7. 14Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14Be(-); measured beta-delayed neutron-, -spectra, -coin; deduced log ft, halo neutron related features. 14B deduced levels. Tof. 1997BE66: 14Be(-); measured...

  8. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  9. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent...

  10. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Mary; Chwastyk, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings in nine applications where LEDs compete with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and certain types of fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  11. DOE SSL Postings: February 18, 2015, issue

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    94%, compared with 68% for the CFLs and 62% for the ceramic metal halide (all of the halogens failed, after typically reaching about 80% of initial output). However, while the...

  12. DOE SSL Postings: September 9, 2015, issue

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    investigated the photometric performance of 27 LED MR16 lamps compared to benchmark halogens, found that while all of the LED MR16s offered some efficacy advantage over the...

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent Lighting at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2010-12-10

    This report reviews a demonstration of light-emitting diode (LED) accent lighting compared to halogen (typical) accent lighting in a gallery of the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

  14. A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plane. BiTeX compounds consist of alternating layers of bismuth, tellurium, and a halogen atom, like chlorine, bromine, or iodine. The layer sequence is such that the axis...

  15. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Other Hours Used Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other Unknown Total 4,196 431 2,811 409 14 159 173 34 24 141 Unknown 104 11 58 19 0...

  16. Method for synthesizing boracities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing boracites is disclosed in which a solution of divalent metal acetate, boric acid, and halogen acid is evaporated to dryness and the resulting solid is heated in an inert atmosphere under pressure.

  17. SAMPLE EMAIL FROM EVALUATING SUPERVISOR TO DIRECT REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to particular sections of the form. Please complete these tasks by logging into Halogen eAppraisal; your self-appraisal is due Friday, February 20 th . Getting Started...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helium being captured and reused producing an annual savings of more than 1 million. Halogen leak detection at DAHRT: Using a 1,000 pollution prevention grant, Rudy Valdez of...

  19. Thermodynamic assessment and experimental verification of reactive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermodynamic analysis of etch chemistries for Co, Fe, and Ni using a combination of hydrogen, oxygen, and halogen gases suggested that a single etchant does not work at 300 K;...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41 51 61 INCANDESCENT HALOGEN CFL LED 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 COUNCIL BASELINE MARKET AVERAGE TYPE: CURRENT PRACTICE BASELINE EFFICACY Linear Fluorescent Lamps, 4ft...

  1. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    STAR, you can save 75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED lightbulbs are available today. ...

  2. SSL GATEWAY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DANCE SHOWCASE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video showing side-by-side dance performances with halogen and LED sidelighting as part of the Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY demonstration at the University of Florida.

  3. Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

    2011-12-06

    A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

  4. Morphology evolution in high-performance polymer solar cells processed from nonhalogenated solvent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Wanzhu; Liu, Peng; Jin, Yaocheng; Xue, Qifan; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P.; Huang, Fei; Yip, Hin -Lap; Cao, Yong

    2015-05-26

    A new processing protocol based on non-halogenated solvent and additive is developed to produce polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies better than those processed from commonly used halogenated solvent-additive pair. Morphology studies show that good performance correlates with a finely distributed nanomorphology with a well-defined polymer fibril network structure, which leads to balanced charge transport in device operation.

  5. SPORTAL3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPORTAL3 Halogen eAppraisal (Performance Appraisal/Evaluation Software) Access All Employees and Evaluating Supervisor /Managers involved in the performance appraisal/evaluation process require an Ames Laboratory network logon and password. On-Site Employee and/or Evaluating Supervisor/Manager 1 Connect to sportal3. o For additional assistance, see 'How do I connect to sportal3?' located at the end of this document. 2 Link to the Halogen site with Internet Explorer: o

  6. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  7. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines lumen depreciation and color shift of 17 different A lamps in steady-state conditions (15 LED, 1 CFL, 1 halogen). The goal of this investigation was to examine the long-term performance of complete LED lamps relative to benchmark halogen and CFL lamps—in this case, A lamps emitting approximately 800 lumens operated continuously at a relatively high ambient temperature of 45°C.

  8. Crystal Structure of Iron-dependent Halogenase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron-dependent Halogenase Over 4000 natural products contain halide atoms such as chlorine, bromine, or iodine.1 Halogenated natural products are medically valuable and include antibiotics (chlorotetracycline and vancomycin), antitumor agents (rebeccamycin and calichemycin), and human thyroid hormone (thyroxine).2 Halogenation is essential to the biological activity and chemical reactivity of such compounds, and often generates versatile molecular building blocks for synthetic organic chemists.

  9. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2003-05-20

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron- capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  10. Use of novel metalloporphyrins as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated phorphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron-capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  11. A FIRST LOOK AT GALAXY FLYBY INTERACTIONS. I. CHARACTERIZING THE FREQUENCY OF FLYBYS IN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Manodeep; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2012-05-20

    Hierarchical structure formation theory is based on the notion that mergers drive galaxy evolution, so a considerable framework of semi-analytic models and N-body simulations has been constructed to calculate how mergers transform a growing galaxy. However, galaxy mergers are only one type of major dynamical interaction between halos-another class of encounter, a close flyby, has been largely ignored. We use cosmological N-body simulations to reconstruct the entire dynamical interaction history of dark matter halos. We present a careful method of identifying and tracking a dark matter halo which resolves the typical classes of anomalies that occur in N-body data. This technique allows us to robustly follow halos and several hierarchical levels of subhalos as they grow, dissolve, merge, and flyby one another-thereby constructing both a census of the dynamical interactions in a volume and an archive of the dynamical evolution of an individual halo. In addition to a census of mergers, our tool characterizes the frequency of close flyby interactions in the universe. We find that the number of close flyby interactions is comparable to, or even surpasses, the number of mergers for halo masses {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} h{sup -1} at z {approx}< 2. Halo flybys occur so frequently to high-mass halos that they are continually perturbed, unable to reach a dynamical equilibrium. In particular, we find that Milky Way type halos undergo a similar number of flybys as mergers irrespective of mass ratio for z {approx}< 2. We also find tentative evidence that at high redshift, z {approx}> 14, flybys are as frequent as mergers. Our results suggest that close halo flybys can play an important role in the evolution of the earliest dark matter halos and their galaxies, and can still influence galaxy evolution at the present epoch. Our companion paper quantifies the effect of close flyby interactions on galaxies and their dark matter hosts.

  12. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  13. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  14. The Vainshtein mechanism in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falck, Bridget; Koyama, Kazuya; Zhao, Gong-bo; Li, Baojiu E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on the cosmic web morphology of both dark matter particles and halos as determined by ORIGAMI. Unlike chameleon and symmetron screening, which come into effect in regions of high density, Vainshtein screening instead depends on the dimensionality of the system, and screened bodies can still feel external fields. ORIGAMI is well-suited to this problem because it defines morphologies according to the dimensionality of the collapsing structure and does not depend on a smoothing scale or density threshold parameter. We find that halo particles are screened while filament, wall, and void particles are unscreened, and this is independent of the particle density. However, after separating halos according to their large scale cosmic web environment, we find no difference in the screening properties of halos in filaments versus halos in clusters. We find that the fifth force enhancement of dark matter particles in halos is greatest well outside the virial radius. We confirm the theoretical expectation that even if the internal field is suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism, the object still feels the fifth force generated by the external fields, by measuring peculiar velocities and velocity dispersions of halos. Finally, we investigate the morphology and gravity model dependence of halo spins, concentrations, and shapes.

  15. Red giant stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. The general field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.; Nissen, P. E.; Wei, P. E-mail: pen@phys.au.dk

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained a sample of ?22,000 red giant branch (RGB) stars based on stellar parameters, provided by the ninth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the CH(G)/MgH indices, measured from the included spectra. The Galactic rest-frame velocity of V {sub gsr} versus longitude for the sample shows the existence of several groups of stars from globular clusters and known streams. Excluding these substructures, a sample of ?16,000 RGB stars from the general field is used to investigate the properties of the thick disk, the inner halo, and the outer halo of our Galaxy. The metallicity and rotational velocity distributions are investigated for stars at 0 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. It is found that the canonical thick disk dominates at 0 kpc < |Z| < 2 kpc and its contribution becomes negligible at |Z| > 3 kpc. The MWTD is present and overlaps with the inner halo at 1 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc. The inner halo starts at 2 kpc < |Z| < 3 kpc and becomes the dominated population for 4 kpc < |Z| < 10 kpc. For halo stars with |Z| > 5 kpc, bimodal metallicity distributions are found for 20 kpc < |Z| < 25 kpc and 35 kpc < RR < 45 kpc, which suggests a dual halo, the inner and the outer halo, as reported in Carollo et al. at low |Z| values. The peak of metallicity for the inner halo is at [Fe/H] ? 1.6 and appears to be at [Fe/H] ? 2.3 for the outer halo. The transition point from the inner to the outer halo is located at |Z| ? 20 kpc and RR ? 35 kpc.

  16. Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona July 20, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Ariz.'s traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Ariz.'s traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale Glendale, Ariz., like many other cities, was facing several problems: a tight budget and aging buildings using outdated lighting - making repairs difficult and

  17. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  18. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Rubenstein, Francis M.; Whitman, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  19. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost of Operating Light Bulbs Dear Webmaster, My wife and I are having a friendly dispute over the cost of operating electric light bulbs and I am hoping that perhaps a physicist might settle things for us. It is not lightly that I turn to such a prestidigious resource, but all other sources (ie. Com Ed customer relations - local electricians) have all demonstrated the recent phenomenon of the dimming down of America. I am pretty sure that in my high school physics class we were taught that

  20. Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money May 30, 2012 - 11:58am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy If you've been to a home improvement store lately, you've probably noticed more and more energy-saving light bulbs available on the shelves. Traditional incandescent light bulbs give off about 90% of the energy they use in the form of heat,

  1. Five Energy-Savings Things I am Thankful for this Year | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Five Energy-Savings Things I am Thankful for this Year Five Energy-Savings Things I am Thankful for this Year November 26, 2014 - 6:58pm Addthis We're thankful for energy-efficient light bulbs, home energy audits, ENERGY STAR appliances, and using public transportation. | Photos courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory We're thankful for energy-efficient light bulbs, home energy audits, ENERGY STAR appliances, and using public transportation. | Photos courtesy of the

  2. Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so

  3. Lumens: The new way to shop for light

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    r a d i t i o n a l I n c a n d e s c e n t W a t t s L u m e n s ( B r i g h t n e s s ) LUMENS: THE NEW WAY TO SHOP FOR LIGHT Choose Your Next Light Bulb for the Brightness You Want. ~450 ~800 ~1100 ~1600 9 years 40 60 75 100 For the greatest savings, choose ENERGY STAR® light bulbs. 12/05/201

  4. Guide to Energy Efficient Lighting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CFLs Although CFLs have been available for residential use since the 1980s, they have made signifcant strides in quality and popularity in recent years. Today, CFLs are the most cost-effective, energy-effcient choice readily available on the market. A CFL produces the same amount of light as a comparable incan- descent, but uses 75% less energy, produces 75% less heat, and lasts up to 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. CFLs come in many sizes and shapes. Three-way CFL bulbs and dimmer-

  5. IA Blog Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blog Archive IA Blog Archive RSS December 7, 2015 IA Blog Archive Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs Launched at COP21 in Paris, the Global Lighting Challenge is a race to deploy 10 billion high-efficiency, high-quality and affordable lighting fixtures and bulbs (like LEDs) around the world. December 1, 2015 Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall Co-Chairs the U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue The United States of America and the Federative Republic of Brazil reaffirmed

  6. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. An average household dedicates about 5% of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. Timers and motion sensors save you even more money by reducing the amount of

  7. Energy 101: Lumens | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lumens Energy 101: Lumens Addthis Description In this edition of Energy 101, we talk about Lumens. When you're shopping for light bulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lumens video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lumens: The new way to shop for light." This is followed by various shots of a store aisle featuring a variety of light bulbs, including close-ups of

  8. Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes Homes From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the <a href="/node/772396">long history of the light bulb</a> and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of the light bulb and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. Our homes are a major source of energy use

  9. Spatial periphery of lithium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galanina, L. I. Zelenskaja, N. S.

    2013-12-15

    The spatial structure of lithium isotopes is studied with the aid of the charge-exchange and (t, p) reactions on lithium nuclei. It is shown that an excited isobaric-analog state of {sup 6}Li (0{sup +}, 3.56MeV) has a halo structure formed by a proton and a neutron, that, in the {sup 9}Li nucleus, there is virtually no neutron halo, and that {sup 11}Li is a Borromean nucleus formed by a {sup 9}Li core and a two-neutron halo manifesting itself in cigar-like and dineutron configurations.

  10. Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: I. Structural Properties and Formation History from a Statistical Sample of Re-simulated Cluster-size Halos Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; Wechsler, Risa H. ; Mao, Yao-Yuan ; Behroozi, Peter S. ;

  11. Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rhapsody: II. Subhalo Properties and the Impact of Tidal Stripping from a Statistical Sample of Cluster-Size Halos Authors: Wu, Hao-Yi ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Michigan U. ; Hahn, Oliver ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

  12. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo

  13. EBR-I Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    Sixty years ago, the first light bulb to be lit with nuclear energy got its juice right here in Idaho. Here's a virtual tour of the place where it all happened. To learn more visit http://www.inl.gov/ebr.

  14. Chapter 21: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimetrosky, S.; Parkinson, K.; Lieb, N.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, residential lighting has represented a significant share of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency electricity savings. Utilities have achieved the majority of these savings by promoting the purchase and installation of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), both standard 'twister' bulbs and specialty CFLs such as reflectors, A-Lamps, globes, and dimmable lights.

  15. CX-004338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photovoltaic Panels, Light Bulb Replacement and Light-Emitting Diode Street LightsCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 10/28/2010Location(s): Draper City, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu; Shalgar, Shashank, E-mail: duan@unm.edu, E-mail: shashankshalgar@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  17. Promising Technology: Retrofit Lights to Light-Emitting Diodes in Refrigerators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs increase in efficacy at lower temperatures, in contrast with conventional fluorescents. The low temperatures in display cases, therefore, make this an attractive application of LEDs to reduce energy consumption. In addition to saving lighting energy, an LED retrofit can potentially reduce the cooling load in a display case because LEDs emit less heat than do fluorescent bulbs.

  18. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  19. Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Reuse & Recycling series of images of recycling: trash heap, light bulbs, circuit boards diagram for focus area three, improving reuse and recycling (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.)

  20. Research on optimization of cooling structure of LED element (The 2nd report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakate, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Takashina, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Utsumi, Y.

    2014-02-20

    This report shows a design guideline on the parts dimension of LED light bulb for heat transfer. LED light bulb is popular owing to the high efficiency and long life. However, LED element is a point heat source. Therefore, LED light bulb has some problems about heat transfer when it is used for lighting. It sometimes causes deterioration by the raise of local temperature, resulting in lowering of efficiency and shorter life. Thus the thermal analysis focused on the number of element, all parts thickness, length, and radiant heat was studied, as systematic report on the points has not been found. In this report, heat radiation was taken into account in the thermal analysis in addition to natural heat convection. Furthermore the temperature of a heat sink model for LED light bulb was measured with thermocouples and thermo-viewer to verify the calculation. The emissivity of aluminum used for the calculation was 0.4. As the result of analysis, it was found that the maximum temperature was mainly influenced by ring length, ring diameter and disk thickness as a design guideline. Concretely, longer length, larger diameter and thicker disk gave lower temperature of LED element. The temperatures of the best and worst model were around 70 °C and 120 °C respectively in the above condition. The temperatures calculated were consistent with those in experiment.

  1. Assessing the Impact of Heat Rejection Technology on CSP Plant Revenue: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the impact of cooling technology on revenue for hybrid-cooled plants with varying wet cooling penetration for four representative locations in the American Southwest. The impact of ACC design-point initial temperature difference (ITD - the difference between the condensing steam temperature and ambient dry-bulb) is also included in the analysis.

  2. Chris Stewart | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chris Stewart Chris Stewart Chris Stewart - Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Most Recent Energy Savings Tips on the Go: Check Out the New Energy Savers Mobile Site March 16 New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25 Top 10 Most Popular Energy Savers Web Pages of 2011 December 27

  3. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  4. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Phelps, Cindy

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  5. Methods for improved growth of group III nitride semiconductor compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melnik, Yuriy; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

    2015-03-17

    Methods are disclosed for growing group III-nitride semiconductor compounds with advanced buffer layer technique. In an embodiment, a method includes providing a suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. The method includes forming an AlN buffer layer by flowing an ammonia gas into a growth zone of the processing chamber, flowing an aluminum halide containing precursor to the growth zone and at the same time flowing additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas into the growth zone of the processing chamber. The additional hydrogen halide or halogen gas that is flowed into the growth zone during buffer layer deposition suppresses homogeneous AlN particle formation. The hydrogen halide or halogen gas may continue flowing for a time period while the flow of the aluminum halide containing precursor is turned off.

  6. Nambu--Goldstone Dark Matter and Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the recent cosmic ray experiments PAMELA, ATIC and PPB-BETS without postulating an overdensity in halo, and the limit on anti-proton flux from PAMELA is naturally evaded. ...

  7. Remarks on calculation of positron flux from galactic dark matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    However, in many models, a substantial fraction of the dark matter halo lies outside the diffusion zone. Positrons produced there can then enter the diffusion zone and get trapped, ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Therefore, the development of very efficient analysis tools combining qualitative and quantitative ... we carry out a high-statistics study of dark matter halos from 67 N-body ...

  9. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of extreme star forming galaxies with star formation rates SFRs in the range of M sub sun yr sup we explore the relationship between high rates of star formation host halo mass...

  10. Prsentation PowerPoint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ?? The existing European Fleet CATEGORIES OPERATORS 1. Strato. jet 2. Jets 3. Large AC 4. Medium AC 5. Small AC Geophysica EEIG Geophysica DLR HALO Cessna 208B NLR Citation...

  11. 8He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    following -decay; deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1991LUZZ: 8He; measured T12. 1993BO24: 8He(-); measured...

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud layer. In particular, the time delay of light returning from the outer diffuse halo of light surrounding the beam entry point, relative to the time delay at beam center,...

  13. A=11Li (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increase in matter radii with increasing A and do not support the idea of a neutron halo in 11Li (1988POZS; prelim.). See, however, (1988TA1A). Fragmentation cross sections of...

  14. A=7B (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for 7Li(+, -)7B (1998PA40) were used to deduce information on 7B proton halo features. Measurements at E 30 - 90 MeV reported by (2000DR19) were used to deduce...

  15. 9Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1991LUZZ: 9Li(-); measured T12. 1992LI24: 9Li(-); measured NMR...

  16. Section I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Gagliardi, V. Kroha, X. D. Tang, L. Trache, R. E. Tribble and S. Zhou Radius of 8B Halo from the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient L. Trache, C. A. Gagliardi, A. M....

  17. A=20C (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1996RE19), and see (1996SH13) for a description of a simple model of neutron "halo nuclei" applied to 20C. Microscopic calculations of beta-decay half-lives for 6 Z...

  18. Purine Inhibitors Of Protein Kinases, G Proteins And Polymerases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA), Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA), Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA), Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2003-09-09

    The invention provides compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where, R.sup.1 is a member selected from the group consisting of H and NH.sub.2 ; R.sup.2 is member selected from the group consisting of H, CO.sub.2 H, OH and halogen; and R.sup.3 is a member selected from the group consisting of CO.sub.2 H, NH.sub.2 and halogen. Also provided are methods of using the compounds and formulations containing the compounds.

  19. Method of separating organic contaminants from fluid feedstreams with polyphosphazene membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert R. (Milford, MA); Cummings, Daniel G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for separating halogenated hydrocarbons from a fluid feedstream. The fluid feedstream is flowed across a first surface of a polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. At least one halogenated hydrocarbon from the fluid feedstream permeates through the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane to a second opposed surface of the semipermeable membrane. Then the permeated polar hydrocarbon is removed from the second opposed surface of the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane. Outstanding and unexpected separation selectivities on the order of 10,000 were obtained for methylene chloride when a methylene chloride in water feedstream was flowed across the polyphosphazene semipermeable membrane in the invented method.

  20. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Kathrein, Hendrik (McMurray, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  1. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  2. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  3. HerMES: COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES AND THE CLUSTERING OF DUSTY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viero, M. P.; Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Wang, L.; Addison, G.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Casey, C. M.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; De Zotti, G.; Farrah, D.; and others

    2013-07-20

    We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency power spectra of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations totaling {approx}70 deg{sup 2} made with the SPIRE instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. We measure a fractional anisotropy {delta}I/I = 14% {+-} 4%, detecting signatures arising from the clustering of dusty star-forming galaxies in both the linear (2-halo) and nonlinear (1-halo) regimes; and that the transition from the 2- to 1-halo terms, below which power originates predominantly from multiple galaxies within dark matter halos, occurs at k{sub {theta}} {approx} 0.10-0.12 arcmin{sup -1} (l {approx} 2160-2380), from 250 to 500 {mu}m. New to this paper is clear evidence of a dependence of the Poisson and 1-halo power on the flux-cut level of masked sources-suggesting that some fraction of the more luminous sources occupy more massive halos as satellites, or are possibly close pairs. We measure the cross-correlation power spectra between bands, finding that bands which are farthest apart are the least correlated, as well as hints of a reduction in the correlation between bands when resolved sources are more aggressively masked. In the second part of the paper, we attempt to interpret the measurements in the framework of the halo model. With the aim of fitting simultaneously with one model the power spectra, number counts, and absolute CIB level in all bands, we find that this is achievable by invoking a luminosity-mass relationship, such that the luminosity-to-mass ratio peaks at a particular halo mass scale and declines toward lower and higher mass halos. Our best-fit model finds that the halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation in the redshift range of peak star-forming activity, z {approx} 1-3, is log(M{sub peak}/M{sub Sun }) {approx} 12.1 {+-} 0.5, and that the minimum halo mass to host infrared galaxies is log(M{sub min}/M{sub Sun }) {approx} 10.1 {+-} 0.6.

  4. Primordial non-Gaussianity in the bispectra of large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Tellarini, Matteo; Ross, Ashley J.; Wands, David E-mail: matteo.tellarini@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    The statistics of large-scale structure in the Universe can be used to probe non-Gaussianity of the primordial density field, complementary to existing constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In particular, the scale dependence of halo bias, which affects the halo distribution at large scales, represents a promising tool for analyzing primordial non-Gaussianity of local form. Future observations, for example, may be able to constrain the trispectrum parameter g{sub NL} that is difficult to study and constrain using the CMB alone. We investigate how galaxy and matter bispectra can distinguish between the two non-Gaussian parameters f{sub NL} and g{sub NL}, whose effects give nearly degenerate contributions to the power spectra. We use a generalization of the univariate bias approach, making the hypothesis that the number density of halos forming at a given position is a function of the local matter density contrast and of its local higher-order statistics. Using this approach, we calculate the halo-matter bispectra and analyze their properties. We determine a connection between the sign of the halo bispectrum on large scales and the parameter g{sub NL}. We also construct a combination of halo and matter bispectra that is sensitive to f{sub NL}, with little contamination from g{sub NL}. We study both the case of single and multiple sources to the primordial gravitational potential, discussing how to extend the concept of stochastic halo bias to the case of bispectra. We use a specific halo mass-function to calculate numerically the bispectra in appropriate squeezed limits, confirming our theoretical findings.

  5. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  6. Gravitational focusing and substructure effects on the rate modulation in direct dark matter searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Witte, Samuel J.

    2015-08-21

    We study how gravitational focusing (GF) of dark matter by the Sun affects the annual and biannual modulation of the expected signal in non-directional direct dark matter searches, in the presence of dark matter substructure in the local dark halo. We consider the Sagittarius stream and a possible dark disk, and show that GF suppresses some, but not all, of the distinguishing features that would characterize substructure of the dark halo were GF neglected.

  7. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN GALAXIES AND DARK MATTER STRUCTURES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Tinker, Jeremy L. E-mail: rwechsler@stanford.edu

    2013-07-01

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}-cold dark matter model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (1) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (2) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (3) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy-halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark universe.

  8. DISCLAIMER : UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED - PLEASE CHECK THE STATUS OF THE DOCUMENT IN IDM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Dec 2015 DISCLAIMER : UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED - PLEASE CHECK THE STATUS OF THE DOCUMENT IN IDM Technical Specifications (In-Cash Procurement) Tech Spec, Halo Rogowski Coil R&D Design, Prototype and Assessment This document describes the technical specifications for the detailed design development of theHalo Rogowski Coil diagnostic sensor to be used on ITER. This specification outlines requirements for development of a viable engineering design, prototype manufacture, and testing

  9. 'Sidecars' Pave the Way for Concurrent Analytics of Large-Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations 'Sidecars' Pave the Way for Concurrent Analytics of Large-Scale Simulations 'Sidecars' Pave the Way for Concurrent Analytics of Large-Scale Simulations Halo Finder Enhancement Puts Supercomputer Users in the Driver's Seat November 2, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov Nyxfilamentsandreeberhalos In this Reeber halo finder simulation, the blueish haze is a volume rendering of the density field that Nyx calculates every time step. The light blue and

  10. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvn wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  11. REVERSAL OF FORTUNE: INCREASED STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCIES IN THE EARLY HISTORIES OF DWARF GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madau, Piero; Weisz, Daniel R.; Conroy, Charlie

    2014-08-01

    On dwarf galaxy scales, the different shapes of the galaxy stellar mass function and the dark halo mass function require a star-formation efficiency (SFE) in these systems that is currently more than 1 dex lower than that of Milky Way-size halos. Here, we argue that this trend may actually be reversed at high redshift. Specifically, by combining the resolved star-formation histories of nearby isolated dwarfs with the simulated mass-growth rates of dark matter halos, we show that the assembly of these systems occurs in two phases: (1) an early, fast halo accretion phase with a rapidly deepening potential well, characterized by a high SFE; and (2) a late, slow halo accretion phase where, perhaps as a consequence of reionization, the SFE is low. Nearby dwarfs have more old stars than predicted by assuming a constant or decreasing SFE with redshift, a behavior that appears to deviate qualitatively from the trends seen among more massive systems. Taken at face value, the data suggest that at sufficiently early epochs, dwarf galaxy halos above the atomic cooling mass limit can be among the most efficient sites of star formation in the universe.

  12. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Ja, Li (Chicago, IL); Yang, Xinmin (Evanston, IL)

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetra fluoro, aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  13. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, P.E.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-08-06

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons. 3 figs.

  14. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Holly (Bethel Island, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethel Island, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  15. Enhanced reactive metal wall for dehalogenation of hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howson, Paul E. (Latham, NY); Mackenzie, Patricia D. (Clifton Park, NY); Horney, David P. (Mayfield, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for remediation of contaminated solutions using a tiered metal wall or column. The tiered metal wall or column has at least three zones with graduated sizes of reducing metal particles. Contaminated solutions pass through the tiered wall or column to dehalogenate contaminant halogenated hydrocarbons.

  16. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Holly (Bethel Island, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Fred S. (Bethel Island, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  17. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

    1985-12-31

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  18. Toxic Remediation System And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

    1996-07-23

    What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

  19. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, T.J.; Ja, L.; Yang, X.

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetrafluoro-aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  20. Method for preparing 6-.beta.-halopenicillanic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, Erik I.; Kran-Nielsen, Mogens P.; Von Daehne, Welf

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to a new and improved method for the preparation of a compound of the formula I ##STR1## in which R stands for halogen, giving rise to high yields of substantially pure 6.beta.-halopenicillanic acids, obtained in one step.